Godfrie Huse

M, #5071, b. WFT Est. 1101-1148, d. 1217
FatherWilliam Huse b. WFT Est. 1069-1110, d. WFT Est. 1101-1159
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Godfrie Huse was born WFT Est. 1101-1148.1 He married an unknown person WFT Est. 1122-1181.1
Godfrie Huse died in 1217 at England.1
     

Family

Child
  • Henry Huse+ b. WFT Est. 1127-1184, d. WFT Est. 1177-1217

Citations

  1. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).

Henry Huse

M, #5072, b. WFT Est. 1127-1184, d. WFT Est. 1177-1217
FatherGodfrie Huse b. WFT Est. 1101-1148, d. 1217
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Henry Huse was born WFT Est. 1127-1184 at Charlecombe, co. Somerset, England.1 He married an unknown person WFT Est. 1151-1217.1
Henry Huse died WFT Est. 1177-1217.1
     

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).

Ralph Huse

M, #5073, b. WFT Est. 1177-1247, d. 1283
FatherHenry Huse b. WFT Est. 1127-1184, d. WFT Est. 1177-1217
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Ralph Huse was born WFT Est. 1177-1247.1 He married an unknown person WFT Est. 1201-1274.1
Ralph Huse died in 1283 at Charlecombe, co. Somerset, England.1
     

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).

William Huse

M, #5074, b. WFT Est. 1211-1276, d. 1313
FatherRalph Huse b. WFT Est. 1177-1247, d. 1283
Last Edited29 May 2001
     William Huse was born WFT Est. 1211-1276 at Sutton Abbas, England.1
William Huse died in 1313 at England.1
     

Citations

  1. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).

Maud/Matilda (?) of Chester, Countess of Chester (suo jure), Countess of Huntingdon1,2,3

F, #5075, b. circa 1171, d. circa 6 January 1233
FatherHugh "of Kevelioc" de Meschines (?) 5th Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranche4,3,5,6,7 b. c 1143, d. 30 Jun 1181
MotherBertrade de Montfort3,5,7,8 b. 1155, d. 1227
ReferenceGAV22 EDV21
Last Edited26 Nov 2020
     Maud/Matilda (?) of Chester, Countess of Chester (suo jure), Countess of Huntingdon was born circa 1171 at Chester, Cheshire West and Chester Unitary Authority, Cheshire, England.1,9,3,5 She married David (?) Earl of Huntingdon, son of Henry de Huntingdon Earl of Northumberland & Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, on 26 August 1190;
His 2nd? wife.10,1,11,4,9,12,13,3,5
Maud/Matilda (?) of Chester, Countess of Chester (suo jure), Countess of Huntingdon was buried circa 6 January 1233 at Sawtry Abbey, Sawtry, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1171, Chester, Cheshire West and Chester Unitary Authority, Cheshire, England
     DEATH     6 Jan 1233 (aged 61–62), England
[Text copied from Wikipedia]
     Family Members
     Parents
          Hugh de Kevelioc 1147–1181
     Spouse
          David of Scotland 1144–1219
     Siblings
          Amicia Meschines Mainwaring 1167–1200
          Agnes Kevelioc de Ferrers 1174–1247
          Hawise De Chester 1180 – unknown
     Children
          Ada Huntingdon
          Isobel of Huntingdon 1199–1251
          John of Scotland 1207–1237
     BURIAL     Sawtry Abbey, Sawtry, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 14 May 2011
     Find a Grave Memorial 69827822.14
Maud/Matilda (?) of Chester, Countess of Chester (suo jure), Countess of Huntingdon died circa 6 January 1233 at England.1,9,3,5
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 314.
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. 6:647.3
GAV-22 EDV-21 GKJ-25.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Maud was born about 1171, the eldest child of Hugh Keveliok Le Meschin, 3rd earl of Chester, and Bertred de Montfort. Her father, a cousin of King Henry II of England, died in 1181 when she was ten years of age. His son Rannulfe succeeded him as earl of Chester, and Maud became a co-heiress of her brother. On 26 August 1190 she married David, earl of Huntingdon, son of Henry, earl of Huntingdon, earl of Northumberland, and a younger brother of Malcolm IV and William I, two kings of Scots.
     “Maud died on 6 January 1233 at the age of about sixty-two. Her husband had died in 1219. In 1290, upon the death of Margaret of Norway, queen of Scots, which caused the extinction of the legitimate line of William I, the descendants of David and Maud became the prime competitors for the crown of Scotland. Through their daughter Isabella they were the ancestors of the renowned Scottish king Robert the Bruce.”.3

Reference: Weis [1992:116] Line 131-29.15

; This is the same person as ”Matilda of Chester, Countess of Huntingdon” at Wikipedia.16

; Per Med Lands:
     "MATILDA ([1171]-[6] Jan 1233). The Annales Cestrienses record in 1171 the birth of “Matildis filia Hugonis comitis Cestrie”[145]. The accuracy of this date depends on the accuracy of the date of birth of her brother Ranulf, as discussed above. The Annales Londonienses record that "Ranulphus comes Cestriæ" had four sisters, of whom "primogenita…Matilda" married "comiti David"[146]. Benedict of Peterborough records the marriage in 1190 of "David frater Willelmi regis Scotiæ" and "sororem Ranulfi comitem Cestriæ"[147]. "Comes David frater regis Scottorum" founded Lindores Abbey, for the souls of "…Matilde comitisse sponse mee et…David filii mei", by undated charter (dated to before 1203 from the names of the subscribers)[148]. The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "comes Cestrie" gave land "in Forthington et in Ulesbi" in Lincolnshire to "comiti Davidi in maritagium cum sorore ipsius comitis"[149]. The Annales Cestrienses record the death “circa Epiphaniam Domini” 1233 of “Matildis mater comitis Johannis”[150].
     "m (26 Aug 1190[151]) [as his second wife,] DAVID of Scotland Earl of Huntingdon, son of HENRY of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland & his wife Ada de Warenne ([1144]-Yardley, Northants 17 Jun 1219, bur Sawtrey Abbey, Hunts)."
Med Lands cites:
[145] Annales Cestrienses, p. 24.
[146] Annales Londonienses, p. 126.
[147] Benedict of Peterborough, Vol. 2 1190, p. 146.
[148] Lindores, II, p. 2.
[149] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 163.
[150] Annales Cestrienses, p. 58.
[151] Chronicle of Melrose, 1190, p. 27.5


; Per Genealogy.EU (Dunkeld): “E3. David, Earl of Huntingdon, Northumberland, Doncaster, Carlisle, Garioch, Cambridge and Lennox, *1144, +Yardley 17.6.1219, bur Sawtrey Abbey, Huntingdonshire; m.26.8.1190 Matilda (*1171, +6.1.1233), dau.of Hugh de Kevilloc, Earl of Chester”.17
; Per Med Lands:
     "DAVID ([1144]-Yardley, Northants 17 Jun 1219, bur Sawtrey Abbey). William of Newburgh names "Hunteduniensem comitem David fratrem regis Scottorum" when recording that he became the leader of a rebellion in England [in 1174][476]. He received Garioch in Aberdeenshire from his brother in 1174, possibly becoming Earl of Garrioch, although there is no evidence of this creation[477]. Earl of Huntingdon in 1185, on the resignation of his brother King William. "Comes David frater regis Scottorum" founded Lindores Abbey, for the souls of "comitis Henrici patris mei et comitisse Ade matris mee…regis Willelmi fratris mei et regine Ermegard et…Matilde comitisse sponse mee et…David filii mei", by undated charter (dated to before 1203 from the names of the subscribers)[478]. "Comes David frater regis Scottorum" donated "ecclesiam de Lundors…ecclesiam de Dunde…ecclesiam de Durnach" to Lindores Abbey, for the souls of "comitis Henrici patris mei et comitisse matris mee et Malcolmi regis fratris mei et…regis Willelmi fratris mei et Regine Armengard…et Matildis sponse mee et…David filii mei", by undated charter[479]. He was deprived of all his English honours in [1215/16], but restored 13 Mar 1218[480]. The Annals of Waverley record the death in 1219 of “comes David, frater Willelmi regis Scotiæ”[481]. John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the death "apud Jerdelay in Anglia…die…Sancti Botulphi" of "comes David" and his burial "apud abbatiam de Sautreia"[482].
     "[m firstly ---. No direct evidence has been of this supposed first marriage of David. However, the date of David’s marriage to Matilda of Chester is late for this to have been his first marriage. In addition, his foundation charter for Lindores abbey refers to the donation of his daughter Ada, who was already married at the time and therefore considerably older than David’s children by his marriage to Matilda. Secondary sources generally assume that Ada was illegitimate. However, it is possibly that she was the daughter of an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage of David, especially as she was given his mother’s name.]
     "m [secondly] (26 Aug 1190[483]) MATILDA of Chester, daughter of HUGH de Kevilloc Earl of Chester & his wife Bertrade de Montfort ([1171]-[6] Jan 1233). The Annales Londonienses record that "Ranulphus comes Cestriæ" had four sisters, of whom "primogenita…Matilda" married "comiti David"[484]. Benedict of Peterborough records the marriage in 1190 of "David frater Willelmi regis Scotiæ" and "sororem Ranulfi comitem Cestriæ"[485]. "Comes David frater regis Scottorum" founded Lindores Abbey, for the souls of "…Matilde comitisse sponse mee et…David filii mei", by undated charter (dated to before 1203 from the names of the subscribers)[486]. "Comes David frater regis Scottorum" donated "ecclesiam de Lundors…ecclesiam de Dunde…ecclesiam de Durnach" to Lindores Abbey, for the souls of "…Matildis sponse mee et…David filii mei", by undated charter[487]. The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "comes Cestrie" gave land "in Forthington et in Ulesbi" in Lincolnshire to "comiti Davidi in maritagium cum sorore ipsius comitis"[488]. The Annales Cestrienses record the death “circa Epiphaniam Domini” 1233 of “Matildis mater comitis Johannis”[489]. Mistresses (1) - (3): ---. The names of David's mistresses are not known."
Med Lands cites:
[476] William of Newburgh II.XXXI, p. 180.
[477] CP VI 646.
[478] Dowden, J. (ed.) (1903) Chartulary of the Abbey of Lindores, Publications of the Scottish History Society Vol. XLII (Edinburgh) ("Lindores"), II, p. 2.
[479] Lindores, III, p. 7.
[480] CP VI 647.
[481] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1865) Annales Monastici Vol. III, Annales de Wintonia, Annales de Waverleia (London), Annales de Waverleia, p. 291.
[482] Johannis de Fordun (Goodall), Vol. II, Lib. IX, Cap. XXVII, p. 34.
[483] Chronicle of Melrose, 1190, p. 27.
[484] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1882) Annales Londonienses and Annales Paulini (London), Annales Londonienses, p. 126.
[485] Benedict of Peterborough 2 1190, p. 146.
[486] Lindores, II, p. 2.
[487] Lindores, III, p. 7.
[488] Public Record Office (1920) Liber Feodum, The Book of Fees commonly called Testa de Nevill (London) ("Testa de Nevill"), Part I, p. 163.
[489] Christie, R. C. (ed.) (1887) Annales Cestrienses or Chronicle of the Abbey of St Werburg at Chester, Record Society [of] Lancashire and Cheshire Vol. XIV, (“Annales Cestrienses”), p. 58.13

Family

David (?) Earl of Huntingdon b. c 1144, d. 17 Jun 1219
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 50, CHESTER 7:iii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1373] The Official Site of the British Monarchy, online http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp, http://www.royal.gov.uk/files/pdf/scottish.pdf "The Scottish Royal Dynasties 842-1625". Hereinafter cited as British Monarchy Site.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Chester: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027682&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#MatildaChesterdied1233. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugh Keveliok Le Meschin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027679&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#HughChesterdied1181
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertred de Montfort: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027680&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 252-26, p. 224. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 115-116, HUNTINGDON 6.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, David: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027681&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Daviddied1219
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 04 July 2020), memorial page for Maud of Chester (1171–6 Jan 1233), Find a Grave Memorial no. 69827822, citing Sawtry Abbey, Sawtry, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/69827822. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, p. 116, line 131-29.
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_of_Chester,_Countess_of_Huntingdon. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Dunkeld: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ada of Huntingdon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027703&tree=LEO
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 115-116, HUNTINGDON 6:i.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert of Huntingdon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027707&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda of Huntingdon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027709&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret of Huntingdon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027684&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Margaretdied1233
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabella of Huntingdon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027706&tree=LEO
  25. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 115-116, HUNTINGDON 6:iii.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Le Scot: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027704&tree=LEO
  27. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 115-116, HUNTINGDON 6:ii.
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry of Huntingdon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027707&tree=LEO

Margaret de Huntingdon Lady of Galloway1,2,3,4

F, #5076, b. circa 1194, d. after 6 January 1233
FatherDavid (?) Earl of Huntingdon5,2,6,7,8,9 b. c 1144, d. 17 Jun 1219
MotherMaud/Matilda (?) of Chester, Countess of Chester (suo jure), Countess of Huntingdon5,2,7,10,8,9 b. c 1171, d. c 6 Jan 1233
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Margaret de Huntingdon Lady of Galloway was born circa 1194.2,8,9 She married Alan fitz Roland Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland, son of Roland Galloway Lord of Galloway and Elena de Morville of Lauder, in 1209 at Dundee, Scotland;
His 3rd wife.11,12,13,14,5,2,15,8,9
Margaret de Huntingdon Lady of Galloway died after 6 January 1233; Genealogics says d. 1233; Genealogy.EU says b. 1228; Med Lands says d. aft 6 Jan 1233.16,3,17,9
     ; Per Weis: "Alan, Lord of Galloway, named in the Magna Charta, Constable of Scotland, 1215-1234, d. 1234, m. (1) said to be a dau. of Reginald, Lord of the Isles; m. (2) 1209, Margaret of Huntingdon (94-27); m. (3) 1228, a dau. of Hugh de Lacy, Earl of Ulster (died 1243) by his 1st wife, Lesceline, dau of Bertran de Verdun (Orpen, Ireland under the Normans III chart p. 286) or daul. or sister of roger de Lacy of Pontefract (Trans. of the Dunfrieshire & Galloway Nat. Hist. Soc., 49:49-55); (SP IV: 138:143; CP IV: 670 chart; Jacobus, Bulkeley, 12).”.18
; Per Med Lands:
     "ALAN of Galloway, son of ROLAND Lord of Galloway & his wife Helen de Moreville (-[2] Feb 1234, bur Dundraynan[1170]). He succeeded his father in 1200 as Lord of Galloway. "Alanus filius Rollandi de Galwythia" donated "partem terre in territorio de Gillebeccokestun…de Widhope" to Melrose abbey, for the souls of "Ricardi de Morevill avi mei et Willemi avunculi mei, Rollandi patris mei et…mea et Helene matris mee", by undated charter[1171]. "Alanus filius Rolandi dominus Galwath[ie] et Scocie constabularius" donated annual revenue to St Bees by undated charter, witnessed by "Alano filio Ketelli, Alano de Camerton, Gilberto filio Gospatrici…"[1172]. "Thomas de Colevilla cognomento Scot" donated "quartam partam de Almelidum…Keresban" to Melrose abbey by undated charter witnessed by "…Alano filio Rolandi de Galewai, Fergus filio Uctredi, Edgaro filio Douenad, Dunkano filio Gilbti comite de Carric…"[1173]. "Alanus fili Rolandi de Galweia constabularius dni regis Scottorum" donated property "in Ulkelyston" to Kelso monastery, for the souls of "patris mei Rolandi, avi mei Huhtredi", by charter dated to [1206][1174]. The Annals of Dunstable record that “dominus Galwinæ” died in 1235[1175]. The Liber Pluscardensis records the death in [1234] of "Alanus de Galway filius Rotholandi de Galway…qui…fuit constabilarius Scociæ" and his burial "apud Dundranan"[1176]. The Chronicle of Lanercost records the death "circa purificacionem beatæ Virginis" [2 Feb] in 1233 of "Alanus dominus Galwydiæ"[1177]. On his death Galway was divided between his daughters, but the people of Galway invited Alexander II King of Scotland to become their sole lord but he refused. The king finally defeated the insurgents after Jul 1235[1178].
     "m firstly (before [19 Dec 1200/1206]) --- de Lacy, daughter of ROGER de Lacy Constable of Chester & his wife Matilda de Clare (-[1201/06]). Keith Stringer says that "one of the daughters of Roger de Lacy was evidently Alan’s first wife" and that "the manor of Kippax" was her dowry, quoting a charter, dated to [19 Dec 1200/1206], under which "Alanus filius Rollandi, dominus Galuuaith Scotie constabularius…et heredibus meis" gave quitclaim to "Rogero de Lascy Cestrie constabularius et heredibus suis" for "advocationem ecclesie de Kipeis"[1179]. Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the following document: the Curia Regis rolls record in 1214 “John [de Lacy] de warrantia carte de terra de Kippes...should warrant the charters of his father Roger which Alan [de Galloway]...has concerning the maritagium of his sister”[1180].
     "[m [secondly] --- [of the Isles, daughter of REGINALD Lord of the Isles & his wife Fonie ---] (-before 1209). Balfour Paul says that Alan Lord of Galloway married first "a lady unknown, said to be a daughter of Reginald Lord of the Isles by whom he had two daughters"[1181]. He cites Chalmers’s Caledonia, but that says only that “the name of the first [wife] is unknown” without providing any indication of her family origin[1182]. Balfour Paul repeats his suggestion under the Lords of the Isles where he notes a daughter of Reginald Lord of the Isles "said to have married Alan of Galloway", without citing any source[1183]. There is no indication of the basis for Balfour Paul’s statements and no primary source which confirms this person’s parentage and marriage has been identified. Her existence should presumably be treated with caution until some such source emerges. If she did marry Alan, she was not the mother of his daughter Ellen shown below. She was either married before his marriage to “--- de Lacy” or before he married Margaret of Huntingdon: she is shown here, for presentational purposes only, as Alan’s possible second wife.]
     "m [thirdly] (Dundee 1209) MARGARET of Huntingdon, daughter of DAVID of Scotland Earl of Huntingdon & his wife Matilda of Chester ([1194]-[after 6 Jan 1233]). The Chronicle of Melrose records the marriage in 1209 of "Alan FitzRoland" and "the daughter of earl David, the brother of the king of Scotland"[1184]. The Annales Londonienses name "Margaretam, Isabellam, Matildam, et Aldam" as the four daughters of "comiti David", recording the marriage of "la primere fille Davi" and "Aleyn de Gavei"[1185]. John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the marriage in 1208 "apud Dunde" of "Alanus magnus de Galweyia, filius Rotholandi" and "Margaretam filiam David comitis de Huntingtona"[1186]. The primary source which confirms her appearance in Jan 1233 has not been identified. The date is inconsistent with Alan’s subsequent marital history, unless his marriage to Margaret was dissolved.
     "m [fourthly] (before 30 Mar 1222, annulled for consanguinity/affinity [1225/29]) JULIANA, daughter of ---. Her husband challenged the validity of this marriage on grounds of consanguinity/affinity. The family relationship between the couple has not been ascertained. Pope Honorius III mandated the archbishop of York and others that “Alan constable of Scotland was of such close kindred and affinity to his wife that they could not cohabit without mortal sin”, and to refer the case to the Papal legate, dated 30 Apr 1222[1187]. Pope Honorius III wrote to the archbishop of Canterbury 28 Feb 1225 requesting him “to proceed to a decision of a suit relating to the alleged marriage of Alan knight and Juliana heard before the abbot of Bruern”, recording details of the proceedings including the appearance of the wife before the Pope who doubted “whether the acts and attestations she brought with her were true”, and ordered “the archbishop, if the said knight will not be induced to treat the woman as his wife, to have the original acts produced and decide the matter”[1188]. Anderson suggests that "Juliana seems to have lost the case"[1189].
     "m [fifthly] ([1228/29]) ROSE de Lacy, daughter of HUGH de Lacy & [his first wife Lesceline de Verdun] (-after 1237). According to Matthew Paris, the wife of Alan of Galloway "iam defunctus" was the (unnamed) daughter of "Hugonem de Lasey"[1190]. The Chronicle of Lanercost records in 1229 that "Alan the lord of Galloway…set out for Ireland and there married the daughter of Hugh de Lacy"[1191]. John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records that "Alanus de Galweia profectus in Hiberniam" married "filiam Hugonis de Lacy" in 1228[1192]. If her parentage and marriage is correctly stated in the two sources quoted, the chronology suggests that this daughter must have been born from Hugh’s first marriage, assuming that she was legitimate. She is named "Rose de Lacy" by Keith Stringer, who cites a charter of St Bees which indicates that she was still alive in 1237[1193]."
Med Lands cites:
[1170] Chronicle of Melrose, 1234, p. 60.
[1171] Melrose Liber, Tome I, 83, p. 72.
[1172] St Bees, 42, p. 71.
[1173] Melrose Liber, Tome I, 192, p. 172.
[1174] Kelso, Tome I, 245, p. 201.
[1175] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 143.
[1176] Liber Pluscardensis, Vol. I, Liber VII, CX, p. 73.
[1177] Lanercost Chronicle, 1233, p. 42.
[1178] Chronicle of Melrose, 1234 and 1235, pp. 60-1.
[1179] Stringer, K. J. ‘Periphery and Core in Thirteenth Century Scotland: Alan son of Roland, Lord of Galloway and Constable of Scotland’, Grant, A. & Stringer, K. J. (eds.) (1998) Medieval Scotland, Crown, Lordship and Community (Edinburgh U.P.), p. 104.
[1180] Stringer, K. J. ‘A new wife for Alan of Galloway’, Transactions of the Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural History and Antiquarian Society, 3rd Series, Vol. XLIX (Dumfries, 1972), p. 51, citing Curia Regis Rolls, Vol. VII (1935). I am grateful to David M. Lawrence for sending a copy of this article.
[1181] Balfour Paul The Scots Peerage, Vol. IV, Galloway, p. 141.
[1182] Chalmers, G. (1890) Caledonia, Vol. V (Paisley), p. 258.
[1183] Balfour Paul The Scots Peerage, Vol. V, Macdonald, Lord of the Isles, p. 32.
[1184] Chronicle of Melrose, 1209, p. 33.
[1185] Annales Londonienses, p. 126.
[1186] Johannis de Fordun (Goodall), Vol. I, Lib. VIII, Cap. LXVIII, p. 523.
[1187] Bliss, W. H. (1893) Calendar of entries in the Papal registers relating to Great Britain and Ireland (London), Vol. I, p. 87.
[1188] Bliss (1893), Vol. I, p. 101.
[1189] Anderson Early Sources, Vol. II, p. 468.
[1190] Matthew Paris, Vol. III, 1236, p. 364.
[1191] Chronicle of Lanercost, p. 40, quoted in Anderson Early Sources, Vol. II, p. 467.
[1192] Johannis de Fordun (Goodall), Vol. II, Lib. IX, Cap. XLVII, p. 58.
[1193] Stringer ‘Periphery and Core: Alan of Galloway’, p. 96, citing Register of St Bees, 5, p. x.19


