Ermentrude de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis1,2,3,4

F, #14611, d. after 13 May 1106
FatherHugues II de Creil dit «de Mouchy» (?) Seigneur de Mouchy, Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis5,3,4,6,7,8 b. c 1030, d. a Nov 1099
MotherMarguerite de Montdidier of Roucy3,4,7,9 b. c 1045, d. c 1110
Last Edited27 Nov 2020
     Ermentrude de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis married Hugues "Lupus" (?) d'Avranches, 1st Earl of Chester, son of Richard Le Goz (?) Vicomte d'Eu, seigneur d'Avranches et d'Hiesmes, before 1093.1,5,10,11,12,4
Ermentrude de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis died after 13 May 1106.4
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "HUGUES d'Avranches "Lupus", son of RICHARD "le Goz" Vicomte d'Avranches & his wife --- ([1047]-St Werburg's Abbey, Chester 27 Jul 1101[15]). A manuscript relating to St Werburgh’s Chester records that “Hugo Lupus filius ducis Britanniæ et nepos Gulielmi magni ex sorore” transformed the foundation into a monastery[16]. This suggests that the mother of Hugues may have been a uterine sister of King William, and therefore daughter of Herluin de Conteville. However, no indication has been in other primary sources which supports the contention that Hugues was the son of a duke of Brittany. It is assumed therefore that both lines of his parentage have been romanticised in this document to improve his status and reputation. Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Hugo vicecomitis Abrincatensis postea…comes Cestrensis" founded "abbatiam Sancti Severi in Constantinensi episcopatu"[17]. The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Hugone postea comite de Cestria" contributed 60 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[18]. Orderic Vitalis records that King William granted “Cestrensem consulatum” to “Hugonis de Abrincis filio Ricardi cognomento Goz” after Gerbod returned to Flanders, dated to 1071[19], whereby he is considered to have become Earl [of Chester]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugonis de Abrincis filio Ricardi cognomento Goz...cum Rodberto de Rodelento et Rodberto de Malopassu” [Robert de Rhuddlan and Robert de Malpas] shed “multum Guallorum sanguinem”[20]. He succeeded his father in [1082] as Vicomte d'Avranches. An undated charter records the grant of pasturage rights "ad castrum Claromontis, Credulii, Gornaci, Lusarchiarum" to Saint-Leu d’Esserant by "Hugo comes Cestrensis" and "Hugo Claromontensis et Margarita uxor eius", later confirmed by "Rainaldus comes" with the consent of "uxore eius Clementia et filiis eius Guidone et Rainaldo"[21]. Domesday Book records that “Earl Hugh” held Bickton in Fordinbridge Hundred in Hampshire; Drayton in Sutton Hundred and Buscot in Wyfold hundred in Berkshire; his land-holdings in Dorset; and in numerous other counties[22]. Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem comitem et Ricardum de Radveriis...Rodbertum de Molbraio” as the main supporters of “Henricus clito” who governed “Abrincas et Cæsarisburgum et Constantiam atque Guabreium” [Avranches, Cherbourg, Coutances, Gavray], dated to [1090][23]. Florence of Worcester records that, in 1098, he and Hugh de Montgommery Earl of Shrewsbury led troops into Anglesey where they mutilated or massacred many of the inhabitants of the island[24]. "…Hugonis comitis…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[25]. He founded the abbeys of Saint-Sever in Normandy and St Werburg in Chester, becoming a monk at the latter four days before he died[26]. Orderic Vitalis states that Hugues was "a slave to gluttony, he staggered under a mountain of fat" and was "given over to carnal lusts and had a numerous progeny of sons and daughters by his concubines"[27]. The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1101 of “Hugone comite Cestrensi”[28]. The Annales Cambriæ record the death in 1101 of "Hugo comes Crassus urbis Legionum"[29]. A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln records the death “VI Kal Aug” of “Hugo primus comes Cestriæ”[30].
     "[m firstly ---. No direct evidence has been found about this supposed first marriage. However, assuming that the birth date of Hugh is correctly estimated to [1047] as shown above, it would be surprising if his marriage to Ermentrude de Clermont (before 1093) was his first.]
     "m [secondly] ([before 1093]) ERMENTRUDE de Clermont, daughter of HUGUES de Clermont [en-Beauvaisis] & his wife Marguerite de Roucy [Montdidier] (-after 13 May 1106). Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugonis de Abrincis filio Ricardi cognomento Goz” married “Ermentrudem filiam Hugonis de Claromonte Belvacensi”[31]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis refers to a sister of "comes Rainaldus" as husband of "comiti Hugoni de Cestre"[32]. “Ricardus Cestrensis comes et Ermentrudis comitissa mater eius” confirmed donations to Abingdon by charter dated 13 May 1106[33]."
Med Lands cites:
[15] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 315.
[16] Dugdale Monasticon II, Chester St Werburgh, I, p. 384.
[17] Robert de Torigny, Tome II, p. 202.
[18] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 22.
[19] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 219.
[20] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 219.
[21] Esserent Saint-Leu, LIX, p. 59.
[22] Domesday Translation, Hampshire, XXII, p. 106, Berkshire, XVIII, p. 147, Dorset, XXVII, pp. 213-4.
[23] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XV, p. 350.
[24] Florence of Worcester, 1098, p. 204.
[25] Bath St Peter, 42, p. 46.
[26] CP III 165.
[27] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 219, translation Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book IV, p. 263.
[28] Annales Cestrienses, p. 16.
[29] Annales Cambriæ, p. 32.
[30] Dugdale Monasticon III, Spalding Priory, Lincolnshire XI, Hugonis primi Comitis Cestriæ…, p. 218.
[31] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 219.
[32] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 15, MGH SS XIII, p. 255.
[33] Barraclough (1988), 6, p. 12.12


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Complete Peerage, 1936, Doubleday, H. A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: III 165.
2. Europaische Stammtafeln, J. A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: III/4 694B.3


; Per Racines et Histoire (Clermonten-Beauvaisis): “Ermentrude (Imtrude) de Clermont ° ~1054 + 1119
     ép. 1093 Hugues Goz d’Avranches «Le Loup» ° 1047 + 27/07/1101 (St Werburg’s Abbey, Chester) 1er earl of Chester, vicomte d’Avranches (1082) (fils de Richard Le Goz et d’Emma de Conteville)
     postérité des comtes de Chester dont : Richard ° ~1094 +x 25/11/1120 qui ép. 1115 Mathilde de Blois ° 1095 + 25/11/1120 ?”.13

; Per Med Lands:
     "ERMENTRUDE de Clermont (-after 13 May 1106). Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugonis de Abrincis filio Ricardi cognomento Goz” married “Ermentrudem filiam Hugonis de Claromonte Belvacensi”[34]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis refers to a sister of "comes Rainaldus" as husband of "comiti Hugoni de Cestre"[35]. “Ricardus Cestrensis comes et Ermentrudis comitissa mater eius” confirmed donations to Abingdon by charter dated 13 May 1106[36].
     "m (before 1093) [as his second wife,] HUGUES d'Avranches Earl of Chester, son of RICHARD Le Goz & his wife --- ([1047]-St Werburg's Abbey, Chester 27 Jul 1101)."
Med Lands cites:
[34] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 219.
[35] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 15, MGH SS XIII, p. 255.
[36] Barraclough (1988), 6, p. 12.4

Family

Hugues "Lupus" (?) d'Avranches, 1st Earl of Chester b. c 1047, d. 27 Jul 1101
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 48, CHESTER 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrude de Clermont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330759&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#ErmentrudeClermontMHuguesAvranchesCheste. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), p. 1. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Clermont dit de Mouchy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164670&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parclerdam.htm#HuguesClermontMMargueriteMontdidier
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Clermonten-Beauvaisis & de Clermont-Nesle, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Clermont-Beauvaisis-Nesle.pdf
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Montdidier: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00164671&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrude de Clermont: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330759&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugh 'le Gros' d'Avranches: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330758&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#HuguesAvranchesdied1101
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Clermonten-Beauvaisis & de Clermont-Nesle, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Clermont-Beauvaisis-Nesle.pdf
  14. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), p. 2.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#RichardAvranchesdied1120

unknown (?)1

F, #14612
FatherRanulph II de Meschines (?) vicomte de Bayeux et du Bessin1 b. c 1045, d. a Apr 1089
MotherMargaret (Maud) Le Goz (?) d'Avranches1 d. a 1098
Last Edited15 Dec 2001
     Unknown (?) married Robert de Trevers Lord of Burgh by Sands.1

Family

Robert de Trevers Lord of Burgh by Sands

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 48, CHESTER 3:iii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.

Geoffrey Meschines1

M, #14614
FatherRanulph II de Meschines (?) vicomte de Bayeux et du Bessin1,2 b. c 1045, d. a Apr 1089
MotherMargaret (Maud) Le Goz (?) d'Avranches1 d. a 1098
Last Edited31 May 2020

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 48, CHESTER 3:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normabc.htm#RanulfBessinMMargueriteAvranches. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

William de Roumare Earl of Lincoln, seigneur de Roumare1,2

M, #14615, b. circa 1096, d. before 1161
FatherRoger Fitz Gerold1,2
MotherLucia (?) of Alkborough1,3,4,2 b. c 1070, d. 1141
Last Edited13 May 2020
     William de Roumare Earl of Lincoln, seigneur de Roumare married Hawise de Reviers, daughter of Richard de Reviers Seigneur de Reviers, Vernon et Néhou and Adelise Peverel.5,2 William de Roumare Earl of Lincoln, seigneur de Roumare was born circa 1096.2
William de Roumare Earl of Lincoln, seigneur de Roumare died before 1161.2
     ; van de Pas cites: The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: VII 667.2

; Meanwhile one William de Roumare, also a Norman, who seems to have had a close though ill-defined connection with Lincolnshire in terms of land-holdings via his mother Lucy, apparently resented the grant of the Earldom of that county to d'Aubigny. He and his half-brother the Earl of Chester therefore appropriated Lincoln Castle in 1140 and fortified it against KING STEPHEN, who swiftly laid siege to it but was made prisoner by Chester and another ally of his, the Earl of Gloucester. STEPHEN was eventually set free and having patched up the quarrel with de Roumares created him Earl of Lincoln in or about 1141. That the patching was somewhat threadbare may be inferred from the fact that only six or so years later STEPHEN made Gilbert de Ga(u)nt Earl of Lincoln, although de Roumares had not apparently been deprived of the dignity.6 He was 1st Earl of Lincoln (2nd creation)
Per Wikipedia: "William de Roumare, Earl of Lincoln (1096–1155) (reverted to Crown)
The Earldom was created for a second time by King Stephen sometime after 1143 for William de Roumare. However, in 1149 or 1150, as William had gone over to the side of Empress Matilda, the King Stephen took the earldom from him and elevated Gilbert de Gant as Earl of Lincoln." between 1143 and 1150.7

Family

Hawise de Reviers
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 49, CHESTER 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Roumare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030586&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1792] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004 "Descent from Richard III of Normandy to Jane Lowe (Grey of Sandiacre)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lucia of Alkborough: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027599&tree=LEO
  5. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Courtenay- Barons Courtenay, Earls of Devon, p. 140. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  6. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Lincoln Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Lincoln. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William 'Hélie' de Roumare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00324448&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL1.htm#WilliamRoumaredied1151. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Gilbert (?)1

M, #14616
ReferenceGAV25
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Gilbert (?) married Goditha (?), daughter of Eldred (?) and NN Taillebois.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GODITHA . Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter of [her son] William of Lancaster to York St Leonard’s, confirming a donation by his "avunculus" Ketel fitz Eldred, from which it can be deduced that William’s mother was Ketel’s sister (assuming that avunculus is interpreted in its strict sense of maternal uncle, which is not always the case)[290]. She is named in the charter dated to [1156/60] under which “Wills de Lancastre” donated pasture rights to the church of Leicester St. Mary du Pré, with the consent of “Willi fil mei et heredis et Gundree uxis mee”, for the souls of “Gilebti pris mei et Godithe matris mei et Jordani fil mei et Margarete fil Comitisse”, witnessed by “Willo fil meo et herede, Gundr fil Comitisse...”[291].
     "m GILBERT, son of ---. An undated manuscript relating to Cockersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Ketellus [genuit] Gilbertum”[292]. As noted above, this statement is contradicted by the charter cited above which describes Ketel as “avunculus” of Gilbert’s son William. This suggests that the more likely family relationship is that Gilbert’s wife was the sister of Ketel. This is possibly corroborated by Gilbert’s own Frankish-origin name (derived from Giselbert?) which, if he was the blood relation of Ketel, would represent the only non-Anglo-Saxon/Danish name in the family."
Med Lands cites:
[290] Domesday Descendants, p. 539, citing Ragg ‘Charters to St Peter’s (St Leonard’s) Hospital, York’, p. 237 (not yet consulted).
[291] Farrer (1902), Lancashire Chartulary, Series XVI Charter IV, p. 392.
[292] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire VI, p. 909.1
GAV-25.

