Waleran/Galeran IV de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Worcester1,2

M, #4711, b. 1104, d. 10 April 1166
FatherSir Robert de Beaumont 1st Earl of Leicester, Comte de Beaument et Meulan Meulan3,2,4 b. 1049, d. 5 Jun 1118
MotherIsabelle/Elisabeth de Vermandois Countess of Leicester3,2,5 b. c 1081, d. 13 Feb 1131
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited18 Mar 2020
     Waleran/Galeran IV de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Worcester was born in 1104 at Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France (now).1,2,6 He married Maud (?) of England, daughter of Stephen (Etienne) (?) de Blois, King of England and Mathilde I (?) comtesse de Boulogne ed de Lens, in April 1136; married on Easter 1136.1 Waleran/Galeran IV de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Worcester married Agnès de Montfort Dame de Gournay-sur-Marne, daughter of Amauri III de Montfort seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury, comte d'Évreux and Agnès de Garlande dame de Rochefort, in 1141.1,2,7
Waleran/Galeran IV de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Worcester died on 10 April 1166 at Ler Preaux, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France (now).1,2,6
Waleran/Galeran IV de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Worcester was buried after 10 April 1166 at Abbey of Saint Peter, Les Preaux, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1104, Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
     DEATH     9 Apr 1166 (aged 61–62), Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
     Waleran de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, 1st Earl of Worcester , was the son of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester and Elizabeth de Vermandois, and the twin brother of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester. He is not referred to by any surname in a contemporary document other than 'Waleran son of Count Robert'.
     Waleran was born in 1104, the eldest of twin sons of Robert de Beaumont, count of Meulan, who was also to become earl of Leicester in 1107. On their father's death in June 1118, the boys came into the wardship of King Henry I of England. They remained in his care till late in 1120 when they were declared adult and allowed to succeed to their father's lands by a division already arranged between the king and their father before his death. By the arrangement, Waleran succeeded to the county of Meulan upriver on the Seine from the Norman border, and the principal family Norman honors of Beaumont and Pont Audemer. His great possessions included the forest of Brotonne, which was centered on his castle of Vatteville on the left bank of the Seine. As part of the family arrangement, Waleran also received a large estate in Dorset centered on the manor of Sturminster Marshall.
     He married, firstly, Matilda, daughter of King Stephen of England and Matilda of Boulogne, Countess de Boulogne, about March 1136. She died in 1137 aged only four. He married, secondly, Agnes de Montfort, daughter of Amaury III de Montfort, Count of Evreux, and Agnes de Garlande, in 1141/2.
     His children with Agnes de Montfort (the boys as they appear in order in his 1165 charter to Gournay priory):
** Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan.
** Isabelle de Meulan (d. 10 May 1220), married twice:
1. ca 1161 Geoffroy, lord of Mayenne;
2. ca 1170 Maurice II, lord of Craon.

** Waleran de Meulan
** Amaury de Meulan, lord of Gournay-sur-Marne.
** Roger de Meulan or Beaumont, viscount of Evreux.
** Raoul (Ralph) de Meulan.
** Etienne (Stephen) de Meulan.
** Mary de Meulan.
     Twenty days before his death he entered the abbey of St Peter of Préaux, the ancestral abbey of his family south of Pont Audemer in Normandy, and died as a monk there on 9 or 10 April 1166. He was buried in its chapter house alongside several other family members
     Family Members
     Parents
          Robert de Beaumont 1049–1118
          Isabel Vermandois Beaumont de Warenne 1081–1131
     Siblings
          Robert de Beaumont 1104–1168
          Isabel Elizabeth De Beaumont De Clare 1105–1172
     Half Siblings
          Reginald de Warenne 1113–1179
          William de Warenne 1118–1148
          Ada De Warenne De Huntingdon 1120–1178
     Children
          Isabelle de Beaumont Craon unknown–1220
     BURIAL     Abbey of Saint Peter, Les Preaux, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 7 Oct 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 59744892.1,2,6
     He was Comte de Meulan.2

; weis 50-25.8 GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

; In 1138 STEPHEN conferred the Earldom of Worcester on Waleran, son of Robert de Beaumont Earl of Leicester by a granddaughter of HENRY I of France. This was among other things an attempt to secure Waleran's support in his struggle against MATILDA or MAUD following the death of HENRY I of England, one of whose leading military men Waleran had been. Under STEPHEN's successor HENRY II the Earldom seems not to have been recognised.

; twin to his borther, Robert.1 He was Earl of Worcester.1

Family 1

Maud (?) of England d. c 1141

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 18, de BEAUMONT-6:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 5 page (The Sires de Beaumont-le-Roger): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont5.html
  3. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, ABeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 42. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I de Beaumont: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120986&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth de Vermandois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015375&tree=LEO
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 18 March 2020), memorial page for Waleran de Beaumont (1104–9 Apr 1166), Find A Grave Memorial no. 59744892, citing Abbey of Saint Peter, Les Preaux, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/59744892/waleran-de_beaumont. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S1967] J Bunot, "Bunot email 27 Sept 2005: "Le Bouteiller/Breaute (Baillon)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/xdExALvLFSk/m/CqmJPHK1txMJ) to e-mail address, 27 Sept 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 27 Sept 2005."
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-25, p. 52. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#IsabelleMeulandied1220. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Alfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia1,2,3,4,5,6,7

M, #4712, b. 1105, d. 21 August 1157
FatherRaimund (?) Count of Burgundy, Galicia & D'Amans1,2,8,3,9,4,5,6 b. c 1045, d. 26 Mar 1107
MotherInfanta doña Urraca Alfonsez (?) Queen of Galicia, Castile & Leon1,2,8,3,4,5,6 b. bt 1081 - 1082, d. 4 Mar 1126
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited12 Aug 2020
     Alfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia was born in 1105 at Castilla, Spain; Leo van de Pas says b. 1104.4,5,2 He married Berenguela Raimundo (?) de Barcelona, daughter of Ramon Berenguer III "el Grande" (?) Count of Barcelona, Besalu and Cerdagne and Dulce Aldonza Milhaud de Gevaudan Countess of Geveaudan, on 17 November 1128 at Saldana, Castile, Spain (now);
His 1st wife.4,5,10,11,12 Alfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia married RixaRichildeRyksa (?) Princess of Silesia, Queen of Castile, daughter of Wladyslaw II 'Wygnaniec' (?) King of Poland and Agnes von Babenberg Queen Consort of Poland, in July 1152;
His 2nd wife; her 1st husband. Med Lands says m. Oct/Dec 1152.13,2,4,5,14,15,12,16
Alfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia died on 21 August 1157 at Fresneda, Spain (now).5,2,4
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Alfonso VII (1 March 1105 - 21 August 1157), born Alfonso Raimúndez, called the Emperor (el Emperador), became the King of Galicia in 1111[1] and King of León and Castile in 1126. Alfonso first used the title Emperor of All Spain, alongside his mother Urraca, once his mother vested him with the direct rule of Toledo in 1116. Alfonso later held another investiture in 1135 in a grand ceremony reasserting his claims to the Imperial title. He was the son of Urraca of León and Raymond of Burgundy, the first of the House of Ivrea to rule in the Iberian peninsula.
     "Alfonso was a dignified and somewhat enigmatic figure. His rule was characterised by the renewed supremacy of the western kingdoms of Christian Iberia over the eastern (Navarre and Aragón) after the reign of Alfonso the Battler. He also sought to make the imperial title meaningful in practice, though his attempts to rule over both Christian and Muslim populations was even less successful. His hegemonic intentions never saw fruition, however. During his tenure, Portugalbecame de facto independent, in 1128, and was recognized as de jure independent, in 1143. He was a patron of poets, including, probably, the troubadour Marcabru.
Succession to three kingdoms
     "In 1111, Diego Gelmírez, Bishop of Compostela and the count of Traba, crowned and anointed[2] Alfonso King of Galicia in the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela.[3] He was a child, but his mother had (1109) succeeded to the united throne of León-Castile-Galicia and desired to assure her son's prospects and groom him for his eventual succession. By 1125 he had inherited the formerly Muslim Kingdom of Toledo. On 10 March 1126, after the death of his mother, he was crowned in León and immediately began the recovery of the Kingdom of Castile, which was then under the domination of Alfonso the Battler. By the Peace of Támara of 1127, the Battler recognised Alfonso VII of Castile. The territory in the far east of his dominion, however, had gained much independence during the rule of his mother and experienced many rebellions. After his recognition in Castile, Alfonso fought to curb the autonomy of the local barons.
     "When Alfonso the Battler, King of Navarre and Aragón, died without descendants in 1134, he willed his kingdom to themilitary orders. The aristocracy of both kingdoms rejected this. García Ramírez, Count of Monzón was elected in Navarre while Alfonso pretended to the throne of Aragón. The nobles chose another candidate in the dead king's brother, Ramiro II. Alfonso responded by occupying La Rioja, conquering Zaragoza, and governing the realms in unison. From this point, the arms of Zaragoza began to appear in those of León.
     "In several skirmishes, he defeated the joint Navarro-Aragonese army and put the kingdoms to vassalage. He had the strong support of the lords north of the Pyrenees, who held lands as far as the River Rhône. In the end, however, the combined forces of the Navarre and Aragón were too much for his control. At this time, he helped Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona, in his wars with the other Catalan counties to unite the old Marca Hispanica.
Imperial rule
     "A vague tradition had always assigned the title of emperor to the sovereign who held León. Sancho the Greatconsidered the city the imperiale culmen and minted coins with the inscription Imperator totius Hispaniae after being crowned in it. Such a sovereign was considered the most direct representative of the Visigothic kings, who had been themselves the representatives of the Roman Empire. But though appearing in charters, and claimed by Alfonso VI of León andAlfonso the Battler, the title had been little more than a flourish of rhetoric.
     "In 1135, Alfonso was crowned "Emperor of Spain" in the Cathedral of León.[4] By this, he probably wished to assert his authority over the entire peninsula and his absolute leadership of the Reconquista. He appears to have striven for the formation of a national unity which Spain had never possessed since the fall of the Visigothic kingdom. The elements he had to deal with could not be welded together. The weakness of Aragon enabled him to make his superiority effective. After Afonso Henriquesrecognised him as liege in 1137, Alfonso VII lost the Battle of Valdevez in 1141 thereby affirming Portugal's independence in theTreaty of Zamora (1143).[5] In 1143, he himself recognised this status quo and consented to the marriage of Petronila of Aragonwith Ramon Berenguer IV, a union which combined Aragon and Catalonia into the Crown of Aragon.
War against Al-Andalus
     "Alfonso was a pious prince. He introduced the Cistercians to Iberia by founding a monastery at Fitero. He adopted a militant attitude towards the Moors of Al-Andalus, especially the Almoravids. From 1138, when he besieged Coria, Alfonso led a series of crusades subjugating the Almoravids. After a seven-month siege, he took the fortress of Oreja near Toledo and, as theChronica Adefonsi Imperatoris tells it:
". . . early in the morning the castle was surrendered and the towers were filled with Christian knights, and the royal standards were raised above a high tower. Those who held the standards shouted out loud and proclaimed "Long live Alfonso, emperor of León and Toledo!"

     "In 1142, Alfonso besieged Coria a second time and took it.[6] In 1144, he advanced as far as Córdoba. Two years later, theAlmohads invaded and he was forced to refortify his southern frontier and come to an agreement with the Almoravid Ibn Ganiya for their mutual defence. WhenPope Eugene III preached the Second Crusade, Alfonso VII, with García Ramírez of Navarre and Ramon Berenguer IV, led a mixed army of Catalans and Franks, with a Genoese-Pisan navy, in a crusade against the rich port city of Almería, which was occupied in October 1147. A third of the city was granted to Genoa and subsequently leased out to Otto de Bonvillano, a Genoese citizen. It was Castile's first Mediterranean seaport.[7] In 1151, Alfonso signed the Treaty of Tudilén with Ramon Berenguer. The treaty defined the zones of conquest in Andalusia in order to prevent the two rulers from coming into conflict. Six years later, Almería entered into Almohad possession. Alfonso was returning from an expedition against them when he died in pass of Muradel in the Sierra Morena, possibly at Viso del Marqués (Ciudad Real).[8]
Legacy
     "Alfonso was at once a patron of the church and a protector, though not a supporter of, the Muslims, who were a minority of his subjects. His reign ended in an unsuccessful campaign against the rising power of the Almohads. Though he was not actually defeated, his death in the pass, while on his way back to Toledo, occurred in circumstances which showed that no man could be what he claimed to be - "king of the men of the two religions." Furthermore, by dividing his realm between his sons, he ensured that Christendom would not present the new Almohad threat with a united front.
Family
     "In November 1128, he married Berenguela,[9] daughter of Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona. She died in 1149. Their children were:
1.     Sancho III of Castile (1134-1158)
2.     Ramon, living 1136, died in infancy
3.     Ferdinand II of León (1137-1188)
4.     Constance (c.1138-1160), married Louis VII of France
5.     Sancha (c.1139-1179), married Sancho VI of Navarre
6.     García (c.1142-1145/6)
7.     Alfonso (c.1144-by 1149)
     "In 1152, Alfonso married Richeza of Poland, the daughter of Ladislaus II the Exile.[10] They had:
1.     Ferdinand, (1153-1157)
2.     Sancha (1155-1208), the wife of Alfonso II of Aragón.
     "Alfonso also had two mistresses, having children by both. By an Asturian noblewoman named Guntroda Pérez, he had an illegitimate daughter, Urraca (1132-1164), who married García Ramírez of Navarre, the mother retiring to a convent in 1133.[11] Later in his reign, he formed a liaison with Urraca Fernández, widow of countRodrigo Martínez and daughter of Fernando Garcés de Hita, an apparent grandson of García Sánchez III of Navarre, having a daughter Stephanie the Unfortunate(1148-1180), who was killed by her jealous husband, Fernán Ruiz de Castro.
References
1. Reilly 2003, p. 59.
2. Fletcher 1984, p. 133.
3. Stroll 2004, p. 239.
4. France 2005, p. 122.
5. Lourie 1975, p. 635.
6. Reilly 2003, p. 60.
7. Reilly 1998, p. 309.
8. Powers 2010, p. 432.
9. Riley-Smith 1990, p. 48.
10. Barton 1997, p. 286.
11. Graham-Leigh 2005, p. table 4.
12. Reilly 1998, pp. 27–28.
13. Barton 1997, p. 13.
14. Hanley 2019, p. 233.
15. Bryson 1999, p. 29.
16. Reilly 1998, p. 114.
17. Reilly 1998, p. 307.
18. Reilly 1998, p. 143.
Bibliography
** Barton, Simon (1997). The Aristocracy in Twelfth-century León and Castile. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521497275.
** Bryson, David (1999). Queen Jeanne and the Promised Land: Dynasty, Homeland, Religion and Violence in Sixteenth-Century France. Brill.
** Fletcher, R.A. (1984). Saint James's catapult : the life and times of Diego Gelmírez of Santiago de Compostela. Oxford [Oxfordshire]: Clarendon Press. ISBN 978-0198225812.
** France, John (2005). The Crusades and the Expansion of Catholic Christendom, 1000-1714. Routledge.
** Graham-Leigh, Elaine (2005). The Southern French Nobility and the Albigensian Crusade. The Boydell Press.
** Hanley, Catherine (2019). Matilda: Empress, Queen, Warrior. Yale University Press.
** Lourie, Elena (1975). "The Will of Alfonso I, "El Batallador," King of Aragon and Navarre: A Reassessment". Speculum. Vol. 50, No. 4 Oct.
** Reilly, Bernard F. (2003). "Alfonso VII, King of León and Castile". In E. Michael Gerli (ed.) Medieval Iberia: An encyclopedia. Taylor & Francis. pp. 59–60. OCLC 701323223.
** Reilly, Bernard F. (1998). The Kingdom of León-Castilla Under King Alfonso VII, 1126 – 1157. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN 9780812234527.
** Riley-Smith, Jonathan (1990). Atlas of the Crusades. New York: Facts on File. ISBN 9780816021864.
** Powers, James F. (2010). "Coria, Siege of". In Rogers, Clifford J. (ed.) The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology. Vol. 1. Oxford ** University Press.
** Stroll, Mary (2004). Calixtus II, 1119 – 1124. Leiden; Boston: Brill. ISBN 9789004139879.
External links
** Arnaldo, Bishop of Astorga, wrote an account of Alfonso VII's life and reign known as the Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris: https://libro.uca.edu/lipskey/chronicle.htm.7 "



Reference: Weis [1992:104] Line 113-25.1 GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-24.

; See also Wikipedia entry.
Per Genealogy.EU: "King ALFONSO VII of Castile and Leon (1127-57), *1105, +Fresneda 21.8.1157; 1m: Saldana 1128 Berenguela of Barcelona (*1116 +1149); 2m: 1152 Richeza (+1185) dau.of Pr Wladislaw II of Cracow and Silesia"
Per Genealogics:
     "Alfonso VII was born on 1 March 1104, the son of Raymond, comte de Bourgogne and Urraca, queen of Castile and León. Nicknamed 'the Emperor', he became king of León, Galicia and Castile in 1126 on the death of his mother.
     "In November 1128 Alfonso married Berenguela of Barcelona, daughter of Ramon Berenguer III 'el Grande', conde de Barcelona, Provence and Carcassonne and Aldonza/Doulce/Dulcia de Gevaudan, heiress of Provence. Alfonso and Berenguela had six children, of whom four would have progeny, including their sons Sancho III and Fernando II. Their daughter Sancha married Sancho VI, king of Navarre, and Constance married Louis VII, king of France.
     "Berenguela died in 1149, and in 1152 Alfonso married Richza/Rikinsa of Poland, daughter of Wladislaw II, king of Poland, duke of Kraków and Slaski, and Agnes von Österreich. They had a daughter Sancha, who married Alfonso II 'the Chaste', king of Aragón.
     "By a mistress, an Asturian noblewoman named Gontrada Perez, Alfonso VII had an illegitimate daughter Urraca, who married Garcia VI, king of Navarre. By another mistress Urraca Fernández, widow of Rodrigo Martinez and daughter of Fernando Garcia de Hita, señor de Guadalaxara, señor de Hita y de Cuéllar, and his second wife Estefania Armengol de Urgel, he had an illegitimate daughter Estefania who would also have progeny as the tragic wife of Fernán Ruiz 'el Castellano' de Castro, señor de la casa de Castro, murdered by her husband.
     "Alfonso was a dignified and somewhat enigmatic figure. A vague tradition had always assigned the title of emperor to the sovereign who held León. Sancho 'the Great' considered it the _imperiale culmen_ and minted coins with the inscription _Imperator Toitus Hispaniae_ after being crowned in León. This sovereign was considered the most direct representative of the Visigoth kings who were themselves the representatives of the Roman Empire. But though given in charters, and claimed by Alfonso VI of León and Alfonso I of Aragón, the title had been little more than a flourish of rhetoric.
     "In León, Alfonso VII was crowned 'Emperor of All Spain' in 1135 after the death of Alfonso I of Aragón. The weakness of Aragón enabled him to make his superiority effective, although Alfonso I of Portugal never recognised him as liege, thereby affirming the new kingdom's independence. He appears to have striven for the formation of a national unity which Spain had never possessed since the fall of the Visigoth kingdom. The elements he had to deal with could not be welded together.
     "Alfonso was at once patron of the church and a protector, if not a supporter, of the Muslims, who formed a large part of his subjects. His reign ended in an unsuccessful campaign against the rising power of the Almohades. Though he was not actually defeated, his death on 21 August 1157 in the pass of Muradel in the Sierra Morena, while on his way back to Toledo, occurred in circumstances which showed that no man could be what he claimed to be - 'king of the men of the two religions.'
     "Alfonso was succeeded by his sons Fernando in León and Sancho in Castile. Arnaldo, bishop of Astorga, wrote an account of Alfonso VII's life and reign known as the _Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris._."5,17,18

Alfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia was also known as Alphonso VII Raimond King of Castile, Leon & Galicia.19

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1968
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.20


; Per Med Lands:
     "Infante don ALFONSO de Castilla y León, son of URRACA Queen of Castile and León & her first husband Raymond de Bourgogne [Comté] ([Grajal], Galicia 1 Mar 1105-Fresneda 21 Aug 1157, bur Toledo, Cathedral Santa María). The Anales Toledanos record the birth 1 Mar 1106 of “El Rey D. Alfonso, fillo del Conde D. Raymondo è de Doña Urraca”[648]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "rex Aldefonsus Hispanie imperator" as son of "comitis Raymundi…ex Waracta filia imperatoris Fernandi"[649]. Crowned King of Galicia 17 Sep 1111 at Santiago de Compostela. He was proclaimed ALFONSO VII “el Emperador” King of Castile, León and Toledo in 1112[650]. "Hildefonsus Raymundi…rex" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 27 Nov 1116, confirmed by "Illa infanta regis germana, Guillelmus comes de Moretegni, Iohannes Reynnitz, Petrus Ansuriz comes…"[651]. He styled himself "imperator" for the first time 9 Dec 1117[652]. He ruled under the tutelage of Pedro Froilaz Conde de Traba and his mother until 1119, although he only assumed effective personal rule after his mother's death in 1126. "Aldefonsus Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea regina Berengaria et Santia mea germana" donated "abbatiam Sancti Facundi et Primitivi" to Cluny by charter dated 7 Sep 1132[653]. King of Zaragoza 1134. He was crowned Emperor 26 May 1135 at León. He negotiated peace with both Aragon and Navarre, with a view to concentrating his military efforts on the reconquest. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "monasterium Sancti Petri de Cardigna" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Jul 1142[654]. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" confirmed the donation to Cluny of "monasterium Sancti Salvatoris de Bodinio" to Cluny as requested by "comitis Gomes" by charter dated Aug 1142[655]. "Adefonsus imperator Hispanie…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "ecclesiam sancti Vincentii de Salamantica" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Oct 1143, confirmed by "Sancius imperatoris major filius…Rodericus Gomez comes, Poncius de Cabreria comes, Guterrus Fernandez, Rodericus Fernandez, Didacus Munioz majordomus imperatoris, Garsias Royz majorinus imperatoris in Burgus"[656]. He captured Almería (1147), Tortosa (1148), and Jaén (1157) from the Muslims, though they recaptured Almería before he died. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[657]. "Aldefonsus…tocius Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea imperatrice domna Rica et…filiis meis Sanctio et Ferrando regibus" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 28 Oct 1155, confirmed by "Comes Rudericus Petriz, Garcia Garçiaz de Aza, Veremundus Petriz, Garcia Gumez, Gonsalvuz Ruderiz, Alvaros Ruderiz, Comes Gonsalvus Fernandi, Dicados Ferrandiz de Bonelas maiorinus in Burgis, Comes Almandricus tenens Bæciam, Comes Poncius maiordomus imperatoris, Comes Lupus, Comes Ranimirus, Comes Petrus Aldeffonsus, Gutierre Ferrandiz, Nunnus Petriz tenens Montor, Gundisalvus de Maranon alferiz imperatoris…"[658]. The Chronicon Burgense records the death in 1157 of “Alfonsus Imperator”[659]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the death in Sep 1195 (1157) of “D. Alfonsus Imperator, filius Comitis D. Raymundi et Reginæ D. Orracæ”[660]. On his death, his lands were divided between his two sons.
     "m firstly (Saldaña Nov 1128) BERENGUELA de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BERENGUER [III] “el Grande” Conde de Barcelona & his wife Dulce/Dolça [I] Ctss de Provence ([1116]-Palencia 15/31 Jan 1149, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records the marriage of "Alfonso…king of León" and "the daughter of Ramón count of Barcelona…Berengaria" in 1128 at Saldaña[661]. The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium record the marriage of "Raimundi-Berengarii comitis…filiam" and "Ildefonso Toletano Imperatori"[662]. The testament of "Raimundus Berengarii…Barchinonensis comes et marchio" dated [8 Jul] 1130 names "Raimundo Berengarii filio meo…et filie mee ipsa de Castella et illa de Fuxo"[663]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[664]. The Anales Toledanos record the death in Feb 1149 of “la Emperadriz”[665].
     "m secondly ([Oct/Dec] 1152) as her first husband, RYKSA of Silesia, daughter of W?ADYS?AW II “Wygnaniec/the Exile” Prince of Krakow and Silesia & his wife Agnes of Austria [Babenberg] ([1130/40]-16 Jun [1185]). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[666]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and her three marriages has not yet been identified. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rikissam", daughter of "regi Russie nomine Musuch" & his wife "Rikissam [filiam ducis Vergescelai de Polonia]", as wife firstly of "imperatoris Castelle Alfunso" and subsequently of "comiti Aragonensi et post comiti Alberto de Everstein ultra Coliniam"[667], contradicting other sources in many aspects. She was known as RIQUILDA in Spain[668], or RICA. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[669]. She married secondly (1161) Raymond Bérenger II Comte de Provence, and thirdly (after 1166) Albert [III] Graf von Everstein.
     "Mistress (1): ([1130/32]) GONTRODO Pérez, wife of GUTIERRE Sebastiániz, daughter of conde PEDRO Díaz de Valle & his wife María Ordóñez (-León 29 Jun 1186, Santa María de Vega near Oviedo). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records that King Alfonso VII "took a concubine…Guntroda, the daughter of Pedro Díaz and María Ordóñez…who belonged to the greatest family of the Asturians and the Tinians", dated to [1130/32] from the context[670]. “Gontrodo Petri...cum domina mea, et filia Urraca” donated property to the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo by charter dated 13 Oct 1153[671]. She became a nun at the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo[672]. Florez reproduces the epitaph in the same monastery which records the death in 1186 of “Guntrodo”[673].
     "Mistress (2): ([1139/48]) URRACA Fernández de Castro, widow of conde RODRIGO Martínez, daughter of FERNANDO García [de Castro] Señor de Hita y Uceda & his second wife Estefanía Armengol de Urgel ([1120]-after 1165). Alfonso VII King of Castile granted the villa de Amusco to "comitissa domina Vrracha uxore comitis Roderici Martinez" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 21 Jan 1139[674]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "Domne Vrrache Ferrandez comitisse" by charter dated 9 Sep 1140[675]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "comitisse domna Vrracha Fernandez…et post filia uestra et mea" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 3 Feb 1148[676]. “Petrus Fernandiz et soror mea Urraca Fernandiz et uxor mea Maria Pedriz...cum filiis et filiabus nostris” donated “sancte Crucis de Valcarcer” to Santa María de Aguilar de Campoo by charter dated 4 Aug 1165[677].
Med Lands cites:
[648] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 386.
[649] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1143, MGH SS XXIII, p. 837.
[650] Chronica Adefonsi imperatoris: Barton, S. and Fletcher, R. (trans. and eds.) The World of El Cid: Chronicles of the Spanish Reconquest (Manchester University Press), pp. 162-263.
[651] Silos 28, p. 37.
[652] Reilly (1982) Chapter 4, p. 126.
[653] Cluny, Tome V, 4038, p. 390.
[654] Cluny, Tome V, 4072, p. 423.
[655] Cluny, Tome V, 4073, p. 426.
[656] Cluny, Tome V, 4076, p. 428.
[657] Colmenares, D. de (1846) Historia de Segovia (Segovia), Tomo I, p. 240.
[658] Silos 57, p. 85.
[659] Chronicon Burgense, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 309.
[660] Chronicon Lusitanum, España Sagrada, Tomo XIV, p. 428.
[661] Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris I, 12, p. 168.
[662] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 376.
[663] Els Testaments, 11, p. 92.
[664] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[665] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 390.
[666] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[667] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1141, MGH SS XXIII, p. 834.
[668] Szabolcs de Vajay (1989), p. 372.
[669] Colmenares (1846), Tomo I, p. 240.
[670] Chronica Adefonsi imperatoris I, 32, p. 178.
[671] Yepes, A. de (1609) Coronica General de la Orden de San Benito, Tomo VII, Apendix, VIII, p. 10.
[672] Pérez, M. Crónica del emperador Alfonso, p. 157, cited in Torres (1999), p. 393.
[673] Florez (1770), Tomo I, p. 306.
[674] Valladolid Santa María, Tome I, XXXIII, p. 185.
[675] Valladolid Santa María, Tome I, XXXIV, p. 190.
[676] Valladolid Santa María, Tome I, XXXV, p. 194.
[677] Rodríguez de Diego, J. L. (2004) Colección diplomática de Santa María de Aguilar de Campoo (852-1230) (Junta de Castilla y León) (“Santa María de Aguilar de Campo”), 27, p. 128.12
He and Gontrada Peres (?) de Asturias were associated.21 Alfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia was King of Galicia between 1111 and 1157.2,7 He was King of León between 1126 and 1157.22,3,7 He was King of Castile between 1127 and 1157.7