; Per Genealogics:
     “Margaret was born in Galloway about 1194, the eldest daughter of David, earl of Huntingdon, and Maud of Chester.
     “In 1209 at Dundee, Margaret became the second wife of Alan FitzRoland, lord of Galloway, constable of Scotland, son of Roland, lord of Galloway, constable of Scotland, and Elena de Moreville. They were reprimanded for marrying within the forbidden limits of kinship and had to obtain a dispensation from Pope Innocent III. They had at least three children of whom Devorguilla would have progeny, marrying John Baliol of Bywell.
     “Margaret died in 1223.”.8

; This is the same person as ”Margaret of Huntingdon, Lady of Galloway” at Wikipedia.4

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Edinburgh, 1977., Gerald Paget, Reference: 155.
2. The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies of the United States; Baltimore, 2004, Roberts, Gary Boyd. 463.8
GAV-23 EDV-23.

; Per Weis: "Margaret of Huntingdon, d. abt. 6 Jan. 1233; m. Alan (38-26), Lord of Galloway, d. 1234, hereditary Constable of Scotland. (CP IV; 670 chart IV, V: 675, VII: 646-647; SP I: 4,7, IV: 142-143; ES II/90).”.20

; Per Genealogy.EU (Dunkeld): “Margaret, *ca 1194, +1228; m.1209 Alan, Lord of Galloway (+1234), whose issue sprung the senior competitors to the Scottish throne after 1286”.17

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGARET ([1194]-[after 6 Jan 1233]). The Chronicle of Melrose records the marriage in 1209 of "Alan FitzRoland" and "the daughter of earl David, the brother of the king of Scotland"[496]. The Annales Londonienses name "Margaretam, Isabellam, Matildam, et Aldam" as the four daughters of "comiti David", recording the marriage of "la primere fille Davi" and "Aleyn de Gavei"[497]. John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the marriage in 1208 "apud Dunde" of "Alanus magnus de Galweyia, filius Rotholandi" and "Margaretam filiam David comitis de Huntingtona"[498]. The primary source which confirms her appearance in Jan 1233 has not been identified. The date is inconsistent with Alan’s subsequent marital history, unless his marriage to Margaret was dissolved.
     "m (Dundee 1209) as his [third] wife, ALAN Lord of Galloway, son of ROLAND Lord of Galloway & his wife Helen de Moreville (-[2] Feb 1234, bur Dundraynan). Constable of Scotland."
Med Lands cites:
[496] Chronicle of Melrose, 1209, p. 33.
[497] Annales Londonienses, p. 126.
[498] Johannis de Fordun (Goodall), Vol. I, Lib. VIII, Cap. LXVIII, p. 523.9

Family

Alan fitz Roland Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland b. c 1175, d. 2 Feb 1324
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 115-116, HUNTINGDON 6:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret of Huntingdon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027684&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_of_Huntingdon,_Lady_of_Galloway. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, David: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027681&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Daviddied1219. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret of Huntingdon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027684&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Margaretdied1233
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Chester: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027682&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 94-27, p. 91. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 102-103, GALLOWAY 4.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 115-116, HUNTINGDON 6:i.
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 38-26, p. 42.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#AlanGallowaydied12331234
  16. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 397. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  18. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), p. 47, Line 38-26. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#ThomasGallowayMdauRagnvaldMan
  20. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, p. 98, Line 94-27.
  21. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 103, GALLOWAY 4:iv.
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs puis comtes d’ Aumale & Aumale (Picardie), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aumale.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Dunkeld: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html#DA
  24. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, p. 98, Line 94-28.
  25. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, MacDougall of MacDougall Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  26. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 21. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Devorguilla of Galloway: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027686&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#DevorguillaGallowaydied1290

Isabella de Huntingdon1,2,3

F, #5077, b. circa 1206, d. before 20 March 1251
FatherDavid (?) Earl of Huntingdon4,2,3,5,6,7 b. c 1144, d. 17 Jun 1219
MotherMaud/Matilda (?) of Chester, Countess of Chester (suo jure), Countess of Huntingdon4,2,3,7,8 b. c 1171, d. c 6 Jan 1233
ReferenceGAV21
Last Edited4 Jul 2020
     Isabella de Huntingdon married Robert V de Brus 5th Lord of Annandale, son of William de Brus Lord of Annandale and Christian/Cristina fitz Alan.9,4,2,3 Isabella de Huntingdon was born circa 1206.2
Isabella de Huntingdon was buried in 1251 at Saltre Abbey, Stilton, Gloucestershire, England.2


Isabella de Huntingdon died before 20 March 1251; Ravilious cites: G. E. Cokayne, "The Complete Peerage," 1910 - [microprint, 1982 (Alan Sutton) ], The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom.10,4,3,2,5
     ; Isabella "the Scot", *ca 1206, +1251, bur Saltre Abbey nr Stilton, Gloucestershire; m.Robert V le Brus, Lord of Annandale (+1245.)2

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: 315
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 68.3

; per Ravilious: Robert de Brus
Death: bef 27 Aug 1237[10]
Occ: Lord of Annandale

of Hartlepool, co. Durham

he had succeeded his father before 13 June 1213, on which date his
younger brother (unnamed) was a hostage of the King of Scotland
for him, and was then residing with his cousin Peter de Brus.
A similar letter to the following, written
' to Peter de Brus concerning the brother of Robert de Brus '
[unidentified] a hostage of the King of Scotland placed with
Peter for safekeeping, to be transferred to the King of England's
custody, 13 June 1213 :
' 574. Concerning the K. of Scotland's hostages. The K. to S[aher]
earl of Winchester. Commands him on receipt, immediately to send
the K. by good and safe messengers, Reginald his own son, and the
son of William de Veteripont, hostages of the K. of Scotland, who
are in his custody by the K.'s order; so that they may be with the
K. at Portsmouth on the vigil of St. John Baptist instant.
Beaulieu. ' [Bain I:100-101[1], cites Foedera I:113; and Close
Roll 15 John, p. 1, m. 4]

' On 26 Jun 1215, Philip de Ulecot was notified that K John had
granted Robert de Brus, son and heir of William de Brus, a Wed
market [ and a fair on f+2 Laurence (10 Aug)] as it was set out
in the charter (RLC, i, p. 217). On 11 Nov 1218, an agreement
between Robert Brus and Patrick, earl of Dunbar and C. the
countess, records that Patrick was to retain one third of the
market (Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland, i, 1108–1272,
p. 123, no. 700). '[2][see also Bain, Cal. Docs. Scotland I:110,
No. 624 dated 26 June 1215[1]]


Re: his wife Isabel:

2nd daughter of Earl David, and coheiress of her brother, John,
Earl of Chester

had the manors of Hatfield Regis and Writtle, Essex as her
share of the Chester inheritance (or in lieu thereof), 1238
[acc. to Sanders, held ' for the service of 1 knight's fee in
exchange for her share of the Chester estates', p. 102[12]]

also held to have received possession of Great Baddow,
Essex, 1243 (Farrer, HKF II: 47)[13]

'Her manors of Writtle and Hatfield (Broad Oak), Essex and the
1/2 hundred pertaining to Hatfield, were taken into the King's
hand before 20 Mar 1251/52, and her son did homage therefor in
Apr. or May. These manors, &c., had been granted to her, 16 Oct.
1241, in exchange for her share of the inheritance of John, Earl
of Chester, in that Earldom.'[10]

Spouse: Isabel of Huntingdon
Death: bef 20 Mar 1251[10]
Father: David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon (-1219)
Mother: Maud of Chester (1171-ca1233)

Children: Robert (1210-1295)

Ravilious cites:
1. Joseph Bain, ed., "Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland,"
Edinburgh: Her Majesty's General Register House, 1881 (Vol. I),
full title: Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland,
Preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London.
2. "Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs to 1516,"
http://www.histparl.ac.uk/cmh/gaz/
3. William Farrer, Hon.D.Litt., Editor, "Early Yorkshire Charters,"
Ballantyne, Hanson & Co., Edinburgh, 1915-1916, Vol. II (1915)
Vol. III (1916), Vol. XII [the family of Constable of Flamborough], courtesy Rosie Bevan, Vol. V [Manfield fee, pp. 53-58 ], courtesy Rosie Bevan, wife of Robert Marmion>, SGM, 26 Feb 2002.
4. Andrew B. W. MacEwen, "telephone conference re: (1) Isabel
de Dunbar, wife of Roger fitz John of Warkworth," (2) Christina
Stewart, countess of Dunbar; (3) Cecilia, dau. of John fitz
Robert of Wark, reference made to his publications on The Seven
Countesses, and 1999 article on Alexander Sutherland of Dunbeath
and his mistress, Catherine Chalmers, 28 October 2004, notes,
library of John P. Ravilious.
5. Andrew B. W. MacEwen, "SEVEN SCOTTISH COUNTESSES: A MISCELLANY,
III. Cristina de Brus, Countess of Dunbar," The Genealogist,
Fall 2003 (Volume 17, No. 2), pp. 223-233, identifieds Christina
Stewart, countess of Dunbar, part of a series on 'the Seven
Scottish Countesses', per telephone conference 28 October 2004,
notes, library of John P. Ravilious.
6. Sir James Balfour Paul, ed., "The Scots Peerage," Edinburgh:
David Douglas, 1904-1914 (9 volumes).
7. Andrew B. W. MacEwen, "A Clarification of the Dunbar Pedigree,"
The Genealogist, Vol. 9, No. 2, 1991, pp. 229-241, cites Joseph
Stevenson, ed., Cronica de Mailros, E Codice Unico in
Bibliotheca Cottoniana Servato (Edinburgh, 1835), and other
sources.
8. George Chalmers, "Caledonia, Or, A Historical and Topographical
Account of North Britain."
9. Alan O. Anderson, "Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers,
A.D. 500 to 1286," London: David Nutt, 1908.
10. G. E. Cokayne, "The Complete Peerage," 1910 - [microprint, 1982 (Alan Sutton) ], The Complete Peerage of England Scotland
Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom.
11. Edward Bateson, "A History of Northumberland," London: Simpkin,
Marshall, Hamilton, Kent, & Company, Limited, 1895, Vol.
II - Embleton parish (Rennington and Broxfield), pp. 151-153),
images, courtesy Ancestry.com.
12. I. J. Sanders, "English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and
Descent, 1086-1327," Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960.
13. William Farrer, Litt.D., "Honors and Knights' Fees," London:
Spottiswoode, Ballantyne & Co., Ltd., 1924 (3 vols.), Vol I:,
Vol II: Chester; Huntingdon, Vol III: Arundel, Eudes the Sewer,
Warenne.
14. G. W. S. Barrow, "Robert Bruce and the Community of the Realm
of Scotland," Edinburgh University Press, 1976 (2nd ed.)
15. Charles J. Leslie, "Historical Records of the Family of
Leslie," Edinburgh: Edmonston and Douglas, 1869.pdf image
files provided by Genealogy.com www.genealogy.com.
16. William Paley Baildon, F.S.A., "Notes on the Religious and
Secular Houses of Yorkshire, Vol. I," The Yorkshire
Archaeological Society Record Series, Vol. XVII, Printed for the
Society, 1894.
17. William Fraser, "The Red Book of Menteith," Edinburgh: 1880,
.pdf image files provided by Genealogy.com
www.genealogy.com, history and evidences concerning the
Earls and Earldom of Mentieth.
18. Joseph Stevenson, "Documents illustrative of the history of
Scotland from the death of King Alexander the Third to the
Accession of Robert Bruce," Edinburgh: H. M. General Register
House, 1870 (Vol. I).
19. "Clan Stirling,"
http://www.clanstirling.org/uploads/ragmanrolls.pdf
provides .pdf file of the names of those who swore allegiance
to Edward I of England at Berwick, 1296 (the 'Ragman Rolls').
20. "Access to Archives," http://www.a2a.pro.gov.uk/
21. Brian Timms, "St George's Roll," College of Arms, London, MS
Vincent 164 ff 1-21b., http://www.briantimms.com/rolls/
Dated c1285. Painted, containing 677 shields., Source: Gerard J
Brault, Rolls of Arms of Edward I, Boydell & Brewer, 1997.5 Isabella de Huntingdon was also known as Isobel de Huntingdon.11 GAV-21.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 115-116, HUNTINGDON 6:v. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabella of Huntingdon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027706&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S2086] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 5 Aug 2006: "re: Eupheme de Brus"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 5 Aug 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 5 Aug 2006."
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, David: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027681&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Daviddied1219. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Chester: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027682&tree=LEO
  9. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 41-3, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  10. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 397. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  11. [S1373] The Official Site of the British Monarchy, online http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp, http://www.royal.gov.uk/files/pdf/scottish.pdf "The Scottish Royal Dynasties 842-1625". Hereinafter cited as British Monarchy Site.

Ada de Huntingdon1,2,3,4

F, #5078, d. between 2 November 1241 and 1242
FatherDavid (?) Earl of Huntingdon5,6,7,2,3,8,9 b. c 1144, d. 17 Jun 1219
MotherMaud/Matilda (?) of Chester, Countess of Chester (suo jure), Countess of Huntingdon7,2,3,9,10 b. c 1171, d. c 6 Jan 1233
ReferenceGAV22 EDV20
Last Edited4 Jul 2020
     Ada de Huntingdon married Sir Henry de Hastings Knt., of Ashill, co. Norfolk, son of Sir William de Hastings Knt. and Margaret Bigod, between 1224 and 7 June 1237.11,12,13,5,7,3,2,4
Ada de Huntingdon died between 2 November 1241 and 1242.13,4
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Edinburgh, 1977., Gerald Paget, Reference: 157.3 GAV-22 EDV-20 GKJ-24.

; Weis [AR7] 93-27.11 She was living on 4 August 1241.4

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 115-116, HUNTINGDON 6:vi. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ada of Huntingdon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027703&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2292] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 13 Dec 2008: "Hastings Family Pedigree"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 13 Dec 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 13 Dec 2008."
  5. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Hastings Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  6. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Vernon, Baron Family Page.
  7. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, David: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027681&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Daviddied1219. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Chester: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027682&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 93-27, p. 90. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line -3, p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 110, HASTINGS 2.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleonore/Hillaria Hastings: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00029006&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry de Hastings: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140345&tree=LEO

Devorguilla (?) of Galloway1

F, #5079, b. circa 1209, d. between 28 January 1289 and 1290
(c) Bodleian Libraries; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
FatherAlan fitz Roland Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland2,3,4,5,6,7,8 b. c 1175, d. 2 Feb 1324
MotherMargaret de Huntingdon Lady of Galloway2,3,4,9,10,8 b. c 1194, d. a 6 Jan 1233
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Devorguilla (?) of Galloway was born circa 1209; Genealogics says b. ca 1209; Med Lands says b. 1218.4,8 She married Sir John I de Balliol Knt., of Barnard Castle, Lord of Galloway, Regent of Scotland, son of Hugh de Baliol 5th Baron of Bywell and Mathilde (alias Cecily) de Fontaines, in 1233.2,3,4,11,12,13,14,8
Devorguilla (?) of Galloway died between 28 January 1289 and 1290 at England.15,4,8
Devorguilla (?) of Galloway was buried after 28 January 1290 at Sweetheart Abbey, New Abbey, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     c.1218
     DEATH     28 Jan 1290 (aged 71–72)
     Scottish Royalty. Born the daughter of Alan de Galloway, Lord of Galloway and Margaret of Huntingdon sometime between 1210 and 1225. She married John de Balliol in 1233. The couple had at least eight children including John Balliol, who was crowned King of Scotland on November 30, 1292. John Balliol founded Balliol College, Oxford in about 1263. After his death in 1268, Dervorguilla ensured the permanence of the college by providing capital, and in 1282, formulated the college statutes. She founded Sweetheart Abbey in 1275, in memory of her husband. Upon her death, her husband's embalmed heart in a casket of ivory and silver, was buried beside her in her grave before the high altar of the abbey's chapel. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Alan de Galloway 1185–1234
          Margaret de Huntingdon de Galloway
     Spouse
          John I de Balliol 1200–1268
     Siblings
          Helen Galloway Quincy unknown–1245
     Children
          John of Scotland 1250–1313
          Matilda Agnes de Baliol FitzAlan BURIAL     
     Sweetheart Abbey     New Abbey, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 10 Aug 1998
     Find a Grave Memorial 3381.16
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. page I 155.
2. The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies of the United States; Baltimore, 2004, Roberts, Gary Boyd. 463.17
GAV-22 EDV-22.