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#ElthredMdauIvoTaillebois. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#WilliamLancasterdiedafter1166
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Lancaster: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196929&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

(?) Malet1

F, #14617, d. before 1083
FatherWilliam/Guillaume Malet seigneur of Graville, Lord of Eye1 d. 1071
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited9 Mar 2020
     (?) Malet married Thorold (?) of Buckingham, son of unknown (?).1,2,3
(?) Malet died before 1083.3
     GAV-25 EDV-25.

Family

Thorold (?) of Buckingham b. b 1049, d. a 1079
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 49, CHESTER 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1049] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:770146, Jennifer Storey (unknown location), downloaded 25 Aug 2001, Turold of Bucknall: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00450121&tree=LEO
  3. [S1049] e-mail address, 25 Aug 2001, NN Malet: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00450122&tree=LEO
  4. [S1792] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004 "Descent from Richard III of Normandy to Jane Lowe (Grey of Sandiacre)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 22 Oct 2004."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lucia of Alkborough: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027599&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lucia of Alkborough: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027599&tree=LEO

William/Guillaume Malet seigneur of Graville, Lord of Eye1,2,3

M, #14618, d. 1071
MotherEsilia? (?)3
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     William/Guillaume Malet seigneur of Graville, Lord of Eye was buried at Bec Abbey, Bec, France (now).4

He married Hesilia/Hesilie Crespin, daughter of Gilbert I Crespin seigneur du Bec-Crespin,seigneur de Damville et Bourth, comte de Brionne, capitaine de Tillières and Gunnor (?) d'Aunou;      Per Ravilious "theorised to be a daughter of Alfgar, and wife of William Malet, who 'was said to be the brother of King Harold's wife...The evidence points to a marriage between William Malet and a daughter of earl Alfgar III of Mercia, of which the issue was Lucy.'2
     Per Burke's Malet Pate:
WILLIAM MALET, of Granville, Normandy; also held lands in Lincs before 1066 (possibly by virtue of his mother’s putative status of Englishwoman); granted the feudal Barony of Eye, Suffolk, following the Conquest, in which he was one of WILLIAM I’s chief lieutenants, being allegedly given the task by WILLIAM of burying HAROLD’s body after Hastings; Sheriff Yorks 1068; m Hesilia Crispin (living 1086), gggdau of ROLLO THE DANE, DUKE OF NORMANDY, and d c 1071, leaving:
1a Robert, of Eye, which he was holding as a tenant-in-chief of the Crown 1086, along with 220 other Manors in Suffolk, 32 in Yorks, eight in Lincs, three in Essex, two in Notts and one in Hants; Sheriff Suffolk, Gt Chamberlain by the start of HENRY I’s reign, but banished after 1105 for supporting HENRY’s bro ROBERT OF NORMANDY; m Elisée/Helise, ggdau of RICHARD I DUKE OF NORMANDY and was allegedly k Battle of Tinchebrai 1106, leaving:
1b William; banished from England 1109 but inherited his f’s lands in Normandy and was ancestor of the MAL(L)ETs de Graville in Caux, Normandy, and the MAL(L)ETs of Jersey
     2a GILBERT

1a Beatrice; m William de Arches."5,6,1,4

William/Guillaume Malet seigneur of Graville, Lord of Eye died in 1071; Med Lands says d. bef 1086.7,6,2,4
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "William Malet (died 1071) held senior positions within the Norman forces that occupied England from 1066. Of the so-called companions of William of Normandy, Malet is one of about a dozen for whom there is evidence of their presence at the Battle of Hastings. For example, the contemporary chronicler William of Poitiers recorded that Malet was present at the battle.
     "According to apocryphal accounts, Malet was related to both William of Normandy and King Harold of England. Some accounts claim that Malet took charge of Harold's body following the Norman victory at Hastings. However, there is no evidence confirming such claims.
     "Malet held substantial property in Normandy – chiefly in the Pays de Caux, with a castle at Graville-Sainte-Honorine [fr] (now a suburb of Le Havre). After 1066, he held many properties in England as well, most of them in Yorkshire and East Anglia.
Biography
Early life
     "According to unverifiable, apocryphal accounts, Malet had significant, multiple ties to the Anglo-Saxon elite before the Norman Conquest.
** Malet's mother was said to be English.
** He was said to be the brother of Aelgifu, wife of Ælfgar, Earl of Mercia (and, therefore, daughter-in-law of Lady Godiva).
** In or about January 1066, King Harold married Ealdgyth, often known as Edith (the dowager of Welsh king Gruffydd ap Llywelyn) and a daughter of Aelgifu and Ælfgar of Mercia. If Malet was a biological uncle of the queen consort of England in 1066, he would probably have been pivotal to Norman-English relations at around the time of the Battle of Hastings.

Battle of Hastings
     "There is evidence that Malet fought on the Norman side at Hastings, regardless of any divided loyalties that may have been caused by family ties. For instance, William of Poitiers wrote of King Harold's remains:
"His corpse was brought into the Duke's camp and William [of Normandy] gave it for burial to William, surnamed Malet, and not to Harold's mother, who offered for the body of her beloved son its weight in gold."[1]

     "If Malet was at the Norman headquarters, immediately after the battle, it would be strong evidence that he played a significant role in the Norman victory.
High Sheriff
     "Malet's activities during the first few years of the Norman conquest of England are not known. But after the Danish stronghold York was captured in 1068, he was appointed the first High Sheriff of Yorkshire and was one of the commanders of the garrisons in the new castles built in the city of York. His efforts at defending the shire from Danish raids were, in the end, a terrible failure, for the next year the city was burned and the garrison slaughtered. Malet, his wife, and two of their children were held as hostages, and finally released when the Danes were driven off.
     "Malet was relieved of his duties in the north, but seems to not have lost the king's favour, for he soon was appointed High Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, and given the great honour of Eye, with lands in Suffolk and several other shires. It was in fact the largest lordship in East Anglia. He built a motte and bailey castle at Eye, and started a market there.
In historical literature & the media
     "The Domesday Book also mentions a Durand Malet, who held land in Lincolnshire[2] and possibly some neighbouring shires. This may be William Malet's brother, but this is not certain.
     "On screen, Malet has been portrayed by Peter Halliday in the two-part BBC TV play Conquest (1966), part of the series Theatre 625, and by Gawn Grainger in the TV drama Blood Royal: William the Conqueror (1990).
Family
     "He had married Hesilia (Helise or Elisee). He was succeeded by his son Robert as Lord of Eye and Sheriff of Suffolk. His other son Gilbert founded the Malets of Shepton Mallet in Somerset.
Death
     "He died around 1071, probably during the rebellion of Hereward the Wake.
References
1. Wm. of Poitiers, Gesta Guillelmi II Ducis Normannorum, quoted in David C.Douglas & George W. Greenaway (Eds.), English Historical Documents 1042–1189, London, 1959, p.229.
2. Domesday Book
3. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Line 234A-25
4. Hollister, C. Warren (1973). "Henry I and Robert Malet". Viator. 4: 115–32.
5. Hurt, Cyril. "William Malet and His Family". Anglo-Norman Studies XIX.
6. Lewis, C. P. (1989). "The King and Eye: A Study in Anglo-Norman Politics". English Historical Review. 104: 569–87. doi:10.1093/ehr/CIV.CCCCXII.569."`.3 He was Seigneur de Graville at Graville St. Honorine, Normandy, France (now).3

; Per Weis [1992:198]: "of Granville St. Honorine, Normandy, at Battle of Hastings 1066, Sheriff of Yorkshire 1068, held barony of Curry Malet, Somerset, 1135, previously held by de Courcelles family."7

; Per Ravilious email [2007]:
Father:     NN Malet
of Barrowby-in-Honington and Barkston, co. Lincoln1
also seigneur of Graville in Normandy
landholder in England prior to Hastings; held to have made the funeral arrangements for King Harold after Hastings, 10661
re: his wife:
theorised to be a daughter of Alfgar, and wife of William Malet, who 'was said to be the brother of King Harold's wife...The evidence points to a marriage between William Malet and a daughter of earl Alfgar III of Mercia, of which the issue was Lucy.'2
Spouse:     NN
Children:     NN (-<1083)
     Robert
     Beatrice
     Gilbert.1

; Per Wikipedia (Fr.):
     "Guillaume Malet († vers 1071), seigneur de Graville (près du Havre) et d'Eye (Suffolk), fut un baron anglo-normand, compagnon de Guillaume le Conquérant.
Biographie
     "Son parentage n'est pas connu. Son père est probablement le seigneur de Graville précédent qui tenait de nombreux fiefs des Giffard dans la même région du pays de Caux. Si on en croit le Carmen de Hastingae Proelio, sa mère serait d'origine anglo-saxonne et Guillaume Malet serait apparenté au roi Harold II d'Angleterre. Des légendes associant son beau-fils Turold le shérif à Godgifu de Mercie, belle-mère d'Harold II, indiquent une possible relation entre sa mère et les comtes de Mercie ou leurs femmes. Ses possessions en Normandie sont dans le Pays de Caux et dans le pays de Caen, son principal château étant à Graville.
     "Il épouse Esilia, fille de Gilbert Crespin, châtelain de Tillières1 dans le sud-est du duché de Normandie. En 1066, il est l'un des compagnons de Guillaume le Conquérant et combat à Hastings. On lui attribue l'enterrement du corps d'Harold II sur la plage, car il lui serait apparenté. Il est un serviteur loyal du roi, et celui-ci le tient probablement en haute estime2.
     "En 1068, durant les campagnes du Conquérant dans le Nord, il est appointé châtelain de York et shérif du Yorkshire. En septembre 1069, York est assiégé par une coalition de Danois et d'Anglo-Saxons. La garnison normande est décimée et Guillaume brièvement retenu captif. Il réussit à s'enfuir avec sa famille et quelques autres, avant que les secours normands n'arrivent. Il est ensuite occupé à réprimer la révolte menée par Hereward l'Exilé dans les Fens. Il meurt très probablement dans cette campagne vers 1071.
     "À sa mort, il a accumulé de nombreux domaines en Angleterre, principalement dans le Norfolk, l'Essex, le Bedfordshire, le Nottinghamshire et le Suffolk. Il est notamment propriétaire du vaste honneur d'Eye dans le Suffolk. Son fils et héritier Robert lui succède.
Famille et descendance
     "Il épouse Esilia, fille de Gilbert Crespin, châtelain de Tillières. Il a de nombreux enfants, mais seuls quelques-uns ont pu être identifiés :
** Robert († 1107), seigneur de Graville et de Eye, haut chambellan d'Angleterre
** Guillaume (II) Malet († 1121), seigneur de Graville et de Eye3
** Béatrice, épouse Guillaume d'Arques ;
** une fille non nommée qui épouse Alfred de Lincoln ;
** une fille non nommée qui épouse Turold le shérif ;
** Durand est probablement son fils et non son frère.