Family 1

Berenguela Raimundo (?) de Barcelona b. c 1116, d. 15 Jan 1149
Children

Family 3

Urraca Fernández de Castro
Child

Family 4

RixaRichildeRyksa (?) Princess of Silesia, Queen of Castile b. c 1135, d. c 16 Jan 1185
Children

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 113-25, p. 104. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 4: Rulers of Portugal, León, and Castile, 1035-1214. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020542&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  6. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Alfonso VII of León and Castile: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfonso_VII_of_Le%C3%B3n_and_Castile. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S1427] Richard Fletcher, The Quest for El Cid (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989/1990), pp. 187. Hereinafter cited as Fletcher [1990] The Quest for El Cid.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raymond: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020899&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 10 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona10.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Barcelona: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020544&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Infante don ALFONSO de Castilla y León, son of URRACA Queen of Castile and León & her first husband Raymond de Bourgogne [Comté] ([Grajal], Galicia 1 Mar 1105-Fresneda 21 Aug 1157, bur Toledo, Cathedral Santa María). The Anales Toledanos record the birth 1 Mar 1106 of “El Rey D. Alfonso, fillo del Conde D. Raymondo è de Doña Urraca”[648]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "rex Aldefonsus Hispanie imperator" as son of "comitis Raymundi…ex Waracta filia imperatoris Fernandi"[649]. Crowned King of Galicia 17 Sep 1111 at Santiago de Compostela. He was proclaimed ALFONSO VII “el Emperador” King of Castile, León and Toledo in 1112[650]. "Hildefonsus Raymundi…rex" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 27 Nov 1116, confirmed by "Illa infanta regis germana, Guillelmus comes de Moretegni, Iohannes Reynnitz, Petrus Ansuriz comes…"[651]. He styled himself "imperator" for the first time 9 Dec 1117[652]. He ruled under the tutelage of Pedro Froilaz Conde de Traba and his mother until 1119, although he only assumed effective personal rule after his mother's death in 1126. "Aldefonsus Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea regina Berengaria et Santia mea germana" donated "abbatiam Sancti Facundi et Primitivi" to Cluny by charter dated 7 Sep 1132[653]. King of Zaragoza 1134. He was crowned Emperor 26 May 1135 at León. He negotiated peace with both Aragon and Navarre, with a view to concentrating his military efforts on the reconquest. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "monasterium Sancti Petri de Cardigna" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Jul 1142[654]. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" confirmed the donation to Cluny of "monasterium Sancti Salvatoris de Bodinio" to Cluny as requested by "comitis Gomes" by charter dated Aug 1142[655]. "Adefonsus imperator Hispanie…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "ecclesiam sancti Vincentii de Salamantica" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Oct 1143, confirmed by "Sancius imperatoris major filius…Rodericus Gomez comes, Poncius de Cabreria comes, Guterrus Fernandez, Rodericus Fernandez, Didacus Munioz majordomus imperatoris, Garsias Royz majorinus imperatoris in Burgus"[656]. He captured Almería (1147), Tortosa (1148), and Jaén (1157) from the Muslims, though they recaptured Almería before he died. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[657]. "Aldefonsus…tocius Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea imperatrice domna Rica et…filiis meis Sanctio et Ferrando regibus" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 28 Oct 1155, confirmed by "Comes Rudericus Petriz, Garcia Garçiaz de Aza, Veremundus Petriz, Garcia Gumez, Gonsalvuz Ruderiz, Alvaros Ruderiz, Comes Gonsalvus Fernandi, Dicados Ferrandiz de Bonelas maiorinus in Burgis, Comes Almandricus tenens Bæciam, Comes Poncius maiordomus imperatoris, Comes Lupus, Comes Ranimirus, Comes Petrus Aldeffonsus, Gutierre Ferrandiz, Nunnus Petriz tenens Montor, Gundisalvus de Maranon alferiz imperatoris…"[658]. The Chronicon Burgense records the death in 1157 of “Alfonsus Imperator”[659]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the death in Sep 1195 (1157) of “D. Alfonsus Imperator, filius Comitis D. Raymundi et Reginæ D. Orracæ”[660]. On his death, his lands were divided between his two sons.

    m firstly (Saldaña Nov 1128) BERENGUELA de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BERENGUER [III] “el Grande” Conde de Barcelona & his wife Dulce/Dolça [I] Ctss de Provence ([1116]-Palencia 15/31 Jan 1149, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records the marriage of "Alfonso…king of León" and "the daughter of Ramón count of Barcelona…Berengaria" in 1128 at Saldaña[661]. The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium record the marriage of "Raimundi-Berengarii comitis…filiam" and "Ildefonso Toletano Imperatori"[662]. The testament of "Raimundus Berengarii…Barchinonensis comes et marchio" dated [8 Jul] 1130 names "Raimundo Berengarii filio meo…et filie mee ipsa de Castella et illa de Fuxo"[663]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[664]. The Anales Toledanos record the death in Feb 1149 of “la Emperadriz”[665].

    m secondly ([Oct/Dec] 1152) as her first husband, RYKSA of Silesia, daughter of W?ADYS?AW II “Wygnaniec/the Exile” Prince of Krakow and Silesia & his wife Agnes of Austria [Babenberg] ([1130/40]-16 Jun [1185]). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[666]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and her three marriages has not yet been identified. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rikissam", daughter of "regi Russie nomine Musuch" & his wife "Rikissam [filiam ducis Vergescelai de Polonia]", as wife firstly of "imperatoris Castelle Alfunso" and subsequently of "comiti Aragonensi et post comiti Alberto de Everstein ultra Coliniam"[667], contradicting other sources in many aspects. She was known as RIQUILDA in Spain[668], or RICA. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[669]. She married secondly (1161) Raymond Bérenger II Comte de Provence, and thirdly (after 1166) Albert [III] Graf von Everstein.

    Mistress (1): ([1130/32]) GONTRODO Pérez, wife of GUTIERRE Sebastiániz, daughter of conde PEDRO Díaz de Valle & his wife María Ordóñez (-León 29 Jun 1186, Santa María de Vega near Oviedo). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records that King Alfonso VII "took a concubine…Guntroda, the daughter of Pedro Díaz and María Ordóñez…who belonged to the greatest family of the Asturians and the Tinians", dated to [1130/32] from the context[670]. “Gontrodo Petri...cum domina mea, et filia Urraca” donated property to the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo by charter dated 13 Oct 1153[671]. She became a nun at the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo[672]. Florez reproduces the epitaph in the same monastery which records the death in 1186 of “Guntrodo”[673].

    Mistress (2): ([1139/48]) URRACA Fernández de Castro, widow of conde RODRIGO Martínez, daughter of FERNANDO García [de Castro] Señor de Hita y Uceda & his second wife Estefanía Armengol de Urgel ([1120]-after 1165). Alfonso VII King of Castile granted the villa de Amusco to "comitissa domina Vrracha uxore comitis Roderici Martinez" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 21 Jan 1139[674]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "Domne Vrrache Ferrandez comitisse" by charter dated 9 Sep 1140[675]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "comitisse domna Vrracha Fernandez…et post filia uestra et mea" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 3 Feb 1148[676]. “Petrus Fernandiz et soror mea Urraca Fernandiz et uxor mea Maria Pedriz...cum filiis et filiabus nostris” donated “sancte Crucis de Valcarcer” to Santa María de Aguilar de Campoo by charter dated 4 Aug 1165[677].. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 116-25, p. 105.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richza|Rikinsa of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027264&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast4.html
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#Richezadied1185
  17. [S1593] Kelsey J. Williams, "Williams email 24 Feb 2004 "Re: Kuman lines into European( and other )Royalty"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Feb 2004, Alfonso VII, King of Castile and León: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020542&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as "Williams email 16 Feb 2004."
  18. [S1593] Kelsey J. Williams, "Williams email 16 Feb 2004," e-mail to e-mail address, 16 Feb 2004, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfonso_VII_of_Le%C3%B3n_and_Castile
  19. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020542&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#_ALFONSO_VII_1112-1157,.
  22. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 220. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  23. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 113-26, p. 104.
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancho III 'el Deseado': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020545&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#SanchoIIIdied1158B
  26. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 114-26, p. 104.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020548&tree=LEO
  28. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.5. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancha of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020630&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Sanchadied1177MSanchoVINavarre
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014170&tree=LEO
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Constanzadied1160MLouisVIIFrance
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Garcias of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027269&tree=LEO
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027270&tree=LEO
  35. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Urraca of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020540&tree=LEO
  36. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Urracadied1164M1GarciaVINavarre
  37. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027268&tree=LEO
  38. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Sanchadied1208MAlfonsoIIAragon
  39. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancha of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007663&tree=LEO

Berenguela Raimundo (?) de Barcelona1,2,3,4

F, #4713, b. circa 1116, d. 15 January 1149
FatherRamon Berenguer III "el Grande" (?) Count of Barcelona, Besalu and Cerdagne5,4 b. c 11 Nov 1081, d. 19 Jun 1131
MotherDulce Aldonza Milhaud de Gevaudan Countess of Geveaudan5,4 b. c 1095, d. 1190
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited12 Aug 2020
     Berenguela Raimundo (?) de Barcelona was born circa 1116 at Saldana, Castile, Spain (now).5,6 She married Alfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia, son of Raimund (?) Count of Burgundy, Galicia & D'Amans and Infanta doña Urraca Alfonsez (?) Queen of Galicia, Castile & Leon, on 17 November 1128 at Saldana, Castile, Spain (now);
His 1st wife.7,8,5,4,9
Berenguela Raimundo (?) de Barcelona died on 15 January 1149 at Palencia, Provincia de Palencia, Castilla y León, Spain; Leo van de Pas says d. Feb. 1149; Genealogy.EU and Wilipedia say d. 15 Jan 1149.5,4,10
Berenguela Raimundo (?) de Barcelona was buried after 15 January 1149 at Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1116, Barcelona, Provincia de Barcelona, Cataluna, Spain
     DEATH     15 Jan 1149 (aged 32–33), Palencia, Provincia de Palencia, Castilla y León, Spain
     Berenguela or Berengaria of Barcelona was Queen consort of Castile, León and Galicia (1128–1149). She was the daughter of Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona and his third wife Douce I, Countess of Provence. She was sister of Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona who was the ruler of the Kingdom of Aragon.
     On November 10/17 1128 in Saldaña, she married Alfonso VII, King of Castile, León and Galicia (1127– 1157). Their children were:
** Sancho III of Castile (1134-1158)
** Ramon, living 1136, died in infancy
** Ferdinand II of León (1137-1188)
** Constance (c.1138-1160), married Louis VII of France
** Sancha (c.1139-1179), married Sancho VI of Navarre
** García (c.1142-1145/6)
** Alfonso (c.1144-by 1149)

     In her times, the formation of a new political entity in the north-east of Iberian Peninsula: Portugal seceded from León in the west, giving more balance to the Christian kingdoms of the Iberian peninsula. Her brother Ramon Berenguer successfully pulled Aragon out of its pledged submission to Castile, aided no doubt by the beauty and charm of his sister Berenguela, wife of Alfonso the Emperor, for which she was well-known in her time. Her niece (daughter of Ramoón Berenguer) Dulce of Aragon (1160–1198), married in 1175 king Sancho I from Portugal. She died in Palencia, and was buried at the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Ramon Berenguer 1080–1131
     Spouse
          Alfonso VII Raimúndez 1105–1157 (m. 1128)
     Siblings
          Raymond Berenguer of Barcelona 1113–1162
     Children
          Sancho III King Of Castile 1134–1158
          Fernando II King Of Leon 1137–1188
          Sancha of Castile 1139–1179
          Constance de Castille 1141–1160
          Garcia Prince Of Castile 1142–1146
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 24 May 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 90699229.5,11
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "Infante don ALFONSO de Castilla y León, son of URRACA Queen of Castile and León & her first husband Raymond de Bourgogne [Comté] ([Grajal], Galicia 1 Mar 1105-Fresneda 21 Aug 1157, bur Toledo, Cathedral Santa María). The Anales Toledanos record the birth 1 Mar 1106 of “El Rey D. Alfonso, fillo del Conde D. Raymondo è de Doña Urraca”[648]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "rex Aldefonsus Hispanie imperator" as son of "comitis Raymundi…ex Waracta filia imperatoris Fernandi"[649]. Crowned King of Galicia 17 Sep 1111 at Santiago de Compostela. He was proclaimed ALFONSO VII “el Emperador” King of Castile, León and Toledo in 1112[650]. "Hildefonsus Raymundi…rex" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 27 Nov 1116, confirmed by "Illa infanta regis germana, Guillelmus comes de Moretegni, Iohannes Reynnitz, Petrus Ansuriz comes…"[651]. He styled himself "imperator" for the first time 9 Dec 1117[652]. He ruled under the tutelage of Pedro Froilaz Conde de Traba and his mother until 1119, although he only assumed effective personal rule after his mother's death in 1126. "Aldefonsus Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea regina Berengaria et Santia mea germana" donated "abbatiam Sancti Facundi et Primitivi" to Cluny by charter dated 7 Sep 1132[653]. King of Zaragoza 1134. He was crowned Emperor 26 May 1135 at León. He negotiated peace with both Aragon and Navarre, with a view to concentrating his military efforts on the reconquest. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "monasterium Sancti Petri de Cardigna" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Jul 1142[654]. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" confirmed the donation to Cluny of "monasterium Sancti Salvatoris de Bodinio" to Cluny as requested by "comitis Gomes" by charter dated Aug 1142[655]. "Adefonsus imperator Hispanie…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "ecclesiam sancti Vincentii de Salamantica" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Oct 1143, confirmed by "Sancius imperatoris major filius…Rodericus Gomez comes, Poncius de Cabreria comes, Guterrus Fernandez, Rodericus Fernandez, Didacus Munioz majordomus imperatoris, Garsias Royz majorinus imperatoris in Burgus"[656]. He captured Almería (1147), Tortosa (1148), and Jaén (1157) from the Muslims, though they recaptured Almería before he died. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[657]. "Aldefonsus…tocius Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea imperatrice domna Rica et…filiis meis Sanctio et Ferrando regibus" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 28 Oct 1155, confirmed by "Comes Rudericus Petriz, Garcia Garçiaz de Aza, Veremundus Petriz, Garcia Gumez, Gonsalvuz Ruderiz, Alvaros Ruderiz, Comes Gonsalvus Fernandi, Dicados Ferrandiz de Bonelas maiorinus in Burgis, Comes Almandricus tenens Bæciam, Comes Poncius maiordomus imperatoris, Comes Lupus, Comes Ranimirus, Comes Petrus Aldeffonsus, Gutierre Ferrandiz, Nunnus Petriz tenens Montor, Gundisalvus de Maranon alferiz imperatoris…"[658]. The Chronicon Burgense records the death in 1157 of “Alfonsus Imperator”[659]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the death in Sep 1195 (1157) of “D. Alfonsus Imperator, filius Comitis D. Raymundi et Reginæ D. Orracæ”[660]. On his death, his lands were divided between his two sons.
     "m firstly (Saldaña Nov 1128) BERENGUELA de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BERENGUER [III] “el Grande” Conde de Barcelona & his wife Dulce/Dolça [I] Ctss de Provence ([1116]-Palencia 15/31 Jan 1149, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records the marriage of "Alfonso…king of León" and "the daughter of Ramón count of Barcelona…Berengaria" in 1128 at Saldaña[661]. The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium record the marriage of "Raimundi-Berengarii comitis…filiam" and "Ildefonso Toletano Imperatori"[662]. The testament of "Raimundus Berengarii…Barchinonensis comes et marchio" dated [8 Jul] 1130 names "Raimundo Berengarii filio meo…et filie mee ipsa de Castella et illa de Fuxo"[663]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[664]. The Anales Toledanos record the death in Feb 1149 of “la Emperadriz”[665].
     "m secondly ([Oct/Dec] 1152) as her first husband, RYKSA of Silesia, daughter of W?ADYS?AW II “Wygnaniec/the Exile” Prince of Krakow and Silesia & his wife Agnes of Austria [Babenberg] ([1130/40]-16 Jun [1185]). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[666]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and her three marriages has not yet been identified. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rikissam", daughter of "regi Russie nomine Musuch" & his wife "Rikissam [filiam ducis Vergescelai de Polonia]", as wife firstly of "imperatoris Castelle Alfunso" and subsequently of "comiti Aragonensi et post comiti Alberto de Everstein ultra Coliniam"[667], contradicting other sources in many aspects. She was known as RIQUILDA in Spain[668], or RICA. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[669]. She married secondly (1161) Raymond Bérenger II Comte de Provence, and thirdly (after 1166) Albert [III] Graf von Everstein.
     "Mistress (1): ([1130/32]) GONTRODO Pérez, wife of GUTIERRE Sebastiániz, daughter of conde PEDRO Díaz de Valle & his wife María Ordóñez (-León 29 Jun 1186, Santa María de Vega near Oviedo). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records that King Alfonso VII "took a concubine…Guntroda, the daughter of Pedro Díaz and María Ordóñez…who belonged to the greatest family of the Asturians and the Tinians", dated to [1130/32] from the context[670]. “Gontrodo Petri...cum domina mea, et filia Urraca” donated property to the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo by charter dated 13 Oct 1153[671]. She became a nun at the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo[672]. Florez reproduces the epitaph in the same monastery which records the death in 1186 of “Guntrodo”[673].
     "Mistress (2): ([1139/48]) URRACA Fernández de Castro, widow of conde RODRIGO Martínez, daughter of FERNANDO García [de Castro] Señor de Hita y Uceda & his second wife Estefanía Armengol de Urgel ([1120]-after 1165). Alfonso VII King of Castile granted the villa de Amusco to "comitissa domina Vrracha uxore comitis Roderici Martinez" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 21 Jan 1139[674]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "Domne Vrrache Ferrandez comitisse" by charter dated 9 Sep 1140[675]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "comitisse domna Vrracha Fernandez…et post filia uestra et mea" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 3 Feb 1148[676]. “Petrus Fernandiz et soror mea Urraca Fernandiz et uxor mea Maria Pedriz...cum filiis et filiabus nostris” donated “sancte Crucis de Valcarcer” to Santa María de Aguilar de Campoo by charter dated 4 Aug 1165[677].
Med Lands cites:
[648] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 386.
[649] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1143, MGH SS XXIII, p. 837.
[650] Chronica Adefonsi imperatoris: Barton, S. and Fletcher, R. (trans. and eds.) The World of El Cid: Chronicles of the Spanish Reconquest (Manchester University Press), pp. 162-263.
[651] Silos 28, p. 37.
[652] Reilly (1982) Chapter 4, p. 126.
[653] Cluny, Tome V, 4038, p. 390.
[654] Cluny, Tome V, 4072, p. 423.
[655] Cluny, Tome V, 4073, p. 426.
[656] Cluny, Tome V, 4076, p. 428.
[657] Colmenares, D. de (1846) Historia de Segovia (Segovia), Tomo I, p. 240.
[658] Silos 57, p. 85.
[659] Chronicon Burgense, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 309.
[660] Chronicon Lusitanum, España Sagrada, Tomo XIV, p. 428.
[661] Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris I, 12, p. 168.
[662] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 376.
[663] Els Testaments, 11, p. 92.
[664] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[665] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 390.
[666] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[667] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1141, MGH SS XXIII, p. 834.
[668] Szabolcs de Vajay (1989), p. 372.
[669] Colmenares (1846), Tomo I, p. 240.
[670] Chronica Adefonsi imperatoris I, 32, p. 178.
[671] Yepes, A. de (1609) Coronica General de la Orden de San Benito, Tomo VII, Apendix, VIII, p. 10.
[672] Pérez, M. Crónica del emperador Alfonso, p. 157, cited in Torres (1999), p. 393.
[673] Florez (1770), Tomo I, p. 306.
[674] Valladolid Santa María, Tome I, XXXIII, p. 185.
[675] Valladolid Santa María, Tome I, XXXIV, p. 190.
[676] Valladolid Santa María, Tome I, XXXV, p. 194.
[677] Rodríguez de Diego, J. L. (2004) Colección diplomática de Santa María de Aguilar de Campoo (852-1230) (Junta de Castilla y León) (“Santa María de Aguilar de Campo”), 27, p. 128.9
GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-24.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Berenguela was born in Barcelona about 1116, the daughter of Ramon Berenguer III 'el Grande', conde de Barcelona, Provence and Carcassonne and Aldonza/Doulce/Dulcia de Gevaudan, heiress of Provence.
     "In 1128 Berenguela married Alfonso VII, king of Castile and León, son of Raymond, comte de Bourgogne and Urraca, queen of Castile and León. Alfonso and Berenguela had six children, of whom four would have progeny, including their sons Sancho III and Fernando II. Their daughter Sancha married Sancho VI, king of Navarre and Constance married Louis VII, king of France.
     "Berenguela was an active supporter of her husband's rule, advising him and her brother Raymond Berenguer IV, conde de Barcelona, in their conquest of Almeria in the great campaign of 1148 that used ships from Genoa. She also devoted herself to artistic and literary patronage, introducing the poetry of the troubadours of Provence to Castile, and supporting the writers narrating the feats of the Cid, Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar. She also espoused the pilgrimage to the shrine of Santiago de Compostela (St. James of Compostela).
     "Berenguela died in February 1149, and was buried in the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, where he son Fernando would also be buried on his death in 1188. The historian and writer Jose Enriquez Ruiz-Domènec writes of Berenguela that she was 'a Catalan who envisioned the land of Spain three hundred years before it became such' under Fernando and Isabella."6



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1968.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:69.6


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Berengaria of Barcelona (1116 – January 15, 1149), called in Spanish Berenguela de Barcelona, was Queen consort of Castile, León and Galicia. She was the daughter of Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona, and Douce I, Countess of Provence.[1]
     "On November 10/17 1128 in Saldaña, Berengaria married Alfonso VII, King of Castile, León and Galicia.[1] Their children were:
1. Sancho III of Castile (1134–1158)
2. Ramon, living 1136, died in infancy
3. Ferdinand II of León (1137–1188)
4. Constance (c. 1138–1160), married Louis VII of France
5. Sancha (c. 1139–1179), married Sancho VI of Navarre
6. García (c. 1142–1145/6)
7. Alfonso (c. 1144–c. 1149)
     "She died in Palencia, and was buried at the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela.
Appearance and character
     ""She was a very beautiful and extremely graceful young girl who loved chastity and truth and all God-fearing people."[2]
References
1. Reilly 1995, p. 168.
2. Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris, Book 1 Chapter 12, trans. Simon Barton and Richard Fletcher in The World of El Cid: Chronicles of the Reconquest, (Manchester University Press, 2000) page 168.
Sources
** Reilly, Bernard F. (1995). The Contest of Christian and Muslim Spain, 1031-1157. Blackwell Publishing Inc."10



; Per Med Lands: "BERENGUELA de Barcelona ([1116]-Palencia 15/31 Jan 1149, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records the marriage of "Alfonso…king of León" and "the daughter of Ramón Conde de Barcelona…Berengaria" in 1128 at Saldaña[424]. The Gesta Comitum Barcinonensium record the marriage of "Raimundi-Berengarii comitis…filiam" and "Ildefonso Toletano Imperatori"[425]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[426]. The testament of "Raimundus Berengarii…Barchinonensis comes et marchio" dated [8 Jul] 1130 names "Raimundo Berengarii filio meo…et filie mee ipsa de Castella et illa de Fuxo"[427]. m (Saldaña Nov 1128) as his first wife, ALFONSO VII "el Emperador" King of Castile and León, son of RAIMOND de Bourgogne [Comté] Comte d’Amous Conde de Galicia & his wife Urraca Queen of Castile and León ([Grajal], Galicia 1 Mar 1105-Fresneda 21 Aug 1157, bur Toledo, Cathedral of Santa María)."
Med Lands cites:
[424] Barton, S. and Fletcher, R. (trans. and eds.) The World of El Cid: Chronicles of the Spanish Reconquest (Manchester U. P.), Chronica Adefonsi imperatoris I, 12, p. 168.
[425] Ex Gesta Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 376.
[426] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[427] Els Testaments, 11, p. 92.12


Reference: Weis [1992:104] Line 113-25.1

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Berenguela, *Saldana 1116, +Palencia 15.1.1149, bur Cathedral of Santiago el Mayor, Santiago de Compostela; m.Saldana 10/17.11.1128 King Alfonso VII of Castile and Leon (*1105 +21.8.1157.)5"

She was Queen consort of León and Castile between 1128 and 1149.10

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 113-25, p. 104. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 5: Rulers of Navarre, Aragon, Catalonia, and Provence, 1035-1214. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Barcelona: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020544&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 10 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona10.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Barcelona: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020544&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020542&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Infante don ALFONSO de Castilla y León, son of URRACA Queen of Castile and León & her first husband Raymond de Bourgogne [Comté] ([Grajal], Galicia 1 Mar 1105-Fresneda 21 Aug 1157, bur Toledo, Cathedral Santa María). The Anales Toledanos record the birth 1 Mar 1106 of “El Rey D. Alfonso, fillo del Conde D. Raymondo è de Doña Urraca”[648]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "rex Aldefonsus Hispanie imperator" as son of "comitis Raymundi…ex Waracta filia imperatoris Fernandi"[649]. Crowned King of Galicia 17 Sep 1111 at Santiago de Compostela. He was proclaimed ALFONSO VII “el Emperador” King of Castile, León and Toledo in 1112[650]. "Hildefonsus Raymundi…rex" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 27 Nov 1116, confirmed by "Illa infanta regis germana, Guillelmus comes de Moretegni, Iohannes Reynnitz, Petrus Ansuriz comes…"[651]. He styled himself "imperator" for the first time 9 Dec 1117[652]. He ruled under the tutelage of Pedro Froilaz Conde de Traba and his mother until 1119, although he only assumed effective personal rule after his mother's death in 1126. "Aldefonsus Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea regina Berengaria et Santia mea germana" donated "abbatiam Sancti Facundi et Primitivi" to Cluny by charter dated 7 Sep 1132[653]. King of Zaragoza 1134. He was crowned Emperor 26 May 1135 at León. He negotiated peace with both Aragon and Navarre, with a view to concentrating his military efforts on the reconquest. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "monasterium Sancti Petri de Cardigna" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Jul 1142[654]. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" confirmed the donation to Cluny of "monasterium Sancti Salvatoris de Bodinio" to Cluny as requested by "comitis Gomes" by charter dated Aug 1142[655]. "Adefonsus imperator Hispanie…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "ecclesiam sancti Vincentii de Salamantica" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Oct 1143, confirmed by "Sancius imperatoris major filius…Rodericus Gomez comes, Poncius de Cabreria comes, Guterrus Fernandez, Rodericus Fernandez, Didacus Munioz majordomus imperatoris, Garsias Royz majorinus imperatoris in Burgus"[656]. He captured Almería (1147), Tortosa (1148), and Jaén (1157) from the Muslims, though they recaptured Almería before he died. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[657]. "Aldefonsus…tocius Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea imperatrice domna Rica et…filiis meis Sanctio et Ferrando regibus" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 28 Oct 1155, confirmed by "Comes Rudericus Petriz, Garcia Garçiaz de Aza, Veremundus Petriz, Garcia Gumez, Gonsalvuz Ruderiz, Alvaros Ruderiz, Comes Gonsalvus Fernandi, Dicados Ferrandiz de Bonelas maiorinus in Burgis, Comes Almandricus tenens Bæciam, Comes Poncius maiordomus imperatoris, Comes Lupus, Comes Ranimirus, Comes Petrus Aldeffonsus, Gutierre Ferrandiz, Nunnus Petriz tenens Montor, Gundisalvus de Maranon alferiz imperatoris…"[658]. The Chronicon Burgense records the death in 1157 of “Alfonsus Imperator”[659]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the death in Sep 1195 (1157) of “D. Alfonsus Imperator, filius Comitis D. Raymundi et Reginæ D. Orracæ”[660]. On his death, his lands were divided between his two sons.

    m firstly (Saldaña Nov 1128) BERENGUELA de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BERENGUER [III] “el Grande” Conde de Barcelona & his wife Dulce/Dolça [I] Ctss de Provence ([1116]-Palencia 15/31 Jan 1149, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records the marriage of "Alfonso…king of León" and "the daughter of Ramón count of Barcelona…Berengaria" in 1128 at Saldaña[661]. The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium record the marriage of "Raimundi-Berengarii comitis…filiam" and "Ildefonso Toletano Imperatori"[662]. The testament of "Raimundus Berengarii…Barchinonensis comes et marchio" dated [8 Jul] 1130 names "Raimundo Berengarii filio meo…et filie mee ipsa de Castella et illa de Fuxo"[663]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[664]. The Anales Toledanos record the death in Feb 1149 of “la Emperadriz”[665].

    m secondly ([Oct/Dec] 1152) as her first husband, RYKSA of Silesia, daughter of W?ADYS?AW II “Wygnaniec/the Exile” Prince of Krakow and Silesia & his wife Agnes of Austria [Babenberg] ([1130/40]-16 Jun [1185]). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[666]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and her three marriages has not yet been identified. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rikissam", daughter of "regi Russie nomine Musuch" & his wife "Rikissam [filiam ducis Vergescelai de Polonia]", as wife firstly of "imperatoris Castelle Alfunso" and subsequently of "comiti Aragonensi et post comiti Alberto de Everstein ultra Coliniam"[667], contradicting other sources in many aspects. She was known as RIQUILDA in Spain[668], or RICA. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[669]. She married secondly (1161) Raymond Bérenger II Comte de Provence, and thirdly (after 1166) Albert [III] Graf von Everstein.