; This is the same person as ”Dervorguilla of Galloway” at Wikipedia.18

; Per Genealogics:
     "Devorguilla was born about 1209, the daughter of Alan FitzRoland, lord of Galloway, constable of Scotland, and Margaret of Huntingdon. About 1233 Devorguilla married John Baliol, son of Hugh Baliol, of Bywell, and Cecilia de Fontaines. They had four daughters and two sons of whom three daughters and their son John, a future king of Scots, would have progeny.
     "As her father died in 1234 without a legitimate son (he had an illegitimate son named Thomas), in accordance with both Anglo-Norman feudal laws and ancient Gaelic customs Devorguilla was one of his heiresses, though her two sisters Helen and Christina were older and therefore senior. This might be considered as unusual practice in England, but it was more common in Scotland and in Western feudal tradition. Because of this, Devorguilla bequeathed lands in Galloway to her descendants, the Balliols and the Comyns.
     "The Balliol family into which Devorguilla married was based at Barnard Castle in County Durham, England. Although the date of her birth is uncertain, her apparent age of 13 was by no means unusually early for betrothal and marriage at the time.
     "In 1263, her husband Sir John was required to make penance after a land dispute with Walter Kirkham, bishop of Durham. Part of this took the very expensive form of founding a College for the poor at the University of Oxford. Sir John's own finances were less substantial than those of his wife, however, and long after his death it fell to Devorguilla to confirm the foundation, with the blessing of the same bishop as well as the University hierarchy. She established a permanent endowment for the college in 1282, as well as its formal statutes. The college still retains the name Balliol College, and the history students' society is called the Devorguilla Society.
     "In April 1273 Devorguilla founded a Cistercian abbey in Kirkcudbright, seven miles south of Dumfries in South West Scotland. The last Cistercian monastery to be built in Scotland, it still stands as a picturesque ruin of red sandstone.
     "When Sir John died in 1269, Devorguilla had his heart embalmed and kept in a casket of ivory bound with silver. The casket travelled with her for the rest of her life.
     "In her last years, the main line of the royal house of Scotland was threatened by a lack of male heirs. Devorguilla died in 1290, just before the young Margaret of Norway, queen of Scots. If she had outlived Margaret she would have been one of the claimants to her throne. Devorguilla was buried beside her husband at New Abbey, which was christened 'Sweetheart Abbey', the name which it retains to this day. The depredations suffered by the abbey in subsequent periods have caused both graves to be lost.
     "Owing to the deaths of her elder two sons, both of whom were childless, Devorguilla's third and youngest surviving son John asserted a claim to the crown of Scotland in 1290 when Queen Margaret died. He won in arbitration against the rival Robert Bruce, 5th lord of Annandale, in 1292, and subsequently was king of Scots for four years (1292-1296)."4

; Per Med Lands:
     "DEVORGUILLA of Galloway ([1218]-28 Jan 1290, bur Sweetheart Abbey, Kirkland). The Annales Londonienses name "Devorgoille de Baillol" as second of the three daughters of "la primere fille Davi" and "Aleyn de Gavei"[1204]. The Chronicle of Melrose records that "Alan of Galloway gave his daughter to John de Bailiol in marriage" in 1233[1205]. The Liber Pluscardensis records the marriage in 1233 of the second daughter of "Alanus de Galway filius Rotholandi de Galway" and "Johannes de Balliolo"[1206]. The Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie records that "Diuorgilla filia Alani domini de Galwidia" founded "monasterium Dulcicordis ordinis Cisterciensis et fratrum minorum de Dundee"[1207]. Alexander III King of Scotland confirmed the donations made by "Deruorguilla de Balliolo filia et una heredes quondam Alani de Galwathya…in viduitate sua" to the church of Glasgow by charter dated 18 May 1277[1208]. A charter dated 22 Feb 1290 records the extent of the manor of Kempstone held by "dominæ Dervergullæ de Balliolo defunctæ", noting that she had died "die Sabbati proxima post conversionem Sancti Pauli, anno prædicto"[1209].
     "m (1233) JOHN de Balliol of Barnard Castle, co Durham, son of HUGH Balliol of Barnard Castle & his wife Cecilie de Fontaines (-before 24 Oct 1268 or 1269). Named son-in-law of Alan of Galloway by Matthew Paris, who does not name his wife[1210]."
Med Lands cites:
[1204] Annales Londonienses, p. 126.
[1205] Chronicle of Melrose, 1234, p. 60.
[1206] Liber Pluscardensis, Vol. I, Liber VII, CX, p. 73.
[1207] Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie, p. 77.
[1208] Glasgow Bishopric, Tome I, 230, p. 192.
[1209] Stephenson (1870), Vol. I, LXXXVI, p. 123.
[1210] Matthew Paris, Vol. III, 1236, p. 365.8


; Per Weis: "Devorguilla of Galloway (95-28), d. 28 Jan. 1289/90; m. 1233 John de Baliol, d. 1269, of Barnard Castle; they were the founders of Baliol College, Oxford. (CP IV:670 chart iv, V:675, VII:646-647; SP I: 4, 7, IV: 142-143; ES II/91).”.7

; Per Genealogy.EU (Baliol): “E1. John de Baliol, 5th Baron of Bywell and Barnard Castle, +soon before 24.10.1268; m.1233 Devorguilla (*ca 1218, +28.1.1290), daughter and co-heiress of Alan, Lord of Galloway”


Per Genealogy.EU (Dunkeld): “G1. Devorguilla, *ca 1218, +28.1.1290, bur Sweetheart Abbey, Kirkland; m.1233 John de Baliol of Barnard Castle (+soon before 24.10.1268)”.19

; Per Racines et Histoire (Baliol): “John 1er Baliol of Barnard Castle ° ~1212/13 (Bywell) + avant 27/10/1268 (inhumé à Sweetheart Abbey, Galloway) chevalier, seigneur de Bailleul, Dompierre, Hornoy, Hélicourt-en-Ponthieu, 5ème baron Bywell, Lord of Barnard Castle, seigneur de Stokesley, Fotheringay, Torkesey, Bywell, Wodehorn, Dryfeld, Kempeston et Totenham, Lord of Galloway (du chef de sa femme), Shérif de Cumberland, Gouverneur de Carlisle Castle, partisan du Roi Henry III d’Angleterre, capturé par Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester, à la bataille de Lewes (1264) Régent d’Ecosse (avec Robert de Ross) durant la minorité d’Alexander III (1255), Commissaire du Roi d’Angleterre (1259) pour les affaires de France, X contre les Gallois (armée convoquée à Chester 01/08/1260), Plénipotentiaire Anglo-Ecossais (16/11/1260), arbitre en Ponthieu un conflit entre Hue de Vaudricourt et Drievon de Granssart (03/1267, sur demande de la comtesse de Ponthieu Jeanne de Castille ; la querelle finit par le mariage de Pierrette de Vaudricourt avec Wautier de Granssart) (paie ~04/1229 150 £ pour le relief de ses seigneuries dont 30 fiefs de chevaliers tenus de son père ; amortit 04/1237 18 journaux de prés vendus à l’Abbaye de Lieu-Dieu par son vassal Simon de Pierrecourt ; souscrit en 1237 le Traité de paix entre Henry III d’Angleterre et Alexander II d’Ecosse ; parvient à éviter de prendre parti dans le conflit entre l’Angleterre et la France et à sauvegarder ses intérêts de chaque côté de la Manche ; amortit en 08/1246 le fief de Broutelette donné au Lieu-Dieu par Thomas de Frieucourt, fils d’Enguerran, chevalier, et de Mahaut ; amortit 50 journaux de terre donnés à Séry par Geoffroi de Broutelle ; autre charte d’amortissement 23/07/1253) [ fondateur avec sa femme du Baliol College en 1263 à Oxford ]
ép. 1233 Devorguilla of Galloway ° ~1218/25 (Fotheringay, Ecosse) + le dimanche suivant 28/01/1290 ns (Kempston, Bedfordshire) (3° fille & héritière d’Alan MacDougal of MacDonald + 1234, Lord of Galloway, Connétable d’Ecosse, et de Margaret of Scotland-Huntingdon, co-héritière de son père David, earl of Huntingdon ; nièce des Rois d’Ecosse Malcolm IV et de William «The Lion» ; elle ép. 2) après 1268/69 John de Vaux + 1288 fils d’Olivier de Vaux et de Péronnelle)
(armes : «D’or, à la fasce échiquetée d’azur & d’argent, à une bande engrélée de gueules, brochante, le tout dans un double trescheur fleuronné & contrefleuronné de gueules»)”.12

; Per Med Lands:
     "JOHN de Balliol, son of HUGH Balliol of Barnard Castle & his wife Cecilie de Fontaines (-before 27 Oct 1268). "John de Balliol, son and heir of Hugh Balliol" made a fine for "his relief of 30 knights’ fees that Hugh de Balliol his father held of the king in chief", dated [Apr] 1229[841]. Bracton records a claim, dated 1230, by "Johannes de Cauz et Alina uxor eius James de Cauz et Alesia uxor eius" against "Johannem de Bailliol" concerning "Hugonem de Bailliol patrem predicti Johannis de Baillol…terra"[842]. Of Barnard Castle, co Durham. Lord of Galloway, de iure uxoris. Sheriff of Cumberland and governor of Carlisle Castle. He supported Henry III King of England against the barons, and was captured with the king at the battle of Lewes in 1264 by Simon de Montfort Earl of Leicester[843]. He and his wife founded Balliol College, Oxford in 1263[844]. A writ after the death of "John de Balliolo", dated "27 Oct 52 Hen III", and later inquisitions name "Sir Hugh de Balliolo his son, age variously stated as 28 or more, and 30 and more" as his heir[845]. The Chronicle of Melrose records the death in 1269 of "John de Balliol…a lover of scholars", adding that "he built a house at Oxford"[846].
     "m (1233[847]) DEVORGUILLA of Galloway, daughter of ALAN Lord of Galloway & his second wife Margaret of Scotland (-28 Jan 1290, bur Sweetheart Abbey, Kirkland). The Chronicle of Melrose records that "Alan of Galloway gave his daughter to John de Bailiol in marriage" in 1233[848]. The Annales Londonienses name "Devorgoille de Baillol" as second of the three daughters of "la primere fille Davi" and "Aleyn de Gavei"[849]. The Liber Pluscardensis records the marriage in 1233 of the second daughter of "Alanus de Galway filius Rotholandi de Galway" and "Johannes de Balliolo"[850]. The Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie records that "Diuorgilla filia Alani domini de Galwidia" founded "monasterium Dulcicordis ordinis Cisterciensis et fratrum minorum de Dundee"[851]. Alexander III King of Scotland confirmed the donations made by "Deruorguilla de Balliolo filia et una heredes quondam Alani de Galwathya…in viduitate sua" to the church of Glasgow by charter dated 18 May 1277[852]. A charter dated 22 Feb 1290 records the extent of the manor of Kempstone held by "dominæ Dervergullæ de Balliolo defunctæ", noting that she had died "die Sabbati proxima post conversionem Sancti Pauli, anno prædicto"[853]. A writ after the death of "Lady Dervergulla de Balliolo", dated "4 Feb 18 Edw I", and later inquisitions name "John de Balliolo her son, aged 40 at the feast of St Michael last…her…heir"[854]."
Med Lands cites:
[841] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 181.
[842] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 432, p. 349.
[843] BEP, p. 21.
[844] CP I 385 footnote b, and Chronicle of Melrose, 1269, p. 121.
[845] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 691, p. 218.
[846] He died iin 1269 according to the Chronicle of Melrose, 1269, p. 121.
[847] Chronicle of Melrose, 1233, p. 59.
[848] Chronicle of Melrose, 1234, p. 60.
[849] Annales Londonienses, p. 126.
[850] Liber Pluscardensis, Vol. I, Liber VII, CX, p. 73.
[851] Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie, p. 77.
[852] Glasgow Bishopric, Tome I, 230, p. 192.
[853] Stephenson, J. (ed.) (1870) Documents illustrative of the History of Scotland from the death of King Alexander the Third to the accession of Robert Bruce 1286-1306 (Edinburgh), Vol. I, LXXXVI, p. 123.
[854] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 771, p. 467.13

Citations

  1. [S4122] Gary Boyd Roberts, Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States with a 2008 Addendum, Coda and Final Addition, in 2 volumes (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Col., Inc., 2008), Vol. I, p. 463. Hereinafter cited as Roberts Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 21. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Devorguilla of Galloway: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027686&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alan FitzRoland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027683&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#AlanGallowaydied12331234. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), p. 98, Line 94-28. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#DevorguillaGallowaydied1290
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, The House of Dunkeld: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html#DA
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret of Huntingdon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027684&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Balliol, of Bywell: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027685&tree=LEO
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Baliol (Bailleul-en-Vimeu) (alias Balliol), p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Baliol.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#JohnBallioldied12681269
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), Line 94-28, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 94-28, p. 91.
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 10 August 2020), memorial page for Devorguilla de Galloway (c.1218–28 Jan 1290), Find a Grave Memorial no. 3381, citing Sweetheart Abbey, New Abbey, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/3381/devorguilla-de_galloway. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Devorguilla of Galloway: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027686&tree=LEO
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dervorguilla_of_Galloway. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Baliol: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/baliol.html
  20. [S1822] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 28 Oct 2004 "Euphemia, Countess of Ross (was Re: Magna Carta line of Eufemia)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 28 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 28 Oct 2004."
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Cecily Baliol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00385220&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ada Balliol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00116977&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alan Balliol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027688&tree=LEO
  24. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_I_de_Balliol
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.9.
  26. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 22.
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Baliol page (The House of Baliol): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/baliol.html#JT
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Baliol: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015431&tree=LEO

Sir John I de Balliol Knt., of Barnard Castle, Lord of Galloway, Regent of Scotland1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #5080, b. circa 1200, d. before 27 October 1268
FatherHugh de Baliol 5th Baron of Bywell2,7,6,8,5 b. a 1186, d. 1229
MotherMathilde (alias Cecily) de Fontaines7,6,8 b. c 1186
ReferenceGAV23 EDV22
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Sir John I de Balliol Knt., of Barnard Castle, Lord of Galloway, Regent of Scotland was born circa 1200 at Bywell, Northumberland, England.8,6 He married Devorguilla (?) of Galloway, daughter of Alan fitz Roland Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland and Margaret de Huntingdon Lady of Galloway, in 1233.1,2,9,8,6,5,10,11
Sir John I de Balliol Knt., of Barnard Castle, Lord of Galloway, Regent of Scotland was buried after 25 October 1268 at Sweetheart Abbey, New Abbey, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1200, Barnard Castle, Durham Unitary Authority, County Durham, England
     DEATH     25 Oct 1268 (aged 67–68), Barnard Castle, Durham Unitary Authority, County Durham, England
     John de Balliol was a leading figure of Scottish and English life of his time. Balliol College, in Oxford is named after him. He was born before 1208 to Hugh de Balliol, Lord of Balliol and of Barnard Castle and Gainford and Cecilia de Fontaines, daughter of Aleure, lord of Fontaines and Longpré-les-Corps-Saints. In 1233, Lord John married Dervorguilla of Galloway and Scotland, she was the daughter of Alan, Lord of Galloway and Margaret of Huntingdon. By the mid-thirteenth century, he and his wife had become very wealthy, principally as a result of inheritances from Dervorguilla's family. This wealth allowed Balliol to play a prominent public role, and, on Henry III's instruction, he served as joint protector of the young king of Scots, Alexander III. He was one of Henry III's leading counsellors between 1258 and 1265. Following a dispute with the Bishop of Durham, he agreed to provide funds for scholars studying at Oxford. Support for a house of students began in around 1263; further endowments after his death, supervised by Dervorguilla, resulted in the establishment of Balliol College.
     John and Dervorguilla had issue:
** Sir Hugh de Balliol, who died without issue before April 10, 1271. He married Agnes de Valence, daughter of William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke.
** Alan de Balliol, who died before 10 April 1271 without issue.
** Sir Alexander de Balliol, who died without issue before November 13, 1278. He married Eleanor de Genoure.
** King John I of Scotland, successful competitor for the Crown in 1292.
** Margaret de Balliol, who might have married Thomas de Moulton.
** Cecilia de Balliol, who married John de Burgh and perhaps had two daughters.
** Ada de Balliol, who married in 1266, William Lindsay, of Lambarton, and had a daughter, Christian de Lindsay.
** Eleanor de Balliol, who married John II Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, and had a son, John 'The Red Comyn, Lord of Badenoch (d. 1306).
** Maud (or Matilda) de Balliol, married to Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan, and feudal Baron of Bedale. They were parents to Agnes FitzAlan (b. 1298), who married Sir Gilbert Stapleton, Knt., of Bedale (1291-1324). Gilbert is better known for his participation in the assassination of Piers Gaveston, Earl of Cornwall.