Voir aussi
** Compagnons de Guillaume le Conquérant
Notes et références
1. The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumièges, Orderic Vitalis, and Robert of Torigni: Introduction, éd. Van Houts, Oxford University Press, 1992, p.xliii
2. Cyril Hart, « William Malet and his Family », ANS XIX.
3. Cyril Hart, « William Malet and his Family », Anglo-Norman Studies XIX: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1996, édité par Christopher Harper-Bill, publié par Boydell & Brewer Ltd, 1997, p. 162
Bibliographie
** P. R. Newman, « The Yorkshire Domesday Clamores and the 'Lost Fee' of William Malet », Anglo-Normans Studies XXII: Proceedings of the Battle Conference, 1999, édité par Christopher Harper-Bill, publié par Boydell & Brewer, 2000, p. 216-2178. (ISBN 0851157963).
** Cyril Hart, « William Malet and his Family », Anglo-Norman Studies XIX: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1996, édité par Christopher Harper-Bill, publié par Boydell & Brewer Ltd, 1997, p. 123-166. (ISBN 0851157076).
** C. W. Hollister, « Henry I and Robert Malet », Viator, vol. 4 (1973), p. 115–122.
** K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, « Domesday Book and the Malets: patrimony and the private history of public lives », Nottingham Medieval Studies, vol. 41 (1997), p. 13–56.
** C. P. Lewis, « The King and Eye: A Study in Anglo-Norman Politics », The English Historical Review, vol. 104, n°412 (juillet 1989), p. 569-589.
Sources
** K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, « Malet, William (d. 1071?) », dans l'Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. Accédé en novembre 2008 [archive]."8

; Boyer [2001:49] shows the dau. of a William Malet marrying Thorold "the Sheriff". Med Lands mentions that a connection exists between Thorold and the Malet family, but doesn't link it to a William Malet.9,10

; Per DNB:
     "Malet, William (d. 1071?)
K. S. B. Keats-Rohan
(https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/17880 Published in print: 23 September 2004Published online: 23 September 2004)
     "Malet, William (d. 1071?), landowner, was lord of Graville-St Honorine in the Norman Pays de Caux; his much-debated byname has been explained as meaning 'one who conducts a mail-horse and its baggage'. Of unknown parentage, he was described by Gui of Amiens as part Norman and part English and as (compater Heraldi), which indicates either spiritual affinity to or close companionship with Harold Godwineson. His father was probably his predecessor as lord of Graville and tenant of the Giffards in numerous other fiefs in the same region. Legends associating his son-in-law Turold the Sheriff with Godgifu (Godiva) of Mercia, mother of Harold's wife, probably indicate a relationship between William's mother and the earls of Mercia or their wives. A strong association of William and his family with Lincolnshire suggests that his English roots lay there.
     "Between 1060 and c.1066 William Malet occurs with William I in a number of charters relating to the abbeys of Montivilliers and Jumièges. He was associated with the abbey of Préaux in the Lieuvin, of which he was given the fellowship by Abbot Ansfrid in 1060, and with the abbey of Bec, which later mistakenly identified him with his descendant, a monk of the same name. His interests in the region of Lisieux probably originated in his marriage to Esilia, daughter of Gilbert Crispin, castellan of Tillières in the Vexin. William fought at Hastings and was soon credited with having been ordered to bury Harold's body on the seashore; whether he had anything to do with Harold's burial is uncertain, but it now seems clear that the body was buried at the church Harold founded at Waltham. In 1068 William became castellan of the first castle at York and sheriff of Yorkshire. In September 1069 the city was attacked by Danes. Briefly held captive, William, his wife, and their younger children were among the few to escape alive. He lost the shrievalty of York and the land associated with it soon afterwards, and was thereafter occupied in suppressing the fenland revolt led by Hereward the Wake. Domesday Book makes it clear that he died in the campaign, probably in 1071.
     "At his death, the bulk of William Malet's wealth lay in the vast lordship (the honour of Eye) granted to him in East Anglia, principally in Suffolk (where he had a castle and a market at Eye), but also in Norfolk, Essex, Surrey, Bedfordshire, and Nottinghamshire. His heir was his eldest son Robert Malet, who occurs with his father from shortly before 1066. Of William's numerous other children few can be identified. He had another son Gilbert, a daughter Beatrice, wife of Guillaume d'Arques, and a daughter who married Alfred of Lincoln. Another daughter married Turold the Sheriff; their daughter Lucy became the principal heir of the family's Lincolnshire estates. Close examination of Domesday Book strongly indicates that Durand Malet was another of William's sons and not his brother, as is often stated.
Sources
** Ordericus Vitalis, Eccl. hist., 2.178, 222
** Symeon of Durham, Opera, 2.188
** The Carmen de Hastingae proelio of Guy, bishop of Amiens, ed. C. Morton and H. Muntz, OMT (1972), 38n.
** ‘Miraculum quo B. Maria subvenit Guillelmo Crispino Seniori’, Patrologia Latina, 150 (1854), 736–7
** J. H. Round, ed., Calendar of documents preserved in France, illustrative of the history of Great Britain and Ireland (1899)
** M. Fauroux, ed., Recueil des actes des ducs de Normandie de 911 à 1066 (Caen, 1961), no. 89
** V. Brown, ed., Eye Priory cartulary and charters, Suffolk RS, Suffolk Charters, 12 (1992), no. 1
** C. P. Lewis, ‘The king and Eye: a study in Anglo-Norman politics’, EngHR, 104 (1989), 569–89
** K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, ‘Domesday Book and the Malets: patrimony and the private history of public lives’, Nottingham Medieval Studies, 41 (1997), 13–56."11

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME [I] Malet (-[Bec Abbey] before 1086). Domesday Book records that "William Malet had 5 carucates of land to the geld" in Alkborough, Lincolnshire, and that "Ivo" (identified as Ivo Taillebois, first husband of Lucy, relative of the Malet family see below) was the current holder[789]. Brown indicates that the reference to assessment "to the geld" suggests that Guillaume may have been the holder of the land before the conquest[790]. A history of the Crispin family names "Esiliam matrem Willelmi Malet" as daughter of Gilbert Crespin, adding that Guillaume ended his life at Bec abbey[791]. The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "Guillaume de Malet" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[792]. Orderic Vitalis names "Guillelmo agnomine Maleto" was charged with the temporary burial of the body of King Harold II on the shore after the battle of Hastings[793]. “…Willielmus Maleit…” witnessed the charter dated to [1067] under which William I King of England confirmed the privileges of Peterborough abbey[794]. Sheriff of York: Simeon of Durham records that "Willelmo Malet qui tunc vicecomitatum gerebat cum sua coniuge et duobus liberis" were made prisoner by the Danes after the capture of the city of York by King William’s forces, dated to 1069[795]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus Ricardi filius Eboracensis præsidii custos” was killed, that “Marius Suenus, Gaius Patricius, Edgarus Adelinus, Archillus et quatuor filii Karoli” attacked “munitionem regis in Eboraco”, and that “Willelmus cognomento Maletus, præses castrensis regi” announced to the king that he would be forced to withdraw unless reinforcements were sent, dated to 1069[796]. The cartulary of Préaux Saint-Pierre includes a document which records that "William Maleth" approved a donation to the monastery by "a certain knight Ralf" and donated property at Butot-en-Caux "that he might be made a monk, which was done", and that "when William was dead, Robert his son" confirmed his father’s gift[797]. Freeman suggests that William Malet died on campaign in Ely, dated to [1070/71], on the basis of two passages in Domesday Book which record land held "in die quo pater R. Malet ivit in servitium Regis…ubi mortuus est" and "pater suus…tenuit quando ivit in maresc [marshland]" (in Happisburgh, Norfolk)[798]. Round suggests that the interpretation of the passage in question is too precise and in any case that the word "maresc" may in any case represent a mistranscription for "Eurvic", indicating York, which, if correct, would negate the theory entirely[799]. It appears that the most that can definitively be concluded from these passages is the Guillaume Malet died while on the king’s service, some time before 1086. This conclusion appears to be contradicted by the history of the Crispin family which states that Guillaume ended his life at Bec abbey[800].
     "m ESILIA, daughter of --- (-after 1086). “Robertus Malet” founded Eye priory, for the souls of “patris mei Willelmi Malet et matris meæ Hesiliæ” who became a nun there, by undated charter dated to the reign of William I King of England[801]. Domesday Book records “Robert Malet’s mother” holding land from Robert Malet in Suffolk[802]. same person as…? ESILIA, daughter of GILBERT Crispin & his wife Gunnora ---. The De nobili genere Crispinorum names "Emmam, Petri de Condeto genetricem, atque Esiliam, matrem Willelmi Malet" as the two daughters of "Gislebertus…Crispini cognomen" and his [wife[803]. However, the wife of her supposed son Guillaume Malet is recorded in a later primary source with the same name so it is possible that the De nobili genere confuses Guillaume’s mother with his wife.] Simeon of Durham records that "Willelmo Malet qui tunc vicecomitatum gerebat cum sua coniuge et duobus liberis" were made prisoner by the Danes after the capture of the city of York by King William’s forces, dated to 1069[804].
     "Guillaume [I] & his wife had [five] children."
Med Lands cites:
     [789] Domesday Translation, folio 350v, p. 911.
[790] Brown (1994), Part 2, Introduction, p. 3.
[791] Robinson (1911), p. 14, quoting Achery, L. Lanfranci Opera, App. p. 53.
[792] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 236.
[793] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, XIV, p. 151.
[794] Dugdale Monasticon I, Peterborough Monastery, XIV, p. 383.
[795] Symeonis Monachi, Vol. II, Historia Regum, 153, p. 182.
[796] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, V, pp. 187-8.
[797] Round (1899), 319, p. 108, citing Cartulary, fo. 145.
[798] Freeman (1876), Vol. 4, Appendix, Note W, pp. 787-90, quoting folios. 247, 332b and 133b.
[799] Round ‘The Death of William Malet’ (Jan-Jun 1884), 26 Apr 1884, no. 625, p. 297.
[800] Robinson (1911), p. 14, quoting Achery, L. Lanfranci Opera, App. p. 53.
[801] Dugdale Monasticon III, Eye Priory, Suffolk, I, p. 404.
[802] Domesday Translation, Suffolk, VI, p. 1204.
[803] De nobili genere Crispinorum, RHGF XIV, p. 268.
[804] Symeonis Monachi, Vol. II, Historia Regum, 153, p. 182.4

; Weis AR-7 [1992:198]: Weis says that Robert Malet is "thought gr. s. of William Malet d. 1071."12