    Mistress (1): ([1130/32]) GONTRODO Pérez, wife of GUTIERRE Sebastiániz, daughter of conde PEDRO Díaz de Valle & his wife María Ordóñez (-León 29 Jun 1186, Santa María de Vega near Oviedo). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records that King Alfonso VII "took a concubine…Guntroda, the daughter of Pedro Díaz and María Ordóñez…who belonged to the greatest family of the Asturians and the Tinians", dated to [1130/32] from the context[670]. “Gontrodo Petri...cum domina mea, et filia Urraca” donated property to the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo by charter dated 13 Oct 1153[671]. She became a nun at the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo[672]. Florez reproduces the epitaph in the same monastery which records the death in 1186 of “Guntrodo”[673].

    Mistress (2): ([1139/48]) URRACA Fernández de Castro, widow of conde RODRIGO Martínez, daughter of FERNANDO García [de Castro] Señor de Hita y Uceda & his second wife Estefanía Armengol de Urgel ([1120]-after 1165). Alfonso VII King of Castile granted the villa de Amusco to "comitissa domina Vrracha uxore comitis Roderici Martinez" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 21 Jan 1139[674]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "Domne Vrrache Ferrandez comitisse" by charter dated 9 Sep 1140[675]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "comitisse domna Vrracha Fernandez…et post filia uestra et mea" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 3 Feb 1148[676]. “Petrus Fernandiz et soror mea Urraca Fernandiz et uxor mea Maria Pedriz...cum filiis et filiabus nostris” donated “sancte Crucis de Valcarcer” to Santa María de Aguilar de Campoo by charter dated 4 Aug 1165[677].. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berengaria_of_Barcelona. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 27 November 2019), memorial page for Berenguela of Barcelona (1116–15 Jan 1149), Find A Grave Memorial no. 90699229, citing Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain ; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/90699229/berenguela-of_barcelona. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CATALAN%20NOBILITY.htm#RamonBerenguerIVdied1162A
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 113-26, p. 104.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancho III 'el Deseado': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020545&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#SanchoIIIdied1158B
  16. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 114-26, p. 104.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020548&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancha of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020630&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Sanchadied1177MSanchoVINavarre
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00014170&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Constanzadied1160MLouisVIIFrance
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Garcias of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027269&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027270&tree=LEO

Sancho III "el Deseado" (?) King of Castile1,2,3

M, #4714, b. 1134, d. 31 August 1158
FatherAlfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia1,4,5,2,6,7,8,9,10 b. 1105, d. 21 Aug 1157
MotherBerenguela Raimundo (?) de Barcelona1,4,2,11,9,10 b. c 1116, d. 15 Jan 1149
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     Sancho III "el Deseado" (?) King of Castile was born in 1134 at Castilla, Spain; Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 6 page) says b. 1134; Leo van de Pas says b. 1134; Louda & Maclagan (Table 47) says b. 1135.2,4,9,10 He married Doña Blanca (Sancha) Garcés (?) Infanta de Navarra, Queen of Castile, daughter of Garcia IV/VI Ramirez "el Restaurador" (?) King of Navarre and Marguerite de L'Aigle Queen Consort of Navarre, on 30 January 1151 at Calahorra, Spain; Genealogy.EU (Iberia 7 and Ivrea 6 pages) say m. 30 Jan 1151; Leo van de Pas says m. 30 Jan 1151; Louda & Maclagan (Table 47) says m. 4 Feb 1150/51.4,12,2,13,14,9,10
Sancho III "el Deseado" (?) King of Castile died on 31 August 1158 at Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain (now).4,2,9,10
Sancho III "el Deseado" (?) King of Castile was buried after 31 August 1158 at Cathedral of Toledo, Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1134, Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain
     DEATH     31 Aug 1158 (aged 23–24), Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain
     Sancho III of Castile (1134 – 31 August 1158) was King of Castile and Toledo for one year, from 1157 to 1158. During the Reconquista, in which he took an active part, he founded the Order of Calatrava. He was called el Deseado (the Desired) due to his position as the first child of his parents, born after eight years of childless marriage.
     He was the eldest son of King Alfonso VII of Leon and Castile and Berenguela of Barcelona. During his father's reign, he appears as "king of Nájera" as early as 1149. His father's will partitioned the kingdom between his two sons: Sancho inherited the kingdoms of Castile and Toledo, and Fernando inherited Leon. The two brothers had just signed a treaty when Sancho suddenly died in the summer of 1158, being buried at Toledo.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Alfonso VII Raimúndez 1105–1157
          Berenguela of Barcelona 1116–1149
     Spouse
          Blanca of Navarre 1133–1156
     Siblings
          Stephanie Alfónsez of Castile unknown–1180
          Fernando II King Of Leon 1137–1188
          Sancha of Castile 1139–1179
          Constance de Castille 1141–1160
          Garcia Prince Of Castile 1142–1146
     Half Siblings
          Sancha de Castile 1154–1208
     Children
          Alfonso VIII Borgoña de Castilla 1155–1214
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Toledo, Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 20 Feb 2011
     Find a Grave Memorial 65908698.15
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. From Alfonso VII to Alfonso X 1989 , Szabolcs de Vajay, Reference: p.373.
2. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1968.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.9
GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-24.

; This is the same person as:
”Sancho III of Castile” at Wikipedia, as
”Sanche III de Castille” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Sancho III de Castilla” at Wikipedia (Es.)16,17,18

; Per Genealogics:
     “Sancho III, called 'el Deseado' (the Desired), was born about 1134, eldest son of Alfonso VII, king of Castile and León, and Berenguela of Barcelona. On 30 January 1151 Sancho married Blanca de Navarre, daughter of Garcia VI, king of Navarre and Marguerite L'Aigle. Sancho and Blanca had two sons, Sancho's heir Alfonso, and Garcias who died in infancy. The will of Alfonso VII partitioned the kingdom between his two sons: Sancho inherited Castile, and Fernando inherited León. The two brothers had just signed the treaty when Sancho suddenly died in the summer of 1158, having ruled Castile for just one year. His heir became Alfonso VIII of Castile.”.9

Reference: Weis [1992:104] Line 113-26.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "Infante don SANCHO de Castilla, son of ALFONSO VII "el Emperador" King of Castile and León & his first wife Berenguela de Barcelona (1134-Toledo 31 Aug or 1 Sep 1158, bur Toledo, Cathedral Santa María). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Sancium et Fernandum, Elisabeth et Beatiam" as the children of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis" and his wife "Berengariam"[711]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "rex Sanctius" as son of "rex Aldefonsus Hispanie imperator"[712]. Don Gutierre Fernández de Castro was named his tutor from his birth[713]. "Santius et…Fredinandus et Garsias filii ymperatories" confirmed the charter dated 12 Sep 1142 under which Alfonso VII King of Castile donated "uillam…Taranna" to "Martino Didaci"[714]. "Adefonsus imperator Hispanie…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "ecclesiam sancti Vincentii de Salamantica" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Oct 1143, confirmed by "Sancius imperatoris major filius…"[715]. "Sancius et…Fernandus et Garsias filii imperatoris…" confirmed the charter dated 19 Aug 1146 under which Alfonso VII King of Castile donated "ecclesiam…sanctam Mariam de Uelerda" to "Martino Didaci"[716]. Called King of Nájera from 1149[717]. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[718]. "Rex Sancius…domni Adefonsi imperatoris filius" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 14 Mar 1155, confirmed by "Regina domna Blanca uxor regis, Comes Almanricus, Comes Poncius maiordomus regis, Fortun Lopiz de Soria…"[719]. He succeeded his father in 1157 as SANCHO III "el Deseado" King of Castile and Toledo. He negotiated a peace treaty with his brother at Sahagún 1158 to avoid further family conflicts which had until then marred the history of Castile. The Chronicon Burgense records the death in 1158 of “Rex Sancius filius Imperatoris”[720]. The Anales Toledanos record the death “el postrimer dia Dagosto” in 1158 of “el Rey D. Sancho fillo del Emperador”[721]. The Annales Compostellani record the death “Kal Sep” in 1158 of “Sancius filius Aldephonsi Imperatoris”[722].
     "m (Calahorra 30 Jan 1151) Infanta doña BLANCA de Navarra, daughter of GARCÍA VI “el Restaurador” King of Navarre & his first wife Marguerite de l’Aigle ([1137]-12 Aug 1156, bur Nájera, Cathedral Santa María de Real). The Annales Compostellani record the death “II Id Aug” in 1146 of “Regina Branca mater istius Aldefonsi Regis Castellæ…filia Garsiæ Regis Navarræ”[723], although the year is clearly incorrect. "Rex Sancius…domni Adefonsi imperatoris Hyspanie filius" donated "[monasterium] beate Marie de Naigara" to Cluny by charter dated 30 Aug 1156 "pro remedio…mulieris mee…regine domne Blanche quam in Jagarensi ecclesia sepelire feci"[724]."
Med Lands cites:
[711] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 5, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[712] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1143, MGH SS XXIII, p. 837.
[713] Torres (1999), p. 87.
[714] Eslonza, Part I, X, p. 21.
[715] Cluny, Tome V, 4076, p. 428.
[716] Eslonza, Part I, XIII, p. 25.
[717] Szabolcs de Vajay (1989), p. 373.
[718] Colmenares (1846), Tomo I, p. 240.
[719] Silos 56, p. 84.
[720] Chronicon Burgense, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 309.
[721] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 391.
[722] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 322.
[723] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 322.
[724] Cluny, Tome V, 4190, p. 536.10


; Per Genealogy.EU (Iberia 7): “F2. [1m.] Blanche, *after 1133, +12.8.1156; m.Calahorra 30.1.1151 King Sancho III of Castile (*1134 +1158)”


Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 6): “B1. SANCHO III "el Deseado" King of Castile (1157-58), *1134, +Toledo 31.8.1158; m.Calahorra 30.1.1151 Blanche of Navarre (+12.8.1156)”.19

; Per Med Lands:
     "Infanta doña BLANCA de Navarra ([1137]-12 Aug 1156, bur Nájera, Cathedral Santa María de Real). The Annales Compostellani record the death “II Id Aug” in 1146 of “Regina Branca mater istius Aldefonsi Regis Castellæ…filia Garsiæ Regis Navarræ”[572], although the year is clearly incorrect. "Rex Sancius…domni Adefonsi imperatoris Hyspanie filius" donated "[monasterium] beate Marie de Naigara" to Cluny by charter dated 30 Aug 1156 "pro remedio…mulieris mee…regine domne Blanche quam in Jagarensi ecclesia sepelire feci"[573].
     "m (Calahorra 30 Jan 1151) Infante don SANCHO de Castilla, son of ALFONSO VII "el Emperador" King of Castile and León & his first wife Berenguela de Barcelona (1134-Toledo 31 Aug 1158, bur Toledo, Cathedral Santa María). He succeeded his father 1157 as SANCHO III “el Deseado” King of Castile."
Med Lands cites:
[572] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 322.
[573] Cluny V, 4190, p. 536.14
He was King of Castile between 1157 and 1158.20,4,5,2,3

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 113-26, p. 104. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancho III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020545&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 4: Rulers of Portugal, León, and Castile, 1035-1214. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020542&tree=LEO
  7. [S1593] Kelsey J. Williams, "Williams email 24 Feb 2004 "Re: Kuman lines into European( and other )Royalty"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Feb 2004, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfonso_VII_of_Le%C3%B3n_and_Castile. Hereinafter cited as "Williams email 16 Feb 2004."
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Infante don ALFONSO de Castilla y León, son of URRACA Queen of Castile and León & her first husband Raymond de Bourgogne [Comté] ([Grajal], Galicia 1 Mar 1105-Fresneda 21 Aug 1157, bur Toledo, Cathedral Santa María). The Anales Toledanos record the birth 1 Mar 1106 of “El Rey D. Alfonso, fillo del Conde D. Raymondo è de Doña Urraca”[648]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "rex Aldefonsus Hispanie imperator" as son of "comitis Raymundi…ex Waracta filia imperatoris Fernandi"[649]. Crowned King of Galicia 17 Sep 1111 at Santiago de Compostela. He was proclaimed ALFONSO VII “el Emperador” King of Castile, León and Toledo in 1112[650]. "Hildefonsus Raymundi…rex" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 27 Nov 1116, confirmed by "Illa infanta regis germana, Guillelmus comes de Moretegni, Iohannes Reynnitz, Petrus Ansuriz comes…"[651]. He styled himself "imperator" for the first time 9 Dec 1117[652]. He ruled under the tutelage of Pedro Froilaz Conde de Traba and his mother until 1119, although he only assumed effective personal rule after his mother's death in 1126. "Aldefonsus Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea regina Berengaria et Santia mea germana" donated "abbatiam Sancti Facundi et Primitivi" to Cluny by charter dated 7 Sep 1132[653]. King of Zaragoza 1134. He was crowned Emperor 26 May 1135 at León. He negotiated peace with both Aragon and Navarre, with a view to concentrating his military efforts on the reconquest. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "monasterium Sancti Petri de Cardigna" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Jul 1142[654]. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" confirmed the donation to Cluny of "monasterium Sancti Salvatoris de Bodinio" to Cluny as requested by "comitis Gomes" by charter dated Aug 1142[655]. "Adefonsus imperator Hispanie…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "ecclesiam sancti Vincentii de Salamantica" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Oct 1143, confirmed by "Sancius imperatoris major filius…Rodericus Gomez comes, Poncius de Cabreria comes, Guterrus Fernandez, Rodericus Fernandez, Didacus Munioz majordomus imperatoris, Garsias Royz majorinus imperatoris in Burgus"[656]. He captured Almería (1147), Tortosa (1148), and Jaén (1157) from the Muslims, though they recaptured Almería before he died. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[657]. "Aldefonsus…tocius Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea imperatrice domna Rica et…filiis meis Sanctio et Ferrando regibus" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 28 Oct 1155, confirmed by "Comes Rudericus Petriz, Garcia Garçiaz de Aza, Veremundus Petriz, Garcia Gumez, Gonsalvuz Ruderiz, Alvaros Ruderiz, Comes Gonsalvus Fernandi, Dicados Ferrandiz de Bonelas maiorinus in Burgis, Comes Almandricus tenens Bæciam, Comes Poncius maiordomus imperatoris, Comes Lupus, Comes Ranimirus, Comes Petrus Aldeffonsus, Gutierre Ferrandiz, Nunnus Petriz tenens Montor, Gundisalvus de Maranon alferiz imperatoris…"[658]. The Chronicon Burgense records the death in 1157 of “Alfonsus Imperator”[659]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the death in Sep 1195 (1157) of “D. Alfonsus Imperator, filius Comitis D. Raymundi et Reginæ D. Orracæ”[660]. On his death, his lands were divided between his two sons.

    m firstly (Saldaña Nov 1128) BERENGUELA de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BERENGUER [III] “el Grande” Conde de Barcelona & his wife Dulce/Dolça [I] Ctss de Provence ([1116]-Palencia 15/31 Jan 1149, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records the marriage of "Alfonso…king of León" and "the daughter of Ramón count of Barcelona…Berengaria" in 1128 at Saldaña[661]. The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium record the marriage of "Raimundi-Berengarii comitis…filiam" and "Ildefonso Toletano Imperatori"[662]. The testament of "Raimundus Berengarii…Barchinonensis comes et marchio" dated [8 Jul] 1130 names "Raimundo Berengarii filio meo…et filie mee ipsa de Castella et illa de Fuxo"[663]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[664]. The Anales Toledanos record the death in Feb 1149 of “la Emperadriz”[665].

    m secondly ([Oct/Dec] 1152) as her first husband, RYKSA of Silesia, daughter of W?ADYS?AW II “Wygnaniec/the Exile” Prince of Krakow and Silesia & his wife Agnes of Austria [Babenberg] ([1130/40]-16 Jun [1185]). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[666]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and her three marriages has not yet been identified. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rikissam", daughter of "regi Russie nomine Musuch" & his wife "Rikissam [filiam ducis Vergescelai de Polonia]", as wife firstly of "imperatoris Castelle Alfunso" and subsequently of "comiti Aragonensi et post comiti Alberto de Everstein ultra Coliniam"[667], contradicting other sources in many aspects. She was known as RIQUILDA in Spain[668], or RICA. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[669]. She married secondly (1161) Raymond Bérenger II Comte de Provence, and thirdly (after 1166) Albert [III] Graf von Everstein.

    Mistress (1): ([1130/32]) GONTRODO Pérez, wife of GUTIERRE Sebastiániz, daughter of conde PEDRO Díaz de Valle & his wife María Ordóñez (-León 29 Jun 1186, Santa María de Vega near Oviedo). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records that King Alfonso VII "took a concubine…Guntroda, the daughter of Pedro Díaz and María Ordóñez…who belonged to the greatest family of the Asturians and the Tinians", dated to [1130/32] from the context[670]. “Gontrodo Petri...cum domina mea, et filia Urraca” donated property to the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo by charter dated 13 Oct 1153[671]. She became a nun at the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo[672]. Florez reproduces the epitaph in the same monastery which records the death in 1186 of “Guntrodo”[673].

    Mistress (2): ([1139/48]) URRACA Fernández de Castro, widow of conde RODRIGO Martínez, daughter of FERNANDO García [de Castro] Señor de Hita y Uceda & his second wife Estefanía Armengol de Urgel ([1120]-after 1165). Alfonso VII King of Castile granted the villa de Amusco to "comitissa domina Vrracha uxore comitis Roderici Martinez" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 21 Jan 1139[674]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "Domne Vrrache Ferrandez comitisse" by charter dated 9 Sep 1140[675]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "comitisse domna Vrracha Fernandez…et post filia uestra et mea" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 3 Feb 1148[676]. “Petrus Fernandiz et soror mea Urraca Fernandiz et uxor mea Maria Pedriz...cum filiis et filiabus nostris” donated “sancte Crucis de Valcarcer” to Santa María de Aguilar de Campoo by charter dated 4 Aug 1165[677].. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancho III 'el Deseado': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020545&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#SanchoIIIdied1158B
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Barcelona: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020544&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Iberia 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/iberia/iberia7.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanca de Navarre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020546&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NAVARRE.htm#Blancadied1156
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 22 June 2020), memorial page for Sancho III King Of Castile (1134–31 Aug 1158), Find a Grave Memorial no. 65908698, citing Cathedral of Toledo, Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/65908698. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sancho_III_of_Castile. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Sanche III de Castille: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanche_III_de_Castille. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  18. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Sancho III de Castilla: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sancho_III_de_Castilla. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Iberia 7: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/iberia/iberia7.html
  20. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 220. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  21. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 113-27, p. 104.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VIII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000234&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#AlfonsoVIIIdied1214B
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Garcias of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020547&tree=LEO

Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon1,2,3,4

M, #4715, b. 1137, d. 21 January 1188
FatherAlfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia1,5,2,6,4,3,7 b. 1105, d. 21 Aug 1157
MotherBerenguela Raimundo (?) de Barcelona1,5,8,4,3 b. c 1116, d. 15 Jan 1149
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited17 Apr 2020
     Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon was born in 1137 at Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain (now).9,10,4,11 He married Infante dona Urraca (?) de Portugal, daughter of Afonso I Henriques 'o Conquistador' (?) King of Portugal and Matilde (Mafalda, Maud) (?) Countess of Savoy, Queen of Portugal, in May 1165;
His 1st wife; Leo van de Pas says m. 1156.5,12,13,4,3,14,15,16 Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon married Teresa Fernandez de Traba, daughter of Fernando Pérez de Traba Conde de Trava, sn de Trastamara and Doña Teresa Alfonso (?) Infanta de Castile y León, between 1172 and 1173;
His 2nd wife, her 2nd husband; Louda & Maclagan (Table 47) says m. 1176; Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 6 page) says m. bef 7 Oct. 1178; Med Lands says m. 1172-6May 1173.5,4,3,17,18,16,19 Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon and Infante dona Urraca (?) de Portugal were divorced in June 1175; Med Lands says repudiated Feb 1171/1172.12,13,4,3,14,15 Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon married Urraca Lopez de Haro, daughter of Lope Diaz de Haro Lord of Vizcaya and Aldonza Rodriguez de Vela, in May 1187;
His 3rd wife.20,4,3,21,16
Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon died on 21 January 1188 at Benavente (Zamora), Provincia de Zamora, Castilla y León, Spain (now); Leo van de Pas says d. 22 Aug 1188; Med Lands says d 22 Jan 1188.3,5,4,16,11
Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon was buried after 21 January 1188 at Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1137, Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain
     DEATH     1188 (aged 50–51), Zamora, Provincia de Zamora, Castilla y León, Spain
     Ferdinand II (1137 – 22 January 1188) was King of Leon and Galicia from 1157 to his death. Born in Toledo, Castile, he was the son of King Alfonso VII of Leon and Castile and of Berenguela, of the House of Barcelona. At his father's death, he received the Leon and Galicia, while his brother Sancho received Castile and Toledo. Ferdinand earned the reputation of a good knight and hard fighter, but did not display political or organizing faculty.
     He spent most of his first year as king in a dispute with his powerful nobles and an invasion by his brother Sancho III. In 1158 the two brother met at Sahagun, and peacefully solved the heritage matters. However, Sancho died in the same year, being succeeded by his child son Alfonso VIII, while Ferdinand occupied parts of Castile.[3] The boundary troubles with Castile restarted in 1164: he then met at Soria with the Lara family, who represented Alfonso VIII, and a truce was established, allowing him to move against the Muslim Almoravids who still held much of southern Spain, and to capture the cities of Alcántara and Alburquerque. In the same year, Ferdinand defeated King Alfonso I of Portugal, who, in 1163, had occupied Salamanca in retaliation for the repopulation of the area ordered by the King of Leon.
     In 1165 he married Urraca, daughter of Alfonso of Portugal. However, strife with Portugal was not put to an end by this move. In 1168 Alfonso again felt menaced by Ferdinand II's repopulation of the area of Ciudad Rodrigo: he then attacked Galicia, occupying Tui and the territory of Xinzo de Limia, former fiefs of his mother. However, as his troops were also besieging the Muslim citadel of Badajoz, Ferdinand II was able to push the Portuguese out of Galicia and to rush to Badajoz. When Alfonso saw the Leonese arrive tried to flee, but he was disabled by a broken leg caused by a fall from his horse, and made prisoner at one the city's gate. Alfonso was obliged to surrender as his ransom almost all the conquests he had made in Galicia in the previous year. In the peace signed at Pontevedra the following year, Ferdinand got back twenty five castle, and the cities of Cáceres, Badajoz, Trujillo, Santa Cruz and Montánchez, previously lost by Leon. When in the same years the Almoravids laid siege to the Portuguese city of Santarém, Ferdinand II came to help his father-in-law, and helped to free the city from the menace.
     Also in 1170, Ferdinand created the military-religious Order of Santiago de Compostela, with the task to protect the pilgrim traveling to the tomb of the apostle James in the cathedral of Compostela. The order had its seat first in Cáceres and then in Uclés.
     In 1175 Pope Alexander III annulled Ferdinand II and Urraca of Portugal's marriage due to consanguinity. The King remarried to Teresa Nuñez de Lara, daughter of count Nuño de Lara. In 1178 war against Castile broke out. Ferdinand surprised his nephew Alfonso VIII, occupied Castrojeriz and Dueñas. The war was settled in 1180 with the peace of Tordesillas. In the same year his wife Teresa died while bearing their second son.
     In 1184, after a series of failed attempts, the Almohad caliph Abu Yaqub Yusuf invaded Portugal with an army recruited in Northern Africa and, in May, besieged Alfonso I in Santarém; the Portuguese were helped by the arrival of the armies sent by the archbishop of Santiago de Compostela, in June, and by Ferdinand II in July.
     In 1185 Ferdinand married for the third time to Urraca Lopez de Haro (daughter of Lope Diaz, lord of Biscay, Najera and Haro), who was his mistress since 1180. Urraca tried in vain to have Alfonso IX, first son of Ferdinand II, declared illegitimate, to favor her son Sancho.
     Ferdinand II died in 1188 at Benavente, while returning from a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. He was buried in the cathedral of Compostela.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Alfonso VII Raimúndez 1105–1157
          Berenguela of Barcelona 1116–1149
     Spouse
          Urraca Of Portugal 1151–1188
     Siblings
          Stephanie Alfónsez of Castile unknown–1180
          Sancho III King Of Castile 1134–1158
          Sancha of Castile 1139–1179
          Constance de Castille 1141–1160
          Garcia Prince Of Castile 1142–1146
     Half Siblings
          Sancha de Castile 1154–1208
     Children
          Alfonso IX de Leon 1171–1230
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 16 Aug 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 57133062.11
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Ferdinand II (c. 1137 – 22 January 1188) was King of León and Galicia from 1157 to his death.
Life
     "Born in Toledo, Castile, he was the son of King Alfonso VII of León and Castile and of Berenguela, of the House of Barcelona. At his father's death, he received León and Galicia, while his brother Sancho received Castile and Toledo.[1] Ferdinand earned the reputation of a good knight and hard fighter, but did not display political or organising faculty.
     "He spent most of his first year as king in a dispute with his powerful nobles and an invasion by his brother Sancho III.[2] In 1158 the two brothers met at Sahagun, and peacefully solved the heritage matters. However, Sancho died in the same year, being succeeded by his child son Alfonso VIII, while Ferdinand occupied parts of Castile.[3] The boundary troubles with Castile restarted in 1164: he then met at Soria with the Lara family, who represented Alfonso VIII, and a truce was established, allowing him to move against the Muslim Almoravids who still held much of southern Spain, and to capture the cities of Alcántara and Alburquerque. In the same year, Ferdinand defeated King Afonso I of Portugal, who, in 1163, had occupied Salamanca in retaliation for the repopulation of the area ordered by the King of León.
     "In 1165 he married Urraca, daughter of Afonso of Portugal. However, strife with Portugal was not put to an end by this move. In 1168 Afonso again felt menaced by Ferdinand II's repopulation of the area of Ciudad Rodrigo: he then attacked Galicia, occupying Tui and the territory of Xinzo de Limia, former fiefs of his mother. However, as his troops were also besieging the Muslim citadel of Badajoz, Ferdinand II was able to push the Portuguese out of Galicia and to rush to Badajoz. When Afonso saw the Leonese arrive he tried to flee, but he was disabled by a broken leg caused by a fall from his horse, and made prisoner at one the city's gates. Afonso was obliged to surrender as his ransom almost all the conquests he had made in Galicia in the previous year. In the peace signed at Pontevedra the following year, Ferdinand got back twenty five castles, and the cities of Cáceres, Badajoz, Trujillo, Santa Cruz and Montánchez, previously lost by León. When in the same years the Almoravids laid siege to the Portuguese city of Santarém, Ferdinand II came to help his father-in-law, and helped to free the city from the menace.
     "Also in 1170, Ferdinand created the military-religious Order of Santiago de Compostela, with the task to protect the city of Cáceres.[4] Like the Order of Alcántara, it initially began as a knightly confraternity and took the name "Santiago" (St. James) after St. James the apostle.[4]
     "In 1175 Pope Alexander III annulled Ferdinand II and Urraca of Portugal's marriage due to consanguinuity. The King remarried to Teresa Fernández de Traba, daughter of count Fernando Pérez de Traba, and widow of count Nuño Pérez de Lara. In 1178 war against Castile broke out. Ferdinand surprised his nephew Alfonso VIII, occupied Castrojeriz and Dueñas, both formerly lands of Teresa's first husband. The war was settled in 1180 with the peace of Tordesillas. In the same year his wife Teresa died while bearing their second son.
     "In 1184, after a series of failed attempts, the Almohad caliph Abu Yaqub Yusuf invaded Portugal with an army recruited in Northern Africa and, in May, besieged Afonso I in Santarém; the Portuguese were helped by the arrival of the armies sent by the archbishop of Santiago de Compostela, in June, and by Ferdinand II in July.
     "In 1185 Ferdinand married for the third time to Urraca López de Haro (daughter of Lope Díaz, lord of Biscay, Nájera and Haro), who was his mistress since 1180. Urraca tried in vain to have Alfonso IX, first son of Ferdinand II, declared illegitimate, to favour her son Sancho.
     "Ferdinand II died in 1188 at Benavente, while returning from a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. He was buried in the cathedral of Compostela.
In 1230 Forty two years after Ferdinand II's death his namesake grandson Ferdinand III of Castile united Castile with Leon permanently.
Family
     "Ferdinand married Urraca of Portugal around 1165, they had one son:
** Alfonso IX.[5]

     "Following her repudiation, he formed a relationship with Teresa Fernández de Traba, daughter of count Fernando Pérez de Traba, and in August 1179 he married her, having:[citation needed]
** Ferdinand (1178–1187), legitimized through his parents' subsequent marriage
** child, b. and d. 6 February 1180, whose birth led to the death of its mother

     "He then formed a liaison with Urraca López de Haro,[6] daughter of Lope Díaz I de Haro, whom he married in May 1187, having:
** García (1182–1184)
** Alfonso, b.1184, legitimized through the subsequent marriage of his parents, died before his father.
** Sancho (1186–1220), lord of Fines

Notes
1. Busk, M. M., The history of Spain and Portugal from B.C. 1000 to A.D. 1814, (Baldwin and Cradock, 1833), 31.
2. The Encyclopædia Britannica, Vol.9, Ed. Thomas Spencer Baynes, (Henry G. Allen and Company, 1888), 80.
3. Busk, 32
4. Morton 2014, p. 39.
5. Leese, Thelma Anna, Blood royal: issue of the kings and queens of medieval England, 1066–1399, (Heritage Books, 1996), 47.
6. Medieval Iberia: an encyclopedia, Ed. E. Michael Gerlis and Samuel G. Armistead, (Taylor & Francis, 2003), 329.
References
** Busk, M. M., The history of Spain and Portugal from B.C. 1000 to A.D. 1814, Baldwin and Cradock, 1833.
** Leese, Thelma Anna, Blood royal: issue of the kings and queens of medieval England, 1066–1399, Heritage Books, 1996.
** Medieval Iberia: an encyclopedia, Ed. E. Michael Gerlis and Samuel G. Armistead, Taylor & Francis, 2003.
** Morton, Nicholas (2014). The Medieval Military Orders: 1120-1314. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-31786-147-8.
Further reading
** Szabolcs de Vajay, "From Alfonso VIII to Alfonso X" in Studies in Genealogy and Family History in Tribute to Charles Evans on the Occasion of his Eightieth Birthday, 1989, pp. 366–417."22



; Per Med Lands:
     "Infante don FERNANDO de Castilla y León, son of ALFONSO VII "el Emperador" King of Castile and León & his first wife Berenguela de Barcelona (1137-Benavente 22 Jan 1188, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Sancium et Fernandum, Elisabeth et Beatiam" as the children of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis" and his wife "Berengariam"[790]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Fernando" as brother of "rex Sanctius"[791]. "Santius et…Fredinandus et Garsias filii ymperatories" confirmed the charter dated 12 Sep 1142 under which Alfonso VII King of Castile donated "uillam…Taranna" to "Martino Didaci"[792]. "Sancius et…Fernandus et Garsias filii imperatoris…" confirmed the charter dated 19 Aug 1146 under which Alfonso VII King of Castile donated "ecclesiam…sanctam Mariam de Uelerda" to "Martino Didaci"[793]. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[794]. He succeeded his father in 1157 as FERNANDO II King of León, Galicia and Extremadura. Regent for his nephew Alfonso VIII King of Castile. He founded the brotherhood of the knights of Cáceres (“hermandad de freiles de Cáceres”) shortly after capturing the town in 1170. This soon developed into the Order of Santiago, which received the confirmation of the Papacy 1175, when the archbishop of Santiago entered the order as an honorary knight and donated a standard of the saint. The Annales Compostellani record the death in 1187 of “Fernandus Rex Legionis”[795]. The Anales Toledanos record the death in 1188 of “el Rey D. Ferrando, fillo del Emperador”[796].
     "m firstly ([May/Jun] 1165, repudiated [Feb 1171/1172]) Infanta dona URRACA de Portugal, daughter of AFONSO I Henriques King of Portugal & his wife Mathilde de Savoie ([1151]-Valladolid 16 Oct 1188). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Sancium et Urracam…et aliam filiam…Tarasia" as the children of "Aldefonsum" & his wife, specifying that Urraca married "Fernandi Regis Legionensis"[797]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records that “D. Orracam” daughter of “Rex Donnus Alfonsus” and his wife “Donnam Matildam, Comitis Amadæi de Moriana filiam” married “Regi Legionensium Donno Fernando”, adding in a later passage that they married in Aug 1209 (1171)[798]. The Crónica Latina records that “el rey Fernando” married “Urraca, hija de Alfonso rey de Portugal” but that they were related in the third degree of consanguinity[799]. "Regina Sancia comitis Raymundi et regine Urrache regia proles" donated an inn near Mucientes to Sahagún monastery by charter dated 15 Mar 1158, subscribed by "Regina Urracha de Asturias, Stephania Infantissa filia imperatoris…"[800]. The dating clause of a charter dated 13 Feb 1171 records "regnante Rege Donno F. in Legione, Galesia, Asturiis et Extrematus…cum uxore sua regina donna Urracha"[801]. Lucas de Tuy records that "Rex Fernandus" repudiated "uxorem suam Urracam filiam Regis Adefonsi, eo quod erat consanguinea eius propinquo gradu"[802]. The precise dating of the couple’s separation is uncertain, but Salazar y Castro states he found no charters naming Urraca as King Fernando’s wife after 1171[803].
     "m secondly ([1172/6 May 1173]) TERESA [Núñez de Lara, daughter of NUÑO Pérez de Lara & his wife Teresa Fernández de Traba] (-León 7 Feb 1180, bur León, monastery of San Isidro). Salazar y Castro states that the Coronica General records the marriage of "el Rey D. Ferrando" and "Doña Teresa fija del conde D. Nuño de Castiella"[804]. There is some doubt whether King Fernando II’s second wife was the widow or daughter of Nuño Pérez de Lara. Lucas de Tuy records that "Rex Fernandus" married secondly "Tharasiam qua fuerat uxor Nunii comitis de Castella"[805], and Rodrigo de Jiménez that the king married "Tarasiam filiam comitis Fernandi, quæ fuerat uxor comitis Nunii de Castella"[806]. Salazar y Castro (following numerous earlier authors which he cites) highlights the difficulties with these texts as written (especially because of “la desigualdad de las edades” of the parties and their consanguinity which would have been even closer than the relationship between King Fernando and his first wife for whose marriage a dispensation was refused), although he cites no earlier primary source which confirms that the king´s wife was Nuño’s daughter. A charter dated 6 May 1173 (“Era MCCXI”) records the sale of property by “Nuño Gontinez y su muger Ximena Ovequez” which had been granted to them by "Rege F. et Regina domina Tarasia…in Montenigro…Villar ripam de Goaa"[807]. Given the death of Nuño Pérez de Lara in 1177, this document would settle the question if accurate but no other reference to the charter has been found to check Salazar y Castro’s extract (in particular whether the date is correctly transcribed). Szabolcs de Vajay accepts the second marriage of Teresa Fernández (Nuño’s widow) with the king, supposedly finding the solution to the chronological difficulties by saying that she was Fernando Pérez´s daughter "by Sancha González (and not, as is often alleged, by the Infanta Teresa of Portugal)"[808]. His solution is inconsistent with the rather garbled text of the Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos which names "D. Sancha Vermuiz, D. Teresa Vermuiz" as the children of "D. Vermui Perez Potestade de Trava" [presumably an error] and his first wife "la Reina D. Teresa de Portugal", in a later passage recording that "El Conde D. Nuño de Lara" married "D. Teresa Fernandez"[809]. While acknowledging that there is no guarantee of the accuracy of Pedro de Barcelos, Szabolcs’s solution does not in any case resolve the chronological problems. The marriages of Fernando Pérez de Traba´s legitimate children by his wife are noted between 1142 and 1150, which would presumably place their births around [1120/35]. This still appears early for the possible birth date of King Fernando II’s second wife given the birth of the couple´s children in [1178/80]. The problems would be resolved if the king’s wife was Nuño’s daughter and not his widow, in line with the Coronica General. This would assume that both Lucas de Tuy and Rodrigo de Jiménez were incorrect, but is consistent with Queen Teresa being named in May 1173, four years before the death of Nuño Pérez, and also with her death in childbirth in 1180 (see below). It should also be noted that Salazar y Castro records that Nuño Pérez and his wife were both buried in the monastery of Perales[810]: no document has been found which confirms this statement, but if it is correct the evidence would be conclusive as a monument in San Isidro, León records the burial of "Regina…coniux Tarasia Regis Fernandi"[811]. Szabolcs de Vajay cites the epitaph which confirms that Queen Teresa died in childbirth[812]. An apparently contrary indication is provided by an early 13th century document: Álvaro Núñez de Lara (son of Nuño Pérez de Lara and his wife) is described as “filius comitis domni Nunonis et regine domne Tarasie” in a donation of property to Sobrado by charter dated 23 Nov 1204[813]. Sánchez de Mora identifies Álvaro’s mother as Teresa Queen of León[814], which is consistent with a literal reading of the wording. However, he does not consider the possibility of an omission in the document (“nepos” omitted after “et”, for example) which could then represent a reference to Álvaro’s descent from Teresa Queen of Portugal, an illustrious relationship which a scribe would have considered worthy of record. In conclusion, there are factors which point both ways, but on balance it seems more likely that King Fernando’s wife was Nuño’s daughter, as Nuño’s widow would have been over fifty in 1180, unusually old for child-bearing.
     "m thirdly (May 1187) URRACA López de Haro, widow of NUÑO Menéndez Señor de Ceón y Riaño, daughter of conde LÓPE Díaz de Haro, Señor de Vizcaya & his second wife Aldonza Rodríguez (-Cistercian monastery of Vilena 1223, bur Vilena). She was the king’s mistress from at least May 1182. Señora de Aguilar y Monteagudo 1187[815]. “Regina domna Vrraka Lupi...cum filio meo infanti Santio et filia mea Maria Nunez” donated “hereditate de Magroueio...in Mafules” to “magistro Michaeli” by charter dated 1195[816]. "Domna Urraca Lupi Regina filia comitis Lupi" donated property to the monastery of Las Huelgas de Burgos for the foundation of the monastery of Vileña, for the soul of "filiique mei Sanci Ferrandi", by charter dated Apr 1222[817]."
Med Lands cites:
[790] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 5, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[791] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1143, MGH SS XXIII, p. 837.
[792] Eslonza, Part I, X, p. 21.
[793] Eslonza, Part I, XIII, p. 25.
[794] Colmenares (1846), Tomo I, p. 240.
[795] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 322.
[796] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 392.
[797] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 5, RHGF XII, p. 382.
[798] Chronicon Lusitanum, España Sagrada, Tomo XIV, pp. 426 and 428.
[799] Crónica Latina de los reyes de Castilla, II, 10.
[800] Sahagún (Pérez), Apéndice III, Escritura CLXXIII, p. 539.
[801] Salazar y Castro, L. (1697) Historia genealogica de la casa de Lara (Madrid), Tomo III, Libro XVI, cap. II, p. 16, quoting Archivo de Uclés.
[802] Salazar y Castro (1697), Tomo III, Libro XVI, cap. II, p. 16, quoting Lucas Tudensis, Tome 4, lib. 4.
[803] Salazar y Castro (1697), Tomo III, Libro XVI, cap. II, p. 16.
[804] Salazar y Castro (1697), Tomo III, Libro XVI, cap. II, p. 16, quoting Coronica General.
[805] Salazar y Castro (1697), Tomo III, Libro XVI, cap. II, p. 15, quoting Lucas Tudensis, Tome 4, lib. 4.
[806] Salazar y Castro (1697), Tomo III, Libro XVI, cap. II, p. 16, quoting Rodericus Toletanus, lib. 7, cap. 23.
[807] Salazar y Castro (1697), Tomo III, Libro XVI, cap. II, p. 16, quoting Archivo de Uclés.
[808] Szabolcs de Vajay (1989), p. 374.
[809] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. VII, Pereiras, 31 p. 64, and Tit. X, Lara, 11, p. 78.
[810] Salazar y Castro (1697), Tomo III, Libro XVI, cap. I, p. 14.
[811] Salazar y Castro (1697), Tomo III, Libro XVI, cap. II, p. 18.
[812] Szabolcs de Vajay (1989), p. 402, note 32, quoting Arco (1954), pp. 58 and 168.
[813] Sobrado, Vol. II, 365, p. 351.
[814] Sánchez de Mora, A. (2003) La nobleza castellana en la plena edad media: el linaje de Lara (ss. XI-XIII), Tesis doctoral (Sevilla), Tomo I, p. 185.
[815] Szabolcs de Vajay (1989), p. 374.
[816] Castán Lanaspa, G. & Castán Lanaspa, J. (1992) Documentos del monasterio de Santa María de Trianos (siglos XII-XIII) (Universidad de Salamanca) (“Trianos Santa María”), 53, p. 55.
[817] Rodríguez López, A. (1907) El Real Monasterio de las Huelgas de Burgos y el Hospital del Rey (Burgos) ("Las Huelgas de Burgos"), Tome I, 44a, p. 389.16


; Per Genealogics:
     "Fernando was born in 1137 in Toledo, Castile, the son of Alfonso VII, king of Castile and León, and his first wife Berenguela of Barcelona, daughter of Ramon Berenguer III el Grande, conde de Barcelona, Provence and Carcassonne and Aldonza/Doulce/Dulcia de Gevaudan, heiress of Provence. Fernando was king of León from his father's death in 1157 to his own death in 1188. His father had divided his kingdom upon his death, with Fernando receiving León and his brother Sancho Castile.
     "Fernando married three times. His first marriage, in 1156 to Urraca of Portugal, daughter of Afonso I 'o Conquistador', king of Portugal and Matilde de Savoie, produced his heir Alfonso IX. He divorced Urraca in 1175. His children from his other marriages would not have progeny.
     "Fernando's reign of thirty years was one of strife marked by no signal success or reverse. He had to contend with his unruly nobles, several of whom he put to death. During the minority of his nephew, Alfonso VIII of Castile, he endeavoured to impose himself on the kingdom as regent. To the west he was in more or less constant strife with the kingdom of Portugal, which had separated from León in 1139. His relations with the Portuguese House of Burgundy must have suffered by his repudiation of his wife Urraca. Though he took the king of Portugal prisoner in 1169, he made no political use of his success. He extended his dominions southward in Extremadura at the expense of the Moors. Fernando left a reputation of a good knight and hard fighter, but did not display political or organising facility. He died on 22 January 1188 and was succeeded by his son Alfonso IX."4



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1968.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 62.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.23


; Per Genealogy.EU: "King FERNANDO II of and Leon (1157-88), *1137, +Benavente 22.1.1188; 1m: V.1165 (annulled VI.1175) Urraca of Portugal; 2m: before 7.10.1178 Teresa (+Leon 1180) dau.of Cde Fernando de Trava, sn de Trastamara and Sancha Gonzalez; 3m: V.1187 Urraca Lopez de Haro (+after 1226) dau.of Cde Lope Diaz de Haro, soberano de Vizcaya and Aldonza Ruiz."4

GAV-22 EDV-22 GKJ-23.

Reference: Weis [1992:104] Line 114-26.1 Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon was also known as Ferdinand II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon.1,24,4 He was King of Leon. See attached map of Leon ca 1200. between 1157 and 1188.1,5,2,4

Family 1

Infante dona Urraca (?) de Portugal b. c 1151, d. 21 Jan 1188
Child

Family 2

Teresa Fernandez de Traba b. c 1120, d. c 5 Feb 1180
Child

Family 3

Urraca Lopez de Haro d. 1227
Children

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 114-26, p. 104. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 4: Rulers of Portugal, León, and Castile, 1035-1214. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020548&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020542&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Infante don ALFONSO de Castilla y León, son of URRACA Queen of Castile and León & her first husband Raymond de Bourgogne [Comté] ([Grajal], Galicia 1 Mar 1105-Fresneda 21 Aug 1157, bur Toledo, Cathedral Santa María). The Anales Toledanos record the birth 1 Mar 1106 of “El Rey D. Alfonso, fillo del Conde D. Raymondo è de Doña Urraca”[648]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "rex Aldefonsus Hispanie imperator" as son of "comitis Raymundi…ex Waracta filia imperatoris Fernandi"[649]. Crowned King of Galicia 17 Sep 1111 at Santiago de Compostela. He was proclaimed ALFONSO VII “el Emperador” King of Castile, León and Toledo in 1112[650]. "Hildefonsus Raymundi…rex" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 27 Nov 1116, confirmed by "Illa infanta regis germana, Guillelmus comes de Moretegni, Iohannes Reynnitz, Petrus Ansuriz comes…"[651]. He styled himself "imperator" for the first time 9 Dec 1117[652]. He ruled under the tutelage of Pedro Froilaz Conde de Traba and his mother until 1119, although he only assumed effective personal rule after his mother's death in 1126. "Aldefonsus Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea regina Berengaria et Santia mea germana" donated "abbatiam Sancti Facundi et Primitivi" to Cluny by charter dated 7 Sep 1132[653]. King of Zaragoza 1134. He was crowned Emperor 26 May 1135 at León. He negotiated peace with both Aragon and Navarre, with a view to concentrating his military efforts on the reconquest. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "monasterium Sancti Petri de Cardigna" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Jul 1142[654]. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" confirmed the donation to Cluny of "monasterium Sancti Salvatoris de Bodinio" to Cluny as requested by "comitis Gomes" by charter dated Aug 1142[655]. "Adefonsus imperator Hispanie…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "ecclesiam sancti Vincentii de Salamantica" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Oct 1143, confirmed by "Sancius imperatoris major filius…Rodericus Gomez comes, Poncius de Cabreria comes, Guterrus Fernandez, Rodericus Fernandez, Didacus Munioz majordomus imperatoris, Garsias Royz majorinus imperatoris in Burgus"[656]. He captured Almería (1147), Tortosa (1148), and Jaén (1157) from the Muslims, though they recaptured Almería before he died. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[657]. "Aldefonsus…tocius Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea imperatrice domna Rica et…filiis meis Sanctio et Ferrando regibus" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 28 Oct 1155, confirmed by "Comes Rudericus Petriz, Garcia Garçiaz de Aza, Veremundus Petriz, Garcia Gumez, Gonsalvuz Ruderiz, Alvaros Ruderiz, Comes Gonsalvus Fernandi, Dicados Ferrandiz de Bonelas maiorinus in Burgis, Comes Almandricus tenens Bæciam, Comes Poncius maiordomus imperatoris, Comes Lupus, Comes Ranimirus, Comes Petrus Aldeffonsus, Gutierre Ferrandiz, Nunnus Petriz tenens Montor, Gundisalvus de Maranon alferiz imperatoris…"[658]. The Chronicon Burgense records the death in 1157 of “Alfonsus Imperator”[659]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the death in Sep 1195 (1157) of “D. Alfonsus Imperator, filius Comitis D. Raymundi et Reginæ D. Orracæ”[660]. On his death, his lands were divided between his two sons.

    m firstly (Saldaña Nov 1128) BERENGUELA de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BERENGUER [III] “el Grande” Conde de Barcelona & his wife Dulce/Dolça [I] Ctss de Provence ([1116]-Palencia 15/31 Jan 1149, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records the marriage of "Alfonso…king of León" and "the daughter of Ramón count of Barcelona…Berengaria" in 1128 at Saldaña[661]. The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium record the marriage of "Raimundi-Berengarii comitis…filiam" and "Ildefonso Toletano Imperatori"[662]. The testament of "Raimundus Berengarii…Barchinonensis comes et marchio" dated [8 Jul] 1130 names "Raimundo Berengarii filio meo…et filie mee ipsa de Castella et illa de Fuxo"[663]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[664]. The Anales Toledanos record the death in Feb 1149 of “la Emperadriz”[665].

    m secondly ([Oct/Dec] 1152) as her first husband, RYKSA of Silesia, daughter of W?ADYS?AW II “Wygnaniec/the Exile” Prince of Krakow and Silesia & his wife Agnes of Austria [Babenberg] ([1130/40]-16 Jun [1185]). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[666]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and her three marriages has not yet been identified. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rikissam", daughter of "regi Russie nomine Musuch" & his wife "Rikissam [filiam ducis Vergescelai de Polonia]", as wife firstly of "imperatoris Castelle Alfunso" and subsequently of "comiti Aragonensi et post comiti Alberto de Everstein ultra Coliniam"[667], contradicting other sources in many aspects. She was known as RIQUILDA in Spain[668], or RICA. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[669]. She married secondly (1161) Raymond Bérenger II Comte de Provence, and thirdly (after 1166) Albert [III] Graf von Everstein.

    Mistress (1): ([1130/32]) GONTRODO Pérez, wife of GUTIERRE Sebastiániz, daughter of conde PEDRO Díaz de Valle & his wife María Ordóñez (-León 29 Jun 1186, Santa María de Vega near Oviedo). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records that King Alfonso VII "took a concubine…Guntroda, the daughter of Pedro Díaz and María Ordóñez…who belonged to the greatest family of the Asturians and the Tinians", dated to [1130/32] from the context[670]. “Gontrodo Petri...cum domina mea, et filia Urraca” donated property to the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo by charter dated 13 Oct 1153[671]. She became a nun at the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo[672]. Florez reproduces the epitaph in the same monastery which records the death in 1186 of “Guntrodo”[673].