     Family Members
     Spouse
          Devorguilla de Galloway 1218–1290
     Children
          John of Scotland 1250–1313
          Matilda Agnes de Baliol FitzAlan BURIAL     
     Sweetheart Abbey     New Abbey, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 25 Feb 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 85736567.12
Sir John I de Balliol Knt., of Barnard Castle, Lord of Galloway, Regent of Scotland died before 27 October 1268; Weis says d. bef 1269; Genealogics says d. bef 24 Nov 1268; Med Lands says d. bef 27 Oct 1268; Racines et Histoire (Baliol) says d. bef 27 Oct 1268; Genealogy.EU says d. "soon before" 24 Oct 1268.10,1,2,6,8,13
     ; Per Weis: "Devorguilla of Galloway (95-28), d. 28 Jan. 1289/90; m. 1233 John de Baliol, d. 1269, of Barnard Castle; they were the founders of Baliol College, Oxford. (CP IV:670 chart iv, V:675, VII:646-647; SP I: 4, 7, IV: 142-143; ES II/91).”.14

; Per Med Lands:
     "DEVORGUILLA of Galloway ([1218]-28 Jan 1290, bur Sweetheart Abbey, Kirkland). The Annales Londonienses name "Devorgoille de Baillol" as second of the three daughters of "la primere fille Davi" and "Aleyn de Gavei"[1204]. The Chronicle of Melrose records that "Alan of Galloway gave his daughter to John de Bailiol in marriage" in 1233[1205]. The Liber Pluscardensis records the marriage in 1233 of the second daughter of "Alanus de Galway filius Rotholandi de Galway" and "Johannes de Balliolo"[1206]. The Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie records that "Diuorgilla filia Alani domini de Galwidia" founded "monasterium Dulcicordis ordinis Cisterciensis et fratrum minorum de Dundee"[1207]. Alexander III King of Scotland confirmed the donations made by "Deruorguilla de Balliolo filia et una heredes quondam Alani de Galwathya…in viduitate sua" to the church of Glasgow by charter dated 18 May 1277[1208]. A charter dated 22 Feb 1290 records the extent of the manor of Kempstone held by "dominæ Dervergullæ de Balliolo defunctæ", noting that she had died "die Sabbati proxima post conversionem Sancti Pauli, anno prædicto"[1209].
     "m (1233) JOHN de Balliol of Barnard Castle, co Durham, son of HUGH Balliol of Barnard Castle & his wife Cecilie de Fontaines (-before 24 Oct 1268 or 1269). Named son-in-law of Alan of Galloway by Matthew Paris, who does not name his wife[1210]."
Med Lands cites:
[1204] Annales Londonienses, p. 126.
[1205] Chronicle of Melrose, 1234, p. 60.
[1206] Liber Pluscardensis, Vol. I, Liber VII, CX, p. 73.
[1207] Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie, p. 77.
[1208] Glasgow Bishopric, Tome I, 230, p. 192.
[1209] Stephenson (1870), Vol. I, LXXXVI, p. 123.
[1210] Matthew Paris, Vol. III, 1236, p. 365.11


; Per Burke's: "John de Baliol. This feudal lord m. Devorgilda, younger dau. and eventually sole heir, of Alan, Lord of Galloway, a great baron of Scotland, by Margaret his wife, sister of John le Scot, the last Earl of Chester, and one of the heirs of David, sometime Earl of Huntingdon, from which alliance arose the claim of the Baliols to the crown of Scotland. By this illustrious lady he acquired the Scottish barony of Galloway. In the 28th of Henry III., when ways and means were required to discharge the debt incurred by the war in Gascony, John de Baliol was one of the committee of twelve chosen to report to parliament upon the subject; and the next year he paid £30 for thirty knight's fees, which he held towards the levy in aid, for marrying the king's dau. He was afterwards sheriff of Cumberland for six successive years, and governor of the castle of Carlisle. Subsequently he had a military summons to attend the king at Chester, to oppose the Welsh, and was sheriff of the counties of Nottingham and Derby for three years; at which time he had the honour of Pewerell committed to his custody. In the baronial contest he adhered faithfully to the king, and fell into the hands of the Earl of Leicester, with his royal master, at the battle of Lewes, in 1264; but he appears to have effected his escape, and to have joined the other loyal barons in raising fresh troops for the captive monarch's redemption. This John Baliol and his wife were the founders of the college that bears the name of Baliol, at Oxford. He d. in 1268, and was s. by his son (then twenty-eight years of age), Hugh de Baliol..."2

; Per Genealogics:
     "John was the son of Hugh Baliol, of Bywell, and Cecilia de Fontaines. He was the head of a family which had been prominent land-owners in England and France for several generations. Their principal base in England was Barnard Castle, named after an earlier head of the family in England, the castle's builder Bernard I de Baliol. In France the family's main home was at Bailleul-en-Vimeu in Picardy, from which Bal(l)iol derives.
     "About 1233 John married Devorguilla, daughter of Alan FitzRoland, lord of Galloway and constable of Scotland, and Margaret of Huntingdon. They had four daughters and two sons of whom three daughters and their son John, a future king of Scots, would have progeny. The latter's claim to the crown of Scotland arose through his mother Devorguilla. Her mother Margaret was a daughter of David, earl of Huntingdon, who was a grandson of David I, king of Scots.
     "About 1263 John and his wife founded Balliol College at Oxford. After his death the foundation was confirmed by his widow Devorguilla. He died before 24 November 1268."8

; This is the same person as ”John I de Balliol” at Wikipedia.15 He was Regent of Scotland.1

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/4:707.
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. I 155.8
GAV-23 EDV-22.

; Per Genealogy.EU (Baliol): “E1. John de Baliol, 5th Baron of Bywell and Barnard Castle, +soon before 24.10.1268; m.1233 Devorguilla (*ca 1218, +28.1.1290), daughter and co-heiress of Alan, Lord of Galloway”


Per Genealogy.EU (Dunkeld): “G1. Devorguilla, *ca 1218, +28.1.1290, bur Sweetheart Abbey, Kirkland; m.1233 John de Baliol of Barnard Castle (+soon before 24.10.1268)”.13

; Per Racines et Histoire (Baliol): “John 1er Baliol of Barnard Castle ° ~1212/13 (Bywell) + avant 27/10/1268 (inhumé à Sweetheart Abbey, Galloway) chevalier, seigneur de Bailleul, Dompierre, Hornoy, Hélicourt-en-Ponthieu, 5ème baron Bywell, Lord of Barnard Castle, seigneur de Stokesley, Fotheringay, Torkesey, Bywell, Wodehorn, Dryfeld, Kempeston et Totenham, Lord of Galloway (du chef de sa femme), Shérif de Cumberland, Gouverneur de Carlisle Castle, partisan du Roi Henry III d’Angleterre, capturé par Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester, à la bataille de Lewes (1264) Régent d’Ecosse (avec Robert de Ross) durant la minorité d’Alexander III (1255), Commissaire du Roi d’Angleterre (1259) pour les affaires de France, X contre les Gallois (armée convoquée à Chester 01/08/1260), Plénipotentiaire Anglo-Ecossais (16/11/1260), arbitre en Ponthieu un conflit entre Hue de Vaudricourt et Drievon de Granssart (03/1267, sur demande de la comtesse de Ponthieu Jeanne de Castille ; la querelle finit par le mariage de Pierrette de Vaudricourt avec Wautier de Granssart) (paie ~04/1229 150 £ pour le relief de ses seigneuries dont 30 fiefs de chevaliers tenus de son père ; amortit 04/1237 18 journaux de prés vendus à l’Abbaye de Lieu-Dieu par son vassal Simon de Pierrecourt ; souscrit en 1237 le Traité de paix entre Henry III d’Angleterre et Alexander II d’Ecosse ; parvient à éviter de prendre parti dans le conflit entre l’Angleterre et la France et à sauvegarder ses intérêts de chaque côté de la Manche ; amortit en 08/1246 le fief de Broutelette donné au Lieu-Dieu par Thomas de Frieucourt, fils d’Enguerran, chevalier, et de Mahaut ; amortit 50 journaux de terre donnés à Séry par Geoffroi de Broutelle ; autre charte d’amortissement 23/07/1253) [ fondateur avec sa femme du Baliol College en 1263 à Oxford ]
ép. 1233 Devorguilla of Galloway ° ~1218/25 (Fotheringay, Ecosse) + le dimanche suivant 28/01/1290 ns (Kempston, Bedfordshire) (3° fille & héritière d’Alan MacDougal of MacDonald + 1234, Lord of Galloway, Connétable d’Ecosse, et de Margaret of Scotland-Huntingdon, co-héritière de son père David, earl of Huntingdon ; nièce des Rois d’Ecosse Malcolm IV et de William «The Lion» ; elle ép. 2) après 1268/69 John de Vaux + 1288 fils d’Olivier de Vaux et de Péronnelle)
(armes : «D’or, à la fasce échiquetée d’azur & d’argent, à une bande engrélée de gueules, brochante, le tout dans un double trescheur fleuronné & contrefleuronné de gueules»)”.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "JOHN de Balliol, son of HUGH Balliol of Barnard Castle & his wife Cecilie de Fontaines (-before 27 Oct 1268). "John de Balliol, son and heir of Hugh Balliol" made a fine for "his relief of 30 knights’ fees that Hugh de Balliol his father held of the king in chief", dated [Apr] 1229[841]. Bracton records a claim, dated 1230, by "Johannes de Cauz et Alina uxor eius James de Cauz et Alesia uxor eius" against "Johannem de Bailliol" concerning "Hugonem de Bailliol patrem predicti Johannis de Baillol…terra"[842]. Of Barnard Castle, co Durham. Lord of Galloway, de iure uxoris. Sheriff of Cumberland and governor of Carlisle Castle. He supported Henry III King of England against the barons, and was captured with the king at the battle of Lewes in 1264 by Simon de Montfort Earl of Leicester[843]. He and his wife founded Balliol College, Oxford in 1263[844]. A writ after the death of "John de Balliolo", dated "27 Oct 52 Hen III", and later inquisitions name "Sir Hugh de Balliolo his son, age variously stated as 28 or more, and 30 and more" as his heir[845]. The Chronicle of Melrose records the death in 1269 of "John de Balliol…a lover of scholars", adding that "he built a house at Oxford"[846].
     "m (1233[847]) DEVORGUILLA of Galloway, daughter of ALAN Lord of Galloway & his second wife Margaret of Scotland (-28 Jan 1290, bur Sweetheart Abbey, Kirkland). The Chronicle of Melrose records that "Alan of Galloway gave his daughter to John de Bailiol in marriage" in 1233[848]. The Annales Londonienses name "Devorgoille de Baillol" as second of the three daughters of "la primere fille Davi" and "Aleyn de Gavei"[849]. The Liber Pluscardensis records the marriage in 1233 of the second daughter of "Alanus de Galway filius Rotholandi de Galway" and "Johannes de Balliolo"[850]. The Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie records that "Diuorgilla filia Alani domini de Galwidia" founded "monasterium Dulcicordis ordinis Cisterciensis et fratrum minorum de Dundee"[851]. Alexander III King of Scotland confirmed the donations made by "Deruorguilla de Balliolo filia et una heredes quondam Alani de Galwathya…in viduitate sua" to the church of Glasgow by charter dated 18 May 1277[852]. A charter dated 22 Feb 1290 records the extent of the manor of Kempstone held by "dominæ Dervergullæ de Balliolo defunctæ", noting that she had died "die Sabbati proxima post conversionem Sancti Pauli, anno prædicto"[853]. A writ after the death of "Lady Dervergulla de Balliolo", dated "4 Feb 18 Edw I", and later inquisitions name "John de Balliolo her son, aged 40 at the feast of St Michael last…her…heir"[854]."
Med Lands cites:
[841] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 181.
[842] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 432, p. 349.
[843] BEP, p. 21.
[844] CP I 385 footnote b, and Chronicle of Melrose, 1269, p. 121.
[845] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 691, p. 218.
[846] He died iin 1269 according to the Chronicle of Melrose, 1269, p. 121.
[847] Chronicle of Melrose, 1233, p. 59.
[848] Chronicle of Melrose, 1234, p. 60.
[849] Annales Londonienses, p. 126.
[850] Liber Pluscardensis, Vol. I, Liber VII, CX, p. 73.
[851] Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie, p. 77.
[852] Glasgow Bishopric, Tome I, 230, p. 192.
[853] Stephenson, J. (ed.) (1870) Documents illustrative of the History of Scotland from the death of King Alexander the Third to the accession of Robert Bruce 1286-1306 (Edinburgh), Vol. I, LXXXVI, p. 123.
[854] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 771, p. 467.5

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 21. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Fitz Walter 5: p. 327. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Balliol, of Bywell, Lord of Galloway, de jure uxoris: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027685&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#JohnBallioldied12681269. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Baliol (Bailleul-en-Vimeu) (alias Balliol), p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Baliol.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S1822] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 28 Oct 2004 "Euphemia, Countess of Ross (was Re: Magna Carta line of Eufemia)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 28 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 28 Oct 2004."
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Balliol, of Bywell: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027685&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Devorguilla of Galloway: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027686&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), Line 94-28, p. 98. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#DevorguillaGallowaydied1290
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 10 August 2020), memorial page for John I de Balliol (1200–25 Oct 1268), Find a Grave Memorial no. 85736567, citing Sweetheart Abbey, New Abbey, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/85736567/john_i-de_balliol. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, The House of Baliol: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/baliol.html
  14. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), p. 98, Line 94-28. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_I_de_Balliol. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Cecily Baliol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00385220&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ada Balliol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00116977&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alan Balliol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027688&tree=LEO
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.9.
  20. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 22.
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Baliol page (The House of Baliol): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/baliol.html#JT
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Baliol: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015431&tree=LEO

Alianore/Eleanor Balliol1,2

F, #5081, b. circa 1245
FatherSir John I de Balliol Knt., of Barnard Castle, Lord of Galloway, Regent of Scotland3,1,4,5 b. c 1200, d. b 27 Oct 1268
MotherDevorguilla (?) of Galloway3,1,6,5 b. c 1209, d. bt 28 Jan 1289 - 1290
ReferenceGAV24 EDV21
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Alianore/Eleanor Balliol was born circa 1245. She married Sir John "Black Comyn" Comyn Lord of Badenoch, son of Sir John "Red Comyn" 1 Comyn and Amabilia (Or Alicia) (?), between 1279 and 1283.3,2
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. I 155
     2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:91.2 GAV-24 EDV-21 GKJ-22. Alianore/Eleanor Balliol was also known as Alianora (Margaret/Mary) de Baliol.7,3,8

; Weis AR
Sister of John Baliol, King of Scotland.9

Family

Sir John "Black Comyn" Comyn Lord of Badenoch b. c 1245, d. c 1303
Child

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 22. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alianore Balliol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027687&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Balliol, of Bywell: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027685&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#JohnBallioldied12681269. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Devorguilla of Galloway: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027686&tree=LEO
  7. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 198. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  8. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 21.
  9. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.9. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.

Beatrix de Vermandois1

F, #5082, b. 1079, d. after 1144
FatherHugues I Magnus de Crepi (?) Duke of France and Burgundy, Count of Amiens, Chaumont, Valois, Vermandois etc.1,2,3 b. 1057, d. 18 Oct 1101
MotherAdélaïde/Aelis de Vermandois comtesse de Vermandois, Valois et Crépy)1,4,3 b. 1050, d. 23 Sep 1124
Last Edited2 May 2020
     Beatrix de Vermandois married Hugues IV de Gournay, son of Gerard de Gournay of Caister Norfolk, Seigneur de Gournay-en-Bray and Edith/Aldgyth de Warenne.1 Beatrix de Vermandois was born in 1079.5
Beatrix de Vermandois died after 1144.1
     

Family

Hugues IV de Gournay b. bt 1098 - 1100, d. 1180

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet8.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues I Magnus: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050023&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#HuguesIdied1102. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adélaïde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050024&tree=LEO
  5. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).

Guy de Clermont1

M, #5083
FatherRenaud II/III (?) Cte de Clermont-en-Beauvais,1,2 b. c 1090, d. bt 1152 - 1153
MotherClémence/Clementia de Bar Comtesse de Dammartin1,3,2 b. c 1110, d. a 20 Jan 1182/83
Last Edited29 Jun 2020
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/4:653.1 Guy de Clermont was living in 1152.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guy de Clermont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00358831&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#Renauddiedbefore1162. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence de Bar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164669&tree=LEO

Mary fitz Marmaduke1

F, #5084
FatherSir John fitz Marmaduke of Horden1,2
MotherIsabel de Bruce1,3
Last Edited28 Jun 2006
     Mary fitz Marmaduke married Sir Robert de Lumley Knt., son of Sir Roger de Lumley Knt. and Sibilla de Morwick.1,4

Family

Sir Robert de Lumley Knt. b. c 1272, d. 1308
Child

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scarbrough Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John FitzMarmaduke, of Horden: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I0165793&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel Bruce: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I0165794&tree=LEO
  4. [S1784] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 29 July 2005 "Re: Descendants of Sir Richard de Lucy and Rohese of Boulogne"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/F9_d7JZUuk0/m/5jgR9n064yQJ) to e-mail address, 29 July 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 29 July 2005."

John de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey1,2,3,4,5

M, #5085, b. circa August 1231, d. circa 29 September 1304
FatherWilliam Plantagenet de Warenne Earl of Warren and 2nd/6th Earl of Surrey2,3,6,5,4 b. c 1180, d. 27 May 1240
MotherMaud Matilda Marshal2,3,7,4 b. c 1171, d. 27 Mar 1248
ReferenceGAV20 EDV20
Last Edited26 Apr 2009
     John de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey was born circa August 1231 at England.8,1,2,3,4,5 He married Alice (Alfais) de Lusignan, daughter of Hugues X "Le Brun" de Lusignan Comte de La Marche et d'Angoulême and Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England, in August 1247.8,9,1,2,10,3,4,5,11
John de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey was buried in 1304 at Lewes Priory, Lewes, East Sussex, England.1


John de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey died circa 29 September 1304 at Kennington (near London), co. Kent, England.12,1,2,3,4
     He was 7th Earl of Surrey of the 1088 cr.13

; per van de Pas: "John was born about August 1231, the son of William de Warenne, earl of Warren and Surrey, and Maud Marshal, the daughter of William Marshall, 1st earl of Pembroke, and widow of Hugh Bigod, 3rd earl of Norfolk. Thus Roger Bigod, 4th earl of Norfolk, was his elder half-brother.

John was a boy when his father died, and for the rest of his minority Peter II de Savoie, earl of Richmond was the guardian of his estates. In 1247 John married Henry III's half-sister Alix (Alfais) de Lusignan, daughter of Hugues X 'le Brun' de Lusignan, comte de La Marche et d'Angoulême and Isabelle d'Angoulême, widow of King John. This marriage was to create resentment among the English nobility, who did not like seeing a wealthy English nobleman marrying someone they considered a penniless outsider.

John and Alix had three children: William, who married Joane de Vere, daughter of Robert de Vere, 5th earl of Oxford, and was accidentally killed at a tournament on 15 December 1286 (his son John succeeded his grandfather as earl of Surrey); Eleanor, who married Sir Henry Percy; and Isabel, who married John Baliol, king of Scots. During the years following his marriage John de Warren was closely associated with the court faction of his in-laws. In 1254 he accompanied the king's son Edward (the future Edward I) on his journey to Spain to marry Eleanor of Castile.

During the conflicts between Henry III and his barons, John started as a strong supporter of the king, switched to support for Simon de Montfort, and then returned to the royalist party. He opposed the initial baronial reform plan of May 1258, but along with other opponents he capitulated and took the oath of the Provisions of Oxford.

By 1260 John had joined the party of Simon de Montfort, but switched back to the king's side in 1263. After the Battle of Lewes, which was fought near his castle at Lewes, he fled to the Continent, where he remained for about a year. He returned to fight in the campaign which culminated in the Battle of Evesham and the siege of Kenilworth Castle.

John served in Edward I's Welsh campaigns in 1277, 1282, and 1283. In 1282 he received the lordships of Bromfield and Yale in Wales. Many of the following years were spent in Scotland. He was one of the negotiators for the 1289 Treaty of Salisbury and for the 1290 Treaty of Birgham, and accompanied Edward on his 1296 invasion of Scotland. On 22 August 1296 the king appointed him 'warden of the kingdom and land of Scotland'. However he returned to England a few months later claiming that the Scottish climate was bad for his health. The following spring saw the rebellion of William Wallace, and after much delay John led an army northward, where they were defeated at the Battle of Stirling Bridge.