William/Guillaume Malet seigneur of Graville, Lord of Eye lived at Graville St. Honorine, Normandy, France.7 William/Guillaume Malet seigneur of Graville, Lord of Eye was also known as William Malet.9

; Per Buekre's: "WILLIAM MALET, of Granville, Normandy; also held lands in Lincs before 1066 (possibly by virtue of his mother's putative status of Englishwoman); granted the feudal Barony of Eye, Suffolk, following the Conquest, in which he was one of WILLIAM I's chief lieutenants, being allegedly given the task by WILLIAM of burying HAROLD's body after Hastings; Sheriff Yorks 1068; m Hesilia Crispin (living 1086), gggdau of ROLLO THE DANE, DUKE OF NORMANDY, and d c 1071."6 GAV-26 EDV-26.
; NB: There is disagreement concerning the MALET family and its lineage. I have consulted anumber of sources in an effort to sort it out, but have been unable to establish a clear lineage. I have made notes where I have found disagreement and indicated which interpretation I have chosen to follow. GA Vaut
     The sources I have consulted are all "tertiary" in that they cite mostly secondary sources and records. They vary in credibility. Most of the cite their own sources. I have looked at:
1. The Genealogics database (multiple individual pages - cited for those individuals) - cites sources in some case, but only sparingly with the Malet family.
2. The Foundations for Medieval Genealogy Medieval Lands Database (multiple pages - cited for those individuals) - cites sources.
3. The Racines et Histoire website (multiple family pages - cited for those individuals) - does not cite sources.
4. Burke's Peerage website - principally the Malet family page - cites sources.
5. English and French versions of Wikipedia (multiple invididual entries - cited for those individuals) - cites sources.13,14,15,16,17,18


; one of WIlliam the Conqueror's chief lieutenants, and was allegedly charged with King Harold's body after the battle of Hastings.5 He was Sheriff of Yorkshire in 1068.7 He was High Sheriff of Yorkshire between 1068 and 1069.3 He was High Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk between 1070 and 1071.3 He was Lord of Eye
The Honour of Eye in 1071.3

Family 1

Child

Citations

  1. [S2179] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 10 Sept 2007: "William Malet to QE II (was: Who Really Came with William the C..)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 10 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 10 Sept 2007."
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Malet_(companion_of_William_the_Conqueror). Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#GuillaumeMaletdiedbefore1086. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 142, MALET 1. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  6. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Malet Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 234A-25, p. 198. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_Malet. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 49, CHESTER 4.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#relativeLucyMLincoln
  11. [S2286] Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online http://oxforddnb.com/index/, https://www.oxforddnb.com/view/10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-17880#odnb-9780198614128-e-17880. Hereinafter cited as ODNB - Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 234A-25, p. 198 Weis says that Robert Malet is "thought gr. s. of William Malet d. 1071."
  13. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 8 March 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia (FR), online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 142, MALET 1:i.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#_Toc25491898
  21. [S2286] ODNB - Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online http://oxforddnb.com/index/, https://www.oxforddnb.com/view/10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-17878
  22. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 142, MALET 1:iii.
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntlo.htm#BeatrixMaletMGuillaumeArques

Ranulph le Meschin1,2

M, #14619
FatherWilliam de Meschines Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, co. York2 d. 1130
MotherCecily de Rumilly Lady of Skipton2 d. bt 1151 - 1155
Last Edited21 Aug 2001

Citations

  1. No issue.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 49, CHESTER 5:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.

Avice de Rumilly1

F, #14621, d. after 1179
FatherWilliam de Meschines Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, co. York2,3 d. 1130
MotherCecily de Rumilly Lady of Skipton2 d. bt 1151 - 1155
ReferenceGAV25
Last Edited27 Jul 2020
     Avice de Rumilly married William II de Curcy in 1125;
Her 1st husband.2,3,1 Avice de Rumilly married William Paynel, son of Ralph Paynel de Moûtiers-Hubert, Normandy, Drax and Hooton, Yorkshire and Maud de Surdeval, circa 1130;
Her 2nd husband.4,1,2 Avice de Rumilly married Walter de Percy, son of Alan de Percy and Emma de Gant (Gaunt, Ghent), before 1153;
Her 3rd husband.2,1
Avice de Rumilly died after 1179.1
     GAV-25. Avice de Rumilly was also known as Avice/Amice de Meschines.2

Reference: Per Med Lands:
     "AVICE de Rumilly (-[1179][444]). “Amicia filia Cecilie de Rumilli” confirmed donations to the canons of St Mary, for the soul of “Willelmi de Curci filii mei”, by charter dated to [1138/50], witnessed by “Willelmo de Curci filio meo…”[445]. An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire records that “Avicia de Romely domina de Bescaudeby” married ”Willielmum Paynel”, and had “filium Willielmum de Curci et filiam Aliciam”[446]. “Avicia de Romelli” notified her donation to the canons of Drax, for the soul of “Willelmi Paganelli mariti mei”, with the consent of “domini Roberti de Gant et Adelicie filie mee uxoris eiusdem Roberti”, by charter dated to [1147/52], witnessed by “Robertus de Gant et Adelicia Paganella uxor eius et Adelicia soror Roberti de Gant…”[447]. The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified. Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Avicia mater Willelmi de Curcy" held two knights’ fees from "Roberti de Gant" in Yorkshire[448].
     "m firstly ([1125]) WILLIAM de Courcy, son of WILLIAM de Courcy [Curcy] & his wife Emma de Falaise (-before 1130).
     "m secondly WILLIAM Paynell of Drax, son of RALPH Paynell & his [first wife ---] (-[1147]).
     "[449]m thirdly (before 1153) WALTER de Percy, son of ALAN de Percy & his wife Emma de Gand."
Med Lands cites:
[444] Domesday Descendants, p. 674.
[445] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. III, 1862, p. 467.
[446] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire V, p. 878.
[447] Early Yorkshire Charters III, 1864, p. 473.
[448] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 433.
[449] Domesday Descendants, p. 631.2

Family 1

William II de Curcy d. bt 1125 - 1130

Family 2

William Paynel d. b 1147
Children

Family 3

Walter de Percy

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normabc.htm#AviceRumillydiedafter1153. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 49, CHESTER 5:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S1780] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 11 Nov 2004: "Re: de Courcy followup to Montfort/Montagu/de la Mare"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 11 Nov 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 11 Nov 2004."
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntps.htm#WilliamPaynelDraxdied1147
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntps.htm#AlicePaynellMRobertGand

William II de Curcy1,2

M, #14622, d. between 1125 and 1130
Last Edited26 Jul 2020
     William II de Curcy married Avice de Rumilly, daughter of William de Meschines Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, co. York and Cecily de Rumilly Lady of Skipton, in 1125;
Her 1st husband.1,2,3
William II de Curcy died between 1125 and 1130.2
     William II de Curcy was also known as William II de Curci.2

Family

Avice de Rumilly d. a 1179

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 49, CHESTER 5:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1780] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 11 Nov 2004: "Re: de Courcy followup to Montfort/Montagu/de la Mare"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 11 Nov 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 11 Nov 2004."
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normabc.htm#AviceRumillydiedafter1153. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

William Paynel1

M, #14623, d. before 1147
FatherRalph Paynel de Moûtiers-Hubert, Normandy, Drax and Hooton, Yorkshire2,3 d. b 1125
MotherMaud de Surdeval4,3
ReferenceGAV25
Last Edited27 Jul 2020
     William Paynel married Avice de Rumilly, daughter of William de Meschines Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, co. York and Cecily de Rumilly Lady of Skipton, circa 1130;
Her 2nd husband.3,5,1
William Paynel died before 1147; Sanders says d. ber 1148; Med Lands says d. 1147; ODNB says d. 1145-7.6,3,7
     He was a witness to Per Med Lands:
     "AVICE de Rumilly (-[1179][444]). “Amicia filia Cecilie de Rumilli” confirmed donations to the canons of St Mary, for the soul of “Willelmi de Curci filii mei”, by charter dated to [1138/50], witnessed by “Willelmo de Curci filio meo…”[445]. An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire records that “Avicia de Romely domina de Bescaudeby” married ”Willielmum Paynel”, and had “filium Willielmum de Curci et filiam Aliciam”[446]. “Avicia de Romelli” notified her donation to the canons of Drax, for the soul of “Willelmi Paganelli mariti mei”, with the consent of “domini Roberti de Gant et Adelicie filie mee uxoris eiusdem Roberti”, by charter dated to [1147/52], witnessed by “Robertus de Gant et Adelicia Paganella uxor eius et Adelicia soror Roberti de Gant…”[447]. The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified. Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Avicia mater Willelmi de Curcy" held two knights’ fees from "Roberti de Gant" in Yorkshire[448].
     "m firstly ([1125]) WILLIAM de Courcy, son of WILLIAM de Courcy [Curcy] & his wife Emma de Falaise (-before 1130).
     "m secondly WILLIAM Paynell of Drax, son of RALPH Paynell & his [first wife ---] (-[1147]).
     "[449]m thirdly (before 1153) WALTER de Percy, son of ALAN de Percy & his wife Emma de Gand."
Med Lands cites:
[444] Domesday Descendants, p. 674.
[445] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. III, 1862, p. 467.
[446] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire V, p. 878.
[447] Early Yorkshire Charters III, 1864, p. 473.
[448] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 433.
[449] Domesday Descendants, p. 631.
with Avice de Rumilly and Living Gray.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "WILLIAM Paynell of Drax (-[1147]). He inherited Drax, Yorkshire and Irnham, Lincolnshire from his father[103]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills Paenell" in Yorkshire, Northumberland[104]. “Willielmus Paganellus” founded Drax priory, Yorkshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Radulfo Paganello...”[105]. "…Willelmo Paganello…" witnessed the charter dated to [1142/46] under which "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina et Henricus filius comitis Andegavie" confirmed the rights of "Unfrido de Buhun" in the lands he held on the death of her father[106].
     "m as her second husband, AVICE de Rumilly, widow of WILLIAM de Courcy, daughter of WILLIAM FitzRanulf du Bessin, of Skipton-in-Craven & his wife Cecily de Rumilly (-[1179][107]). An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire records that “Avicia de Romely domina de Bescaudeby” married ”Willielmum Paynel”, and had “filium Willielmum de Curci et filiam Aliciam”[108]. “Avicia de Romelli” notified her donation to the canons of Drax, for the soul of “Willelmi Paganelli mariti mei”, with the consent of “domini Roberti de Gant et Adelicie filie mee uxoris eiusdem Roberti”, by charter dated to [1147/52], witnessed by “Robertus de Gant et Adelicia Paganella uxor eius et Adelicia soror Roberti de Gant…”[109]. She married thirdly (before 1153) Walter de Percy. The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified. Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Avicia mater Willelmi de Curcy" held two knights’ fees from "Roberti de Gant" in Yorkshire[110]."
Med Lands cites:
[103] CP VIII 284, footnote d.
[104] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Yorkshire, Northumberland, p. 29.
[105] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Drax Priory, Yorkshire, I, p. 195.
[106] Actes Henri II, Tome I, III, p. 7.
[107] Domesday Descendants, p. 674.
[108] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire V, p. 878.
[109] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. III, 1864, p. 473.
[110] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 433.3
GAV-25. William Paynel was also known as William de Paynel of Drax, Yorkshire.6,3 A
William Paynel was a witness to the NB: There is a disagreement regarding the lineage of the English side of the Paynel family between the "Paynel family" article in and the lineage as laid out in Med Lands.