    Mistress (2): ([1139/48]) URRACA Fernández de Castro, widow of conde RODRIGO Martínez, daughter of FERNANDO García [de Castro] Señor de Hita y Uceda & his second wife Estefanía Armengol de Urgel ([1120]-after 1165). Alfonso VII King of Castile granted the villa de Amusco to "comitissa domina Vrracha uxore comitis Roderici Martinez" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 21 Jan 1139[674]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "Domne Vrrache Ferrandez comitisse" by charter dated 9 Sep 1140[675]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "comitisse domna Vrracha Fernandez…et post filia uestra et mea" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 3 Feb 1148[676]. “Petrus Fernandiz et soror mea Urraca Fernandiz et uxor mea Maria Pedriz...cum filiis et filiabus nostris” donated “sancte Crucis de Valcarcer” to Santa María de Aguilar de Campoo by charter dated 4 Aug 1165[677].. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Barcelona: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020544&tree=LEO
  9. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  10. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 December 2019), memorial page for Fernando II King Of Leon (1137–1188), Find A Grave Memorial no. 57133062, citing Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/57133062/fernando_ii-king_of_leon. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 92: Portugal - Early Kings (House of Burgundy).
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 47 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet47.html
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Urraca of Portugal: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020549&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PORTUGAL.htm#AffonsoIdied1185B
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#FernandoIILeondied1188B
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teresa Fernandez de Trava: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00399767&tree=LEO
  18. [S2185] Francisco Tavares de Almeida, "de Almeida email 23 Sept 2007: "Re: Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "de Almeida email 23 Sept 2007."
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Teresa Fernandez de Trava: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00325787&tree=LEO
  20. [S1495] Thierry Stasser, "Stasser email #2 "Re: Diego Lopez de Haro, de Vizcaya/Biscay"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 5 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Stasser email #2 5 November 2003."
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Urraca López de Haro: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00399769&tree=LEO
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferdinand_II_of_Le%C3%B3n. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020548&tree=LEO
  24. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, History of Medieval Spain, Appendix, Chart 7: Kings of León-Castile, 1214-1504.
  25. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 114-27, p. 104.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso IX: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020550&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando of León: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00399768&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Garcia Fernández of León: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00399772&tree=LEO

Infante dona Urraca (?) de Portugal1,2,3,4,5

F, #4716, b. circa 1151, d. 21 January 1188
FatherAfonso I Henriques 'o Conquistador' (?) King of Portugal1,6,2,3,4,7,5 b. 25 Jul 1110, d. 6 Dec 1185
MotherMatilde (Mafalda, Maud) (?) Countess of Savoy, Queen of Portugal1,2,3,4,8 b. 1125, d. 4 Nov 1157
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited11 Dec 2019
     Infante dona Urraca (?) de Portugal was born circa 1151.3,5 She married Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon, son of Alfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia and Berenguela Raimundo (?) de Barcelona, in May 1165;
His 1st wife; Leo van de Pas says m. 1156.6,2,3,9,10,4,5,11 Infante dona Urraca (?) de Portugal and Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon were divorced in June 1175; Med Lands says repudiated Feb 1171/1172.2,3,9,10,4,5
Infante dona Urraca (?) de Portugal died on 21 January 1188 at Benevente, Italy; Med Lands says d. 16 Oct 1188 in Vallaodolid.12,2,3,5
Infante dona Urraca (?) de Portugal was buried after 21 January 1188

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1151, Coimbra, Coimbra Municipality, Coimbra, Portugal
     DEATH     16 Oct 1188 (aged 36–37), Valladolid, Provincia de Valladolid, Castilla y León, Spain
     Not to be confused with Urraca of León and Castile (1079- 1128) also buried at Basilica of San Isidoro.
     Queen Consort of León (1165–1175)
     Infanta Urraca of Portugal was a Portuguese infanta (princess), daughter of Afonso I, 1st King of Portugal and Queen Maud of Savoy.
     Urraca was born at Coimbra. She married Ferdinand II of León with whom she had Alfonso IX of León. This marriage failed to prevent her father Afonso I from declaring war on Ferdinand after he became his son-in-law. This short war culminated in disaster when Afonso was captured in Badajoz. Perhaps due to his marriage to Urraca, Ferdinand was generous to Afonso, and let him leave. However, the marriage of Ferdinand II and Urraca was annulled in 1175 by the Pope, the two being second cousins, great-grandchildren of Alfonso VI of León and Castile. That this was political in nature is shown by Ferdinand's remarriage to Teresa
Fernández de Traba, the half-aunt of Urraca and thus a generation closer to Alfonso VI.
     After the dissolution of her marriage, Urraca returned to the court of her father at Valladolid, and died there, aged only 37, nine months after the death of her former husband.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Afonso Henriques I 1110–1185
          Mafalda de Saboia 1125–1157
     Spouse
          Fernando II King Of Leon 1137–1188
     Siblings
          Sancho I 1154–1212
          Teresa of Portugal 1157–1218
     Children
          Alfonso IX de Leon 1171–1230
     BURIAL     Basilica Of San Isidoro, León, Provincia de León, Castilla y León, Spain
     Created by: Angie Swann
     Added: 22 Jun 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 148159503.13
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Urraca was born in Coimbra about 1151, the daughter of Afonso I 'o Conquistador', king of Portugal, and Mathilde de Savoie.
     "In 1156 Urraca married Fernando II, king of León, son of Alfonso VII, king of Castile and León, and Berenguela of Barcelona. Of their four children only Alfonso IX would have progeny.
     "Urraca's marriage did not prevent her father Afonso from declaring war on his son-in-law. This short war culminated in disaster when Afonso was captured in Badajoz. Perhaps due to his marriage to Urraca, Fernando was generous to Afonso, and let him leave. However the marriage of Fernando and Urraca was annulled in 1175 by the pope, using as justification the fact that Urraca was Fernando's second cousin.
     "After the dissolution of her marriage, Urraca returned to the court of her father, and she died there on 16 October 1188, aged only 37, nine months after the death of her former husband."4

Infante dona Urraca (?) de Portugal lived at an unknown place ; Per Med Lands: "Infanta dona URRACA de Portugal ([1151]-Valladolid 16 Oct 1188). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Sancium et Urracam…et aliam filiam…Tarasia" as the children of "Aldefonsum" & his wife, specifying that Urraca married "Fernandi Regis Legionensis"[72]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records that “D. Orracam” daughter of “Rex Donnus Alfonsus” and his wife “Donnam Matildam, Comitis Amadæi de Moriana filiam” married “Regi Legionensium Donno Fernando”, adding in a later passage that they married in Aug 1209 (1171)[73]. The Crónica Latina records that “el rey Fernando” married “Urraca, hija de Alfonso rey de Portugal” but that they were related in the third degree of consanguinity[74]. "Regina Sancia comitis Raymundi et regine Urrache regia proles" donated an inn near Mucientes to Sahagún monastery by charter dated 15 Mar 1158, subscribed by "Regina Urracha de Asturias, Stephania Infantissa filia imperatoris…"[75]. The dating clause of a charter dated 13 Feb 1171 records "regnante Rege Donno F. in Legione, Galesia, Asturiis et Extrematus…cum uxore sua regina donna Urracha"[76]. Lucas de Tuy records that "Rex Fernandus" repudiated "uxorem suam Urracam filiam Regis Adefonsi, eo quod erat consanguinea eius propinquo gradu"[77]. m ([May/Jun] 1165, repudiated [Feb 1171/1172]) as his first wife, FERNANDO II King of León, son of ALFONSO VII "el Emperador" King of Castile and León & his first wife Berenguela de Barcelona (1137-Benavente 22 Jan 1188, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor)."
Med Lands cites:
[72] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 5, RHGF XII, p. 382.
[73] Chronicon Lusitanum, España Sagrada, Tomo XIV, pp. 426 and 428.
[74] Crónica Latina de los reyes de Castilla, II, 10, consulted at (12 Apr 2008).
[75] Sahagún (Pérez), Apéndice III, Escritura CLXXIII, p. 639.
[76] Salazar y Castro, L. (1697) Historia genealogica de la casa de Lara (Madrid), Tomo III, Libro XVI, cap. II, p. 16, quoting Archivo de Uclés.
[77] Salazar y Castro (1697), Tomo III, Libro XVI, cap. II, p. 15, quoting Lucas Tudensis, Tome 4, lib. 4.5


Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1968.4

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Urraca of Portugal (Portuguese pronunciation: [u??ak?]; (Coimbra, 1148[1] – Wamba, Valladolid, 1211[2]) was an infanta of Portugal, daughter of Afonso Henriques, the first king of Portugal, and his wife, Queen Maud of Savoy. She was queen consort of León as the wife of King Ferdinand II and the mother of Alfonso IX.
Life
     "Daughter of Afonso I, the first king of Portugal, and his wife Maud of Savoy, she had several siblings, including King Sancho I.
     "In May or June 1165, she married Ferdinand II, becoming the first infanta of Portugal to have married a Leonese monarch. The only son of this marriage, Alfonso IX, was born in Zamora on 15 August 1171.[3]
     "However, the marriage of Ferdinand II and Urraca was annulled in 1171 or 1172 by Pope Alexander III the two being second cousins, great-grandchildren of Alfonso VI of León and Castile. Urraca then became a nun joining the Order of Saint John of Jerusalem and retired to live in the estates that her former husband had given her in the Carta de Arras (wedding tokens) in Zamora. Later, she retired in the Monastery of Santa María de Wamba which belonged to the aforementioned order.[4]
     "On 25 May 1176, Queen Urraca donated land and villas to the Order of Saint John, probably coinciding with her joining the order. These properties included Castroverde de Campos and Mansilla in León and Salas and San Andrés in Asturias.[5] She was present in 1188 at the coronation of her son Alfonso IX who inherited the throne after his father's death on 22 January 1188 and, in that same year, on 4 May, both confirmed the privileges granted by the former king to the Order of Santiago.[4] Her presence is registered for the last time in medieval charters in 1211 when she donated the village of Castrotorafe that she had received from her husband the king in 1165 as a wedding gift to the Cathedral of Zamora.[6][2]
Burial
     "Queen Urraca was buried at the Monastery of Santa María de Wamba in what is now the province of Valladolid.[4] St Mary's, the former monastic church and the only part remaining of the ancient monastery, contains the Chapel of the Queen: a plaque that was placed there subsequently mentions that Queen Urraca of Portugal had been interred in this church.[7]
References
1. Mattoso 2014, p. 226.
2. Rodrigues Oliveira 2010, p. 79.
3. Arco y Garay 1954, p. 167.
4. Arco y Garay 1954, p. 168.
5. García Tato 2004, pp. 133-134, doc. 31.
6. Gross 1998, pp. 1226-227.
7. Elorza et al 1990, p. 57.
Bibliography
** Arco y Garay, Ricardo del (1954). Sepulcros de la Casa Real de Castilla. Madrid: Instituto Jerónimo Zurita. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas. OCLC 11366237.
** Elorza, Juan C; Vaquero, Lourdes; Castillo, Belén; Negro, Marta (1990). Junta de Castilla y León. Consejería de Cultura y Bienestar Social (ed.) El Panteón Real de las Huelgas de Burgos. Los enterramientos de los reyes de León y de Castilla. Publisher Evergráficas S.A. ISBN 84-241-9999-5.
** García Tato, Isidro (2004). Las encomiendas gallegas de la Orden Militar de San Juan de Jerusalén: Estudio y edición documental (in Spanish). Vol. I. Santiago de Compostela: Instituto de Estudios Gallegos «Padre Sarmiento». hdl:10261/49926. ISBN 8400082508.
** Gross, Georg (1998). "El fuero de Castrotorafe (1129). Transición a la documentación romanizadora". Boletín de la Real Academia de la Historia (in Spanish). Madrid. Vol. CXCV, Cuaderno II: 221–229. ISSN 0034-0626.
** Mattoso, José (2014). D. Afonso Henriques (in Portuguese). Lisbon: Temas e Debates. ISBN 978-972-759-911-0.
** Rodrigues Oliveira, Ana (2010). Rainhas medievais de Portugal. Dezassete mulheres, duas dinastias, quatro séculos de História (in Portuguese). Lisbon: A esfera dos livros. ISBN 978-989-626-261-7."14 GAV-22 EDV-22 GKJ-23.

; weis 112-26.1

Family

Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon b. 1137, d. 21 Jan 1188
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 112-26, p. 103. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 92: Portugal - Early Kings (House of Burgundy). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 47 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet47.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Urraca of Portugal: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020549&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PORTUGAL.htm#AffonsoIdied1185B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Afonso I 'o Conquistador': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020556&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilde de Savoie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020557&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020548&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#FernandoIILeondied1188B
  12. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 December 2019), memorial page for Urraca “Queen of Leon” Of Portugal (1151–16 Oct 1188), Find A Grave Memorial no. 148159503, citing Basilica Of San Isidoro, León, Provincia de León, Castilla y León, Spain ; Maintained by Angie Swann (contributor 48313732), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/148159503/urraca-of_portugal. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urraca_of_Portugal. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 114-27, p. 104.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso IX: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020550&tree=LEO

Doña Blanche Alfonsa (?) Infanta de Castilla, Regent of France1,2,3,4,5

F, #4717, b. 4 March 1187/88, d. 27 November 1252
FatherAlfonso VIII "El Noble" Sanchez (?) King of Castile & Leon1,6,2,3,7,8,5,4 b. 11 Nov 1155, d. 6 Oct 1214
MotherLeonor (Eleanor) Pantagenet of England, Queen of Castile1,6,2,9,3,8,10,5,4 b. 13 Oct 1162, d. 31 Oct 1214
ReferenceGAV21 EDV22
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     Doña Blanche Alfonsa (?) Infanta de Castilla, Regent of France was born on 4 March 1187/88 at Chateaux de Palencia, Palencia, Provincia de Palencia, Castilla y León, Spain.2,6,11,3,12,5,4 She married Louis VIII "Le Lion" (?) King of France, son of Philippe II Auguste (?) King of France, Count of Artois and Isabelle (?) de Hainaut, Cts d'Artois, Queen of France, on 23 May 1200 at Abbaye de Port-Mort, Pont-Audemer, Departement de l'Eure, Haute-Normandie, France (now).11,6,13,2,3,14,5
Doña Blanche Alfonsa (?) Infanta de Castilla, Regent of France died on 27 November 1252 at Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, at age 64.2,6,11,3,12,5
Doña Blanche Alfonsa (?) Infanta de Castilla, Regent of France was buried after 29 November 1252 at Abbey de Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen-l'Aumone, Departement du Val-d'Oise, Île-de-France, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1188, Palencia, Provincia de Palencia, Castilla y León, Spain
     DEATH     27 Nov 1252 (aged 63–64), Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
     French Royalty. During the winter of 1199/1200 Eleanor of Aquitaine, aged 79 years, traveled to Castile to visit her daughter and to select a wife for the French heir to the throne. During her stay in Palencia she choose her twelve year old granddaughter Blanche to strengthen the peace treaty between John of England and Philippe II Auguste. Blanche accompanied her to Fontevraud and from there she traveled alone. In May the court traveled to Normandy to celebrate the wedding. France had been placed under the interdict after the king had repudiated his second wife and the wedding could therefore not be celebrated on French territory. Afterwards the young couple lived together in Paris. They were taught together, played together and grew up together. Their first child was born in 1205, but died soon afterwards. In 1214 she gave birth to a son who was named after the father and who will later succeed him. A month after the death of Philippe II Auguste they were crowned in Reims. In the following years Louis has to fight in the west and south, conquers La Rochelle and Poitou, and Blanche manages the kingdom from Paris. In 1226 he besieges Avignon and takes the city in September. As a result Beaucaire, Nîmes, Carcassonne, Béziers and Narbonne surrender. The army is seized by an dysentery epidemic, the Siege of Toulouse is abandoned due to the weakened army. His health, which has always been weak, took another downturn. In November he became sick and died on the 8th. He is buried a week later in Saint-Denis and his eldest son, only 12 years old, is crowned king. Blanche becomes regent for him and soon has to fight for her power. A child on the throne gives several barons hope for more power and larger territories. A group with Pierre de Bretagne, Hugh X de Lusignan, and Thibaut IV de Champagne is supported by the English king and count Raymond VII of Toulouse. They rebel but Blanche raises an army and defeats them in the same winter. In March they swear loyalty to the king and the rebellion is over. To secure the peace in the south she signs a peace treaty with her cousin Raymond VII of Toulouse and marries her son Alphonso to his daughter. With the years Blanche becomes more and more secure in her power and even reigns without a council. In 1234 she marries her son to Marguerite de Provence in hope to later include the Provence into the kingdom. The two women can't stand each other from the beginning. With the years Louis restricted her power but she remains his closest advisor and when he felt unwell she is there to take over for him. When Louis left France for the crusade she is installed as regent, but is not given full power. In February 1250 Louis army is defeated at Mansurah, he is imprisoned and his younger brother Robert is killed. After paying a huge ransom he is released but remains in the holy land to secure the Christian interests. In 1251 she suppresses a rebellion of peasants and afterwards retires to Maubuisson.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Alfonso VIII Borgoña de Castilla 1155–1214
      Eleanor Plantagenet 1162–1214
     Spouse
      Louis VIII Capet, King of France 1187–1226
     Siblings
      Berenguela de Castilla y Plantagenet de León 1180–1246
      Sancho de Castilla y Plantagenet 1181–1181
      Sancha de Castilla y Plantagenet 1182–1184
      Urraca Of Castile 1187–1220
      Fernando de Castilla y Plantagenet 1189–1211
      Mafalda de Castilla y Plantagenet 1191–1211
      Leonor de Castilla y Plantagenet de Aragona 1202–1244
      Enrique I de Castilla y Plantagenet 1204–1217
     Children
      Philippe de France 1209–1218
      Louis IX of France 1214–1270
      Robert I d'Artois 1216–1250
      Alphonse III de Poitiers 1220–1271
      Philippe Dagobert de France 1222–1232
      Isabelle of France 1225–1270
      Charles of Anjou 1226–1285
      Charles of Anjou 1226–1285
     BURIAL     Abbey of Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen-l'Aumone, Departement du Val-d'Oise, Île-de-France, France
     PLOT     grave destroyed
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 11 Apr 2007
     Find A Grave Memorial 18883572.3,12
     GAV-21 EDV-22.

; Per Genealogics: "Blanche was born at Palencia before 4 March 1188, the daughter of Alfonso VIII, king of Castile, and Eleanor of England. In 1200 her formidable grandmother, Eleanor of Aquitaine, queen of England, took her to France to be married to its crown prince. Twenty-three years and ten children later he became King Louis VIII. After only three years Louis VIII died and Blanche became regent for her son, the new King Louis IX, until 1234."
     " It was her formidable grandmother, Queen Eleanor of England, who took her to France to be married to its crown prince who, twenty-three years and ten children later, became King Louis VIII. However, after only three years Louis VIII died and Blanche became Regent for her son, the new King Louis IX, until 1234.
     "In 1236 in London she attended the marriage of King Henry III to Eleanor de Provence. Together with her son she brought from the east the reputedly Holy Cross from Christ's crucifixion to Paris and they built the Sainte Chapelle to house it. In 1248 Louis IX went on crusade and Blanche again became Regent. In 1250 news reached her that Louis IX had been captured and she rewarded the messengers by having them hanged.
     "When the Pastoureaux uprising in 1251 reached Paris, she at first held talks with its leaders but then imprisoned them and put them to death. She herself died in 1252."5

; This is the same person as:
”Blanche of Castile” at Wikipedia, as
”Blanche de Castille” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Blanca de Castilla” at Wikipedia (Es.)15,16,17

Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: yr.1961.5 Doña Blanche Alfonsa (?) Infanta de Castilla, Regent of France was also known as Blanca (?) de Castilla y Léon.3,18 Doña Blanche Alfonsa (?) Infanta de Castilla, Regent of France was also known as Doña Blanca (?) Infanta de Castilla, Regent of France.8

Reference: Weis [1992:104] Line 113-28.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "Infanta doña BLANCA de Castilla (Palencia [1188/89] before 4 Mar-Paris 27 Nov 1252, bur Notre-Dame de Maubuisson). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Blanche Francie regina" as daughter of "filio…Sanctii rege", in a later passage recording the marriage in 1200 of "Ludovicus filius regis Francie" and "Blancham filiam Alphonsi regis Castelle neptem ex sorore regum Anglie Richardi et Iohannis"[766]. The dating clause of a charter dated 4 Mar 1190 (“era MCCXXVIII”), which records a donation to Arlanza, states “anno quo nata est Palentie infantissa Blanca de regina Alienor”[767]. Blanca´s birth in 1190 appears inconsistent with the birth of her brother Fernando 29 Nov 1189. Fernando´s birth makes 1189 improbable as well, unless Blanca was born very early in the year. “[1188/89]” seems the best estimation, which is consistent with her having reached the age of 12 on her marriage. As part of continuing Anglo/French peace negotiations, John King of England gave Infanta Blanca (who was his niece) as dowry Issoudun and Graçay en Berry, le Vexin, Evreux and 20,000 marcs of silver. She was crowned Queen with her husband 6 Aug 1223. Regent of France during the minority of her son King Louis IX 1226-1234, and also during his absence on crusade 1248 until her death. An anonymous chronicle of the kings of France, written [1286/1314], records the death in 1252 of "Blanche...reine de France" and her burial "à l´abeïe de Maubuisson"[768]. Her death is recorded by Matthew of Paris[769]. The necrology of Hôtel-Dieu at Provins records the death "IV Kal Dec" of "Blancha Francorum regina"[770]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "V Kal Dec" of "Blanche regina"[771].
     "m (Abbaye de Port-Mort near Pont-Audemer, Normandy 23 May 1200) LOUIS de France, son of PHILIPPE II “Auguste” King of France & his first wife Isabelle de Hainaut (Paris, Palais Royal 3 Sep 1187-Château de Montpensier-en-Auvergne 8 Nov 1226, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). He succeeded his father in 1223 as LOUIS VIII King of France."
Med Lands cites:
[766] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1143 and 1200, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 837 and 877.
[767] Arlanza, CXXVI, p. 232.
[768] RHGF XXI, Chronique anonyme des rois de France, p. 83.
[769] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1252, p. 354.
[770] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Hôtel-Dieu de Provins, p. 964.
[771] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 332.4


; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 6): “D7. Blanca, *Palencia 1188, +Paris 1252, bur Maubuisson; m.nr Pont-Audemer 1200 King Louis VIII of France (*1187 +1226)”


Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 5): “A1. [1m.] King LOUIS VIII "le Lion" of France (1223-26), *Paris 3.9.1187, +Château de Montpensier-en-Auvergne 8.11.1226, bur St.Denis; m.nr Pont-Audemer, Normandy 23.5.1200 Blanca of Castile (*4.3.1188 +26/27.11.1252)”.19,20 She was Regent of France between 1226 and 1236.21,3 She was Regent of France between 1248 and 1252.3

Family

Louis VIII "Le Lion" (?) King of France b. 5 Sep 1187, d. 8 Nov 1226
Children

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 113-28, p. 104. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), France 4: p. 339. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Blancadied1252MLouisVIIIFrance. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000163&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VIII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000234&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#AlfonsoVIIIdied1214B
  9. [S1979] Douglas Richardson, "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005: "Grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005."
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000235&tree=LEO
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 October 2019), memorial page for Blanche de Castile (1188–27 Nov 1252), Find A Grave Memorial no. 18883572, citing Abbey of Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen-l'Aumone, Departement du Val-d'Oise, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/18883572/blanche-de_castile. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis XIII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000162&tree=LEO
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blanche_of_Castile. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Blanche de Castille: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blanche_de_Castille. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  17. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Blanca de Castilla: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blanca_de_Castilla. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Artois.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html#S3
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html#L8
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000163&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Louis IX: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000003&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I , Comte d'Artois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005200&tree=LEO
  24. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 200-201. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  25. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Isabel of France at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08179a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles I Etienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004073&tree=LEO
  27. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Sicily 5: pp. 653-4.
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles I Etienne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004073&tree=LEO
  29. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#CharlesIdied1285

Christina (Elvira) Diaz1,2

F, #4718, b. 1075
FatherRodrigo Diaz "El Cid", "El Campeador" de Vivar (?) Senor de Vivar, Count of Valencia1,2 b. c 1043, d. 10 Jul 1099
MotherJimena (Ximena) Diaz (?) of Asturias1,2 b. 1051, d. c 1115
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited12 Aug 2020
     Christina (Elvira) Diaz was born in 1075.3 She married Ramiro II Sanchez (?) Senor de Monzon, Infante of Navarre, son of Sancho Garces (?) Senor de Uncastillo, Infante of Navarre and Constanza (?), circa 1095; Fletcher says marriage "...could have taken place at any time between 1094 and 1099"; Genealogy.EU says m. after 1098.1,4,2
     ; Weis AR 113a-24.1 GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 113A-24, p. 104. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Iberia 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/iberia/iberia7.html
  3. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  4. [S1427] Richard Fletcher, The Quest for El Cid (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989/1990), p. 178. Hereinafter cited as Fletcher [1990] The Quest for El Cid.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 44: Navarre: General Survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 113A-25, p. 104.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Garcia VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020538&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NAVARRE.htm#GarciaVIdied1150B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Ramiro II Sanchez (?) Senor de Monzon, Infante of Navarre1,2,3

M, #4719, b. 1073, d. 1116
FatherSancho Garces (?) Senor de Uncastillo, Infante of Navarre3 d. 1074
MotherConstanza (?)3 b. bt 1033 - 1037, d. a 29 Nov 1074
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited12 Aug 2020
     Ramiro II Sanchez (?) Senor de Monzon, Infante of Navarre was born in 1073.4 He married Christina (Elvira) Diaz, daughter of Rodrigo Diaz "El Cid", "El Campeador" de Vivar (?) Senor de Vivar, Count of Valencia and Jimena (Ximena) Diaz (?) of Asturias, circa 1095; Fletcher says marriage "...could have taken place at any time between 1094 and 1099"; Genealogy.EU says m. after 1098.1,5,3
Ramiro II Sanchez (?) Senor de Monzon, Infante of Navarre died in 1116.6,1,2,5,3
     ; "This Ramiro the younger was one of the most prominent noblemen in the kingdom of Aragon and was to serve as the lord of the important place of Monzon from 1104 until his death in 1116."5

; weis 113a-24.1 GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 113A-24, p. 104. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 44: Navarre: General Survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Iberia 7 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/iberia/iberia7.html
  4. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S1427] Richard Fletcher, The Quest for El Cid (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989/1990), p. 178. Hereinafter cited as Fletcher [1990] The Quest for El Cid.
  6. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 113A-25, p. 104.
  8. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 5: Rulers of Navarre, Aragon, Catalonia, and Provence, 1035-1214. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Garcia VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020538&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NAVARRE.htm#GarciaVIdied1150B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