Nevertheless the king appointed John captain of the next campaign against the Scots in early 1298. He raised the siege of Roxburgh and retook the castle at Berwick. The king himself took to the field later that year, and John was one of the commanders at the Battle of Falkirk.

John died in 1304 at Kensington near London.4 " GAV-20 EDV20 GKJ-21.

; 7th Earl of Surrey.14,12

; van de Pas cites: 1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: vol III/2 page 355
2. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: page 569
3. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H., Reference: page 97
4. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: vol XII page 503.4

Family

Alice (Alfais) de Lusignan b. c 1224, d. 9 Feb 1256
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 261-262, de WARENNE 7. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015385&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 8.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Warenne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015383&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud Marshal: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015384&tree=LEO
  8. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 151-2, p. 184. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 137, de LUSIGNAN 5:iii.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Lusignan 2 page (de Lusignan Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/lusignan2.html#R1
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix (Alfais) de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015386&tree=LEO
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 83-28, p. 82. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Northumberland Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  14. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant4.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Warenne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015411&tree=LEO
  17. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 409, 412. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  18. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015430&tree=LEO

Alice (Alfais) de Lusignan1,2,3,4,5

F, #5086, b. circa 1224, d. 9 February 1256
FatherHugues X "Le Brun" de Lusignan Comte de La Marche et d'Angoulême2,6,3,5 b. c 1190, d. a 6 Jun 1249
MotherIsabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England2,3,5 b. bt 1186 - 1187, d. c 4 Jun 1246
ReferenceGAV20 EDV20
Last Edited26 Apr 2009
     Alice (Alfais) de Lusignan was born circa 1224.2,3,4 She married John de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey, son of William Plantagenet de Warenne Earl of Warren and 2nd/6th Earl of Surrey and Maud Matilda Marshal, in August 1247.7,1,8,9,2,3,10,4,5
Alice (Alfais) de Lusignan died on 9 February 1256 at Warren, co. Sussex, England; died in childbirth.11,1,2,3,4,5
     GAV-20 EDV-20.

; van de Pas cites: 1. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: vol XII page 507
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: vol III/3 page 564.
3. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 569.5

Family

John de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey b. c Aug 1231, d. c 29 Sep 1304
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 137, de LUSIGNAN 5:iii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Lusignan 2 page (de Lusignan Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/lusignan2.html#R1
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 8.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alix (Alfais) de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015386&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues X 'le Brun' de Lusignan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008715&tree=LEO
  7. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 151-2, p. 184. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 261-262, de WARENNE 7.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015385&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 153-29, p. 134. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Warenne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015411&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015430&tree=LEO

William Plantagenet de Warenne Earl of Warren and 2nd/6th Earl of Surrey1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #5087, b. circa 1180, d. 27 May 1240
FatherHamelin (?) d'Anjou, vicomte de Touraine, 1st Earl of Surrey, 1st Earl Warenne4,7,5,8,9,10 b. 1130, d. 7 May 1202
MotherIsabel de Warenne 4th Countess of Surrey4,7,5,9,10,11 b. 1137, d. 12 Jul 1203
ReferenceGAV22 EDV21
Last Edited30 Sep 2020
     William Plantagenet de Warenne Earl of Warren and 2nd/6th Earl of Surrey was buried at Lewes Priory, Lewes, East Sussex, England.3

He was born circa 1180 at England; Genealogics says b. ca 1180; Racines et Histoire says b. ca 116/1175.4,6,12 He married Maud d'Aubigny; his 1st wife.3,4 William Plantagenet de Warenne Earl of Warren and 2nd/6th Earl of Surrey married Maud Matilda Marshal, daughter of William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabella de Clare Countess of Strigoil, before 13 October 1225.1,13,3,4,6,5
William Plantagenet de Warenne Earl of Warren and 2nd/6th Earl of Surrey died on 27 May 1240 at London, City of London, Greater London, England.1,3,4,5,6
     ; William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, *1166, +27.5.1240; 1m: Mathilde d'Aubigny (+1216); 2m: before 13.10.1225 Maud Marshall (*ca 1171 +27.3.1248), dau.of William, 1st Earl of Pembroke; all kids were by 2m.4 He was 2nd/6th Earl of Surrey.4 GAV-22 EDV-21 GKJ-22.

; van de Pas says: [quote]William was the son of Hameline bâtard d'Anjou, earl of Surrey, vicomte de Touraine, and Isabel de Warenne, daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd earl of Surrey and Warenne and Ela de Ponthieu. William's grandfather was Geoffrey V, comte d'Anjou et Maine, and duke of Normandy. Therefore Henry II, king of England was William's uncle. William was present at the coronation of King John on 27 May 1199. When Normandy was lost to the French in 1204 he lost his Norman holdings (in 1202 he had been lieutenant of Gascony), but King John of England recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford.

His first tenure of office as lord warden of the Cinque Ports was from 1204 to 1206. He was also warden of the Welsh marches from 1208 to 1213.

William was one of the few barons who remained loyal to King John (who was his cousin) during the king's difficulties with the barons, when they sought for the French dauphin Louis (the future Louis VIII) to assume the English throne, and he is listed as one of those who advised John to accede to the Magna Carta. His allegiance only faltered a few times when the king's cause looked hopeless.

In March 1217 William again demonstrated his loyalty to England by supporting the young King Henry III. He was responsible for the establishment of the cathedral at Salisbury.

Between 1200 and 1208, and between 1213 and 1226, he served as the sheriff of Wiltshire. In 1214 he was again appointed lord warden of the Cinque Ports.

William first married Maud de Albini, the daughter of an earl of Arundel, possibly William d'Aubigny, 1st earl of Arundel. There were no children from this marriage, and Maud died in 1216.

Before 13 October 1225 William married Maud Marshal, eldest daughter and later co-heiress of William Marshal, 1st earl of Pembroke, and widow of Hugh Bigod, 3rd earl of Norfolk. They had a son John who would have progeny, and a daughter Isabel. John succeeded his father as earl, while Isabel married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th earl of Arundel.

William died in London 27 May 1240. [end quote]5

; van de Pas cites: A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: page 569
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: vol XII page 500
3. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: page 187.5

; Weis AR 83-27.

; named in the Magna Charta, 1215.14
; signed Magna Carta.
Counsellors named in Magna Carta
     "The preamble to Magna Carta includes the names of the following 27 ecclesiastical and secular magnates who had counselled John to accept its terms. The names include some of the moderate reformers, notably Archbishop Stephen Langton, and some of John's loyal supporters, such as William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke. They are listed here in the order in which they appear in the charter itself:[62]
1. Stephen Langton, Archbishop of Canterbury and Cardinal
2. Henry de Loundres, Archbishop of Dublin
3. William of Sainte-Mère-Église, Bishop of London
4. Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester
5. Jocelin of Wells, Bishop of Bath and Glastonbury
6. Hugh of Wells, Bishop of Lincoln
7. Walter de Gray, Bishop of Worcester
8. William de Cornhill, Bishop of Coventry
9. Benedict of Sausetun, Bishop of Rochester
10. Pandulf Verraccio, subdeacon and papal legate to England
11. Eymeric, Master of the Knights Templar in England
12. William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke
13. William Longespée, Earl of Salisbury
14. William de Warenne, Earl of Surrey
15. William d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel
16. Alan of Galloway, Constable of Scotland
17. Warin FitzGerold
18. Peter FitzHerbert
19 Hubert de Burgh, Seneschal of Poitou
20. Hugh de Neville
21. Matthew FitzHerbert
22. Thomas Basset
23. Alan Basset
24. Philip d'Aubigny
25. Robert of Ropsley
26. John Marshal
27. John FitzHugh

The Council of Twenty-Five Barons
     "The names of the Twenty-Five Barons appointed under clause 61 to monitor John's future conduct are not given in the charter itself, but do appear in four early sources, all seemingly based on a contemporary listing: a late 13th-century collection of law tracts and statutes, a Reading Abbey manuscript now in Lambeth Palace Library, and the Chronica Majora and Liber Additamentorum of Matthew Paris.[63][64][65] The process of appointment is not known, but the names were drawn almost exclusively from among John's more active opponents.[66] They are listed here in the order in which they appear in the original sources:
1. Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford
2. William de Forz, Earl of Albemarle
3. Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex and Gloucester
4. Saer de Quincy, Earl of Winchester
5. Henry de Bohun, Earl of Hereford
6. Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk
7. Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford
8. William Marshal junior
9. Robert Fitzwalter, baron of Little Dunmow
10. Gilbert de Clare, heir to the earldom of Hertford
11. Eustace de Vesci, Lord of Alnwick Castle
12. Hugh Bigod, heir to the Earldoms of Norfolk and Suffolk
13. William de Mowbray, Lord of Axholme Castle
14. William Hardell, Mayor of the City of London
15. William de Lanvallei, Lord of Walkern
16. Robert de Ros, Baron of Helmsley
17. John de Lacy, Constable of Chester and Lord of Pontefract Castle
18. Richard de Percy
19. John FitzRobert de Clavering, Lord of Warkworth Castle
20. William Malet
21. Geoffrey de Saye
22. Roger de Montbegon, Lord of Hornby Castle, Lancashire[f]
23. William of Huntingfield, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk
24. Richard de Montfichet
25. William d'Aubigny, Lord of Belvoir

Excommunicated rebels
     "In September 1215, the papal commissioners in England – Subdeacon Pandulf, Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester, and Simon, Abbot of Reading – excommunicated the rebels, acting on instructions earlier received from Rome. A letter sent by the commissioners from Dover on 5 September to Archbishop Langton explicitly names nine senior rebel barons (all members of the Council of Twenty-Five), and six clerics numbered among the rebel ranks:[67]
Barons
1. Robert Fitzwalter
2. Saer de Quincy, Earl of Winchester
3. Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford
4. Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex and Gloucester
5. Eustace de Vesci
6. Richard de Percy
7. John de Lacy, Constable of Chester
8. William d'Aubigny
9. William de Mowbray
Clerics
10. Giles de Braose, Bishop of Hereford
11. William, Archdeacon of Hereford
12. Alexander the clerk [possibly Alexander of St Albans]
13. Osbert de Samara
14. John de Fereby
15. Robert, chaplain to Robert Fitzwalter.15

Family 1

Maud d'Aubigny d. 1216

Family 2

Maud Matilda Marshal b. c 1171, d. 27 Mar 1248
Children

Citations

  1. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 151-1, p. 184. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 199-200, PLANTAGENET 7:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 260-261, de WARENNE 6.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Warenne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015383&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S1704] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 17 Dec 2004 "A Plantagenet Descent: FitzWilliam of Woodhall to William Farrar"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/xCbd-kLQN30/m/PPe2A57bjJAJ) to e-mail address, 17 Dec 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 17 Dec 2004."
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hameline: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015369&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#Hamelindied1202B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel de Warenne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015370&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Warenne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015383&tree=LEO
  13. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 149, MARSHAL 3:vi.
  14. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis MCS-5, line 148-2, p. 181.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magna_Carta. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 260-261, de WARENNE 6:ii.
  17. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015432&tree=LEO
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.7.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015385&tree=LEO

Sir John fitz Marmaduke of Horden1,2

M, #5088
Last Edited28 Jun 2006
     Sir John fitz Marmaduke of Horden married Isabel de Bruce, daughter of Sir Robert "the Competitor" de Brus 6th Lord of Anandale, Earl of Carrick and Isabella de Clare.1,2,3
     ; van de Pas cites: The Complete Peerage, 1936, Doubleday, H. A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: VIII 268.2 Sir John fitz Marmaduke of Horden was Sherriff of North Durham.2

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Scarbrough Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John FitzMarmaduke, of Horden: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I0165793&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel Bruce: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I0165794&tree=LEO

Sir Richard Fitz Roy Knt., Lord of Chilham1,2,3,4,5

M, #5089, b. circa 1186, d. before 24 June 1246
FatherJohn I "Lackland" (?) King of England2,3,5,6 b. 24 Dec 1167, d. 19 Oct 1216
Mothernn (Isabel) de Warenne3,5,7 b. 1172
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited21 Dec 2020
     Sir Richard Fitz Roy Knt., Lord of Chilham was born circa 1186.2 He married Rohese de Douvres of Dover, daughter of Fulbert/Foubert de Douvres of Chilham, Kent and Isabel de Briwere, before 11 May 1214; her 1st husband.8,9,2,10,3,4,5,11
Sir Richard Fitz Roy Knt., Lord of Chilham died before 24 June 1246; shortly before 24.6.1246.2,5
     He was Constab le of Wallingford Castle at Wallingford Castle, Wallingford, Berkshire, England.4

; van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: III 356b.5 GAV-22 EDV-22 GKJ-21.

; [illegitimate by Isabella de Warenne, wife of Lord Pevensey] Richard Fitzroy of Chilham, *ca 1186, +shortly before 24.6.1246; m.ca 1207 Rohese de Dovor (i.e. Rose of Dover) (*ca 1188, +1264/65.)2

Family

Rohese de Douvres of Dover b. c 1203, d. b 11 Feb 1261
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 200, PLANTAGENET 8:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.12. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, pp. 48-49.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard Fitzroy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199053&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000807&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN (Isabel) de Warenne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00437351&tree=LEO
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 218-27, p. 182. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 200, PLANTAGENET 9.
  10. [S1784] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 29 July 2005 "Re: Descendants of Sir Richard de Lucy and Rohese of Boulogne"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/F9_d7JZUuk0/m/5jgR9n064yQJ) to e-mail address, 29 July 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 29 July 2005."
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rohese de Dover: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199054&tree=LEO
  12. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Kenworthy-Barons Strabolgi Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  13. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p. 49.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard de Chilham: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00437352&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#RichardChilhamMMaudAngus. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel Fitzroy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00054199&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lorette de Dover: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140234&tree=LEO
  18. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Marmion 5: p. 493.

Philip Fitz Robert1

M, #5090
FatherRobert de Caen "The Consul" (?) 1st Earl of Gloucester b. c 1090, d. 31 Oct 1147
MotherMaud Mabel Fitz Hamon
Last Edited7 Sep 2001
     

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 185-186, NORMANDY 9:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).

Gunnild (?) of Dunbar1,2

F, #5091
FatherWaltheof (?) 1st Lord of Allerdale3 b. c 1060, d. 1138
MotherSigrid (?)4
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited24 Aug 2019
     Gunnild (?) of Dunbar married Uchtred (?) Lord of Galloway, son of Fergus (?) 1st Lord of Galloway and Unknown (?).2,5,6,7
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis. 41
     2. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 101.7 GAV-23 EDV-24 GKJ-25.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 101-102, GALLOWAY 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 187, NURTHUMBERLAND 4.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Waltheof, Lord of Allerdale: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106717&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sigrid: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00385434&tree=LEO
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 38-24, p. 41. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Uchtred, Lord of Galloway: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106715&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gunnild of Dunbar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106716&tree=LEO
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 102, GALLOWAY 2:i.
  9. [S2090] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 19 Aug 2006: "Re: The Comyns and the House of Galloway: a prior Connection ?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 19 Aug 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 19 Aug 2006."
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dervorguilla of Galloway, Derbforgaill inghen Uchtred a Gallobha: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00116896&tree=LEO
  11. [S1838] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #1 23 Nov 2004 "Re: Morville - Stuteville question"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 23 Nov 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #1 23 Nov 2004."

Fergus (?) 1st Lord of Galloway1

M, #5092, b. circa 1096, d. 12 May 1161
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited4 Aug 2020
     Fergus (?) 1st Lord of Galloway married Unknown (?)2,3 Fergus (?) 1st Lord of Galloway was born circa 1096.4
Fergus (?) 1st Lord of Galloway died on 12 May 1161 at Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh, Mid-Lothian, Scotland; Weis says d. 12 May 1166; Genealogics says d. 1161.5,2,4
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. 184.
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. III 55.4


;
Per Genealogics:
     "Fergus was lord of Galloway from an unknown date (probably in the 1110s), until his death. He was the founder of that 'sub-kingdom', the resurrector of the bishopric of Whithorn, the patron of new abbeys (such as Dundrennan), and much else besides. He became a legend after his death, although his actual life is clouded in mystery.
     "Fergus first appears in the historical sources in 1136. His origins and his parentage, however, are a mystery. He was almost certainly a native Galwegian. There is no evidence that Galloway was ever part of the kingdom of Strathclyde. Thus Galloway (west of the Nith at least) lay outside of the traditional area claimed by the kingdom of Alba, Strathclyde's successor state in the area, Galloway, often defined as all of the area to the south and west of the Clyde and west of the Tiver Annan, lay outside of traditional Scottish territory. Though it formed part of the northern mainland of Britain, Galloway was just as much part of the Irish Sea.
     "Fergus is known to have had two wives whose names are unknown. By one wife he had a son Gilbert (Gille Brigte) and a daughter Afraicq, both of whom would have progeny. By his other wife, had a son Uchtred who would have progeny.
     "If one of Fergus' wives was an illegitimate daughter of Henry I, the marriage can be interpreted as part of the forward policy of Henry in the northwest of his dominions and the Irish Sea zone in general, which was engineered in the second decade of the 12th century. It may have been during this time that Fergus began calling himself _rex Galwitensium_ ('King of Galloway'). However, while Henry lived, Fergus, like David I, king of Scots, seems to have remained a faithful vassal.
     "As part of his pretensions in the Irish Sea world, Fergus made himself the father-in-law of Amhlaib (Olaf) 'Morsel', king of Man and the Isles, by marrying off his daughter Afraicq to him. Amhlaib was in many ways a client of the English and Scottish kings, and so within this new Anglo-Gaelic Irish Sea system Fergus could establish a dominant position. This position lasted until the death of Amhlaib in 1153 at the hands of his brother's sons, who had been brought up in Dublin and were waiting in the wings.
     "A related development was Fergus' resurrection of the bishopric of Whithorn, an ancient Galwegian See first established by the expansionary Northumbrians under the jurisdiction of the archbishop of York. It is likely the bishopric disappeared with Northumbrian power, a decline marked by the sack and subsequent occupation of York by the Danes in 867. In the following two and half centuries Galloway, if and where jurisdiction actually existed, seems to have been under the jurisdiction of the bishop of Man in the west, with Durham and Glasgow in the east.
     "In terms of the see's resurrection, on 9 December 1125 Pope Honorius II wrote to the bishop-elect of Whithorn, ordering him to appear before the archbishop of York. The would-be bishop was a cleric called Gille Aldan, and the archbishop was Thurstan. York had been coming under increasing pressure from the ambitions of Canterbury, and the northern English metropolitan had only two suffragans (Durham and Man). He needed three to hold proper archiepiscopal elections. It is likely that York and Fergus did a deal ensuring that the Galwegian Church would not undermine Fergus' independence from both Man and Scotland, and securing an identity for the new kingdom in the framework of northern Britain and the Isles.
     "On Henry's death in late 1135, Fergus' relationship with the English kings could not be maintained. David I, king of Scots, ruler of much of Scotland and northern England, assumed a position of dominance. The balance of power swung firmly in David's favour. It was no longer possible to maintain a position of real independence from the Scottish king. It was at this point that Fergus comes into contemporary sources. In the summer of 1136, David I was in attendance at the consecration of Bishop John's cathedral in Glasgow. Here was a big gathering of Scottish and Norman nobles. Fergus is recorded as having been in attendance (with his son Uchtred), leading a list of southwestern Gaelic nobility.
     "The gathering also assisted David's ambitions against Stephen, the new and weak king of the English. Galwegian contingents are recorded in several sources as being present during the subsequent campaign and the defeat of David by the levies of Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire at the Battle of the Standard in 1138. We cannot know for sure if Fergus was there, but the peace treaty made between David and Stephen in 1139 stipulated that one of Fergus' sons (certainly Uchtred) be given as a hostage.
     "In 1153, King David died. The personal relationship of superiority which David had enjoyed over Fergus was not meant to apply to David's successors. David was succeeded by the boy-king, Máel Coluim IV, Malcolm IV 'the Maiden'. Yet Fergus initially seems to have had a good relationship with the new king. In 1156 Fergus captured and handed over Máel Coluim's rival Domnall mac Mail Choluim, the MacHeth pretender to the kingdom of the Scots.
     "However, by the end of the decade Fergus and King Máel Coluim were not friends. In 1157 the boy-king's position in southern Scotland was weakened when he was forced by King Henry II to hand over Cumbria and Northumbria. It was probably this blow to Máel Coluim's power that gave Fergus his chance to reassert his independence. The _Chronicle of Holyrood_ reports that Máel Coluim led three campaigns against Fergus in 1160. The context was that Máel Coluim (who was an English feudatory in his capacity as earl of Huntingdon) had been in France with his lord Henry II, and had just returned to Scotland. Many of the native Scottish magnates besieged Máel Coluim at Perth upon his return. However Fergus was not one of them, and any connection between the so-called Revolt of the Earls and Fergus has no evidence to substantiate it. On the other hand, it is highly suggestive that this revolt occurred in exactly the same year as the invasion of Galloway.
     "Fergus' later years were mired by the squabbling of his two sons. It is also possible that Fergus' longevity was testing his sons' patience. Walter Daniel reported that, in relation to the mid-1150s, Fergus was: '....incensed against his sons, and the sons raging against the father and each other....The King of Scotland could nor subdue, nor the bishop pacify their mutual hatreds, rancour and tyranny. Sons were against father, father against sons, brother against brother, daily polluting the unhappy little land with bloodshed.'
     "Whether because of Gilbert and Uchtred, or because of Máel Coluim's campaigns, Fergus was forced into retirement, becoming a monk at Holyrood Abbey in 1160. He died the following year."4 He was Lord of Galloway.2 GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

; This is the same person as ”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fergus_of_Galloway” at Wikipedia.