     I. ODNB says that a Ralph Paynel (d. bef 1124) was the 1st English representative of the family, and gives no origin for Ralph. It assigns Ralph two possible wives, m1 NN de Lacy and m2 Maud de Surdeval. Ralph's heir was his son William (d. 1145x7). Per ODNB:
I.0. Unnamed ancestor
I.1. Ralph (d. bef 1124), m1 NN de Lacy, m2 Maud de Surdeval; he had a son:
-----> I.1.1 William (d. 1145x7), m1 NN d'Avranches, and had four sons and one dau.:
-----> I.1.2.1 Hugh I (d. c a 1179)
-----> I.1.2.2 Fulk I (d. 1182/3), m. Lesceline de Grippon or de Subligny
-----> I.1.2.3
-----> I.1.2.4 (not named)
-----> I.1.2.5 (not named)
          m2 Avice de Rumillly (d. ca 1176), and had one dau.:
-----> I.1.2.5 Alice


     II. Med Lands says that the early English Ralph was brother of another William (d. 1087), who was the father of the William (the heir, d. aft 1145). Thus, Ralph was the uncle, not father, of the William (the heir, d. aft 1145). Per Med Lands:
II.0. NN Paynel, he had two sons:
-----> II.1. William (d1087), had a son:
----------> II.1.1. William (d aft 1145) m. NN d'Avranches; he had two sons:
---------------> II.1.1.1. Hugh (d 1180 or bef) m. Nicole NN
---------------> II.1.1.2 Fulk I (d 1182), m. Lesceline de Subligny
-----> II.2. Ralph (d. aft 1088), m1 NN, m2 Maud de Surdeval; he had a son
----------> II.2.1 William (d aft 1147), m. Avice de Rumilly
Conclusion: The differences between ODNB and Med Lands are more complicated than this simple presentation (in assignments of children, names of spouses, etc.) It is tempting to read into this that Med Lands has confused two Williams (II.1.1 and II.2.1); but there is no proof of that. Perhaps the common father for William II.1 and Ralph II.2 is mythical or perhaps William II.1 was in fact the of William II.1.1 and Ralph II.2. For the moment this is just speculation on my part, and I have chosen to follow the more complicated Med Lands lineage, though I continue to study the issue. GA Vaut with (?) de Paynel de Moûtiers-Hubert (Normandy), Drax and Hooton (Yorkshire).7,8,9

; Per the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Ralph's lands in Drax, Yorkshire, and Middle Rasen, Lincolnshire, passed by 1124 to his eldest surviving son, William (I) Paynel (d. 1145x7), who may also have secured possession of Les Moutiers-Hubert and Hambye in Normandy through him, and added further holdings in Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire to the Paynel honour."7

Family

Avice de Rumilly d. a 1179
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 49, CHESTER 5:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1439] I. J. Sanders, English Baronies: A Study of their Origin and Descent 1086-1327 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960). Hereinafter cited as Sanders: English Baronies.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntps.htm#WilliamPaynelDraxdied1147. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1441] John P. Ravilious, "Therav email 22 May 2003: de Chaworth of Kempsford and les Seigneurs de Mondoubleau," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 22 May 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 22 May 2003."
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normabc.htm#AviceRumillydiedafter1153
  6. [S1439] I. J. Sanders, Sanders: English Baronies, p. 125, note 2.
  7. [S2286] Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online http://oxforddnb.com/index/, Paynel Family: https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/53593. Hereinafter cited as ODNB - Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntps.htm#_Toc21095947
  9. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 27 July 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntps.htm#AlicePaynellMRobertGand

Walter de Percy1,2

M, #14624
FatherAlan de Percy2 b. b 1100, d. b Dec 1135
MotherEmma de Gant (Gaunt, Ghent)2
Last Edited26 Jul 2020
     Walter de Percy married Avice de Rumilly, daughter of William de Meschines Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, co. York and Cecily de Rumilly Lady of Skipton, before 1153;
Her 3rd husband.1,3
     Walter de Percy was a witness to Per Med Lands:
     "AVICE de Rumilly (-[1179][444]). “Amicia filia Cecilie de Rumilli” confirmed donations to the canons of St Mary, for the soul of “Willelmi de Curci filii mei”, by charter dated to [1138/50], witnessed by “Willelmo de Curci filio meo…”[445]. An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire records that “Avicia de Romely domina de Bescaudeby” married ”Willielmum Paynel”, and had “filium Willielmum de Curci et filiam Aliciam”[446]. “Avicia de Romelli” notified her donation to the canons of Drax, for the soul of “Willelmi Paganelli mariti mei”, with the consent of “domini Roberti de Gant et Adelicie filie mee uxoris eiusdem Roberti”, by charter dated to [1147/52], witnessed by “Robertus de Gant et Adelicia Paganella uxor eius et Adelicia soror Roberti de Gant…”[447]. The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified. Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Avicia mater Willelmi de Curcy" held two knights’ fees from "Roberti de Gant" in Yorkshire[448].
     "m firstly ([1125]) WILLIAM de Courcy, son of WILLIAM de Courcy [Curcy] & his wife Emma de Falaise (-before 1130).
     "m secondly WILLIAM Paynell of Drax, son of RALPH Paynell & his [first wife ---] (-[1147]).
     "[449]m thirdly (before 1153) WALTER de Percy, son of ALAN de Percy & his wife Emma de Gand."
Med Lands cites:
[444] Domesday Descendants, p. 674.
[445] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. III, 1862, p. 467.
[446] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire V, p. 878.
[447] Early Yorkshire Charters III, 1864, p. 473.
[448] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 433.
[449] Domesday Descendants, p. 631.
with Avice de Rumilly and Living Gray.1 Walter de Percy lived at an unknown place ; Walter; received a gift of land from his mother which he presented to Whitby Abbey; m by 1153, as her 3rd husb, Avice Meschin, dau of Cecily de Romelli (through whom Avice inherited Rougemont, W Yorks) and widow of (a) William de Curcy and (b) William Paynel.4

Family

Avice de Rumilly d. a 1179

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 49, CHESTER 5:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 194, de PERCY 2:ii.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normabc.htm#AviceRumillydiedafter1153. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Northumberland Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Beatrix de Gernon1

F, #14625
FatherRanulph 'de Gernon' de Meschines 2nd Earl of Chester1,2 b. b 1100, d. 16 Dec 1153
MotherMaud FitzRobert de Caen of Gloucester1,3 b. c 1123, d. 29 Jul 1189
Last Edited21 Dec 2020
     Beatrix de Gernon married Ranulph (?) Baron of Malpas.1

Family

Ranulph (?) Baron of Malpas

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 49-50, CHESTER 6:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ranulph de Meschines: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027601&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Gloucester: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027602&tree=LEO

Amicia de Meschines1

F, #14627
FatherHugh "of Kevelioc" de Meschines (?) 5th Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranche2,3,4 b. c 1143, d. 30 Jun 1181
ReferenceGAV23 EDV22
Last Edited26 Nov 2020
     Amicia de Meschines married Sir Ralph Mainwaring of Cheshire before 1181.2,5,1
     GAV-22 EDV-22 GKJ-22.

; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Ancestors of American Presidents, 1995, Boston, MA, Roberts, Gary Boyd, Reference: 183
2. the Royal descents of 500 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the USA, Baltimore, 1993, Roberts, Gary Boyd, Reference: 398.1 Amicia de Meschines was also known as Amicia de Kevelioc possibly illegitimate befor father's marriage to Bertrade.2 Amicia de Meschines was also known as Amicia of Chester.6

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amicia de Meschines: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00287605&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 50, CHESTER 7:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugh Keveliok Le Meschin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027679&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#HughChesterdied1181. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Ralph Mainwaring: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00287604&tree=LEO
  6. [S2072] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 30 May 2006: "Bertrada de Blancminster, daughter of Amice de Audley"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 30 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 30 May 2006."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Roger Mainwaring, of Warmincham: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00221512&tree=LEO

Gilla (?)1

F, #14628
ReferenceGAV23
Last Edited20 Jul 2007

Family

William de Chesney Lord of Horsford and Colne b. c 1137, d. 1174
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilla: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00296270&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Chesney: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139379&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sara de Chesney: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00446037&tree=LEO
  4. [S2063] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 19 April 2006: "Re: de Clavering family"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 19 April 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 19 April 2006."

Clemence de Fougeres1,2

F, #14629, d. 1252
FatherGuillaume/William de Fougères1,2,3,4,5 d. 7 Jun 1187
MotherAgatha du Hammet1,2,3,6,5 d. 1180
Last Edited26 Jul 2020
     Clemence de Fougeres married Alain de Vitre Sire de Dinan, son of Robert III de Vitre Sire de Vitré and Emma de Dinan; her 1st husband.1,3 Clemence de Fougeres married Sir Ranulph III "de Blundeville" de Kevelioc Earl of Chester, Earl of Lincoln, son of Hugh "of Kevelioc" de Meschines (?) 5th Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranche and Bertrade de Montfort, on 7 October 1200; her 2nd husband.1,2
Clemence de Fougeres died in 1252; date per John Ravilious, who cites Jim Stevens, "Earl Ranulf of Chester," Jan 23, 1998, GEN-MEDIEVAL-L@rootsweb.com.3
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: XIV 136.2

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 50, CHESTER 7:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence de Fougères: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00178111&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1656] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 18 June 2004: "Re: CP - ES correction needed?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 June 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 18 June 2004."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume de Fougères: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00293983&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#GuillaumeFougeresdied1187. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agatha de Hommet: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00293984&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alain de Vitré: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00178110&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gervaise de Vitre: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00111109&tree=LEO
  9. [S2111] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 1 Dec 2006: "Re: Complete Peerage Addition: Iseult de Dol, mother of Sir Elias d'Aubeney, Lord Daubeney"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 1 Dec 2006."