RixaRichildeRyksa (?) Princess of Silesia, Queen of Castile1,2,3,4

F, #4720, b. circa 1135, d. circa 16 January 1185
FatherWladyslaw II 'Wygnaniec' (?) King of Poland1,2,5,3,6,4 b. 1105, d. 30 May 1159
MotherAgnes von Babenberg Queen Consort of Poland1,3,4,7 b. c 1111, d. 25 Jan 1163
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited21 May 2020
     RixaRichildeRyksa (?) Princess of Silesia, Queen of Castile was born circa 1135 at Wroclaw, Miasto Wroclaw, Dolnoslaskie, Poland; Leo van de Pas says b. ca 1135; Piast 4 page says b. 1130/40; Med Lands says b. 1130/40.3,4,8 She married Alfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia, son of Raimund (?) Count of Burgundy, Galicia & D'Amans and Infanta doña Urraca Alfonsez (?) Queen of Galicia, Castile & Leon, in July 1152;
His 2nd wife; her 1st husband. Med Lands says m. Oct/Dec 1152.9,2,10,6,3,4,11,8 RixaRichildeRyksa (?) Princess of Silesia, Queen of Castile married Ramon Berenguer II (?) Comte de Provence et Mauguion, son of Berenguer Ramon I (?) Comte de Provence, Vicomte de Rodez, de Gevaudan et de Carladet and Beatrix de Melgueil Cts de Melgueil, circa 1162 at Wroclaw, Miasto Wroclaw, Dolnoslaskie, Poland;
Her 2nd husband; Leo van de Pas says m. 1162; Piast 4 page says m. 1161; Med Lands says m. aft 1162.12,3,4,8,13 RixaRichildeRyksa (?) Princess of Silesia, Queen of Castile married Albert III von Everstein Graf von Everstein after 1166; her 3rd husband; Leo van de Pas says m. 1166;
Piast 4 page says m. aft 1166; Med Lands says m. aft 1166.14,4,8,15
RixaRichildeRyksa (?) Princess of Silesia, Queen of Castile died circa 16 January 1185.3,6,4,8
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Richza was born in Breslau about 1135, the third child and only daughter of Wladislaw II, king of Poland, duke of Kraków and Slaski, and Agnes von Österreich. Raised for the first years of her life in Poland, Richza accompanied her parents and brothers into exile in 1146. They established themselves firstly in Bohemia and later in Germany, under the care of Konrad III von Schwaben, king of The Romans, Herzog von Franken, who gave his deposed brother-in-law the Saxon district of Altenburg as his residence.
     "In 1154 came the news that the widower Alfonso VII, king of Castile and León, wanted to make an alliance with the kingdom of Germany by marrying again. Richza, niece of Konrad III, was the most appropriate candidate to be the wife of the Iberian ruler. Richza and Alfonso VII, son of Raymond de Bourgogne and Urraca, queen of Castile and León, were married in July 1152. Her first child, Infante Fernando of Castile, was born in the city of Toledo one year later, in 1153. On 21 September 1154 Richza gave birth to her second child, Infanta Sancha of Castile. Alfonso VII died suddenly on 21 August 1157 in the middle of the war against the Moors in Sierra Morena. Infante Fernando died apparently shortly before his father.
     "The late king divided his domains between his two surviving sons from his first marriage to Berenguela of Barcelona. Sancho III obtained Castile and Fernando II received León. The relationship between Richza and her stepsons was not good, especially after King Sancho III declared war on Raymund Berengar IV, conde de Barcelona, father of Alfonso (later king of Aragón as Alfonso II 'the Chaste', who was betrothed to Richza's daughter Sancha. The unstable relations of King Fernando II with the Holy Roman Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa (cousin of Richza) and the Antipope Victor IV added further difficulties to the dowager queen, who finally decided to move to the kingdom of Aragón in 1159.
     "At the Aragonese court Richza met Raymond Berengar V, comte de Provence et Mauguion, nephew of the count of Barcelona. Although they soon fell in love, their union would be clearly political. Raymond Berengar V supported Victor IV against Pope Alexander III, who, in turn, supported King Louis VII of France. The county of Provence was in a strategic location, between France and the Italian Peninsula. Friedrich Barbarossa also wanted to win to his side Raymond Berengar IV, conde de Barcelona, who had entered in an alliance with the kings of France, Castile and León. In contrast, Raymond Berengar V, soon cousin by marriage of the emperor, gained prestige and could face the pretensions of Hugues, comte de Baux, who had just received the imperial Provence as a fief.
     "Premarital negotiations lasted almost a year and a half. Between January and October 1161 Richza and Raymond Berengar were finally married. They had only a daughter Dulce II de Provence, born about 1162. Raymond Berengar V was killed during the siege of Nice in 1166.
     "Soon after her second husband's death, plans began for a new marriage for Richza. She was betrothed to Raymond VI, comte de Toulouse, by her cousin Emperor Friedrich Barbarossa; at the same time, the new countess Dulce II of Provence was engaged to Raymond VI's son, the future Raymond VII. With his engagement Raymond VI wanted to become more closely linked to the Hohenstaufen dynasty, and he took full control over the county of Provence. However the strong opposition of Alfonso II 'the Chaste', king of Aragón (Richza's future son-in-law) soon cancelled both betrothals, and with the help of the Genoese, Alfonso began a war against Raymond VI which lasted eight years.
     "By 1167 Richza married her third and last husband Albrecht, Graf von Everstein, son of Albrecht, Graf von Everstein, and Judith von Schwalenberg, and she moved to Germany with her new husband. Albrecht had fought at the side of Friedrich Barbarossa in his wars against the Guelphs. They certainly had two sons, Albrecht IV who would have progeny, and Konrad II. Some sources give three further sons: Otto, Louis and Hermann.
     "Little is known about the later life of Richza. She died on 16 June 1185."15

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 191.
2. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1968.15


; Per Med Lands: "RYKSA ([1130/40]-16 Jun [1185]). The primary source which confirms her parentage and her three marriages has not so far been identified. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[38]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rikissam" as the only daughter of "dux Vergescelaus de Polonia" & his wife Agnes, specifying that "primo fuit regina Suecie", that by her second husband "regi Russie nomine Musuch" she was mother of "Sophiam reginam Dacie et Rikissam", the latter marrying "imperatoris Castelle Alfunso"[39], which contradicts other sources in many aspects. She was known as RIQUILDA in Spain[40]. m firstly ([Oct/Dec] 1152) as his second wife, ALFONSO VII “el Emperador” King of Castile and Leon, son of RAYMOND de Bourgogne [Comté] & his wife doña Urraca Queen of Castile and León ([Grajal], Galicia 1 Mar 1105-Fresneda 21 Aug 1157, bur Toledo, Cathedral Santa María). m secondly (after 1162) RAYMOND BERENGER II Comte de Provence, son of BERENGER RAYMOND I Comte de Provence & his wife Beatrix Ctss de Melgueil ([1140]-murdered Nice 1166). m thirdly (after 1166) ALBERT [III] Graf von Everstein, son of ALBERT [II] Graf von Everstein & his wife ---. 1162/1197."
Med Lands cites:
[38] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[39] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1141, MGH SS XXIII, p. 834.
[40] Szabolcs de Vajay 'From Alfonso VII to Alfonso X, the first two centuries of the Burgundian dynasty in Castile and Leon - a prosopographical catalogue in social genealogy, 1100-1300', Studies in Genealogy and Family History in tribute to Charles Evans, edited Lindsay L Brook (Association for the Promotion of Scholarship in Genealogy Ltd, Occasional Publication no 2, 1989, Salt Lake City, Utah), p. 372.
[41] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 562.8
GAV-23 EDV-24 GKJ-25.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Richeza of Poland (also known as of Silesia) (Polish: Ryksa Polska or ?l?ska) (c. 1140 – 16 June 1185) was a Polish princess of the House of Piast in the Silesian branch. By her marriages she was Queen consort of León and Castile, Countess of Provence, and Countess of Eberstein.
     "Richeza was the third child and only daughter of W?adys?aw II the Exile, the High Duke of Poland and ruler of Silesia, by his wife Agnes of Babenberg, daughter of Margrave Leopold III of Austria and half-sister of King Conrad III of Germany.[1]
Life
Queen of Castile and León
     "Born and raised for the first years of her life in Poland, Richeza accompanied her parents and brothers into exile in 1146. They established themselves first in Bohemia and later in Germany under the care of King Conrad III, who gave his deposed brother-in-law the Saxon district of Altenburg as his residence.
     "In 1151 came the news that the King Alfonso VII of León and Castile wanted to make an alliance with the Kingdom of Germany through a wedding. Richeza, niece of King Conrad III, was the most attractive candidate available. Richeza and King Alfonso VII married between October and December 1152.[1] Her first child, Ferdinand, was born in the city of Toledo one year later, in 1153. Two years later, in 1155, Richeza gave birth to her second child, Sancha. King Alfonso VII died suddenly in the middle of the war against the Moors in Sierra Morena on 21 August 1157. Apparently, Infante Ferdinand died shortly before his father.[2]
Countess of Provence
     "The late king divided his domains between his two surviving sons born from his first marriage to Berenguela of Barcelona: Sancho III obtained Castile and Ferdinand II received León. The relationship between Richeza and her stepsons wasn't good, especially after King Sancho III declared war on Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona, father of Alfonso (later King of Aragon), who was betrothed to Richeza's daughter Sancha. The unstable relations of King Ferdinand II with the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick Barbarossa (cousin of Richeza) and the Antipope Victor IV added further difficulties to the Dowager Queen, who finally decided to move to the Kingdom of Aragon in 1159.
     "At the court of Aragon, Richeza met Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Provence, nephew of Count of Barcelona. Although they soon fell in love, their union would be clearly political. Ramon Berenguer II supported Victor IV against Pope Alexander III, who, in turn, supported King Louis VII of France. The county of Provence was in a strategic location, between France and the Italian Peninsula. Frederick Barbarossa also wanted to win to his side Count Ramon Berenguer IV, who entered in an alliance with the kings of France, Castile and León. In contrast, Ramon Berenguer II, soon cousin by marriage of the Emperor, gained prestige and could face the pretensions of Count Hugh of Baux, who had just received the Imperial Provence as a fief.
     "Premarital negotiations lasted almost a year and a half. Richeza and Count Ramon Berenguer II were finally married between January and October 1161.[3] They had only one daughter, Douce of Provence, born ca. 1162. Ramon Berenguer II was killed during the siege of Nice in 1166.
     "Soon after her second husband's death, plans for a new marriage for Richeza began. Apparently, she was betrothed to Raymond V, Count of Toulouse, by her cousin the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa around 1166;[4] at the same time, the now Countess Douce II of Provence was engaged to the future Raymond VI. Count Raymond V wanted with this engagement to become more closely tied to the Hohenstaufen dynasty and took full control over the County of Provence. However, the firm opposition of King Alfonso II of Aragon (Richeza's future son-in-law) soon cancelled both betrothals, and with the help of the Genoese, he began a war against Raymond V that lasted eight years.
     "Some sources stated that in fact Richeza and Raymond V were married, however this event is refuted by the majority of modern historians.
Countess of Eberstein
     "By 1167, Richeza married her third and last husband, Count Albert III of Eberstein, who fought at the side of Frederick Barbarossa in his wars against the Guelphs. She moved to Germany with her new husband. From this union were born two sons, Counts Albert IV and Konrad II of Eberstein.
     "Little is known about the later life of Richeza. She died in 1185.
References
1. Reilly 1998, p. 114.
2. Reilly 1998, p. 307.
3. Sabaté 2017, p. 102.
4. Sabaté 2017, p. 103.
Sources
** Reilly, Bernard F. (1998). The Kingdom of León-Castilla Under King Alfonso VII, 1126 – 1157. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN 9780812234527.
** Sabaté, Flocel, ed. (2017). The Crown of Aragon: A Singular Mediterranean Empire. Brill."16

Reference: Weis [1992]:129] Line 147-27.1 She was Queen consort of León and Galicia between 1152 and 1157.16 She was Queen consort of Castile between 1152 and 1157.16

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 147-27, p. 129. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richza|Rikinsa of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027264&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Piast 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast4.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wladislaw II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027262&tree=LEO
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes von Österreich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027263&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#Richezadied1185. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 116-25, p. 105.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020542&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Infante don ALFONSO de Castilla y León, son of URRACA Queen of Castile and León & her first husband Raymond de Bourgogne [Comté] ([Grajal], Galicia 1 Mar 1105-Fresneda 21 Aug 1157, bur Toledo, Cathedral Santa María). The Anales Toledanos record the birth 1 Mar 1106 of “El Rey D. Alfonso, fillo del Conde D. Raymondo è de Doña Urraca”[648]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "rex Aldefonsus Hispanie imperator" as son of "comitis Raymundi…ex Waracta filia imperatoris Fernandi"[649]. Crowned King of Galicia 17 Sep 1111 at Santiago de Compostela. He was proclaimed ALFONSO VII “el Emperador” King of Castile, León and Toledo in 1112[650]. "Hildefonsus Raymundi…rex" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 27 Nov 1116, confirmed by "Illa infanta regis germana, Guillelmus comes de Moretegni, Iohannes Reynnitz, Petrus Ansuriz comes…"[651]. He styled himself "imperator" for the first time 9 Dec 1117[652]. He ruled under the tutelage of Pedro Froilaz Conde de Traba and his mother until 1119, although he only assumed effective personal rule after his mother's death in 1126. "Aldefonsus Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea regina Berengaria et Santia mea germana" donated "abbatiam Sancti Facundi et Primitivi" to Cluny by charter dated 7 Sep 1132[653]. King of Zaragoza 1134. He was crowned Emperor 26 May 1135 at León. He negotiated peace with both Aragon and Navarre, with a view to concentrating his military efforts on the reconquest. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "monasterium Sancti Petri de Cardigna" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Jul 1142[654]. "Adefonsus Hispanie imperator…cum uxore mea Berengaria" confirmed the donation to Cluny of "monasterium Sancti Salvatoris de Bodinio" to Cluny as requested by "comitis Gomes" by charter dated Aug 1142[655]. "Adefonsus imperator Hispanie…cum uxore mea Berengaria" donated "ecclesiam sancti Vincentii de Salamantica" to Cluny by charter dated 29 Oct 1143, confirmed by "Sancius imperatoris major filius…Rodericus Gomez comes, Poncius de Cabreria comes, Guterrus Fernandez, Rodericus Fernandez, Didacus Munioz majordomus imperatoris, Garsias Royz majorinus imperatoris in Burgus"[656]. He captured Almería (1147), Tortosa (1148), and Jaén (1157) from the Muslims, though they recaptured Almería before he died. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[657]. "Aldefonsus…tocius Hyspanie imperator…cum uxore mea imperatrice domna Rica et…filiis meis Sanctio et Ferrando regibus" donated property to the abbey of Silos by charter dated 28 Oct 1155, confirmed by "Comes Rudericus Petriz, Garcia Garçiaz de Aza, Veremundus Petriz, Garcia Gumez, Gonsalvuz Ruderiz, Alvaros Ruderiz, Comes Gonsalvus Fernandi, Dicados Ferrandiz de Bonelas maiorinus in Burgis, Comes Almandricus tenens Bæciam, Comes Poncius maiordomus imperatoris, Comes Lupus, Comes Ranimirus, Comes Petrus Aldeffonsus, Gutierre Ferrandiz, Nunnus Petriz tenens Montor, Gundisalvus de Maranon alferiz imperatoris…"[658]. The Chronicon Burgense records the death in 1157 of “Alfonsus Imperator”[659]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the death in Sep 1195 (1157) of “D. Alfonsus Imperator, filius Comitis D. Raymundi et Reginæ D. Orracæ”[660]. On his death, his lands were divided between his two sons.

    m firstly (Saldaña Nov 1128) BERENGUELA de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BERENGUER [III] “el Grande” Conde de Barcelona & his wife Dulce/Dolça [I] Ctss de Provence ([1116]-Palencia 15/31 Jan 1149, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records the marriage of "Alfonso…king of León" and "the daughter of Ramón count of Barcelona…Berengaria" in 1128 at Saldaña[661]. The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium record the marriage of "Raimundi-Berengarii comitis…filiam" and "Ildefonso Toletano Imperatori"[662]. The testament of "Raimundus Berengarii…Barchinonensis comes et marchio" dated [8 Jul] 1130 names "Raimundo Berengarii filio meo…et filie mee ipsa de Castella et illa de Fuxo"[663]. The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[664]. The Anales Toledanos record the death in Feb 1149 of “la Emperadriz”[665].

    m secondly ([Oct/Dec] 1152) as her first husband, RYKSA of Silesia, daughter of W?ADYS?AW II “Wygnaniec/the Exile” Prince of Krakow and Silesia & his wife Agnes of Austria [Babenberg] ([1130/40]-16 Jun [1185]). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Berengariam atque Richam" as the wives of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis"[666]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and her three marriages has not yet been identified. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rikissam", daughter of "regi Russie nomine Musuch" & his wife "Rikissam [filiam ducis Vergescelai de Polonia]", as wife firstly of "imperatoris Castelle Alfunso" and subsequently of "comiti Aragonensi et post comiti Alberto de Everstein ultra Coliniam"[667], contradicting other sources in many aspects. She was known as RIQUILDA in Spain[668], or RICA. “Adefonsus Imperator Hispaniæ...cum uxore mea Imperatrice Domina Rica et cum filiis meis Sancio et Ferrando Regibus” donated property to the bishop of Segovia by charter dated 28 Jan 1155[669]. She married secondly (1161) Raymond Bérenger II Comte de Provence, and thirdly (after 1166) Albert [III] Graf von Everstein.

    Mistress (1): ([1130/32]) GONTRODO Pérez, wife of GUTIERRE Sebastiániz, daughter of conde PEDRO Díaz de Valle & his wife María Ordóñez (-León 29 Jun 1186, Santa María de Vega near Oviedo). The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records that King Alfonso VII "took a concubine…Guntroda, the daughter of Pedro Díaz and María Ordóñez…who belonged to the greatest family of the Asturians and the Tinians", dated to [1130/32] from the context[670]. “Gontrodo Petri...cum domina mea, et filia Urraca” donated property to the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo by charter dated 13 Oct 1153[671]. She became a nun at the monastery of Santa María de Vega near Oviedo[672]. Florez reproduces the epitaph in the same monastery which records the death in 1186 of “Guntrodo”[673].

    Mistress (2): ([1139/48]) URRACA Fernández de Castro, widow of conde RODRIGO Martínez, daughter of FERNANDO García [de Castro] Señor de Hita y Uceda & his second wife Estefanía Armengol de Urgel ([1120]-after 1165). Alfonso VII King of Castile granted the villa de Amusco to "comitissa domina Vrracha uxore comitis Roderici Martinez" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 21 Jan 1139[674]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "Domne Vrrache Ferrandez comitisse" by charter dated 9 Sep 1140[675]. Alfonso VII King of Castile granted property to "comitisse domna Vrracha Fernandez…et post filia uestra et mea" in exchange for other properties by charter dated 3 Feb 1148[676]. “Petrus Fernandiz et soror mea Urraca Fernandiz et uxor mea Maria Pedriz...cum filiis et filiabus nostris” donated “sancte Crucis de Valcarcer” to Santa María de Aguilar de Campoo by charter dated 4 Aug 1165[677].
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raymond Berengar V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00309839&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#RaymondBerengerIIProvencedied1166
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albrecht: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00125082&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richza|Rikinsa of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027264&tree=LEO
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richeza_of_Poland,_Queen_of_Castile. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027268&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Sanchadied1208MAlfonsoIIAragon
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancha of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007663&tree=LEO
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dulce II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00309840&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Albrecht: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00125081&tree=LEO

Sancha Alfonez (?) Princess of Castile, Queen of Aragon1,2,3

F, #4721, b. 21 September 1154, d. 9 November 1208
FatherAlfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia1,4,5 b. 1105, d. 21 Aug 1157
MotherRixaRichildeRyksa (?) Princess of Silesia, Queen of Castile1,6,4,5 b. c 1135, d. c 16 Jan 1185
ReferenceGAV22 EDV24
Last Edited26 Dec 2020
     Sancha Alfonez (?) Princess of Castile, Queen of Aragon was born on 21 September 1154 at Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now); Med Lands says b. 1155; Genealogics says b. 21 Sep 1154.1,4,5,7 She married Alfonso II Raimundez 'el Casto' (?) King of Aragon & Pamplona, Comte de Barcelone, Provence and Roussillon, son of Ramon/Raimund IV Berenguer "the Saint" (?) Count of Barcelona and Infanta doña Petronilla I Ramirez Queen of Aragon, on 18 January 1174 at Zaragoza, Provincia de Zaragoza, Aragon, Spain; Genealogics says m. 18 Jan 1174.1,8,9,10,11,5
Sancha Alfonez (?) Princess of Castile, Queen of Aragon died on 9 November 1208 at Monasterio De Jaen, Jaen, Jaen, Spain, at age 54; Med Lands says d. 9 Nov 1208; Genealogics says d. Nov 1208.1,4,5
Sancha Alfonez (?) Princess of Castile, Queen of Aragon was buried after 9 November 1208 at Monastery of Santa María de Sigena, Huesca, Provincia de Huesca, Aragon, Spain,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     21 Sep 1154, Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain
     DEATH     9 Nov 1208 (aged 54), Villanueva de Sigena, Provincia de Huesca, Aragon, Spain
     Queen of Aragon. Daughter of Alfonso VII and Ryska, Princess of Poland, daughter of Vladislav II, Duke of Silesia. She was the wife of Alfonso II, King of Aragon and Pamplona. They married January 18, 1174, in Zaragoza, and had many children, at least eight who survived childhood including:
* Constance, married King Imre of Hungary & Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor
* Eleanor, married Count Raymond VI of Toulouse
* Peter II of Aragon 1174-1213 killed at the Battle of Muret
* Dolça, nun
* Alfonso II, Count of Provence 1180-1209
* Ferdinand, Abbot of Montearagon, died after 1227
* Ramon Berenguer, died in the 1190s
* Sancha, married Raymond VII of Toulouse

     Sancha fought her husband for lands that were included in her dowry, and was involved in the taking of Ribagorza. Once her husband died, Peter took the throne and she was forced to take a back seat, withdrew from court, and retired to the abbey of Nuestra Senora, at Sijena, which she had founded by 1208, the monastery being constructed for nuns from the richest families in Aragon. Sancha took the cross of the Order of St John of Jerusalem which she wore till the end of her life. When her daughter, Constance became a widow having lost her husband, the King of Hungary, Sancha arranged a marriage with Frederick II, the Emperor of the Holy Empire, and died soon after. She is interred with her son, Peter at the high alter in the church at Sigena, the Monastery of Santa María de Sigena.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Alfonso VII Raimúndez 1105–1157
          Richilde of Poland 1134–1185
     Spouse
          Alfonso II of Aragon 1152–1196 (m. 1174)
     Siblings
          Stephanie Alfónsez of Castile unknown–1180
     Half Siblings
          Sancho III King Of Castile 1134–1158
          Fernando II King Of Leon 1137–1188
          Sancha of Castile 1139–1179
     Children
          Pedro II Aragon 1178–1213
          Constance of Aragon 1179–1222
          Alphonse II de Provence 1180–1209
     BURIAL     Monastery of Santa María de Sigena, Huesca, Provincia de Huesca, Aragon, Spain
     PLOT     Interred before the high altar of the church at Sijena.
     Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Added: 12 Apr 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 88413122
     SPONSORED BY Billie Jasper.12
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 45.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.5
GAV-22 EDV-24 GKJ-24.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Sancha was born on 21 September 1154, the only surviving child of Alfonso VII, king of Castile and León, and his second wife Richza/Rikinsa of Poland.
     "On 18 January 1174 in Saragossa she married Alfonso II 'the Chaste', king of Aragón. They had nine children, but only seven would survive into adulthood, and two sons Pedro II and Alfonso II, and two daughters Sancha and Costanza, would have progeny.
     "A patroness of troubadours such as Giraud de Calanson and Peire Raymond, Queen Sancha became involved in a legal dispute with her husband concerning properties which formed part of her dower estate. In 1177 she entered the county of Ribagorza and took forcible possession of various castles and fortresses which had belonged to the crown there.
     "After her husband died at Perpignan in 1196, Sancha was relegated to the background of political affairs by her son Pedro II, and she retired from court, withdrawing to the abbey of Nuestra Senora at Sijena which she had founded. There she assumed the cross of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem which she wore until the end of her life. The queen mother entertained her widowed daughter Queen Constanza of Hungary at Sijena prior to her leaving Aragón for her marriage with Emperor Friedrich II in 1208. Sancha died soon afterwards on 9 November that year, aged fifty-four, and was interred before the high altar of the church at Sijena."5

; The is the same person as Sancha of Castile, Queen of Aragon at Wikipedia, and as Sancha de Castille (reine d'Aragon) at Wikipédia (Fr.)13,14

; Per Med Lands:
     "Infanta doña SANCHA de Castilla (1155-Sijena 9 Nov 1208, bur Sijena, monastery of Nuestra Señora). The "Corónicas" Navarras name "la filla del Emperador dona Sancha" as the wife of "el rey don Alfonso d'Aragón"[698]. The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium records the marriage of "Ildefonsus" and "Sanciam…filiam Imperatoris Magni Ildefonsi de Castellæ"[699]. Her name is confirmed in the charter dated 24 Feb 1212 under which Pedro II King of Aragon "filio Sanctiæ…Reginæ Aragonum" granted property to "Guillelmo de Montepessulano…filius Agnetis feminæ"[700]. She founded the Hospitaller priory of nuns of Nuestra Señora at San Juan de Sijena in 1188, and became a nun there herself in 1197. The Anales Toledanos record the death in 1208 of “la Reyna Doña Sancha Daragon, filla del Emperador” and her burial “en Sixena”[701].
     "m (Zaragoza 18 Jan 1174) ALFONSO II “el Casto” King of Aragon Conde de Barcelona, son of RAMÓN BERENGUER IV Conde de Barcelona & his wife Petronilla Queen of Aragon (Villamayor del Valle, Huesca 1/25 Mar 1157-Perpignan 25 Apr 1195, bur Poblet, monastery of Nuestra Señora)."
Med Lands cites:
[698] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.11, p. 32.
[699] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 379.
[700] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 576.
[701] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 394.4


Reference: Weis [1992:105] Line 116-26.15

Sancha Alfonez (?) Princess of Castile, Queen of Aragon lived at Castilla, Spain.16

; Per Genealogy.EU: "B9. [2m.] Infta Sancha, *1155/57, +Sijena 1208; m.Saragosa 1174 King Alfonso II of Aragon (*1157 +1196.)17"

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Ramon, who became King ALFONSO II of Aragon (1162-96), Ct of Barcelona Girona, Osona, Besalu, Cerdagne and Roussillon (1162-96), Ct of Provence (1166-96), Marquis de Lerida, Marquis de Tortosa, Vicomte de Millau, Vicomte de Carlat, Count de Tarragona, *Villa Mayor del Valle, Huesca 25.3.1157, +Perpignan 25.4.1196; m. Zaragoza 18.1.1174 Sancha of Castile (*1155/7 +1208); m(?) Mafalda of Portugal (*ca 1149 +1173/4)."8 She was Queen consort of Aragon between 1174 and 1196.