This is also the same person as ”Fergus, lord of Galloway” at the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.6,7

; Per Med Lands:
     "FERGUS, son of --- (-[1136]). Lord of Galloway. "…Fergus de Galweia…Uchtred filio Fergus" witnessed a charter dated to [1136] by which "David Rex Scotiæ" granted Perdeyc to the church of Glasqow[1111]. "…Fgus de Galweia…" witnessed the undated charter under which David I King of Scotland donated "decimam meam de meo Chan" to the church of Glasgow[1112].
     "m ELIZABETH, daughter of ---."
Med Lands cites:
[1111] Early Scottish Charters CIX, p. 85.
[1112] Glasgow Bishopric, Tome I, 9, p. 12.8

Family 2

Unknown (?)
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 101, GALLOWAY 1. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 131B-26, pp. 108-109. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 183-185, NORMANDY 8:xxi.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fergus, Lord of Galloway: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028386&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 38-24, p. 41.
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fergus_of_Galloway. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S2286] Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online http://oxforddnb.com/index/, https://www.oxforddnb.com/view/10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-49360?rskey=uIgSWP&result=2. Hereinafter cited as ODNB - Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc359672002. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 101, GALLOWAY 1:ii.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert of Carrick: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028387&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#DuncanGallowayCarrickA
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Uchtred, Lord of Galloway: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106715&tree=LEO

Hawise de Lancaster1,2

F, #5093, d. 1191
FatherWilliam I de Lancaster 5th Baron Kendal of Workington1,3,4,2 b. c 1115, d. c 1170
MotherGundred de Warenne Countess of Warwick5 b. 1117, d. a 1166
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited9 Mar 2020
     Hawise de Lancaster married Richard de Morville, son of Hugh de Morville and Beatrice de Beauchamp;
Her 2nd husband.6,7,1,8,2,9 Hawise de Lancaster married William "the Younger" Peverel of Nottingham, son of William "the Elder" Peverel of Nottingham and Adeline (?), between 1140 and 1145;
His 2nd wife; her 1st husband. (See Note from Med Lands.)2,10
Hawise de Lancaster died in 1191; Genealogics says d. 1191; Med Lands says d. aft 1188/89.8,2
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 101.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis. 41.8


; Per Med Lands:
     "HAWISE de Lancaster (-after [1188/89]). "Ricardus de Morevill constabularius regis Scottie" donated "totam terram de Blanesleye" to Melrose abbey, with the consent of "Willi de Morevill filii et heredis mei", for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee Auicie et Willi filii mei", by undated charter[319]. "Will de Morev" confirmed the donation of "totam terram de Bleyneslei" to Melrose abbey, made by "pater meus Ric de Moreuill", for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee", by undated charter witnessed by "Ric de Morv patre meo, Auice de Loncastre matre…"[320]. There is uncertainty surrounding this "Hawise de Lancaster". Her marriage to William Peveril is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Avisia de Lancastria, uxor Willielmi Peverel” donated property to Derley Priory by undated charter[321]. Her marriage to Richard de Moreville is confirmed by the 1169/70 Pipe Roll which records "Ric de Moreuill" owing ".cc. m p recto hndo de tra q clamat c filia Willi de Lancastr" in Lancashire[322]. The primary source which confirms that the widow of William Peverel was the same person who remarried Richard de Morville has not yet been identified. There is also a difficulty concerning Hawise’s parentage. Domesday Descendants states that the wife of Richard de Morville was the daughter of William de Lancaster (no corresponding primary source cited)[323]. As can be seen from the chronology of William de Lancaster’s known wife Gundred de Warenne, this affiliation would only be possible if Hawise had been born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage. On the other hand, the onomastics are favourable for this affiliation, as each succeeding generation of the "de Lancaster" family included a Hawise de Lancaster. A different affiliation is suggested by the Complete Peerage which speculates that the wife of William Peverel was Hawise, daughter of Roger de Montgommery Lord of Lancaster & his wife Almodis Ctss de la Marche[324]. This is not an ideal fit. Her supposed father Roger was banished from England in 1102 and retired to La Marche, so it is unclear why Hawise would have been described as “de Lancastria” in a charter which must have been dated about 40 years later. In any case, the chronology is unfavourable. It is unlikely that the wife of Roger de Montgommery, Almodis de la Marche, was born much later than 1070, given the known chronology of her family, which means that her children would have been born before 1110 at the latest. On the other hand, it is likely that William Peverel’s second marriage should be dated to the early 1140s at the earliest, as his first wife is named in one of the charters of Stephen King of England (who succeeded in 1135). Such a marriage date is late if his second wife was born in the early 1100s, and impossible assuming that his widow was the same person who married Richard de Morville and had children by him in the late 1150s. “Helewis filia Willelmi de Lancastr” confirmed to “Gileberto fratri meo...terras quas pater meus” had given him “Slegil...et Sockebroc et Tyrerhge...et totam terram de Paterickedale” by charter dated to [1189], witnessed by “......Roberto de Pinkenei...Gervas de Aencurt...”[325]. "Avicia de Lonc spouse of Richard de Morevilla, with the consent of William her heir and her other heirs" confirmed a donation to Furness St. Mary by charter dated to [1188/89][326].
     "m firstly as his second wife, WILLIAM Peverel of Nottingham, son of WILLIAM Peverel & his wife Adeline ([1100/05]-after 1155).
     "m secondly RICHARD de Moreville, son of HUGH de Morville & his wife Beatrice de Beauchamp (-1189). "
Med Lands cites:
[319] Melrose Liber, Tome I, 94, p. 82.
[320] Melrose Liber, Tome I, 95, p. 83.
[321] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Derley Priory, Derbyshire, XIX, p. 361.
[322] Pipe Roll 16 Hen II (1169/70), Lancashire, p. 53.
[323] Domesday Descendants, p. 603.
[324] CP I Appendix I, p. 762.
[325] Ragg ‘De Lancaster’ (1910), Charter III, p. 431.
[326] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. I, 195, p. 28.2
GAV-23 EDV-24. Hawise de Lancaster was also known as Avice (Alice) de Lancaster.6

; Genalogics says her mother was William's 2nd wife, Gundred, but Med Lands says that given the various dates, she must have been the dau. of an unknown 1st wife.11,8

Family 1

Richard de Morville b. 1143, d. 1189
Children

Family 2

William "the Younger" Peverel of Nottingham b. bt 1100 - 1105, d. a 1155

Citations

  1. [S1838] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #1 23 Nov 2004 "Re: Morville - Stuteville question"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 23 Nov 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #1 23 Nov 2004."
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#HawiseLancasterM2RichardMorville. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Lancaster_I. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Lancaster: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196929&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gundred de Warenne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196930&tree=LEO
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 122, LANCASTER 2:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 171, de MORVILLE of Lauder 1.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Avice de Lancaster: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196922&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#RichardMorvilledied1189
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntps.htm#WilliamPeverildiedafter1155
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#WilliamLancasterdiedafter1166
  12. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 171, de MORVILLE of Lauder 1:i.

William I de Lancaster 5th Baron Kendal of Workington1

M, #5094, b. circa 1115, d. circa 1170
FatherGilbert (?)2,3,4
MotherGoditha (?)2,3,4
ReferenceGAV25 EDV24
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     William I de Lancaster 5th Baron Kendal of Workington was born circa 1115;
Genealogy.EU says b. ca 1115; Genealogics says b. ca 1125.5,4 He married Gundred de Warenne Countess of Warwick, daughter of William II de Warenne 2nd Earl of Surrey, 2nd Earl of Warenne and Isabelle/Elisabeth de Vermandois Countess of Leicester, between 1153 and 1156;
His 2nd wife? Her 2nd husband.6,1,7,8,3,4,9
William I de Lancaster 5th Baron Kendal of Workington died circa 1170; Med Lands says d. aft 1166.6,8,4,3
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 101.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia - much of his biography.4


; Per Genealogics:
     "William was a nobleman of the 12th century in Northwest England. He is the first person of whom there is any record to bear the name of Lancaster and pass it on to his descendants as a family name. William's father was named Gilbert, and his mother was Godith. They are both mentioned clearly in a benefaction of William to St.Mary de Pré and William was often referred to as William the son of Gilbert (fitz Gilbert). William was said to have descended from both Ives de Taillebois and Eldred of Workington, contemporaries of King William II Rufus, but the exact nature of the relationship is far from clear.
     "According to a note written by the 17th century antiquarian Benjamin Ayloffe, William was _Senechallus Hospitii Regis,_ or steward of the king's household. The same note also states that William's father was the king's 'Receiver for the County of Lancaster'.
     "Before 1156 William married Gundred de Warenne, widow of Roger de Beaumont, 2nd earl of Warwick, and daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd earl of Surrey, 2nd earl of Warenne, and Elisabeth de Vermandois. They had at least five children, of whom William and Avice are recorded with progeny.
     "It is worth noting that William II de Blois, son of King Stephen, married Gundred's niece Isabel de Warenne. This implies a very close relationship with the king's party.
     "William and his relatives appear in contemporary documents relating mainly to the modern county of Cumbria, especially Copeland in western Cumberland, Furness in the Lake District, the barony of Kendal, which became part of Westmorland, and various areas such as Barton between Kendal and Ullswater, also in Westmorland.
     "Although only part of this area was within the later English county of Lancashire, this entity had not yet come to be clearly defined. So the name of 'de Lancaster', by which William is remembered, could have referred not only to the church city of Lancaster, to the south of this area, but to an area under its control.
     "According to William Farrer, in his 1902 edition of _Lancashire Pipe Rolls_ and early charters, 'It appears that (William) was possessed of the lordship of Mulcaster (now Muncaster), over the Penningtons of Pennington in Furness, and under Robert de Romilly, lord of Egremont and Skipton, who held it in right of his wife, Cecilia, daughter and heiress of William de Meschines.' According to Farrer, this title would have been one granted to Roger de Mowbray, of Masham, having come into his hands after the death without male heirs of Ives de Taillebois. He also believed that this grant to William de Lancaster came to be annulled.
     "The manors of Workington and Lamplugh in Cumberland were given by William, in exchange for Middleton in Westmorland, to a relative, Cospatrick, feudal lord of Workington, son of Orm of Kendal, the brother-in-law of Waltheof, lord of Allerdale.
     "The Register of St. Bees shows that both William, son of Gilbert de Lancastre, and William's son William had land in the area of Hensingham. William's was at a place called Swartof or Suarthow, 'probably the rising ground between Whitehaven and Hensingham, known locally as Swartha Brow'. This appears to have come from his father Gilbert. His brother Roger apparently held land at Walton, just outside of modern Hensingham, and had a son named Robert. Roger and William also named a brother called Robert.
     "Farrer argued that Ulverston may have been held by William and perhaps his father Gilbert, before it was granted by Stephen, count of Boulogne and Mortain, to Furness Abbey in 1127.
     "According to a later grant to Gilbert Fitz Reinfrid, William must have held some position over the whole forest of Westmarieland (the Northern or Appleby Barony of Westmorland), Kendal and Furness. His claims in Furness may have gone beyond just the forest, but this appears to have put him in conflict with the claims of the Furness Abbey, and this conflict continued over many generations. His family may have had links there before him.
     "William died in about 1170."4

; Per Wikipedia:
     "William de Lancaster I, or William Fitz Gilbert, was a nobleman of the 12th century in Northwest England. According to a document some generations later, he was also referred to as William de Tailboys (de Taillebois) when younger, and then became "William de Lancaster, baron of Kendal", although there is some uncertainty amongst most commentators concerning the exact meaning of the term "baron" in this case. He is the first person of whom there is any record to bear the name of Lancaster and pass it on to his descendants as a family name. He died in about 1170.
Titles and positions
Earliest holdings

     "Despite his surname, William and his relatives appear in contemporary documents relating mainly to what is now the modern county of Cumbria, not Lancashire, especially Copeland in western Cumberland, Furness in the Lake District, The Barony of Kendal, which became part of Westmorland, and various areas such as Barton between Kendal and Ullswater, also in Westmorland. Much of this area was not yet permanently part of England.
     "Although only part of this area was within the later English county of Lancaster or Lancashire, this entity had not yet come to be clearly defined. So the title of "de Lancaster", by which William is remembered, could have referred not only to the church city of Lancaster, to the south of this area, but to an area under its control. In 1900, William Farrer claimed that "all of the southern half of Westmorland, not only the Kirkby Lonsdale Ward of Westmorland, but also the Kendal Ward, were linked with Northern Lancashire from a very early time" and formed a single district for fiscal administrative purposes.[1]
     "The two apparently lost records which are said to have mentioned William's father Gilbert also apparently connected him to Cumbria, specifically to the area of Furness.[2]
     "The following are areas associated with him, for example ...
** Muncaster in Cumberland. According to William Farrer, in his 1902 edition of Lancashire Pipe Rolls and early charters,wrote:
It appears that he was possessed of the lordship of Mulcaster (now Muncaster), over the Penningtons of Pennington in Furness, and under Robert de Romille, lord of Egremont and Skipton, who held it in right of his wife, Cecilia, daughter and heiress of William de Meschines.[3]

     "According to Farrer, this title would have been one of those granted by Roger de Mowbray, son of Nigel de Albini, having come into his hands after the decease without male heirs of Ivo de Taillebois. He also believed that this grant to William de Lancaster came to be annulled.
** Workington, Lamplugh and Middleton. The manors of Workington and Lamplugh in Cumberland were given by William de Lancaster, in exchange for Middleton in Westmorland, to an apparently close relative, Gospatric, son of Orme, brother-in-law of Waldeve, Lord of Allerdale.[4]
** Hensingham. The Register of St Bees shows that both William son of Gilbert de Lancastre, and William's son William had land in this area. William's was at a place called Swartof or Suarthow, "probably the rising ground between Whitehaven and Hensingham, known locally as Swartha Brow". The appears to have come from his father Gilbert. His brother Roger apparently held land at Walton, just outside modern Hensingham, and had a son named Robert. Roger and William also named a brother called Robert.[5]
** Ulverston. Farrer argued that this may have been held by William and perhaps his father Gilbert, before it was granted by Stephen, Count of Boulogne and Mortain, to Furness Abbey in 1127.[6] The possible connection of William's father Gilbert to Furness will be discussed further below.