Jeanne de Dargies1

F, #14630, d. 1348
Last Edited1 Feb 2009
     Jeanne de Dargies married Hugh de Chatillon Comte de St. Pol, Seigneur de Leuze de Condé de Carency de Buquoy, son of Jacques I de Châtillon Seigneur de Leuze de Condé and Catherine de Carency Heiress of Buquoy, Duisant & Aubigny, in 1316.1,2
Jeanne de Dargies died in 1348.1
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Genealogie der Graven van Holland Zaltbommel, 1969. , Dr. A. W. E. Dek, Reference: VII 16, 18.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Dargies: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027561&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Châtillon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027560&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Catherine de Châtillon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027563&tree=LEO

Tanglust de Kevelioc1

F, #14632
FatherHugh "of Kevelioc" de Meschines (?) 5th Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranche1,2 b. c 1143, d. 30 Jun 1181
Last Edited26 Nov 2020
     Tanglust de Kevelioc married William le Belward.1

Family

William le Belward

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 50, CHESTER 7:vii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugh Keveliok Le Meschin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027679&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Baudouin de Brionne seigneur de Meulles et de Sap, Lord of Okehampton1,2

M, #14634, b. 1022, d. February 1090
FatherGilbert (Giselbert) I Crispin (?) Comte de Brionne, Comte d'Eu3,1,2 b. c 979, d. Mar 1040
MotherGunnora (?) d'Anjou4 b. c 1000
ReferenceGAV26
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Baudouin de Brionne seigneur de Meulles et de Sap, Lord of Okehampton married Auberee/Alberade (?) d'Avranches, daughter of Richard Le Goz (?) Vicomte d'Eu, seigneur d'Avranches et d'Hiesmes.3,5,6,1 Baudouin de Brionne seigneur de Meulles et de Sap, Lord of Okehampton was born in 1022 at Le Sap, Departement de l'Orne, Basse-Normandie, France (now).7
Baudouin de Brionne seigneur de Meulles et de Sap, Lord of Okehampton was buried in February 1090 at All Saints Churchyard, Okehampton, West Devon Borough, Devonshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1022, Le Sap, Departement de l'Orne, Basse-Normandie, France
     DEATH     1090 (aged 67–68), Okehampton, West Devon Borough, Devon, England
     Baldwin de Brionne, 1st Lord of Okehampton, Sheriff of Devonshire was the second and youngest son of Gilbert de Brionne, 2nd Count of Eu, 2nd Count of Bronne (1000-1040). His mother was one daughters of the Count of Flanders, which remains a secret of history. He married Albreda de le Goz (1032-1088), daughter of Richard le Goz, Viscount of Avranches, and had had five children by that marriage: three sons and two daughters.
     All three of his sons died successively without progeny, and were succeeded by the progeny of their two sisters, about which surviving sources are obscure. Many people call him Baldwin Fitzgilbert, but this is inaccurate as he was a legitimate son of the Count of Eu. He was also one of the 52 Devon Domesday Book tenants-in-chief of King William the Conqueror.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Gilbert de Brionne 1000–1040
     Siblings
          Richard FitzGilbert 1030–1091
          Emma De Crispin De Conde 1030 – unknown
     BURIAL     All Saints Churchyard, Okehampton, West Devon Borough, Devon, England
     Created by: Natalie de Clare, Contes? de Markland, DGK
     Added: 24 Mar 2016
     Find A Grave Memorial 159988311.7
Baudouin de Brionne seigneur de Meulles et de Sap, Lord of Okehampton died in February 1090 at Okehampton, West Devon Borough, Devonshire, England.2,7
     ; Per Racines et Histoire: "Baudouin de Brionne alias Baldwin FitzGilbert + 02/1090 seigneur de Meulles et de Sap, Lord of Okehampton, Sherif de Devon (1080-1086), reçoit 160 seigneuries en Angleterre (Devon, Dorset, Somerset)
ép. Emma ou Auberée (Alberade) d’Avranches ° ~1045 (fille de Richard de Goz, vicomte d’Avranches ou de Mauger, vicomte de Cotentin ?)2"

; Per Med Lands:
     "BAUDOUIN de Brionne (-[Feb] 1090). Guillaume de Jumièges names "Richardum et Balduinum” as the two sons of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[941]. He and his brother are named as sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[942]. Seigneur de Sap et de Meules, Normandy, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[943]. Orderic Vitalis names “...Balduinus et Ricardus Gisleberti comitis filii...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[944]. Orderic Vitalis records that William I King of England built a castle within the walls of Exeter, after he suppressed the town’s rebellion, and appointed “Balduinum de Molis filium Gisleberti comitis” as custodian, dated to early 1067[945]. After the Norman conquest of England, William I King of England gave Baudouin about 160 lordships in Devon, Dorset and Somerset, among which he became Lord of Okehampton, Devon. “…Halduini [Balduini?] filii comitis Gilberti…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[946]. Sheriff of Devon 1080 to 1086. The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Baldoinus filius comitis", undated but listed among deaths recorded in Feb[947].
     "m ALBERADE, daughter of ---. Orderic Vitalis describes Alberade as the daughter of the amita of William II King of England[948]. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” married “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[949]. Her precise parentage has not yet been ascertained.
     "Baudouin & his wife had six children"
Med Lands cites:
[941] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312.
[942] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 209.
[943] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 209.
[944] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, XI, p. 121.
[945] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, p. 181.
[946] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Covenham Priory, Lincolnshire, I, p. 993.
[947] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Prieuré de Saint-Nicaise de Meulan, p. 238.
[948] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 209.
[949] Dugdale Monasticon V, Forde Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 377.1
GAV-26. Baudouin de Brionne seigneur de Meulles et de Sap, Lord of Okehampton was also known as Baldwin fits Gilbert seigneur de Meulles et de Sap, Lord of Okehampton.3,8,2

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normacre.htm#GeoffreyBrionnedied1015B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Eu.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 51, de CLARE 3:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  4. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I42033
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10.
  6. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Courtenay- Barons Courtenay, Earls of Devon, p. 140. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 March 2020), memorial page for Baldwin de Brionne (1022–1090), Find A Grave Memorial no. 159988311, citing All Saints Churchyard, Okehampton, West Devon Borough, Devon, England ; Maintained by Natalie de Clare, Contes? de Markland, DGK (contributor 48673746), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/159988311/baldwin-de_brionne. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Courtenay- Barons Courtenay, Earls of Devon, pp. 139-140.
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 13: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Eu.pdf

Alfred de Fougères Seigneur de Fougères1

M, #14635, d. 1048
FatherMien I (?) de Fougeres1 d. 1020
Last Edited7 Oct 2020
     Alfred de Fougères Seigneur de Fougères died in 1048.1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ALFRED de Fougères (-1048). "Mainonis avi mei…Alfridus genitor meus" are named in the undated charter under which "Maino" donated property to Sainte-Trinité de Fougères[572]. He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Fougères.
     "m ---. The name of Alfred's wife is not known."
Med Lands cites: [572] Fougères Sainte-Trinité I, p. 183.1

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#MeenIFougeresdied1020B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Walter/Gautier 1 Giffard seigneur de Longueville1,2

M, #14636, b. say 1010, d. before 1085
FatherGauthier Giffard Seigneur de Longueville1,3,4 b. c 1030, d. 1084
MotherErmengarde Flaitel5
Last Edited8 Mar 2020
     Walter/Gautier 1 Giffard seigneur de Longueville was born say 1010.6
Walter/Gautier 1 Giffard seigneur de Longueville died before 1085.6
     GKJ-25.

; companion of William the Conqueror.6,7

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 51, de CLARE 4. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00294144&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normacre.htm#ErmengardeFlaitelMWalterGiffard. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Giffard,_Lord_of_Longueville. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 104, GIFFARD 3.
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 184-1. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 104, GIFFARD 3:iii.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 104, GIFFARD 3:iv.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 104, GIFFARD 3:v.

Roger de Clare Seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec1

M, #14637, d. after 1131
FatherRichard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare2,3,4,5,1 b. b 1035, d. c 1090
MotherRohese Giffard2,6,1,5 b. 1034, d. 1118
Last Edited12 Mar 2020
     Roger de Clare Seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec died after 1131; Racines et Histoire and Med lands say d. aft 1131; Genealogics says d. 1130.6,5,1
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/1:156.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROGER FitzRichard (-after 1131). Guillaume of Jumièges names “Richardum strenuissimum militem” as the son of “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis”, adding that he donated property to Bec with “filii eius Gislebertus, Rogerius, Walterius, Rodbertus”[1506]. Orderic Vitalis names “Rogerium et Gislebertum, Gualterium et Rodbertum atque Ricardum” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filium] Ricardum” and his wife “Roaldem Gualterii Gifardi filiam”[1507]. He succeeded his father in [1090] as Seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec. He fought with Henry I King of England between 1111 and 1113, and saved the king's life at the battle of Bremulé in 1119[1508]. "Rogerius filius Ricardi cognatus regis" accompanied Mathilda, daughter of Henry I King of England, to Germany for her marriage to Emperor Heinrich V[1509]. "Comes Ricardus filius comitis Gisleberti" confirmed donations of property to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "Radulfus de Vuaterivilla et Ansuuidus apud Bosunvillam", with the consent of "Rogerii filii Ricardi et comitis Gisleberti patris mei", by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery), witnessed by "Herveio de Monte Morenci…"[1510]. He was succeeded at Bienfaite and Orbec by his nephew Gilbert FitzGilbert de Clare, later Earl of Pembroke.
     "m ---. The name of Roger's wife is not known.
     "Roger & his wife had one child:
     "     "a) MABEL ([1123/24]-after 1184)."
Med Lands cites:
[1506] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber IV, XVIII, p. 247.
[1507] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XIII, p. 344.
[1508] Orderic Vitalis VI 234-8, cited in Domesday Descendants, p. 399.
[1509] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, p. 201.
[1510] Caux Saint-Victor, II.2, p. 380.5


; Per Racines et Histoire: "Roger FitzRichard de Clare + après 1131 seigneur de Bienfaite et d’Orbec (1090) combat avec Henry 1er (1111/13), sauve le Roi à Brémule (1119), accompagne Mathilde (mariage avec l’empereur Heinrich IV) (son neveu Gilbert, futur earl of Pembroke hérite de ses titres et biens.)3" Roger de Clare Seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec was also known as Roger Fitz Richard d.s.p.2,6

; per Racines et Histoire: "seigneur de Bienfaite et d’Orbec (1090) combat avec Henry 1er (1111/13), sauve le Roi à Brémule (1119), accompagne Mathilde (mariage avec l’empereur Heinrich IV) (son neveu Gilbert, futur earl of Pembroke hérite de ses titres et biens.)6"

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Roger de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478461&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 51, de CLARE 4:iii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Eu.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106210&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#RichardBrionneClaredied1090B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10.

Walter Fitz Richard Lord of Netherwent1,2,3

M, #14638, d. 1138
FatherRichard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare2,4,5,6,7 b. b 1035, d. c 1090
MotherRohese Giffard2,4,7 b. 1034, d. 1118
Last Edited12 Mar 2020
     Walter Fitz Richard Lord of Netherwent married Isabel de Toeni, daughter of Raoul/Ralph IV de Toëny seigneur de Conches, Lord of Flamstead, co. Hertford and Alice (Judith) (?) of Northumberland, Heiress of Walthamstow.8,9
Walter Fitz Richard Lord of Netherwent was buried in 1138

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1075, Clare, St Edmundsbury Borough, Suffolk, England
     DEATH     10 Mar 1138 (aged 62–63), Clare, St Edmundsbury Borough, Suffolk, England
     Walter "FitzRichard" de Clare, 1st Lord of Nether Gwent, 3rd Lord of Striguil was the son of Richard "FitzGilbert" de Clare, 1st Lord of Clare (1024 - 1090) and Rohese de Giffard (1034 - 1113). He ever married and died childless. On his death his nephew, Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke, 3rd Lord of Clare, 4th Lord of Striguil (1100-1148), inherited his title of Lord of Nether Gwent as well as Striguil Castle in Chepstow, Monmouthshire, England. Striguil Castle had its named changed around 1400 to Chepstow Castle by which it is known today.
     When Lord de Clare was born King Henry I. of England bestowed upon him the Lordship of Nether Gwent. Walter de Clare would later go on to found Tintern Abbey on 9 May 1131. Lord de Clare was first cousin of William de Giffard, Lord Chancellor of England, Bishop of Winchester, who had introduced the first colony of Cistercians to Waverley, Surrey, in 1128. The Cistercian monks who lived at Tintern followed the Rule of St. Benedict which appealed to Lord de Clare. After being persuaded by Walter de Gifford Lord de Clare finally founded Tintern Abbey which would exist until the reign of King Henry VIII of England when His Majesty's Dissolution of the Monasteries ended monastic life in England.
     With this austere way of life, the Cistercians were one of the most successful orders in the 12th and 13th centuries. The Carta Caritatis (Charter of Love) laid out their basic principles, of obedience, poverty, chastity, silence, prayer, and work. This was Lord de Clares legacy which today sits in ruins.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Richard FitzGilbert 1030–1091
          Rohese De Giffard De Clare 1034–1118
     Siblings
          Gilbert De Clare 1055–1117
          Rohese FitzRichard 1060–1121
          Richard fitz Richard de Clare 1062–1107
          Robert FitzRichard De Clare 1064–1136
     BURIAL     Clare Priory, Clare, St Edmundsbury Borough, Suffolk, England
     Created by: Natalie de Clare, Contes? de Markland, DGK
     Added: 8 Jul 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 148868814.10
Walter Fitz Richard Lord of Netherwent died in 1138; Genealogics and Racines et Histoire say d. 1138; Boyer [2001:51] says d. 1137.2,7,4
     He was Founder of Tintern Abbey.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "WALTER FitzRichard de Clare (-1138). Guillaume of Jumièges names “Richardum strenuissimum militem” as the son of “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis”, adding that he donated property to Bec with “filii eius Gislebertus, Rogerius, Walterius, Rodbertus”[1572]. Orderic Vitalis names “Rogerium et Gislebertum, Gualterium et Rodbertum atque Ricardum” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filium] Ricardum” and his wife “Roaldem Gualterii Gifardi filiam”[1573]. Lord of Netherwent, with the castle of Strigoil, later known as Chepstow. He founded Tintern Abbey in 1131. He was succeeded by his nephew Gilbert FitzGilbert de Clare, later Earl of Pembroke.
     "[m ISABELLE de Tosny, daughter of RALPH de Tosny & his wife Adelisa of Huntingdon (-after [1158]). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.]"
Med Lands cites:
[1572] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber IV, XVIII, p. 247.
[1573] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XIII, p. 344.8