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancha of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007663&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Sanchadied1208MAlfonsoIIAragon. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancha of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007663&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richza|Rikinsa of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027264&tree=LEO
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 20 May 2020), memorial page for Alfonso II of Aragon (4 Apr 1152–25 Apr 1196), Find a Grave Memorial no. 59283434, citing Poblet Monastery, Poblet, Provincia de Tarragona, Cataluna, Spain ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/59283434/alfonso_ii-of_aragon. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  9. [S1563] Histoire de Comtes de Foix, online http://www.foixstory.com/, Chart: http://www.foixstory.com/data/genealogiq/foix/foix1/fxa1.htm. Hereinafter cited as Histoire de Comtes de Foix.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso II 'the Chaste': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007662&tree=LEO
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 47 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet47.html
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 20 May 2020), memorial page for Sancha de Castile (21 Sep 1154–9 Nov 1208), Find a Grave Memorial no. 88413122, citing Monastery of Santa María de Sigena, Huesca, Provincia de Huesca, Aragon, Spain ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/88413122/sancha-de-castile
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Sancha of Castile, Queen of Aragon. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Sancha de Castille (reine d'Aragon): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sancha_de_Castille_(reine_d%27Aragon). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), p. 105, Line 116-26. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  16. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html#SA7
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARAGON%20&%20CATALONIA.htm#childrenAlfonsoII
  19. [S1563] Histoire de Comtes de Foix, online http://www.foixstory.com/, Chart: http://www.foixstory.com/data/genealogiq/foix/foix1/fxa1.htm
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pedro II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007100&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARAGON%20&%20CATALONIA.htm#PedroIIdied1213
  22. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 105A-28, p. 108.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#FriedrichIIGermanydied1250B.
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constanza of Aragón: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013540&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARAGON%20&%20CATALONIA.htm#Constanzadied1222
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027265&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#AlfonsoIIdied1209A

Alfonso II Raimundez 'el Casto' (?) King of Aragon & Pamplona, Comte de Barcelone, Provence and Roussillon1,2

M, #4722, b. 4 April 1152, d. 25 April 1196
FatherRamon/Raimund IV Berenguer "the Saint" (?) Count of Barcelona3,4,1,5,6 b. c 1113, d. 8 Aug 1162
MotherInfanta doña Petronilla I Ramirez Queen of Aragon3,4,1,6 b. 1135, d. 17 Oct 1174
ReferenceGAV22 EDV24
Last Edited26 Dec 2020
     Alfonso II Raimundez 'el Casto' (?) King of Aragon & Pamplona, Comte de Barcelone, Provence and Roussillon was born on 4 April 1152 at Villa Mayor del Valle, Huesca, Provincia de Huesca, Aragon, Spain; Genealogics and Med Lands say b. "Abt 1 Mar 1157/25 Mar 1157."7,8,3,9,6,2 He and Infante dona Mafalda (?) de Portugal were engaged on 30 January 1160; Per Genealogy.EU: "This marriage is according to Schwennicke, Band II, Tafel 38; however, in Tafel 70, Alfonso is said to have married only once, to Sancha of Castile." Med Lands says they were "betrothed". Med Lands says "betrothed."2,10,11 Alfonso II Raimundez 'el Casto' (?) King of Aragon & Pamplona, Comte de Barcelone, Provence and Roussillon married Sancha Alfonez (?) Princess of Castile, Queen of Aragon, daughter of Alfonso VII (Alfonao) Raimúndez (?) King of Castile, León, & Galicia and RixaRichildeRyksa (?) Princess of Silesia, Queen of Castile, on 18 January 1174 at Zaragoza, Provincia de Zaragoza, Aragon, Spain; Genealogics says m. 18 Jan 1174.3,9,1,6,10,12
Alfonso II Raimundez 'el Casto' (?) King of Aragon & Pamplona, Comte de Barcelone, Provence and Roussillon died on 25 April 1196 at Avignon, Departement du Vaucluse, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France (now), at age 44.3,7,13,9,1,6,2
Alfonso II Raimundez 'el Casto' (?) King of Aragon & Pamplona, Comte de Barcelone, Provence and Roussillon was buried after 25 April 1196 at Poblet Monastery, Poblet, Provincia de Tarragona, Cataluna, Spain,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     4 Apr 1152, Huesca, Provincia de Huesca, Aragon, Spain
     DEATH     25 Apr 1196 (aged 44), Perpignan, Departement des Pyrénées-Orientales, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
     King of Aragon, Count of Barcelona, nicknamed the Chaste or the Troubadour. Alfonso was the son of Ramon Berenguer IV of Barcelona and Queen Petronilla of Aragon. Grandson of Ramon Berenguer III and Douce, Countess of Provence, Ramiro, Bishop of Barbastro-Roda and his wife Agnes. He was born Raymond Berengar/Berenguer at Huesca, but changed his name to honor Alfonso I. He married Infanta Sancha of Castile, the only surviving child of King Alfonso VII of Castile by his second wife, Richeza of Poland. They married January 18, 1174, in Zaragoza, and had many children, at least eight who survived childhood including:
* Constance, married King Imre of Hungary & Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor
* Eleanor, married Count Raymond VI of Toulouse
* Peter II of Aragon 1174-1213 killed at the Battle of Muret
* Dolça, nun
* Alfonso II, Count of Provence 1180-1209
* Ferdinand, Abbot of Montearagon, died after 1227
* Ramon Berenguer, died in the 1190s
* Sancha, married Raymond VII of Toulouse

     He was the King of Aragon from 1164 to his death 1196, replacing his regent mother, Petronilla, and his title went to his son. Peter. Alfonso was known for the Treaty of Cazorla, and his involvement in the affairs of Languedoc would cost the life of his son, Peter II of Aragon. Alfonso II provided the first land grant to the Cistercian monks on the banks of the Ebro River in the Aragon region, which would become the site of the first Cistercian monastery in this region. He was a noted poet of his time and a close friend of King Richard the Lionheart, and was famous for his love affairs. He died at Perpignan in 1196.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Raymond Berenguer of Barcelona 1113–1162
          Petronila of Aragon 1134–1174
     Spouse
          Sancha de Castile 1154–1208 (m. 1174)
     Siblings
          Dulce of Aragon 1160–1198
     Children
          Pedro II Aragon 1178–1213
          Constance of Aragon 1179–1222
          Alphonse II de Provence 1180–1209
     BURIAL     Poblet Monastery, Poblet, Provincia de Tarragona, Cataluna, Spain
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 27 Sep 2010
     Find a Grave Memorial 59283434
     SPONSORED BY Billie Jasper.14
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "B9. [2m.] Infta Sancha, *1155/57, +Sijena 1208; m.Saragosa 1174 King Alfonso II of Aragon (*1157 +1196.)15"

; Per Genealogics:
     "Alfonso II 'the Chaste', king of Aragón, was most likely born at Huesca between 1 and 25 March 1157, the son of Raymond Berengar IV, conde de Barcelona and Petronella, queen of Aragón. Born Raymond Berengar, he was not yet five when his father died. He ascended the united thrones of Aragón (1164) and Barcelona (1162) as Alfonso, his name being changed in deference to the Aragónese, to honour King Alfonso I of Aragón. He had various guardians, honorific and real: Henry II of England was named as a guardian, but in an entirely honorific capacity. So to, perhaps, was the official guardianship of his cousin Ramon Berenguer, count of Provence (d.1166). Documents show that the real power in Catalonia and Aragón was wielded by the seneschal Guillem Ramon de Montcada (d.1173) and Guillem de Torroja (d.1175), powerful lords from influential vicecomital families. Alfonso appears to have attained an acknowledged majority in 1173. He was the first ruler to be both king of Aragón and count of Barcelona. He was also count of Provence from 1181 to 1185.
     "On 18 January 1174 at Saragossa, Alfonso married Sancha of Castile, daughter of Alfonso VII, king of Castile and León and his second wife Richza/Rikinsa of Poland, who was the daughter of Wladislaw II, king of Poland and duke of Cracow and Slaski and Agnes von Österreich. Alfonso and Sancha had six children, of whom four were to have progeny, including his heir Pedro, who succeeded Alfonso as Pedro II, king of Aragón.
     "For most of his reign Alfonso was allied with King Alfonso VIII of Castile, both against Navarre and against the Moorish taifa kingdoms of the south. Apart from common interests, kings of Aragón and Castile were united by a formal bond of vassalage the former owed to the latter.
     "In his _Reconquista_ effort Alfonso II pushed as far as Teruel, conquering this important stronghold on the road to Valencia in 1171. The same year saw him capturing Caspe. Another milestone in his alliance with Alfonso VIII of Castile was a formal treaty the two kings concluded at Cazorla in 1179, delineating zones of conquest in the south along the watershed of rivers Júcar and Segura. Southern areas of Valencia including Denia were thus secured to Aragón.
     "During his reign Catalonian influence north of the Pyrenees reached its zenith. His realms incorporated not only Provence, but also the counties of Cerdanya and Roussillon (inherited in 1172). Béarn and Bigorre paid homage to him in 1187. Alfonso's involvement in the affairs of Languedoc, which would cost the life of his successor, Pedro II of Aragón, for the moment proved highly beneficial, strengthening Catalonian trade and stimulating emigration from the north to colonise the newly reconquered lands in Aragón.
     "Alfonso died at Avignon on 25 April 1196. He was a noted poet of his time and a close friend of King Richard the Lionheart."6

; Per Taylor email [2008]:
     "There is a good historigraphical discussion of this in Joan F. Cabestany, "Alfons el Cast" in Percy Ernst Schramm, Joan F. Cabestany and Enric Bague, _El primers comtes-reis_ (Barcelona, 1960), 62-63 of my edition which the 3d ed., 1985. Cabestany concludes that Alfonso was most likely born at Huesca, between 1 and 25 March 1157, following Antonio Ubieto, "De nuevo sobre el nacimiento de Alfonso II de Aragon, "_Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragon_ 6 (2956), 203-09. His mother wrote a will while pregnant in May 1152, but that was not with Alfonso.
     "Alfonso was known as 'Ramon Berenguer' until after his father's death (he is so named in his father's will). The name 'Alfonso' appears immediately following his accession in his acts.
     "The king had various guardians honorific and real: Henry II of England was named as a guardian, but entirely honorary. So to, perhaps, was the official guardianship of his cousin Ramon Berenguer, count of Provence (d. 1166). Documents show that real power in Catalonia and Aragon was wielded by Guillem Ramon de Montcada (d. 1173) (seneschal) and Guillem de Torroja (d. 1175), powerful lords from influential vicecomital families. Alfonso appears to have attained an acknowledged majority in 1173. (See Cabestany, p. 66, for this.)16" He was Comte de Barcelone, Provence and Roussillon.1

; The is the same person as Alfonso II of Aragon at Wikipedia, and as Alphonse II d'Aragon at Wikipédia (Fr.)17,18

; Per Med Lands:
     "Infante don RAMÓN de Aragón, son of RAMÓN BERENGUER IV Conde de Barcelona & his wife Petronila Queen of Aragon (Villamayor del Valle, Huesca 1/25 Mar 1157-Perpignan 25 Apr 1195, bur Poblet, monastery of Nuestra Señora). The "Corónicas" Navarras name (in order) "don Pedro…el rey don Alfonso, que ovo nombre Remón Belenguer et el conte don Pedro de Provença et el conte don Sancho et a la muller del rey don Sancho de Portugal" as the children of the "conte de Barçalona…en esta su muller [dona Peyronela]", stating that the first named Pedro died in Huesca[310]. The Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ names "Ildefonsum primogenitum" as son of "Berengarius comes Barchinonæ et Provinciæ, maritus Petronillæ"[311]. He succeeded his father in 1162 as RAMÓN Conde de Barcelona, Girona, Osona, Besalú, Cerdagne/Cerdaña and Roussillon. "Ildefonsus…rex Aragonensis, comes Barchinonensis, duc Provinciæ" granted "vicecomitatu de Carlades", held by "avus patris mei Guilbertus…comes", to "Hugonem comitem Rutenensem" by charter dated 1167[312]. He founded Teruel 1169-72. He secured the vassalage of Marie Ctss de Béarn 1170. Comte de Roussillon (including the see of Elne) in 1172 on the death of Guinard II Comte de Roussillon without heirs. He succeeded his mother in 1174 as ALFONSO II “el Casto” King of Aragon. He secured the vassalage of Centule Comte de Bigorre 1175, by granting him the Val d’Aran. He conceded Murcia to Castile under the treaty of Cazola Mar 1179, retaining Valencia within the Aragonese sphere of influence. Roger II Vicomte de Béziers-Carcassonne confirmed his vassalage Nov 1179. He succeeded his brother in 1185 as ALFONSO I Comte de Provence (declaring himself Marquis de Provence), appointing Roger Bernard Comte de Foix as procurator. He acquired Pallars Jussà 1192 by cession of Dolça de So. He ordered the compilation (completed 1194) of the Great Book of Fiefs (liber feudorum maior), an administrative register of property, under the direction of Ramón de Caldes, dean of Barcelona cathedral. Betrothed to Matilda or Teresa, daughter of Afonso I King of Portugal (-1218). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death of "Hildefonsum rex Arragonum" and his burial "in abbatio de Populato"[313]. The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium records the death in 1196 of "Ildefonsus" and his burial "in Monasterio Populeti" which he had founded[314]. The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the death of King Alfonso in 1196 aged 42 and his burial "al monasterio de Poblet"[315]. The "Corónicas" Navarras record that "el rey don Alfonso de Aragón, fijo de conte de Barçalona" died "al yssient de abril", in 1234[316]. The Anales Toledanos record the death in Apr 1195 of “el Rey D. Alfonso de Aragon”[317]. The Thalamus de Montpellier records the death in Apr 1196 of "Namfos rei dAragon a Perpinhan"[318].
     "Betrothed ([30 Jan 1160]) to Infanta dona MAFALDA de Portugal, daughter of AFONSO I King of Portugal & his wife Mathilde de Savoie ([1149]-1173/4). A Chronica Breve names "dona Mafalda" first among the daughters of King Afonso I, adding that she married "comde Reymon de Barcelona" (although this source is inaccurate in other details)[319].
     "m (Zaragoza 18 Jan 1174) Infanta doña SANCHA de Castilla, daughter of ALFONSO VII "el Emperador" King of Castile and León & his second wife Ryksa of Poland (1155-Monastery of Sijena 9 Nov 1208). The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium records the marriage of "Ildefonsus" and "Sanciam…filiam Imperatoris Magni Ildefonsi de Castellæ"[320]. The "Corónicas" Navarras name "la filla del Emperador dona Sancha" as the wife of "el rey don Alfonso d'Aragón"[321]. She founded the Hospitaller priory of nuns of Nuestra Señora at San Juan de Sijena in 1188, and became a nun there herself in 1197. Her name is confirmed in the charter dated 24 Feb 1212 under which Pedro II King of Aragon "filio Sanctiæ…Reginæ Aragonum" granted property to "Guillelmo de Montepessulano…filius Agnetis feminæ"[322]. The Anales Toledanos record the death in 1208 of “la Reyna Doña Sancha Daragon, filla del Emperador” and her burial “en Sixena”[323]."
Med Lands cites:
[310] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.10, p. 31.
[311] Ex Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ e familia comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 363.
[312] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 539.
[313] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 873.
[314] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 380.
[315] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIII, p. 135.
[316] "Corónicas" Navarras 6.47, p. 70.
[317] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 393.
[318] Société Archéologique de Montpellier (1841) Le petit Thalamus de Montpellier, extracts available at (23 Apr 2008).
[319] Chronica Breve do Archivo Nacional, Portugaliæ Monumenta Historica, Scriptores, Vol. I, II, p. 25.
[320] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 379.
[321] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.11, p. 32.
[322] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 576.
[323] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 394.2


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 205.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.6
Alfonso II Raimundez 'el Casto' (?) King of Aragon & Pamplona, Comte de Barcelone, Provence and Roussillon was also known as Don Ramon (?) Infante de Aragón Name when born.2

Reference: Weis [1992:103] Line 111-27.19 GAV-22 EDV-24 GKJ-24.

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Ramon, who became King ALFONSO II of Aragon (1162-96), Ct of Barcelona Girona, Osona, Besalu, Cerdagne and Roussillon (1162-96), Ct of Provence (1166-96), Marquis de Lerida, Marquis de Tortosa, Vicomte de Millau, Vicomte de Carlat, Count de Tarragona, *Villa Mayor del Valle, Huesca 25.3.1157, +Perpignan 25.4.1196; m. Zaragoza 18.1.1174 Sancha of Castile (*1155/7 +1208); m(?) Mafalda of Portugal (*ca 1149 +1173/4)."9

; Per Genealogy.EU: "B4. Mafalda, *ca 1149, +1173/4; m.ca 1160 King Alfonso II of Aragon (+1196); this marriage is according to Schwennicke, Band II, Tafel 38; however, in Tafel 70, Alfonso is said to have married only once, to Sancha of Castile."20 He was Count of Barcelona between 1164 and 1196.17 He was King of Aragon
(See attached map of Aragon ca 1200) between 1164 and 1196.8,3,4,17 He was Count of Provence between 1166 and 1171.17

Citations

  1. [S1563] Histoire de Comtes de Foix, online http://www.foixstory.com/, Chart: http://www.foixstory.com/data/genealogiq/foix/foix1/fxa1.htm. Hereinafter cited as Histoire de Comtes de Foix.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARAGON%20&%20CATALONIA.htm#childrenAlfonsoII. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 5: Rulers of Navarre, Aragon, Catalonia, and Provence, 1035-1214. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raymund Berengar IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007661&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso II 'the Chaste': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007662&tree=LEO
  7. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 111-27, p. 103. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 47 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet47.html
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PORTUGAL.htm#Mafaldadied1173
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancha of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007663&tree=LEO
  13. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 20 May 2020), memorial page for Alfonso II of Aragon (4 Apr 1152–25 Apr 1196), Find a Grave Memorial no. 59283434, citing Poblet Monastery, Poblet, Provincia de Tarragona, Cataluna, Spain ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/59283434/alfonso_ii-of_aragon. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html#SA7
  16. [S2248] Nathaniel Taylor, "Taylor email 3 Mar 2008: "Re: Alfonso the Chaste of Aragon"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 Mar 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Taylor email 3 Mar 2008."
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfonso_II_of_Aragon. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alphonse_II_d%27Aragon. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, p. 103, Line 111-27.
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 47: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet47.html#MA1
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pedro II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007100&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARAGON%20&%20CATALONIA.htm#PedroIIdied1213
  23. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 105A-28, p. 108.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  24. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III).
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#FriedrichIIGermanydied1250B.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constanza of Aragón: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013540&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARAGON%20&%20CATALONIA.htm#Constanzadied1222
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#AlfonsoIIdied1209A

Eleanor (?) Princess of England1

F, #4723, b. 18 June 1269, d. 29 August 1298
FatherEdward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England1,2,3,4 b. 17 Jun 1239, d. 7 Jul 1307
MotherDoña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu1,4,5 b. c 1241, d. 28 Nov 1290
Last Edited12 Jul 2020
     Eleanor (?) Princess of England was born on 18 June 1269 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Windsor and Maidenhead Royal Borough, Berkshire, England.1,6,7,8 She and Alfonso III "el Liberal" (?) King of Aragon and Sicily were engaged before 18 June 1291.7 Eleanor (?) Princess of England married Henri III de Bar Comte de Bar, Seigneur de Torcy en Brie, graf von Nassau, son of Thibault/Theobald II de Bar Comte de Bar-le-Duc, Brie et Saint-Fargeau, seigneur de Torcy and Jeanne/Joanna de Montmorency dame de Toucy, Saint-Fargeau et Puisaye, on 20 September 1293 at Bristol, co. Somerset, England.9,10,11,7,8
Eleanor (?) Princess of England died on 29 August 1298 at Ghent, Flanders, Belgium (now), at age 29.1,7
     ; Pss Eleanor, *Windsor 18.6.1269, +Ghent 29.8.1297; m.Bristol 20.9.1293 Cte Henri III de Bar (+1302.)1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  2. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward I 'Longshanks': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000809&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIdied1307B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001694&tree=LEO
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 283. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.19. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  9. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, Henri III.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bar 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bar/bar2.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007051&tree=LEO
  12. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bar.pdf, p. 8.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Bar: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015409&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edouard I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007052&tree=LEO

Henry (?) of England1,2

M, #4724, b. before 6 May 1268, d. 14 October 1274
FatherEdward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England1,3,2,4,5 b. 17 Jun 1239, d. 7 Jul 1307
MotherDoña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu1,2,5,6 b. c 1241, d. 28 Nov 1290
Last Edited12 Jul 2020
     Henry (?) of England was born before 6 May 1268 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Windsor and Maidenhead Royal Borough, Berkshire, England; Genealogy.EU (Anjou 3) says b. shortly before 6.5.1268.7,1,2
Henry (?) of England died on 14 October 1274 at Guildford, co. Surrey, England.7,1,2
Henry (?) of England was buried after 14 October 1274 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England.7,1,2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.19. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward I 'Longshanks': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000809&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIdied1307B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001694&tree=LEO
  7. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), Henri III. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.

Alfonso/Alphonse (?) of England, Earl of Chester1,2

M, #4725, b. 24 November 1273, d. 19 August 1284
FatherEdward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England3,4,1,5,2 b. 17 Jun 1239, d. 7 Jul 1307
MotherDoña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu3,1,2,6 b. c 1241, d. 28 Nov 1290
Last Edited12 Jul 2020
     Alfonso/Alphonse (?) of England, Earl of Chester was born on 24 November 1273 at Bayonne, Atlantiques, Gascony, France (now).7,8,3,1
Alfonso/Alphonse (?) of England, Earl of Chester died on 19 August 1284 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Windsor and Maidenhead Royal Borough, Berkshire, England, at age 10.7,3,1
Alfonso/Alphonse (?) of England, Earl of Chester was buried after 19 August 1284 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England.8,3,1


     He was Earl of Chester.7 Alfonso/Alphonse (?) of England, Earl of Chester was also known as Alphonso Earl of Chester.3

Citations

  1. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.20. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIdied1307B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  4. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward I 'Longshanks': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000809&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001694&tree=LEO
  7. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  8. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 283. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.

Margaret (?) of England1,2

F, #4726, b. 15 March 1275, d. circa 1318
FatherEdward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England1,3,4,5 b. 17 Jun 1239, d. 7 Jul 1307
MotherDoña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu1,5,6 b. c 1241, d. 28 Nov 1290
Last Edited12 Jul 2020
     Margaret (?) of England was born on 15 March 1275 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Windsor and Maidenhead Royal Borough, Berkshire, England; Richardson says b. 15 Mar. 1275.7,1,2,8 She married Jean II "le Pacifique" (?) Duke of Lorraine, Brabant and Limburg, son of Jean I "Victorious" (?) Duke of Brabant and Limburg and Marguerite de Dampierre of Flanders, on 9 July 1290 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England.7,9,1,10,2,8,11,12
Margaret (?) of England died circa 1318; Ravilious says d. 1318.1,3,2,8
Margaret (?) of England was buried circa 1318 at Ste. Gudule, Brussels, Arrondissement Brussel-Hoofdstad, Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     11 Sep 1275, Windsor, Windsor and Maidenhead Royal Borough, Berkshire, England
     DEATH     c.1318 (aged 42–43), Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium
     English Royalty. Born at Windsor Castle, the daughter of Edward I, King of England and Eleanor de Castilla, the ninth of their seventeen children. She married Jean II de Brabant, Duc de Brabant, in July 1290 at Westminster Abbey. The couple had one son. She died at 43 in Brussels, Belgium and was buried at Collegiate Church of St. Gudule. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Edward I 1239–1307
          Eleanor of Castile 1240–1290
     Spouse
          Jean of Brabant 1275–1312 (m. 1290)
     Siblings
          Katherine Plantagenet 1261–1264
          Joan Plantagenet 1265–1265
          John Plantagenet 1266–1271
          Henry Plantagenet 1267–1274
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1269–1298
          Joan of Acre 1272–1307
          Alfonso Plantagenet 1273–1284
          Berengaria Plantagenet 1276–1278
          Mary Plantagenet 1278–1332
          Isabella Plantagenet 1279–1279
          Elizabeth Plantagenet 1282–1316
          Edward II 1284–1327
          Beatrice Plantagenet Princess of England 1286–1286
     Half Siblings
          Thomas Plantagenet of Brotherton 1300–1338
          Edmund Plantagenet of Woodstock 1301–1330
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1306–1311
     Children
          Jean III de Brabant 1300–1355
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Saint Michael and Saint Gudula, Brussels, Arrondissement Brussel-Hoofdstad, Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium
     PLOT     Mausoleum of the Dukes of Brabant
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 27 Dec 2000
     Find A Grave Memorial 19227.1,2,8,13
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 , Reference: page 197 & John Carmi Parsons
2. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1961.8


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Pss Margaret, *Windsor 15.3.1275, +after III.1333, bur Ste.Gudule, Brussels; m.Westminster Abbey 9.7.1290 Duke John II of Brabant (*after 1273 +27.12.1312.)1"

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Margaret of England (15 March 1275 – after 1333) was the tenth child and seventh daughter of King Edward I of England and his first wife, Eleanor of Castile. Her husband was John II, Duke of Brabant, whom she married in 1290, the year of her mother's death. Margaret and John had one child, John III, Duke of Brabant.
Family
     "Margaret was born on 15 March 1275,[1] at Windsor Castle, the tenth child of King Edward I and his cousin Eleanor of Castile.
     "Margaret's fifteen siblings included Joan of Acre, Eleanor, Countess of Bar, Elizabeth of Rhuddlan and her father's successor, Edward II of England.
Marriage
     "On 8 July 1290 Margaret married John II, Duke of Brabant in Westminster Abbey, London, becoming Duchess of Brabant less than four years later on 3 May 1294. She had been acquainted with her groom since childhood,[2] as they had been betrothed in 1278 when she was three years old. Margaret's wedding festivities were splendidly extravagant; they included a procession of knights in full body armour and richly dressed ladies singing as they paraded through the streets of London to the music provided by harpers, minstrels and violinists, while fools danced.[3] Their only child was John III, Duke of Brabant, successor to his father.
     "Margaret, described as having been a good-natured, merry child in her youth,[3] was unhappy at the Brabant court, as she was forced to accept her husband's perennial succession of mistresses and the illegitimate children they bore him,[3] all of whom were raised at court alongside her own son John. The latter was her only child, born 10 years into her marriage to the Duke.
     "During the reign of John II, Brabant continued supporting a coalition to stop French expansion. He tried to conquer South Holland from the pro-French count John II of Holland, but was not successful. John, who suffered from kidney stones and wanted his duchy to be peacefully handed over to his son upon his death, in 1312 signed the famous Charter of Kortenberg.
     "Margaret and John attended the wedding of her brother Edward to Isabella of France in Boulogne on 25 January 1308. They accompanied the royal pair to England for their joint coronation at Westminster Abbey the following month.
     "Margaret died twenty-two years after her husband. She died in Brabant and was buried at the Cathedral of St. Michael and St. Gudula, Brussels. She was the longest-living and last surviving of Edward I's nineteen children, dying in the reign of her nephew Edward III of England. Her tomb and that of her husband have been destroyed.
References
1. Richardson, Douglas, Everingham, Kimball G. (2004). Plantagenet Ancestry: a study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company. Page 20. Google Books. Retrieved 25-11-10.
2. Costain, Thomas B. (1958). The Three Edwards. Garden City, New York: Doubleday and Company, Inc. p.39
3. Costain, p.39
4. Selby, Walford Dakin; Harwood, H. W. Forsyth; Murray, Keith W. (1895). The genealogist. London: George Bell & Sons. pp. 30–31."14

; Per Genealogics:
     "Margaret was born on 15 March 1275 at Windsor Castle, the tenth child of Edward I 'Longshanks', king of England, and his first wife Eleonore of Castile, comtesse de Ponthieu.
     "On 9 July 1290 at Westminster Abbey, Margaret married Jan II, the future duke of Brabant and Limburg, son of Jan I, duke of Brabant, and Margarethe of Flanders. She had been acquainted with her groom since childhood, as they had been betrothed in 1278 when she was three years old. Margaret's wedding festivities were splendidly extravagant; they included a procession of knights in full body armour and richly-dressed ladies singing as they paraded through the streets of London to the music provided by harpers, minstrels and violinists. Their only child Jan III, born 10 years after their marriage, would have progeny and succeed his father.
     "Margaret, described having been a good-natured, merry child in her youth, was unhappy at the Brabant court, as she was forced to accept her husband's perennial succession of mistresses and the illegitimate children they bore him, all of whom were raised at court alongside her own son Jan.
     "During the reign of Jan II, Brabant continued supporting a coalition to stop French expansion. He tried to conquer South Holland (a district of medieval Holland) from the pro-French Jan II d'Avesnes, count of Holland, but was not successful.
     "Jan II of Brabant, who suffered from kidney stones and wanted his duchy to be peacefully handed over to his son upon his death, in 1312 signed the famous Charter of Cortenberg, whereby the duchy of Brabant was given what was in effect a constitution.
     "Margaret and Jan attended the wedding of her brother Edward II to Isabelle of France in Boulogne on 25 January 1308. They accompanied the royal pair to England for their joint coronation at Westminster Abbey the following month.
     "Margaret died in Brabant after 11 March in 1333, twenty-two years after her husband. She was buried at the Cathedral of St. Gudule in Brussels. Her tomb and her husband's have been destroyed."8

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.20. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward I 'Longshanks': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000809&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIdied1307B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001694&tree=LEO
  7. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), Henri III. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005918&tree=LEO
  9. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant3.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012388&tree=LEO
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_II,_Duke_of_Brabant. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 October 2019), memorial page for Margaret of England (11 Sep 1275–c.1318), Find A Grave Memorial no. 19227, citing Cathedral of Saint Michael and Saint Gudula, Brussels, Arrondissement Brussel-Hoofdstad, Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/19227/margaret-of_england. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_of_England,_Duchess_of_Brabant.
  15. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 57. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012389&tree=LEO

Mary (?) Princess of England1

F, #4727, b. 11 March 1279, d. 29 May 1332
FatherEdward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England1,2,3 b. 17 Jun 1239, d. 7 Jul 1307
MotherDoña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu1,3,4 b. c 1241, d. 28 Nov 1290
Last Edited12 Jul 2020
     Mary (?) Princess of England was born on 11 March 1279 at Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England.5,1
Mary (?) Princess of England died on 29 May 1332 at Amesbury, England, at age 53.1,5
Mary (?) Princess of England was buried after 29 May 1332 at Benedictine Convent, Amesbury, England.1


     She was Nun in 1291 at Benedictine Convent, Amesbury, England.1,5

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  2. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIdied1307B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001694&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), Henri III. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.