Enfeoffment from King Stephen
     "King Stephen's reign in England lasted from 1135 to 1154, but only during a small part of this did he control this region. For the majority of his reign all or most of this area was under the rule of David I of Scotland.
     "During the period when Stephen was in control "we possess distinct and clear evidence that Stephen, as king, enfeoffed a knight of the lands of Warton in Kentdale and the wide territory of Garstang, in Lancashire, to hold for the service of one knight. This was William de Lancaster, son of Gilbert by Godith his wife, described in the Inquest of service made in 1212 as "Willelmus filius Gilberti primus," that is, the first to be enfeoffed of that fee."[7]
Enfeoffment from Roger de Mowbray
     "At a similar time, during the period 1145-1154, a major enfeoffment by Roger de Mowbray put William in control, or perhaps just confirmed his control, of what would become the Barony of Kendal, plus Warton, Garstang, and Wyresdale in Lancashire, as well as Horton in Ribblesdale and "Londsdale". The latter two are sometimes apparently being interpreted as indicating possession for some time of at least part of what would become the Wapentake of Ewcross in the West Riding of Yorkshire.
The Scottish period
     "During the Scottish occupation, Hugh de Morville became the overlord of much of this area, a position he kept when the area later returned to English control. Farrer and Curwen remark:
William de Lancaster no longer held anything in Kentdale of Roger de Mowbray; but he appears to have held his lands in Westmarieland and Kentdale of Morevill by rendering Noutgeld of £14 6s. 3d. per annum, and some 16 carucates of land in nine vills in Kentdale as farmer under Morevill. In 1166 William de Lancaster I held only two knight's fees, of the new feoffment of Roger de Mowbray in Sedbergh, Thornton, Burton in Lonsdale, and the other places in Yorkshire previously named, which his descendants held long after of the fee of Mowbray by the same service. The Mowbray connexion with Kentdale had come to an end upon the accession of Henry II, who placed Hugh de Morevill in possession of Westmarieland in return, possibly, for past services and in pursuance of the policy of planting his favourites in regions of great strategic importance. Probably the change of paramount lord had little, if any, effect on the position of William de Lancaster in Kentdale.[7]

     "In Cumberland further west, William was probably castellan in the castle of Egremont under William fitz Duncan. Such proposals are based on his transaction with his cousin Gospatrick son of Orme, whereby castle service at Egremont was due to William for Workington.[8]
The Barony of Kendal?
     "William de Lancaster is often described as having been a Baron of Kendal. In fact this is not so clear what kind of lordship existed over Kendal, given the lack of clarity of records in this period. The word barony developed specific meanings during the Middle Ages, namely feudal baron and baron by writ. William Farrer wrote, in the Introduction to his Records of Kendal:
After a careful review of the evidence which has been sketched above, the author is of opinion that no barony or reputed barony of Kentdale existed prior to the grants of 1189–90; and that neither William de Lancaster, son of Gilbert, nor William de Lancaster II, his son and successor, can be rightly described as "baron" of Kentdale.[7]

     "Whether or not "Barony" is the clearest word, what became the Barony of Kendal is generally accepted as having come together under Ivo de Taillebois (d. 1094) in the time of William Rufus, some generations before William. And, as will be discussed below, at least in later generations William was depicted by his family as having been a Taillebois. A continuity is therefore often asserted between what Ivo held, and what William later held, despite the fact that William had no known hereditary claim on Kendal, and Ivo had no male heirs. (This is also the reason for the frequent assertion that William held the entire wapentake of Ewcross, even though it seems that the family of Roger de Mowbray kept hold of at least Burton in Kendal. William held two parts of it, mentioned above, while Ivo had held another, Clapham. The rest is speculation.)
     "According to Farrer, the Barony of Kendal became a real barony only in the time of William's grand daughter Hawise, who married Gilbert son of Roger fitz Reinfrid. Both he and his son William de Lancaster III, both successors of William de Lancaster I (and possibly of Ivo de Taillebois) were certainly Barons of Kendal.
Concerning other specific holdings and ranks
     "** Furness and the Royal forests. According to a later grant to Gilbert Fitz Reinfrid, William must have held some position over the whole forest of Westmarieland (the Northern or Appleby Barony of Westmorland), Kendal and Furness. His claims in Furness may have gone beyond just the forest, but this appears to have put him in conflict with the claims of the Furness Abbey, and this conflict continued over many generations. His family may have had links there before him. Some websites report that his father Gilbert was known as "Gilbert of Furness". (This apparently comes from a 17th-century note by Benjamin Ayloffe, mentioned below.)
     "** Lancaster Castle. According to Dugdale, the eminent English antiquarian, he was governor of Lancaster Castle in the reign of Henry II, about 1180. Little is known about how William came to hold the honour of Lancaster and use the surname, but it is sometimes suggested that it implies connections to royalty, perhaps coming from his apparent marriage to Gundred de Warrenne (or was this just yet another reward for some forgotten service, perhaps against the Scots?).
     "** Seneschal. According to a note written by the 17th century antiquarian Benjamin Ayloffe, which is reproduced in the introduction of Walford Dakin Selby's collection of Lancashire and Cheshire Records, p.xxix, William was Seneschallus Hospitii Regis, or steward of the king's household. The same note also states that William's father was the kings "Receiver for the County of Lancaster".[9]
Ancestry
     "William's father was named Gilbert, and his mother was Godith. They are both mentioned clearly in a benefaction of William to St Mary de Pré and William was often referred to as William the son of Gilbert (fitz Gilbert). William was also said to have descended from both Ivo de Taillebois and Eldred of Workington, who were contemporaries of William Rufus, but the exact nature of the relationship is unclear and indeed controversial.
     "Two late cartularies, those of Cockersand Abbey and St Mary's Abbey in Yorkshire, give a father-to-son descent from Ivo through Eldred, Ketel, and Gilbert to William.[10] However, monastic genealogies concerning their benefactors are generally considered unreliable.[11] There are chronological concerns with this pedigree: Ivo and Eldred appear to have been contemporaries, as were Ketel and Gilbert. Likewise, it implies that William de Lancaster was heir to Ketel fitz Eldred, but Ketel is commonly thought to have had another heir. And there is also no record of Eldred being an heir to Ivo, while it would be unusual for the descendants of a Norman noble (Ivo) to have so many Anglo-Saxon names (Eldred, Ketel, etc.)
     "Annalist Peter of Blois, related that Ivo's "only daughter, who had been nobly espoused, died before her father; for that evil shoots should not fix deep roots in the world, the accursed lineage of that wicked man perished by the axe of the Almighty, which cut off all his issue." The only known heiress of Ivo was a daughter named Beatrix. Her sons by her one documented husband, Ribald of Middleham, did occasionally use the Taillebois surname. A connection between William and Ivo de Taillebois is still supported based upon a similarity of land holdings between the two. Likewise, a record in the Coucher Book of Furness Abbey involving Helewise de Lancaster, William's granddaughter, claims he had been known as William de Tailboys before receiving the right to be called "Willelmum de Lancastre, Baronem de Kendale".[12] However, Farrer and Curwen have questioned the accuracy of this account, pointing out that William was probably not Baron of Kendal, but an under-lord there.[7] There was a Tailboys family present in Westmorland during the 12th century, for example in Cliburn, and these were presumably relatives of William de Lancaster. This family used the personal name Ivo at least once, and may have been related to Ivo and Beatrix.[13]
     "In a 1212 Curia Regis Roll entry, William's granddaughter Helewise de Lancaster and her husband refer to "Ketel filius Eutret" as her "antecessor", a term that could mean literal ancestor, or simply a predecessor more generally. A grant to St Leonard's York by William refers to Ketel, the son of "Elred", as his avunculus (maternal uncle). Likewise, a second charter, from 1357, repeats the claim that Ketel son of "Aldred" was avunculus of William.[14] Gilbert was thus not son of Ketel. Noting that avunculus was sometimes used imprecisely for a paternal uncle, Frederick Ragg proposed that Gilbert was the brother of Ketel, and hence son rather than grandson of Eldred[15] However, George Washington and George Andrews Moriarty instead viewed Ketel as maternal uncle to William, brother to Gilbert's wife Godith. Washington noted that the names Godith, Ketel and Eldred are all Anglo-Saxon names, rarely used by Normans, possibly indicative of a single family. This contrasts with the French names of Gilbert, and his son and grandsons named William. Moriarty suggested that Christina, Ketel's wife, may have been a relative of Ivo de Taillebois such as the unnamed daughter mentioned by Peter of Blois.[16] The daughter mentioned by Peter of Blois is often considered to be the same as the one known daughter, Beatrix, the wife of Ribald of Middleham. For example, Katherine Keats-Rohan accepted Godith as Ketel's sister, but proposed their mother to be Beatrix, through a marriage to Eldred of which no contemporary record has been found.[17]
Descendants and relatives
     "William married, perhaps his second wife, Gundred. She is sometimes identified with the widow of Roger, Earl of Warwick, who was daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth of Vermandois, but William Farrer instead identified her as daughter of Roger and the elder Gundred.[18]
     "William had issue:
** Avicia, who married Richard de Morville, constable of Scotland (possibly as widow of William de Peveral)
** William (II), whose legitimate heir Helewise de Lancaster married Gilbert son of Roger Fitz Reinfrid.
** Jordan, mentioned in a benefaction to St Mary de Pré in Leicester, he died young.
** Agnes, who married Alexander de Windsore[19]
** Sigrid, married to William the clerk of Garstang.[19]

     "William's eventual heiress was his granddaughter of Helwise, whose son by Gilbert fitz Reinfrid took his mother's surname. This William de Lancaster III died without male heirs, heavily indebted, apparently due to payments demanded after he was captured at Rochester during the First Barons' War, and ransomed off by his father.
References
1. Farrer, William (1900), "The Domesday Survey of North Lancashire and the Adjacent Parts of Cumberland, Westmorland, and Yorkshire", Transactions of the Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society: 90
2. One is discussed in William Farrer's transcriptions and annotations of Lancashire Pipe Rolls and Early Lancashire Charters (1902), pages 442-3. The other is a note collected by the 17th century antiquarian Benjamin Ayloffe, wherein Gilbert was the king's "Receiver for the County of Lancaster" and was named "Gilbert de Furnesio", and had sons William and Warin (who took up the name of Lancaster). This is reproduced in the introduction of Walford Selby's collection of Lancashire and Cheshire Records, page xxix.
3. Farrer, William (1902), Lancashire Pipe Rolls and Early Lancashire Charters, p. 305
4. "Parishes: Thursby - Workington", Magna Britannia, volume 4: Cumberland, 1816, pp. 159–175
5. "Register of St Bees", The Publications of the Surtees Society, 126
6. Farrer, William (1903), Lancashire Inquests, Extents, and Feudal Aids, p. xi
7. Farrer; Curwen (1923), "Introduction", Records of Kendal, 1. Also at [1].
8. FW Ragg (1914) De Culwen, TCWAAS [2]. See page 381. Ragg writes "forensic service .to William, not for William, at the Castle of Egremon".
9. Lancashire and Cheshire records preserved in the Public Record Office, 1882
10. For William Farrer's remarks on this see Farrer (1902) p.vii (Addenda and Corrigenda) concerning p. 389 I.18, and Farrer (1909), The Chartulary of Cockersand Abbey of the Premonstratensian Order, Volume I, Part II, pp. 305–8
11. See for example the opening comments in J. H. Round's 1922 "The Legend of Eudo Dapifer", in The English Historical Review.
12. Coucher Book of Furness Abbey, 1887, pp. 344–345
13. Ragg (1928), "Cliburn Hervy and Cliburn Tailbois; Part II", Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society, new series, vol.28.
14. F. W. Ragg (1910), "De Lancaster", Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society: 395–493)
15. Rev. F. W. Ragg, (1909) "Charters to St. Peter's, York," 236 ; New Series IX.
16. George Washington, (1962) "The parentage of William de Lancaster, lord of Kendal," in Transactions of the Cumberland & Westmorland Antiq. & Arch. Soc. n.s. 62, pages 95-97.
17. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants. See the pedigree of Taillebois, p.42 and the entry for Willelm filius Gilberti de Lancastria on p.339.
18. Farrer (1902), Lancashire Pipe rolls and early Lancashire charters, pp. 390–394
19. Farrer, 1906; Brownbill, "The Lancaster Fee of Warton and Garstang", A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 1, pp. 357–66
Further reading
** "The Lancaster Family" H.F. Lancaster 1902 Library of Congress Call CS71.L245 1902
** Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 34-24, 38-25, 88-25.
** Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants
** William Dugdale's Monasticon. Cockersand Abbey, St Mary's Abbey in Yorkshire, and St Leonard's in Yorkshire." (See original Wikipedia entry for links.10) He was 5th Baron Kendal of Workington.6

; Per Weis [1992:87]: "...he inherited an extensive fief held of the Honour of Coupland, served as castellan of William Fitz Duncan's castle of Egremont in 1138, and was Governor of the Castle of Lancaster."11,6

; Per Med Lands:
     "WILLIAM [I] "Taillebois" de Lancaster, son of GILBERT & his wife Goditha --- (-after 1166). An undated manuscript relating to Cockersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Gilbertus [genuit] Will; qui quidem Willielmus fecit se vocari Willielmum de Lancaster...baronem de Kendale”[303]. “Willielmus filius Ranulphi” confirmed the foundation of St Bee’s priory, Cumberland by undated charter, dated to [1105/20], which refers to donations by “Willielmus filius Gilberti de Lancastria”[304]. "Willelmus filius Ranulfi" confirmed the donation of land "de Swartahof" donated by "Willelmus filius Gilberti de Lancastre" to St Bees by undated charter[305]. An undated manuscript relating to Cockersand Abbey, Lancashire names “Willielmum de Lancaster” as son of ”Gilbertus”[306]. A charter of King Henry II confirmed the donation to Furness by “Willilemum filium Gilberti” also named “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys”[307]. "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated property to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et hæredis et Gundredæ uxoris meæ", by charter dated to [1153/56][308]. "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated pasture rights in "feodum meum in Lonisdale et in Aumundernesse" to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et heredis et Gundree uxoris mee", for the souls of "…Gilberti patris mei et Godithe matris mee et Jordani filii mei et Margarete filia Comitisse", by charter dated to [1156/60], witnessed by "Willelmo filio meo et herede, Gundr fil Comitisse…"[309]. Lord of Kendale and Lonsdale in Westmoreland in 1166[310]. A charter of King Henry II records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic”[311].
     "[m firstly ---. No direct proof has been found of this supposed first marriage. However, assuming that Hawise, wife of Richard de Moreville, was the daughter of William [I] de Lancaster, she must have been born from an otherwise unrecorded first marriage, given the estimated birth date of William’s known wife Gundred de Warenne.]
     "m [secondly] ([Jun 1153/1156]) as her second husband, GUNDRED de Warenne, widow of ROGER de Beaumont Earl of Warwick, daughter of WILLIAM [II] de Warenne Earl of Surrey & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet] ([1120 or after]-after 1166). Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Walerannus et Robertus...mater eorum” married secondly after the death of her first husband “secundo Willelmo de Warenna comiti Surreiæ” by whom she had “Willelmum tertium et duas filias” of whom “filiarum...primogenitam” married “comes Rogerus de Warwic”[312]. Robert of Torigny names "Gondrada sorore uterine Galeranni comitis Mellenti" as wife of "Rogero comite Warwicensi"[313]. An undated manuscript relating to Cockersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Willielmum de Lancaster” married ”Gundredam prius comitissam de Warwyke”[314]. Her second marriage is confirmed by a charter of King Henry II which records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic” and that she was the mother of his son William[315]. Her marriage date is dictated by the death of her first husband, recorded in Jun 1153. "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated property to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et hæredis et Gundredæ uxoris meæ", by charter dated to [1153/56][316]. "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated pasture rights in "feodum meum in Lonisdale et in Aumundernesse" to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et heredis et Gundree uxoris mee", for the souls of "…Gilberti patris mei et Godithe matris mee et Jordani filii mei et Margarete filia Comitisse", by charter dated to [1156/60], witnessed by "Willelmo filio meo et herede, Gundr fil Comitisse…"[317]. Farrer has suggested that the wording of this last document indicates that the wife of William de Lancaster was the daughter of Countess Gundred rather than the countess herself, suggesting that the latter must have been "well advanced in years" at the time of the marriage and implying that she would therefore have been past child-bearing age[318]. It is correct that the wording of the document is curious as it appears inconsistent with both possibilities: if Gundred was "Comitisse", one would expect the first part of the document to read "Gundree Comitisse uxoris mee"; on the other hand, if she was Gundred the daughter, one would expect the subscription to read "Gundr fil Comitisse ux mee". The two names which are quoted above in the subscription list of the document dated to [1156/60] precede the subscribers who held religious positions. It would therefore be normal for them to be the same persons who are named in the body of the document, in the same order, giving their consent to the transaction. However, it is difficult to adopt an interpretation which contradicts the three different sources quoted above (Robert de Torigny, the undated manuscript, and the charter of King Henry II) which identify the countess as William’s wife. "
Med Lands cites:
[303] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire VI, p. 909.
[304] Dugdale Monasticon III, St. Bee’s Priory, Cumberland, III, p. 577.
[305] St Bees, 11, p. 39.
[306] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire VI, p. 909.
[307] Dugdale Monasticon V, Furness Abbey, Lancashire, X, p. 248.
[308] Farrer (1902), Lancashire Chartulary, Series XVI, Charter III, p. 391.
[309] Farrer (1902), Lancashire Chartulary, Series XVI, Charter IV, p. 393.
[310] Domesday Descendants, p. 539.
[311] Dugdale Monasticon V, Furness Abbey, Lancashire, X, p. 248.
[312] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XLI, p. 314.
[313] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1153, p. 273.
[314] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire VI, p. 909.
[315] Dugdale Monasticon V, Furness Abbey, Lancashire, X, p. 248.
[316] Farrer (1902), Lancashire Chartulary, Series XVI, Charter III, p. 391.
[317] Farrer (1902), Lancashire Chartulary, Series XVI, Charter IV, p. 393.
[318] Farrer (1902), Lancashire Chartulary, Notes, p. 394.3
GAV-25 EDV-24 GKJ-24.

; Per Genealogy.EU: "C3. Gundred, *ca 1117, +after 1166; 1m: by 1130 Roger de Newburgh, Earl of Warwick, (*1102 +12.6.1153); 2m: William I de Lancaster (*ca 1115, +ca 1170.)5"

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 122, LANCASTER 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#ElthredMdauIvoTaillebois. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#WilliamLancasterdiedafter1166
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Lancaster: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196929&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Warenne page (de Warenne family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/warenne.html
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 88-25, p. 87. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 259, de WARENNE 3:iii.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Warenne page (de Warenne family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/warenne.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gundred de Warenne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196930&tree=LEO
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Lancaster_I. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  12. [S1838] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email #1 23 Nov 2004 "Re: Morville - Stuteville question"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 23 Nov 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email #1 23 Nov 2004."
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#HawiseLancasterM2RichardMorville
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Lancaster: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00470446&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel de Lancaster: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00451650&tree=LEO

Rutpert/Robert III (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau1

M, #5095, b. 800, d. before 19 February 834
FatherRutpert/Robert II (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau1,2,3 d. 12 Jul 807
MotherTheoderate/Theoderata/Tietrada (?)4,3 b. bt 730 - 782, d. b 789
ReferenceGAV31 EDV31
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Rutpert/Robert III (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau was born in 800.5 He married Waldrada/Wiltrud (?), daughter of Adrian (?) Count of Orléans and Waldrada (?), in 819 at Worms, Wormsgau, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany (now);
Her 1st husband.
Med lands says m. 808.6,7,8,3,9,10
Rutpert/Robert III (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau died before 19 February 834 at France; Med lands says d. bef 19 Feb 834.6,1,5,9
     ; This is the same person as:
”Robert III of Worms” at Wikipedia, as
”Robert III de Hesbaye” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Rutpert III. (Oberrheingau)” at Wikipedia (De.)5,11,12

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 13.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) tafel 10.3
GAV-31 EDV-31 GKJ-32.

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 2): “A1. Ct Robert III in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau, +ca 834; m.ca 808 Wiltrud, dau.of Ct Hadrian of Orleans”.13

; Per Med Lands:
     "WILTRUD . The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. "Wialdruth et Guntram" donated property "in Buosinesheim" to Kloster Lorsch for the soul of "Rutperti comitis quondam viri mei" by charter dated 19 Feb 834[784].
     "m ([808]) ROBERT [III] Graf im Wormsgau, son of --- (-before 19 Feb 834). "Karolus…augustus…imperator Romanum…rex Francorum et Langobardorum" issued a judgment by charter dated 8 Mar 812 which names "fidelibus nostri: Gerulfus, Guntlandus, Hedo, Armannus, Hamricus, Sicardus, Rotbertus comitibus…Amalricus comiti palatii nostro"[785]."
Med Lands cites:
[784] Codex Laureshamensis II, 271, p. 49.
[785] DD Kar. 1, 216, p. 288.10


; NB: Genealogics and Genealogy.EU show Rutpert/Robert III as the son of Rutpert/Robert II. Med Lands does not identify the father of Rutpert/Robert II.9,2,3,13 He was living in 812.3

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020382&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020385&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theoderata|Tietrada: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020383&tree=LEO
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_III_of_Worms. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 48-16, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldrada_of_Worms
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#RobertIIIdied834. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#WiltrudMRobertIII
  11. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Robert III de Hesbaye: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_III_de_Hesbaye. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  12. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Rutpert III. (Oberrheingau): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutpert_III._(Oberrheingau). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  14. [S4759] Wikipédia (DE), online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Walaho IV.: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walaho_IV
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#OdaMWalahoWormsgau
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#WildrutMAledramITroyes
  17. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Robert "le Fort" (Rotbertus Fortis, Robert "the Strong"): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/rober100.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odo_I,_Count_of_Troyes.
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKISH%20NOBILITY.htm#Eudesdied871

Waldrada/Wiltrud (?)1,2

F, #5096, b. 801
FatherAdrian (?) Count of Orléans4,2 b. c 755, d. b Nov 821
MotherWaldrada (?)3,2 b. c 774, d. a 824
ReferenceGAV30 EDV31
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Waldrada/Wiltrud (?) was born in 801 at Toulouse, Departement de la Haute-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France (now).5 She married Rutpert/Robert III (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau, son of Rutpert/Robert II (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau and Theoderate/Theoderata/Tietrada (?), in 819 at Worms, Wormsgau, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany (now);
Her 1st husband.
Med lands says m. 808.6,4,7,8,9,2 Waldrada/Wiltrud (?) married Konrad II 'the Younger' (?) Duke of Burgundy, Cte d'Auxerre, Margrave of Transjurania, son of Konrad I 'the Elder' (?) Count of Auxerre, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau and Aelis/Adelaide (?) de Tours, after 834;
Her 2nd husbad; his 2nd wife. Her 1st husband d. 834.1,10,7,11
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 2): “A1. Ct Robert III in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau, +ca 834; m.ca 808 Wiltrud, dau.of Ct Hadrian of Orleans”.12 GAV-30 EDV-31 GKJ-32.