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Walter de Clare or Walter fitzRichard at an unknown age (died probably 1137 or 1138) was an Anglo-Norman nobleman and founder of Tintern Abbey. A member of a powerful family, Walter was a younger son who was given lands around Chepstow Castle by King Henry I of England sometime before 1119. Walter continued to appear in Henry's charters for the rest of the reign, and was an early supporter of King Stephen of England, Henry's successor as king. Walter last appears in the historical record in 1136 and died without children. His lands went to his nephew.
Family and background
     "Walter was a younger son of Richard de Clare, a Norman lord and landholder who also held Clare and Tonbridge in England. Walter's mother was Rohese, the daughter of Walter Giffard.[3] Rohese and Richard had at least six sons and two daughters. Besides Walter, they were Roger, Gilbert, Richard, Robert and Godfrey. The daughters were Alice and Rohese.[4] Walter's family of de Clare was a powerful one, with members of it having participated in rebellions and conspiracies against Henry's older brother King William II of England (d. 1100) in 1088 and 1095.[5]
Life
     "Little is known of Walter's life, most of it deriving from the Gesta Normannorum Ducum written by William of Jumieges. The first mention of Walter in the historical record is when he was granted the lordship of Netherwent, including Chepstow Castle beside the River Wye, by King Henry I of England. This occurred sometime before 1119.[3] Walter's lordship of Netherwent or Chepstow was generally considered a feudal barony,[6] and Walter is considered a baron by most historians.[3][7][b] Walter's land grant was part of a larger series of grants by Henry in southern Wales, including some given to Walter's brother Gilbert de Clare.[9] Henry also granted lands to another brother of Gilbert and Walter: Robert, who received Little Dunmow. These grants from the king to the Clare family helped bring them over to the royal side during the conflict between the king and his nephew William Clito over the control of Normandy in the late 1110s.[5]
     "Walter was a witness on 12 of Henry's royal charters, all before 1131. He also was a witness for some royal charters issued by Henry's successor, King Stephen of England, early in Stephen's reign. One was a charter issued at Henry's funeral on 4 January 1136 and another at Stephen's court at Easter 1136. These two charter attestations show that he was an early supporter of Stephen in the king's seizure of the throne from Henry's daughter Matilda. These early charters from Stephen's reign are Walter's last appearances in documents during his lifetime.[3] Also in 1136 Walter was in charge of the defense of Le Sap in Normandy against Geoffrey V of Anjou.[10]
     "Walter established Tintern Abbey as a Cistercian monastery on 9 May 1131, the second Cistercian monastic house to be endowed in Britain.[c] The monks for the establishment came from L'Aumône Abbey in France. Although the ruins of Tintern were the subject of a poem by William Wordsworth an unknown date and a painting by J. M. W. Turner, these ruins are not Walter's original buildings, as little remains of them.[3]
Death and legacy
     "Historians differ over whether Walter ever married, but agree that he died childless. Michael Altschul lists no wife in his work on the Clares,[12] and C. Warren Hollister, revising J. Horace Round's entry in the Dictionary of National Biography for the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, states that it is unclear if Walter married. Jennifer Ward, however, states that Walter married Isabella, a daughter of Ralph de Tosny.[13] Katharine Keats-Rohan states that Walter married Isabel, a daughter of Ralph de Tosny, and states that his widow gave an endowment to the cathedral chapter of Salisbury Cathedral for the sake of Walter's soul.[10] Walter was alive at Easter in 1136,[e] but died after that date. The obituary for Walter from Tintern gives his death date as 10 March, but does not state a year.[15] A date of 1138 is usually given for his death; though this has not been proven, it is likely.[3] His estates passed to his nephew Gilbert de Clare, son of his brother Gilbert,[3] who had died around 1115.[6]
Notes
a. Other versions of his name include Walter fitz Richard of Clare[1] and Walter fitz Richard de Clare.[2]
b. These lands had previously been held by Roger de Breteuil, who rebelled in 1075 and had his lands confiscated by the king.[8]
c. The first was Waverley Abbey, which was founded in 1128.[3]
d. The poem has the full title of "Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey", although it is often shortened to "Tintern Abbey" and was published in 1798.[11]
e.aster in 1136 occurred on 22 March.[14]
Citations
1. Hollister Henry I p. 552
2. King King Stephen p. 380
3. Round and Hollister "Clare, Walter de" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
4. Mortimer "Clare, Richard de" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
5. Hollister Henry I pp. 339–340
6. Sanders English Baronies p. 111
7. King King Stephen p. 60
8. Altschul Baronial Family p. 20
9. Hollister Henry I p. 236
10. Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 400
11. Kuiper Merriam Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature p. 1117
12. Altschul Baronial Family Table I after p. 322
13. Ward "Royal Service" Anglo Norman Studies IX p. 262
14. Cheney Handbook of Dates p. 84
15. Cockayne Complete Peerage X p. 349
References
** Altschul, Michael (1965). A Baronial Family in Medieval England: The Clares 1217–1314. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Press. OCLC 796745.
** Cheney, C. R., ed. (1995). Handbook of Dates for Students of English History (Reprint ed.) Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-55151-X.
** Cokayne, George E. (1982) [1945]. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant. X (Microprint ed.) Gloucester, UK: A. Sutton. ISBN 0-904387-82-8.
** Hollister, C. Warren (2001). Frost, Amanda Clark (ed.) Henry I. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-08858-2.
** Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. (1999). Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents, 1066–1166: Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum. Ipswich, UK: Boydell Press. ISBN 0-85115-863-3.
** King, Edmund (2010). King Stephen. The English Monarchs Series. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-11223-8.
** Kuipier, Kathleen, ed. (1994). Merriam-Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature. Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster. ISBN 0-87779-042-6.
** Mortimer, Richard (2004). "Clare, Richard de (1030x35–1087x90)" ((subscription or UK public library membership required)). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5445. Retrieved 7 January 2015.
** Round, J. H; Hollister, C. Warren (2004). "Clare, Walter de (d. 1137/8?)" ((subscription or UK public library membership required)). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5450. Retrieved 7 January 2015.
** Sanders, I. J. (1960). English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086–1327. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press. OCLC 931660.
** Ward, Jennifer C. (1989). "Royal Service and Reward: The Clare Family and the Crown, 1066–1154". In Brown, R. Allen (ed.) Anglo-Norman Studies XI: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1988. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell Press. pp. 261–278. ISBN 0-85115-526-X."11

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: 3/1:156..7 Walter Fitz Richard Lord of Netherwent was also known as Walter de Clare Lord of Netherwent.7

; per Racines et Histoire: "Walter FitzRichard de Clare + 1138 Lord of Netherwent, châtelain de Strigoil (Chepstow), fonde Tintern Abbey (1131) (son neveu Gilbert, futur earl of Pembroke hérite de ses titres et biens) ép. Isabelle de Tosny + après 1138 (fille de Ralph de Tosny.)3"

Family

Isabel de Toeni d. a 1158

Citations

  1. No issue, founded Tintern Abbey in 1131.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 51, de CLARE 4:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Eu.pdf
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106210&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#RichardBrionneClaredied1090B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walter de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478462&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#WalterFitzRichardClaredied1138
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#IsabelleTosnyMWalterFitzRichard
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 March 2020), memorial page for Walter “1st Lord of Nether Gwent” De Clare (1075–10 Mar 1138), Find A Grave Memorial no. 148868814, citing Clare Priory, Clare, St Edmundsbury Borough, Suffolk, England ; Maintained by Natalie de Clare, Contes? de Markland, DGK (contributor 48673746), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/148868814/walter-de_clare. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_de_Clare. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Adelize/Adelise de Clare1,2

F, #14639, b. circa 1068, d. between 1125 and 1135
FatherRichard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare1,3,4,5,6 b. b 1035, d. c 1090
MotherRohese Giffard1,6 b. 1034, d. 1118
Last Edited13 Mar 2020
     Adelize/Adelise de Clare married Gauthier II Tirell.1,2,6 Adelize/Adelise de Clare was born circa 1068.2
Adelize/Adelise de Clare died between 1125 and 1135; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELISA FitzRichard de Clare (-[1125/35] or after, bur Conflans Sainte-Honorine). She is called "Adelidem filiam Ricardi de…prosapia Gifardorum" by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her marriage[1578]. Her identification as the daughter of Richard de Clare was first made by Round[1579]. "Adelissa [mater Gauterii filii Gauterii Tirelli]" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise by charter dated [1125/35] which states that the donation was made after the death of her son and the latter was buried at the abbey. The same charter also records a later donation by "Gauterius Tirellus pater memorati Gauterii iuvenis" witnessed by "Ada uxore Hugonis Tirelli, Gauterius Tirelli et Hugonis filii eius"[1580]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Adeliz uxor Walti Tirelli" in Essex in relation to "eisde plac de La Wingeha"[1581]. Her place of burial is confirmed by the charter dated 9 Jun 1147 under which [her son and grandson] “Hugo Tirellus et Gualterius filius eius” donated “decimam...apud Spieias” to Conflans Sainte Honorine, for the soul of “matrie sue que apud Conflentum sanctimonialis fuit et ibi quiescit”[1582].
     "m GAUTHIER [II] Tirell, son of GODRICH & his wife Aremburgis --- (-Jerusalem after [1140])."
Med Lands cites:
[1578] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book X, pp. 293-5.
[1579] Round (1895), p. 355.
[1580] Pontoise Saint-Martin, LXXXV, p. 66.
[1581] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Essex, p. 56.
[1582] Depoin ‘Les comtes de Beaumont-sur-Oise’ (1915), III, 36, p. 79.7

     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: 3/1:156..6

; Per Racines et Histoire: "Adelise de Clare ° ~1068 (citée charte 1125/35)
     ép. sir Walter (Gautier) Tyrel, Châtelain de Poix et de Pontoise (fils de ? de Poix et d’Eremburge) (ll tue accidentellement ? le Roi Guillaume II «Le Roux» - 08/1100.)5"