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     801, Toulouse, Departement de la Haute-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France
     DEATH     unknown, Lorraine, France
     Waldrada of Orleans (or Waldraith) was the second wife of Conrad II, Duke of Transjurane Burgundy. They had two known children, Adelaide of Auxerre and Rudolph I of Burgundy. She was first married to Robert III of Worms, in 819 in Wormgau, Germany. This marriage brought in 820 a son, Robert IV the Strong. The marriage ended when Robert III died in 822.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Adrian d'Orleans unknown–820
      Waldrada de Toulouse of Gellone d'Orleans 790 – unknown
     Spouses
      Robert von Wormsgau 789–833
      Conrad II le Jeune d'Auxerre unknown–876
     Siblings
      William de Blois
      Eudes Odo d'Orleans 780–834
     Children
      Adelaide d'Auxerre
      Robert The Strong of Orleans 820–866
     BURIAL     Unknown
     Created by: Memerizion
     Added: 26 Mar 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 144202521
     SPONSORED BY Christian H. F. Riley.5

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Waldrada of Worms (or Waldraith; born 801, date of death unknown). She was first married to Robert III of Worms, in 819 in Wormsgau, Germany. This marriage brought in 830 a son, Robert IV the Strong. The marriage ended when Robert III died in 834. She was the second wife of Conrad II, Duke of Transjurane Burgundy. They had two known children, Adelaide of Auxerre and Rudolph I of Burgundy.
     "Her father was Adrian, Count of Orléans (758-824), and mother was also named Waldrada, daughter of William of Gellone (William of Orange) 755-812."7 Waldrada/Wiltrud (?) was also known as Waldrada of Worms.7 Waldrada/Wiltrud (?) was also known as Waldrada of Wormgau.3,1 Waldrada/Wiltrud (?) was also known as Wialdruth/Wiltrud.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "WILTRUD . The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. "Wialdruth et Guntram" donated property "in Buosinesheim" to Kloster Lorsch for the soul of "Rutperti comitis quondam viri mei" by charter dated 19 Feb 834[784].
     "m ([808]) ROBERT [III] Graf im Wormsgau, son of --- (-before 19 Feb 834). "Karolus…augustus…imperator Romanum…rex Francorum et Langobardorum" issued a judgment by charter dated 8 Mar 812 which names "fidelibus nostri: Gerulfus, Guntlandus, Hedo, Armannus, Hamricus, Sicardus, Rotbertus comitibus…Amalricus comiti palatii nostro"[785]."
Med Lands cites:
[784] Codex Laureshamensis II, 271, p. 49.
[785] DD Kar. 1, 216, p. 288.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page (The House of Welfen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#WiltrudMRobertIII. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S792] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=johanson, Susan Johanson (unknown location), downloaded updated 29 June 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=johanson&id=I07987
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  5. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 October 2019), memorial page for Waldrada d'Orleans (801–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 144202521, ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664) Unknown, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/144202521/waldrada-d_orleans. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 48-16, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldrada_of_Worms. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020385&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#RobertIIIdied834
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020419&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#ConradAuxerreMWaldrada
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  13. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Walaho IV.: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walaho_IV.. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#OdaMWalahoWormsgau
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#WildrutMAledramITroyes
  16. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Robert "le Fort" (Rotbertus Fortis, Robert "the Strong"): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/rober100.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odo_I,_Count_of_Troyes.
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKISH%20NOBILITY.htm#Eudesdied871
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20KINGS.htm#AdelaisMbefore915LouisIIIProvence
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid d'Auxerre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020422&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rudolf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020435&tree=LEO

Rutpert/Robert II (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau1,2,3

M, #5097, d. 12 July 807
FatherThuringbert/Turincbertus (?)1,4,5,6,2 d. bt 767 - 770
ReferenceGAV32 EDV32
Last Edited28 Jun 2020
     Rutpert/Robert II (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau married Theoderate/Theoderata/Tietrada (?);
His 1st wife.1,7,2,8 Rutpert/Robert II (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau married Isengarde (?);
His 2nd wife.1,2,9
Rutpert/Robert II (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau died on 12 July 807 at France.1,4
     GAV-32 EDV-32 GKJ-33.

; Per Med Lands: "ROBERT [II] (-12 Jul 807). "Turincbertus et filius meus Rotbertus" donated property "in pago Rinensi in villa…Birstat" to Lorsch by charter dated Jun 770[533]. Graf im Wormsgau und Oberrheingau 795/807. Herr zu Dienheim 795. [same person as…? RADBERT (-807). Einhard records that "Radbertus missus imperatoris" died in 807 after returning from the Orient[534]. It is possible that "Radbertus" refers to "Rodbertus".]"
Med Lands cites:
[533] Codex Laureshamensis II, 168, p. 4.
[534] Einhardi Annales 807, MGH SS I, p. 194.3


Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. 1961 9.2 Rutpert/Robert II (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau was also known as Robert II Count of Hesbaye.4

; NB: Genealogics and Genealogy.EU show Rutpert/Robert III as the son of Rutpert/Robert II. Med Lands does not identify the father of Rutpert/Robert II.10,2,11,12

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 1): “G1. Ct Robert II in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau, +12.7.807; 1m: Theoderata N; 2m: Isengarde N; for his descendants see http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html”.13 He was living in 770.2

Family 1

Isengarde (?)

Family 2

Theoderate/Theoderata/Tietrada (?) b. bt 730 - 782, d. b 789
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020382&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#RobertIIdied807. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_II,_Count_of_Hesbaye. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thuringbert (Turincbertus): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020381&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#Robertdiedbefore764B
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 48-15, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theoderata|Tietrada: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020383&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isingarde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020384&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#RobertIIIdied834
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020385&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 2: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet1.html

Theoderate/Theoderata/Tietrada (?)1

F, #5098, b. between 730 and 782, d. before 789
ReferenceGAV32 EDV32
Last Edited28 Jun 2020
     Theoderate/Theoderata/Tietrada (?) married Rutpert/Robert II (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau, son of Thuringbert/Turincbertus (?);
His 1st wife.2,3,4,1 Theoderate/Theoderata/Tietrada (?) was born between 730 and 782; date is WFT estimate.5
Theoderate/Theoderata/Tietrada (?) died before 789.3,1
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 1): “G1. Ct Robert II in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau, +12.7.807; 1m: Theoderata N; 2m: Isengarde N; for his descendants see http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html”.6 GAV-32 EDV-32 GKJ-32.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. 1961 9.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theoderata|Tietrada: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020383&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet1.html
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 48-15, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020382&tree=LEO
  5. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet1.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020385&tree=LEO

Thuringbert/Turincbertus (?)1,2

M, #5099, d. between 767 and 770
FatherRobert I (?) Comte de Hesbaie, Count Palatine, Graf im Oberrheingau und Wormsgau1,3,4,2 b. bt 700 - 710, d. bt 757 - 764
MotherWilliswint (?)1,5,4,2 d. bt 12 Jul 764 - 776
ReferenceGAV33 EDV33
Last Edited28 Jun 2020
     Thuringbert/Turincbertus (?) died between 767 and 770; Genealogy.EU (Capet 1 page) says d. aft 1 June 770.1,6
     GAV-33 EDV-33 GKJ-34.

; Per Med Lands:
     "THURINGBERT (-Jun 770 or after). "Cancor et Angila conjux mea" donated property "in illa marcha de Bisistat…de dote Angilæ" [Birstatt] to Lorsch by charter dated 1 Jun 770, signed by "Thurincberti fratris ipsius Cancronis et Heimerici filii sui"[529]. The Chronicon Laureshamense records "Thurincberti fratris ipsius Cancronis" as signatory of the donation dated 1 Jun 770 by "comitis Cancronis et uxoris eius Angila"[530]. "Turincbertus" donated property to Lorsch by charter dated 1 Nov 767 subscribed by "Heimerici comitis"[531]. Grundherr im Rheingau und Wormsgau. "Turincbertus et filius meus Rotbertus" donated property "in pago Rinensi in villa…Birstat" to Lorsch by charter dated Jun 770[532].
     "m ---. The name of Thuringbert's wife is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[530] Chronicon Laureshamense, MGH SS XXI, p. 350.
[531] Codex Laureshamensis II, 167, p. 3.
[532] Codex Laureshamensis II, 168, p. 4.4


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. 1961 9.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:10.2
He was living in 767; Genealogics says living 767; Weis says "seen 767-770."2,6

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thuringbert (Turincbertus): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020381&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020378&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#Robertdiedbefore764B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Williswint: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020379&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 48-14, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_II,_Count_of_Hesbaye. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020382&tree=LEO

Robert I (?) Comte de Hesbaie, Count Palatine, Graf im Oberrheingau und Wormsgau1

M, #5100, b. between 700 and 710, d. between 757 and 764
FatherLantbertus II (Lambert) (?) of Hesbaye2,3,4,1 b. c 669, d. b 741
MotherChrotlind (?)5,4,1 b. c 670
ReferenceGAV34 EDV34
Last Edited28 Jun 2020
     Robert I (?) Comte de Hesbaie, Count Palatine, Graf im Oberrheingau und Wormsgau was born between 700 and 710.1 He married Williswint (?), daughter of Count Adelhelm (?) Grundherr im Wormsgau, circa 730.6,7,4,1,8
Robert I (?) Comte de Hesbaie, Count Palatine, Graf im Oberrheingau und Wormsgau died between 757 and 764; Genealogy.EU (Capet 1 page) says living in 764; Med Lands says d. bef 764.7,6,1
     GAV-34 EDV-34 GKJ-35.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 13.
2. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1961 9.4


; This is the same person as:
”Robert I, Count of Hesbaye” at Wikipedia and as
”Robert Ier de Hesbaye” at Wikipédia (Fr.)9,10 Robert I (?) Comte de Hesbaie, Count Palatine, Graf im Oberrheingau und Wormsgau was also known as Robert I (?) Duke in Haspengau, Ct in Oberrheinsgau and Wormsgau.6 Robert I (?) Comte de Hesbaie, Count Palatine, Graf im Oberrheingau und Wormsgau was also known as Rutpert I (?) Duke in Haspengau, Graf in Wormsgau and Upper-Rhine.4

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 1): “E1. Robert I, Duke in Haspengau, Ct in Oberrheinsgau and Wormsgau, living 764; m.ca 730 Williswint (+after 768) dau.of Ct Adalheim”.11

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT [I], son of LAMBERT [II] comes in Neustria and Austrasia & his wife --- ([700/10]-before 764). The third continuator of the Gesta Abbatum Trudonensium names "Robertus comes vel dux Hasbanie" in 715, and quotes a charter dated 7 Apr 742 under which "Robertus comes, filius condam Lamberti" donated property "in villa…Sarcinio…in pago Hasbaniensi…[et] Halon, Scaffnis, Felepa et Marholt" to St Trudon[501]. Comte de Hesbaie. Comes palatinus 741/42. Graf im Oberrheingau und Wormsgau.
     "m ([730]) WILLISWINDA, daughter of ADALHELM Grundherr im Wormsgau & his wife --- (-[12 Jul 764/776]). "Cancor…Rhenensis pagi comes cum matre sua…Williswinda vidua Ruperti comitis" founded Kloster Lorsch by charter dated 764[502]. "Williswinda…et filius meus Cancor" donated "villam…in pago Wormatiense…Hagenheim super fluvium Salusiam", inherited from "genitoris mei…Adelhelmi", to monastery "Lauresham in pago Rhenense super fluvium Wisgotz" by charter dated 12 Jul 764, signed by "…Heimerici filii Cancronis"[503]. "Heimericus" names "Williswinda avia ipsius Heimericus" in an undated charter relating to a donation to Kloster Lorsch[504]. "Karolus…rex Francorum", in an undated charter (placed in the compilation with charters dated 772) related to Kloster Lorsch, names "avia…Heimerici…Williswinda vel genitor suus Cancor, germano suo domino Ruodgango archiepiscopo"[505]. The primary source which confirms her parentage, and that her husband was named Robert, has not yet been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[501] Gestorum Abbatum Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia, I, 7, MGH SS X, p. 371.
[502] Codex Laureshamensis (1768), Tome I, p. 2.
[503] Codex Laureshamensis (1768), Tome I, I, p. 2.
[504] Glöckner, K. (ed.) (1933) Codex Laureshamensis, Band II (Darmstadt) (“Lorsch”) 65, p. 94.
[505] DD Kar. 1, 65, p. 94.1

; NB: There seems to be disagreement about the descent from Chrodobert (Robert).
     I. Genealogics shows
1 Chrodobertus (Robert), nobleman in Neustria, courtier of Dagobert I
     2 Lambert (I) (Lantbertus), Referendarius to Dagobert I, King of Neustria d. Aft 650
          3 Chrodobertus (Robert), Count Palatine, Chancellor of Chlotar III m. Doda|Detta
               4 Lambert (II) (Lantbertus) d. Bef 741 m. Chrotlind
                    5 Rutpert I, Duke in Haspengau m. Williswint
Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:10.
2. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser 1961 9.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 13.



     II. Genealogy.EU (Capet 1) follows Genealogics, showing:
A1. Chrodobertus=Robert, living 630
     B1. Lambert I, +after 650
          C1. Chrodobertus=Robert II, m.Doda N
               D1. Ct Lambert II, living 741
                    E1. Robert I, Duke in Haspengau


     III. Med Lands argues that there were two Mairodomos, named CHRODBERT [Robert] [I] and CHRODBERT [Robert] [II], and shows no relation between them.
Chrodbert #1 per Med Lands:
     "CHRODBERT [Robert] [I] . The Vita Lantberti names "Hrotbertus ac Haltbertus" as "avunculi" of "Lambertus vir…nobilissimi generis prosapia ortus", specifying that "Hrotbertus" was "summus palatii referendarius"[513]. Referendarius of King Dagobert I 8 Apr 630. Anulus of King Clotaire III. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[514], Chrodbert [I] and his brothers were sons of "Charibert nobilis in Neustria †635". No reference has been found to this person in any of the primary sources so far consulted and it has been decided to omit him until a positive identification can be made.
     "m ---. The name of Chrodbert’s wife is not known.
     "Chrodbert [I] & his wife had one child:
     "a) ANGADRISMA ."

Here Med Lands cites:
[513] Vita Lantberti Abbatis Fontanellensis et episcopi Lugdunensis 1, MGH SS rer. Merov. V, p. 608.
[514] ES II 10.
[515] Vita Ansberti Episcopi Rotomagensis 2 and 3, MGH SS rer. Merov. V, pp. 620 and 621.



Chrodbert #2 per Med Lands:
     "CHRODBERT [Robert] [II] (-before 12 Sep 677). According to Europäische Stammtafeln[519], Chrodbert [II] was the son of "Lambert [I] nobilis in Neustria †after 650", who in turn was the son of Chrodbert [I] (see above). No reference has been found to "Lambert [I]" in any of the primary sources so far consulted and it has been decided to omit him until a positive identification can be made. "Chlodovius rex Francorum" confirmed the privileges of the abbey of St Denis by charter dated 22 Jun 653, subscribed by "…Chradoberctus…"[520]. Chancellor for King Clothar III 658. "Childericus rex Francorum, Chadicho duce, Rodeberto comite" donated property to the monastery of St Gregory in Alsace by charter dated 4 Mar 673, the editor of the compilation identifying "Rodeberto comite" as "comes Alsatiæ superioris sive Sundgaviæ"[521]. Comes palatinus 2 Oct 678.
     "m DODA, daughter of --- (-before 12 Sep 677). The Vita Leudegarii names "Rotpertus et uxor Tota"[522]. "Theudericus rex Francorum" donated property held by "Detta relicta Chrodoberctho quondam" to "Chainoni diacono" by charter dated 12 Sep 677[523].
     "Chrodbert [II] & his wife had [one possible child]:
     "a) [LAMBERT [II] (-before 741)."

Med Lands cites:
[519] ES II 10.
[520] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 19, p. 19.
[521] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 30, p. 29, footnote 43.
[522] Vita Beati Leudegarii Martyris I, MGH Poetæ Latini ævi Carolini III, p. 23.
[523] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 47, p. 43.
[524] ES II 10.
[525] Gestorum Abbatum Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia, I, 7, MGH SS X, p. 371.



From here, the descent to the Rutpert I shown as #5 in Genealogic's descent, is as follows:
1 CHRODBERT [Robert] [II] (-before 12 Sep 677)
2 [LAMBERT [II] (-before 741)
3 ROBERT [I] ([700/10]-before 764) Comte de Hesbaie m ([730]) WILLISWINDA
Conclusion: It seems that:
1. Genealogics' 3 Chrodobertus (Robert) matches Med Lands CHRODBERT [Robert] [I], and
2. Genealogics' 3 Chrodobertus (Robert), Count Palatine matches Med Lands' 1 CHRODBERT [Robert] [II]

This leaves the questions for Med Lands of:
1. If we accept that there may have been two Chrodbert's, who was Genealogic's Lambert I?
2. What was the relationship between the two Chrodberts?

I have chosen to use the Genealogics/Genealogy.EU lineage. GA Vaut.3,12,13,14,2 He was living in 722.7 He was living in 732.4

Family

Williswint (?) d. bt 12 Jul 764 - 776
Children

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#Robertdiedbefore764B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lambert (II) (Lantbertus): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020377&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKSMaiordomi.htm
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020378&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chrotlind: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00220725&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet1.html
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 48-13, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Williswint: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020379&tree=LEO
  9. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Robert Ier de Hesbaye: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Ier_de_Hesbaye. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I,_Count_of_Hesbaye. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet1.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chrodobertus (Robert): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076150&tree=LEO
  13. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 28 June 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Chrodobertus (Robert): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020375&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thuringbert (Turincbertus): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020381&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rupert/Cancor: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00076145&tree=LEO