Family

Gauthier II Tirell b. 1065, d. b 1140

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 51, de CLARE 4:v. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106210&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#RichardBrionneClaredied1090B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Eu.pdf
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelize de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478465&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#AdelisaClareMGauthierTirell

Gauthier II Tirell1

M, #14640, b. 1065, d. before 1140
Last Edited13 Mar 2020
     Gauthier II Tirell married Adelize/Adelise de Clare, daughter of Richard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare and Rohese Giffard.2,3,4 Gauthier II Tirell was born in 1065 at Tonbridge, Tonbridge and Malling Borough, co. Kent, England.5
Gauthier II Tirell died before 1140 at Jerusalem, Israel (now).1
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GAUTHIER [II] Tirell, son of GAUDRY [I] [de Corbeil] & his wife Aremburge --- (-[Jerusalem] before [1140]). An undated charter, dated to 1092 as explained above, records the donation of “ecclesiam...sancti Dyonisii de Bunduslo” to Longpont by "Fredericus, Gaudrici filius et Isembardus cognomento Paganus, filius Anselli de Stampis", with the consent of "parentis isti: Aremburgis mater eiusdem Frederici et fratres eiusdem Frederici…Gaufredus et Bego…et Gautherius Tyrellus et Mathildis soror eorum"[912]. A charter dated [5 Apr/24 Sep] 1097 records that "Dnus Hugo" went to "Corbolium castrum" where “alios parentes filios Herenburgis neptis sue...unus Fredericus...alius Gaufredus, tertius Walterius et quartus Bego...cum matre eorum Herenburge et sororibus suis filiabus eiusdem Herenburgis” confirmed his donation to Saint-Martin-des-Champs, witnessed by “Odo comes Corboili, Fredericus filius Balduini Belvacensis, Godolricus vicecomes...”[913]. Châtelain de Poix, châtelain de Pontoise: Orderic Vitalis records that "Gualterio Tirello…de Francia miles…Picis et Pontisariæ oppidanus" accidentally shot William II King of England with an arrow [in Aug 1100] after which he fled to France, and died many years later in Jerusalem[914]. The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, suggests that "un chevalier leur cousin…Gaultier Tirel" was responsible for the death of William II King of England in 1100[915]. Suger's Vita Ludovici records that "Galterio Tirello" was accused of killing King William but adds that he later swore that he was never in that part of the forest with the king[916]. A charter dated 23 Oct 1118 records "Gualterii Tirelli" donated property to the priory which he founded in his castle of Poix, with the consent of "uxore sua Adelicia et Hugone filio eius"[917]. A charter dated to [1140] records that "Galterius Tyrellus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Longpont on leaving for Jerusalem, that "Gaufredus de Edera, frater ipsius Galterii" withheld it, but that it was restored on his return by "Ada uxor sua cognomento Machaina et filius eorum Galterius Tyrellus"[918].]
     "m ADELISA de Clare, daughter of RICHARD FitzGilbert Lord of Clare & his wife Rohese Giffard of Buckingham (-[1125/35] or after, bur Conflans Sainte-Honorine). She is called "Adelidem filiam Ricardi de…prosapia Gifardorum" by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her marriage[919]. Her identification as the daughter of Richard de Clare was first made by Round[920]. A charter dated 23 Oct 1118 records "Gualterii Tirelli" donated property to the priory which he founded in his castle of Poix, with the consent of "uxore sua Adelicia et Hugone filio eius"[921]. "Adelissa [mater Gauterii filii Gauterii Tirelli]" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise by charter dated [1125/35] which states that the donation was made after the death of her son and the latter was buried at the abbey. The same charter also records a later donation by "Gauterius Tirellus pater memorati Gauterii iuvenis" witnessed by "Ada uxore Hugonis Tirelli, Gauterius Tirelli et Hugonis filii eius"[922]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Adeliz uxor Walti Tirelli" in Essex in relation to "eisde plac de La Wingeha"[923]. Her place of burial is confirmed by the charter dated 9 Jun 1147 under which [her son and grandson] “Hugo Tirellus et Gualterius filius eius” donated “decimam...apud Spieias” to Conflans Sainte Honorine, for the soul of “matrie sue que apud Conflentum sanctimonialis fuit et ibi quiescit”[924]."
Med Lands cites:
[912] Longpont Notre-Dame, CXCIV, p. 179.
[913] Paris Saint-Martin-des-Champs, Tome I, 79b, p. 129.
[914] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber X, XIV, pp. 86-91.
[915] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF, Tome XIII, p. 246.
[916] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis I, p. 13.
[917] Pontoise Saint-Martin, p. 453, quoting Arch. de l’Oise, H. 112.
[918] Longpont Notre-Dame, CLXXVII, p. 167.
[919] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, pp. 293-5.
[920] Round (1895), p. 355.
[921] Pontoise Saint-Martin, p. 453, quoting Arch. de l’Oise, H. 112.
[922] Pontoise Saint-Martin LXXXV, p. 66.
[923] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Essex, p. 56.
[924] Depoin, ‘Les comtes de Beaumont-sur-Oise’ (1915), III, 36, p. 79.1,6


;
Racines et Histoire shows Gautier II Tyrel (c1068-aft 1110) as m. Aélis Giffard. This seems to be the same man as identified by Med Lands as the husband of Adelize de Clare.
"Gautier II Tyrel ° ~1068 ? + dès 1110 seigneur de Poix, Bucy, Croixrault, Equennes, Famechon, Frémontiers et Moyencourt, Namps-au-Mont, Agnières, Bergicourt, Gauville et Méricourt, Châtelain de Pontoise, croisé, tue accidentellement 02/08/1100 au cours d’une chasse le Roi d’Angleterre Guillaume II «Rufus» («Le Roux») et doit s’exiler en France (cité 1069 cession de Raoul de Crépy, comte d’Amiens à la Cathédrale ; accord 1087 avec Enguerrand, comte d’Amiens, seigneur de Boves et de Coucy ; héberge Louis VI à Pontoise 1102 à l’Hôtel de Poix ensuite dit d’Orgemont)
     ép. Aélis Giffard, dame de Sélincourt (fille de Richard Giffard et de Maud de Mortimer, fille de Walter/Gautier de Mortimer, proches du Conquérant) (fonde un prieuré à Sélincourt dès 1131 ; + religieuse au prieuré de Conflans, dépendant du Bec) (armes : «De gueules à 3 lions léopardés d’argent passant l’un sur l’autre» (Angleterre) et «Palé d’or et de gueules de 6 pièces» (France.)7"

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Walter Tirel III[1] (1065 – some time after 1100), was an Anglo-Norman nobleman. He is infamous for his involvement in the death of King William II of England, also known as William Rufus.
Life
     "Walter Tirel was born in Tonbridge, Kent, the son of Norman Walter Tirel, and was lord of Poix-de-Picardie in France, and of Langham, Essex (as appears in the Domesday Survey). By marriage, he became linked to the English royal family, having wed Adeliza, the daughter of royal kinsman, Richard Fitz Gilbert. He died some time after 1100. The grandson of Walter and Adeliza, Hugh Tyrrel, took part in the Norman Conquest of Ireland and became the first baron of Castleknock.
Death of William II
     "On 2 August 1100, King William II organized a hunting trip in the New Forest. William was presented with six arrows, on the eve of the hunt; taking four for himself, he handed the other two to Tirel, saying, "Bon archer, bonnes fleches" ("[To the] good archer, the good arrows.")
     "On the subsequent hunt, the party spread out as they chased their prey, and William, in the company of Tirel, became separated from the others. It was the last time that William was seen alive.
     "In their search for prey, according to chroniclers, Tirel let loose a wild shot at a passing stag. However, instead of striking the stag as intended, the arrow pierced William in the chest, puncturing his lungs. Stricken with panic, Walter leapt upon his horse and fled to France. A version of this tale is given by William of Malmesbury in his Chronicle of the Kings of the English (c. 1128), in which Tirel is referred to as "Walter Thurold":
     "The day before the king died he dreamt that he went to hell and the Devil said to him "I can't wait for tomorrow because we can finally meet in person!". He suddenly awoke. He commanded a light to be brought, and forbade his attendants to leave him. The next day he went into the forest... He was attended by a few persons... Walter Thurold remained with him, while the others, were on the chase. The sun was now declining, when the king, drawing his bow and letting fly an arrow, slightly wounded a stag which passed before him... The stag was still running... The king, followed it a long time with his eyes, holding up his hand to keep off the power of the sun's rays. At this instant Walter decided to kill another stag. Oh, gracious God! the arrow pierced the king's breast.
     "On receiving the wound the king uttered not a word; but breaking off the shaft of the arrow where it projected from his body... This accelerated his death. Walter immediately ran up, but as he found him senseless, he leapt upon his horse, and escaped with the utmost speed. Indeed there were none to pursue him: some helped his flight; others felt sorry for him.
     "The king's body was placed on a cart and conveyed to the cathedral at Winchester... blood dripped from the body all the way. Here he was buried within the tower. The next year, the tower fell down. William Rufus died in 1100... aged forty years. He was a man much pitied by the clergy... he had a soul which they could not save... He was loved by his soldiers but hated by the people because he caused them to be plundered.
Murder or accident?
     "To some chroniclers, such an "Act of God" was a just end for a wicked king. However, over the centuries, the obvious suggestion that one of William's many enemies may have had a hand in this extraordinary event has been repeatedly made. Even chroniclers of the time point out that Walter was renowned as a keen bowman, and unlikely to fire such an impetuous shot. William's brother Henry, who was among the hunting party that day, benefited directly from William's death, as he was shortly after crowned king. Henry, who once threw a man off a tower to his death,[2] was not normally troubled by moral scruples: on the other hand it has been argued that fratricide was then regarded as a particularly horrible crime,[3] and even the suspicion of it would have done great harm to the new King's reputation. It may be significant, as Henry's modern biographer remarks, that nobody at the time seems to have had any such suspicions: contemporaries took it for granted that the death was an accident, such accidents being common enough.[4]
     "Abbot Suger, another chronicler, was Thurold's friend and sheltered him in his French exile. He said later:
It was laid to the charge of a certain noble, Walter Thurold, that he had shot the king with an arrow; but I have often heard him, when he had nothing to fear nor to hope, solemnly swear that on the day in question he was not in the part of the forest where the king was hunting, nor ever saw him in the forest at all.

Notes
1. Also called Tyrell, Thurold, Turold; French Gaultier or Gautier Tirel
2. Hollister, C. Warren Henry I Yale University Press 2001 p.73
3. Brooke, Christopher From Alfred to Henry III 1961 Sphere Edition p. 167
4. Hollister p.104
References
** Hollister, C. Warren. "The Strange Death of William Rufus." Speculum, 48.4 (1973): 637-653.
** Warren, W. L. "The Death of William Rufus." History Today, 9 (1959)
External links
** J.H. Round's Medieval England: Walter Tirel and his wife. [inaccessible 13 March 2020]"5 Gauthier II Tirell was also known as Walter/Gautier Tyrel châtelain de Poix et de Pontoise.2,3 Gauthier II Tirell was also known as Walter III Tirell.5

Family

Adelize/Adelise de Clare b. c 1068, d. bt 1125 - 1135

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/pardreman.htm#GauthierIITirell. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 51, de CLARE 4:v. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelize de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00478465&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Tirel. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/parcorroc.htm#GauthierIITirellA
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Tyrel de Poix, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Tyrel-de-Poix.pdf