William de Braiose1,2

M, #4728, b. circa 1175, d. 1210
FatherWilliam III de Braiose 4th Lord of Bramber1,3,4,5 b. bt 1140 - 1150, d. 9 Apr 1211
MotherMaud/Mahaut/Mathilde de Saint-Valéry The Lady of Hay1,3,6 b. c 1150, d. 1210
ReferenceGAV24 EDV23
Last Edited30 Apr 2020
     William de Braiose married Maude de Clare, daughter of Richard de Clare 6th Earl of Clare, Hertford & Glouc and Amice Meullent Fitz William Countess of Gloucester.7,8,1,2,9 William de Braiose was born circa 1175.8
William de Braiose died in 1210 at Corfe or Windsor Castle, England.10,3
     ; weis 63a-28.11 GAV--24 EDV-23 GKJ-26.

; Starved to death with mother, by King John.12,13

; Died: 1210

William did not accompany K. Richard on Crusade but fought with K. John against Philip of France in Normandy (1203/4). John demanded William as a hostage for his father's loyalty in 1208. His mother Maud refused and they fled to the family estates in Ireland. In 1210 John prepared an expedition to Ireland. Maud and William escaped Ireland but were apprehended in Scotland. (William the father was in Wales at this time.) It is believed that Maud and William were starved to death at Windsor Castle. (Some say Corfe.)

Father: William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber

Mother: Maud de St Valery

Married to Matilda de Clare, a younger daughter of Richard, Earl of Clare
(In 1219, Matilda was married to Rhys Gryg, son of the Lord Rhys)

Child 1: John de Braose
Child 2: Giles
Child 3: Philip
(Giles and Philip were imprisoned by K.John at Corfe until Oct 1215 then released into the guardianship of their uncles, Hugh de Mortimer and Walter de Lacy)
[Child 4: Maud (b 1200) = Henry de Tracey]?2

Family

Maude de Clare d. Jan 1225
Children

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Braose, Baron Braose, of Gower, p. 72. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S1493] Doug Thompson: "The de Braose Web", online http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/family/home.html, William de Braose: http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/index1.htm. Hereinafter cited as The de Braose Web.
  3. [S1493] The de Braose Web, online http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/family/home.html, William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber: http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/index1.htm
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William de Braose: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00146979&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3.htm#WilliamBriousedied1210B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda|Maud de St.Valéry: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00146980&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 29A-28, p. 31. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 28A-2, p. 37. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud de Clare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00146982&tree=LEO
  10. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis MCS-5, line 28A-2, p. 37: "...of starvation by order of King John."
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 63A-28, p. 67.
  12. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 29A-28, p. 31: "...starved to death by King John 1210."
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 63A-29, p. 67.

John Marshal1

M, #4729, b. circa 1105, d. before 29 September 1165
FatherGilbert "the Marshal" (?)2,3,1
Mother(?) de Venuz4
ReferenceGAV23 EDV22
Last Edited30 Aug 2019
     John Marshal married Aline Pipard, daughter of Walter Pipard.5,1 John Marshal was born circa 1105.1 He married Sibylle de Salisbury, daughter of Walter Fitz Edward d'Evreux of Salisbury and Sybil de Chaworth, after 1141.5,1
John Marshal died before 29 September 1165.5
     GAV-23 EDV-22 GKJ-23.

;
Per Genealogics:
     "John was born about 1105, the son of Gilbert Giffard, royal serjeant and marshal to King Henry I, and a daughter of Geoffrey de Venuz. He was a minor Anglo-Norman nobleman during the reign of King Stephen, and fought in the 12th century civil war on the side of the Empress Matilda. Since at least 1130 and probably earlier, he had been the royal marshal to King Henry I. When Henry died, John swore for Stephen and was granted the castles of Marlborough and Ludgershall, Wiltshire during this time. Along with Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of the valley of the River Kennet in Wiltshire. Around 1139 John changed sides and swore for the Empress Matilda. In September 1141 Matilda fled the siege of Winchester and took refuge in John the Marshal's castle at Ludgershall. While covering her retreat from Winchester, John was forced to take refuge at Wherwell Abbey. The attackers set fire to the building, and John lost an eye to dripping lead from the melting roof.
     "In 1141 John arranged an annulment of his marriage to Aline Pipard in order to marry Sibylle of Salisbury, the daughter of Walter FitzEdward of Salisbury and Sibylle de Chanort, and sister of Patrick de Salisbury, 1st earl of Salisbury, who had been a local rival of his, and a supporter of King Stephen, up to that point. John had two sons by Aline - Gilbert and Walter. Walter predeceased his father and Gilbert died shortly after inheriting his father's lands. John and Sibylle had two sons, John and William, of whom William would have progeny. Their other sons were Henry, who went on to become bishop of Exeter, and Ancel, who served as a knight in the household of his kinsman Rotrou II, comte du Perche, son of his aunt Havise de Salisbury. They also had a daughter Margaret, married to Ralph de Somery, son of John de Somery and Hawise de Paynell.
     "In 1152 John had a legendary confrontation with King Stephen, who had besieged him at Newbury Castle. After John had broken an agreement to surrender, Stephen threatened to kill his son, whom John had given as a hostage. John refused, saying he could make more sons, but Stephen apparently took pity on the young boy and did not kill him. The boy was William, who would become a legendary figure in medieval lore, and one of the most powerful men in England.
     "John died about 1165. The office of Lord Marshal, originally related to the keeping of the King's horses, and later, the head of his household troops, was inherited by his eldest son John (died 1194) by Sibylle, who held it until his death. The title was then granted by King Richard the Lionheart to William, John's second son by Sibylle, who made the name and title famous. Though he had started out as a younger son without inheritance, by the time he actually inherited the title his reputation as a soldier and statesman was unmatched across Western Europe."1

Reference: Genealogics cites: The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 97.1

;
Per Boyer [2001:147-8]:
     "The office of Marshal assumed responsibility for keeping accounts of payments made out of the Treasury and Chamber.
     "He was with Henry I in Normandy in 1130, and with Stephen in Normandy in 1137. In 1138 he fortified the castles of Marlborough and Ludgershall. He held Marlborough for the king in 1140, and captured Robert Fitz Hurbert, who had taken the royal castle of Devizes.
     "After King Stephen was taken prisoner at Lincoln, John joined the Empress at Reading in May 1141, at Oxford in July, and at Winchester in August and September of that year. In the final rout of the Empress' forces in September "he as cut off and surrounded in Wherwell Abbey, but escaped iwht the loss of an eye and other wounds". In 1144 he was using his base at Marlborough to raid the surrounding countryside and oppress the clergy. In 1149 and 1153 he was with Maud's son Henry at Devizes. After Henry's accession he was granted Crown lands in Wiltshire, but he had to surrender Marlborough Castle in 1158. Soon after he was present at the Council fo Clarendon in 1164 he sued Thomas Becket for part of his manor of Pagham in Sussex."5 John Marshal was also known as John "the Marshal" Fitz Gilbert.5 He was Royal marshal to King Henry I circa 1130.1 The marriage of John Marshal and Aline Pipard was annulled in 1141.1,5

Family 1

Aline Pipard
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Marshall: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174779&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 147, MARSHAL 1. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert Marshall: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174781&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Venuz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174782&tree=LEO
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 147-148, MARSHAL 2.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 147-148, MARSHAL 2:i.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walter Marshal: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00576215&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry Marshal, Bishop of Exeter: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00341712&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ancel Marshal: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00576217&tree=LEO
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 147-148, MARSHAL 2:ii.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Marshall: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00684961&tree=LEO

Sibylle de Salisbury1

F, #4730
FatherWalter Fitz Edward d'Evreux of Salisbury2,1 d. 1147
MotherSybil de Chaworth1
ReferenceGAV23 EDV22
Last Edited30 Aug 2019
     Sibylle de Salisbury married John Marshal, son of Gilbert "the Marshal" (?) and (?) de Venuz, after 1141.3,4
     Reference:
Weis AR 66-27

Genealogics cites: The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 97.5,1 GAV-23 EDV-22 GKJ-23.6

Family

John Marshal b. c 1105, d. b 29 Sep 1165
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sibylle of Salisbury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174780&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Walter FitzEdward of Salisbury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120877&tree=LEO
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 147-148, MARSHAL 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Marshall: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174779&tree=LEO
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 66-27, p. 69. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry Marshal, Bishop of Exeter: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00341712&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ancel Marshal: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00576217&tree=LEO
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 147-148, MARSHAL 2:ii.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Marshall: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00684961&tree=LEO

Margaret Marshal1

F, #4731, d. after 1242
FatherJohn Marshal2 b. c 1105, d. b 29 Sep 1165
MotherSibylle de Salisbury3
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited30 Aug 2019
     Margaret Marshal married Sir Ralph de Somery Lord of Dudley, co. Worcester, son of Sir John de Somery and Hawise Paynel.4,1,5 Margaret Marshal married Maurice de Gant (Berkeley), son of Robert fitz Robert fitz Harding and Avice de Gaunt.5
Margaret Marshal died after 1242.5
     ; Weis AR 55-27a. GAV-22 EDV-22 GKJ-23.

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 147-148, MARSHAL 2:v. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Marshall: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174779&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sibylle of Salisbury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174780&tree=LEO
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 54-28, pp. 59. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 227, de SOMERY 2.
  6. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 136-2, p. 175. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  7. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 227, de SOMERY 2:iv.
  8. [S1637] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 13 May 2004: "Possible Identification of Juliana, wife of Robert de Chaucombe"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/fVGUjhV53I8/m/txhvX4TJk2oJ) to e-mail address, 13 May 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 13 May 2004."
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 227, de SOMERY 2:ii.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 227, de SOMERY 2:iii.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 227, de SOMERY 2:i.
  12. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Mowbray 4: p. 528. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

Margaret/Marguerite de Beaumont1,2

F, #4732, b. circa 1125, d. after 1185
FatherSir Robert II de Beaumont Knt., 2nd Earl of Leicester, Viceroy of England3 b. 1104, d. 5 Apr 1168
MotherAmeciaAmice de Montfort d. a 1168
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited25 May 2020
     Margaret/Marguerite de Beaumont was born circa 1125; living in 1185, allegedly aged 60.4,2 She married Ralph V de Toeni (de Conches) Lord of Flamstead, son of Roger III de Toeni (de Conches) Lord of Flamstead and Gertrude/Ida (?) of Hainault, after 1155.5,1,3,2
Margaret/Marguerite de Beaumont died after 1185.2
     GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-24.

; weis 98a-26.5

She was living in 1185.5

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 19, de BEAUMONT-7:iv. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Beaumont 5 page (The Sires de Beaumont-le-Roger): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/beaumont/beaumont5.html
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stafford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 242, de TOENI 8.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 98A-26, p. 95. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  7. [S1709] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=jweber, Jim Weber (unknown location), downloaded updated 16 July 2005 accessed 7 Aug 2005, http://whttp://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jweber&id=I03438.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida de Tosny: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00304040&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Bertrade de Montfort1,2,3

F, #4733, b. 1155, d. 1227
FatherSimon III "le Chauve" de Montfort seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury, comte d’Evreux, de Rochefort et de Leicester, châtelain de Beynes2,3 b. c 1128, d. 12 Mar 1180
MotherMaud (?)2,3
ReferenceGAV23 EDV22
Last Edited26 Nov 2020
     Bertrade de Montfort was born in 1155 at Montfort, France.4,5,2 She married Hugh "of Kevelioc" de Meschines (?) 5th Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranche, son of Ranulph 'de Gernon' de Meschines 2nd Earl of Chester and Maud FitzRobert de Caen of Gloucester, in 1169;
His 1st wife.6,7,8,9,10,2
Bertrade de Montfort died in 1227 at Quierzy, Aisne, France.5,11,2
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:642.
2. The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 95.2
GAV-23 EDV-22 GKJ-23.

; Per Med Lands:
     "BERTRADE de Montfort ([1155]-1227). The Annales Cestrienses record in 1169 that “Hugo comes Cestrie” married “filiam Simonis comitis Ebroensis...Bertrad” arranged by King Henry II and that she was “ipsius cognata”[748]. Robert of Torigny records the marriage arranged by Henry II King of England in 1170 of "Hugoni comiti Cestriæ cognate suo" and "filiam comitis Ebroicensis cognatam suam ex parte patris sui"[749]. “Bertreia comitissa Cestrie...” witnessed the charter dated to [1169/73] under which Hugh Earl of Chester granted land at Coventry to Godfrey his homager[750]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Beltesford et Hemmingebi et Dunintone” held by “Bertia comitissa, filia comitis de Evereros, uxor Hugonis comitis Cestrie”[751]. “Bertrada comitissa Cestrie...” witnessed the charter dated [3 Feb 1188/15 Nov 1189] under which “Ranulfus dux Britannie comes Cestrie et Richmondie” confirmed a donation to Bordesley abbey[752]. The Annals of Burton record the death in 1227 of “Bertrudis comitissa Cestriæ”[753]. The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1227 of “Bertrudis comitissa Cestrie”[754].
     "m ([1169/70]) HUGH Earl of Chester, son of RANULF de Gernon Earl of Chester & his wife Matilda of Gloucester (Kevelioc, co. Monmouth 1147-Leek, Staffordshire 30 Jun 1181, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh)."
Med Lands cites:
[749] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 22.
[750] Barraclough (1988), 206, p. 208.
[751] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, Jerene Wapentak, p. 8.
[752] Barraclough (1988), 193, p. 198.
[753] Annales de Burton, p. 244.
[754] Annales Cestrienses, p. 54.3


; Per Racines et Histoire (Montfort): “Bertrade de Montfort °~1152/55 +1227 (Evreux)
     ép. 1169 Hugh 1er Kevelioc, 3e earl of Chester ° ~1147 (Kevelioc, Monmouthshire) + 30/06/1181 (Leek, Staffordshire) (fils de Ranulf de Gernon (de Meschines), 2° earl of Chester, et de Maud FitzRobert de Gloucester)”.12
; Per Weis: “Hugh of Kevelioc, b. 1147, Kevelioc, co. Monmouth, d. 30 June 1181, Leek, co. Stafford, 3rd Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches in Normandy; m. 1169, Bertrade de Montfort, dau. of Simon de Montfort, s. 1180-81, Count of Evreux, and Maud. (CP III:167, V:670 chart iv, VII:App. D. 708-717; Wagner, Pedigrees and Progress, chart p. 204).”.13

; Per Med Lands:
     "HUGH "of Kevelioc" (Kevelioc, co. Monmouth 1147-Leek, Staffordshire 30 Jun 1181, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh). The Annales Cestrienses record the birth in 1147 of “comes Hugo II”[104]. Robert of Torigny names "Hugonem filium suum" as successor of "Ranulfus comes Cestriæ"[105]. He succeeded his father in 1153 as Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches. "Hugo comes Cestrie" confirmed a donation of land in Thoresby donated by "Willelmus filius Othuer" to Greenfield priory, Lincolnshire, for the soul of "patris mei Randulfi", by charter dated to [1155] witnessed by "Matilla matre sua…"[106]. The Annales Cestrienses record in 1169 that “Hugo comes Cestrie” was made a knight[107]. He joined the rebellion of Henry "the Young King" against Henry II King of England and was taken prisoner at Alnwick 13 Jul 1174: the Annales Cestrienses record in 1173 that “Henricus tertius Rex Anglie filius Henrici Regis Anglie” captured “patrem suum” with the help of “duobus comitibus Anglie...Hugone comite Cestrensi et Roberto comite Leicestrie”, adding that “Hugo comes Cestrie” was captured “apud Dol in Britanniam...cum Radulpho de Feugis”[108]. He was deprived of the earldom but restored in Jan 1177[109]. The Annales Cestrienses record in 1177 that “Hugo comes Cestrie” captured “totam Bromfeld in Id Jun” with “David filio Owino”[110]. A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln records the death “II Kal Jul” of “Hugo”, son of “Ranulfus de Gernons”, and his burial at St Werburgh’s, Chester[111]. The Annales Cestrienses record the death “II Kal Jul...apud Lech” 1181 of “Hugo II...comes Cestrie”[112].
     "m ([1169/70]) BERTRADE de Montfort, daughter of SIMON [III] de Montfort Comte d'Evreux & his wife Mathilde --- ([1155]-1227). The Annales Cestrienses record in 1169 that “Hugo comes Cestrie” married “filiam Simonis comitis Ebroensis...Bertrad” arranged by King Henry II and that she was “ipsius cognata”[113]. Robert of Torigny records the marriage arranged by Henry II King of England in 1170 of "Hugoni comiti Cestriæ cognate suo" and "filiam comitis Ebroicensis cognatam suam ex parte patris sui"[114]. “Bertreia comitissa Cestrie...” witnessed the charter dated to [1169/73] under which Hugh Earl of Chester granted land at Coventry to Godfrey his homager[115]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Beltesford et Hemmingebi et Dunintone” held by “Bertia comitissa, filia comitis de Evereros, uxor Hugonis comitis Cestrie”[116]. “Bertrada comitissa Cestrie...” witnessed the charter dated [3 Feb 1188/15 Nov 1189] under which “Ranulfus dux Britannie comes Cestrie et Richmondie” confirmed a donation to Bordesley abbey[117]. The Annals of Burton record the death in 1227 of “Bertrudis comitissa Cestriæ”[118]. The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1227 of “Bertrudis comitissa Cestrie”[119]."
Med Lands cites:
[104] Annales Cestrienses, p. 20.
[105] Robert de Torigny I, 1153, p. 281.
[106] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Greenfield, 150, p. 99.
[107] Annales Cestrienses, p. 24.
[108] Annales Cestrienses, p. 26.
[109] CP III 167.
[110] Annales Cestrienses, p. 26.
[111] Dugdale Monasticon III, Spalding Priory, Lincolnshire XI, Hugonis primi Comitis Cestriæ…, p. 218.
[112] Annales Cestrienses, p. 28.
[113] Annales Cestrienses, p. 24.
[114] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 22.
[115] Barraclough (1988), 206, p. 208.
[116] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, Jerene Wapentak, p. 8.
[117] Barraclough (1988), 193, p. 198.
[118] Annales de Burton, p. 244.
[119] Annales Cestrienses, p. 54.10

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 160, de MONTFORT of Leicester 5:iii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertred de Montfort: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027680&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#BertradeMontfortMHugoChester. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  5. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 50, CHESTER 7.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugh Keveliok Le Meschin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027679&tree=LEO
  8. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), line 125-28, p. 125.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Ferrers (Ferrières): p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Ferrers.pdf@#$%. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#HughChesterdied1181
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 160, de MONTFORT of Leicester 5:ii - year of death.
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montfort (act. -L’Amaury), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montfort.pdf
  13. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 125-29, p. 125.
  14. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 129. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Chester: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027682&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#MatildaChesterdied1233
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#dauHughChesterMLlywelyn
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hawise of Chester: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027710&tree=LEO
  19. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, line 125-29, p. 125.
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#HawiseChesterMRobertQuincy
  21. [S4794] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry: A Study in colonial and Medieval Families (5 Volumes) (n.p.: n.pub., 2013), Vol. IV, p. 441. Hereinafter cited as Richardson [2013] Royal Ancestry.

Maude (Matilda) de Huntingdon Queen of the Scots, Countess of Huntingdon & Northumberland1,2,3

F, #4734, b. circa 1074, d. between 23 April 1130 and 1131
FatherWaltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland4,5,2,6,7,8,9 b. c 1035, d. 31 May 1076
MotherJudith (?) of Lens2,10,6,8,9 b. 1054, d. a 1086
ReferenceGAV24 EDV23
Last Edited4 Jul 2020
     Maude (Matilda) de Huntingdon Queen of the Scots, Countess of Huntingdon & Northumberland was born circa 1074; Genealogy.EU (Dunkeld page) and Genealogics says b. ca 1074; Boyer says ca 1072; Med Lands says b. 1071/74.11,5,8,9 She married Simon I de St. Liz 1st Earl of Huntingdon & Northampton, son of Ranulph "The Rich" (?), circa 1090;
Her 1st husband. Med Lands says m. 1087/90.12,2,9,8,13,14 Maude (Matilda) de Huntingdon Queen of the Scots, Countess of Huntingdon & Northumberland married David I "The Saint" (?) King of Scots, son of Máel-Coluim (Malcolm III) mac Donnchada "Canmore") (?) King of Scotland (Alba) and Saint Margaret (?) Queen of Scotland, between 1113 and 1114;
Her 2nd husband.12,1,15,4,5,2,16,17,9,8
Maude (Matilda) de Huntingdon Queen of the Scots, Countess of Huntingdon & Northumberland was buried after 23 April 1130 at Scone Abbey, Scone, Perth and Kinross, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1074
     DEATH     1130 (aged 55–56)
     Scottish monarch, queen consort of St. David I, King of Scots. Daughter of Waltheof, Earl of Huntingdon and Judith, she was also known as Maud. A Saxon princess and widow of Simon de Senlis, she married David in 1113. As a result of this marriage, David acquired the Earldom of Huntingdon as well as a legitimate claim to a large part of England. She gave the king four children: Malcolm, Henry, Claricia, and Hodierna. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
          Waltheof of Huntingdon 1050–1076
          Judith of Lens 1054–1086
     Spouses
          Simon de Senlis 1068–1111
          David I, King of Scots 1080–1153
     Siblings
          Uchtred Johnston 1070–1155
     Children
          Waltheof Of Melrose 1095–1159
          Simon II de Senlis 1103–1153
          Henry de Huntingdon 1114–1152
     BURIAL     Scone Abbey, Scone, Perth and Kinross, Scotland
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Kristen Conrad
     Added: 13 Sep 2004
     Find a Grave Memorial 9457518.1,5,18
Maude (Matilda) de Huntingdon Queen of the Scots, Countess of Huntingdon & Northumberland died between 23 April 1130 and 1131; Genealogics says d. 1130/31; Med Lands says d. 23 Apr 1130/22 Apr 1131.19,1,4,5,9,8
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "DAVID, son of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England ([1080]-Carlisle 24 May 1153, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife). He is named, and his parentage given, by Roger of Hoveden, who lists him as the sixth son of his parents[413]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun names "Edward, Edmund, Ethelred, Edgar, Alexander and…David" as the sons of King Malcolm and his wife[414]. He was designated Prince of Cumbria in [1107][415]. "David comes" made donations to the monks of Durham by undated charter which names "frater meus Eadgarus rex", witnessed by "Mathildis Reginæ et Willelmi filii sui"[416], presumably referring to his sister Matilda Queen of England which dates the document to before Jun 1118. Earl of Northampton and Huntingdon, de iure uxoris. "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk by charter dated to [1120], witnessed by "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…"[417]. "David comes filii Malcolmi regis Scotorum" founded the monastery of Kelso by charter dated to [1119/24] witnessed by "Matilda comitissa, Henrico filio comitis…Willo nepote comitis…"[418]. Inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concern land owned by the church of Glasgow[419]. He succeeded his brother in 1124 as DAVID I King of Scotland. Having at first supported Empress Matilda's right to succeed her father Henry I King of England, he made peace with King Stephen, agreeing in 1136 to resign his English earldoms to his son Henry[420]. The peace was short-lived, King David being defeated by King Stephen at the battle of the Standard 22 Aug 1138. "Rex Scottorum" (no name) donated "terram de Eldune…Dernewic" to Melrose abbey, for the souls of "fratris mei Ædgari et alios fratrem et sororis mearum et uxoris mee Matild et…Henrici filii mei", by charter dated "die Venis crastino Ascensionis dni…quo Stephanus rex Anglie captus est" (29 Apr 1141)[421]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1153 of "David rex Scotiæ"[422]. The Chronicle of the Picts and Scots dated 1251 records that "David" reigned for 29 years and 3 months, died "in Carlelle", and was buried "in Dumfermline"[423]. The Chronicle of Melrose records the death "IX Kal Jun" in 1153 of King David[424]. John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the death "IX Kal Jun" in 1153 of "rex…sanctus David junior filius Malcolmi et S. Margaretæ Scotorum reginæ" and his burial at Dunfermline[425].
     "m (1113) as her second husband, MATILDA [Maud] of Huntingdon, widow of SIMON de St Lis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton, daughter of WALTHEOF Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton & his wife Judith de Lens [Boulogne] ([1071/76]-[23 Apr 1130/22 Apr 1131], bur Scone Abbey, Perthshire). Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Matilda eldest daughter of Judith and "Earl Simon[426]. Orderic Vitalis records that David King of Scotland married “filiam...Guallevi comitis et Judith consobrinæ regis” who brought him “binosque comitatus Northamtonæ et Huntendonæ” which “Simon Silvanectensis comes” had possessed with her[427]. Robert of Torigny records that the wife of "David [rex Scotiæ] frater [Alexandri]" was "filiam Gallevi comitis et Judith consobrini regis", naming "Symon Silvanectensis comes" as her first husband[428]. "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1120] under which "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk[429]. "David comes filii Malcolmi regis Scotorum" founded the monastery of Kelso by charter dated to [1119/24] witnessed by "Matilda comitissa, Henrico filio comitis…Willo nepote comitis…"[430]. "Matildis comitissa…" witnessed inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow[431]."
Med Lands cites:
[413] RH I, p. 122.
[414] John of Fordun (Skene), Book V, XVI, p. 203.
[415] Duncan (2002), pp. 60-1.
[416] Early Scottish Charters XXIX, p. 23.
[417] Early Scottish Charters XXXV, p. 26.
[418] Kelso, Tome I, 1, p. 3.
[419] Early Scottish Charters L, p. 46.
[420] CP VI 641.
[421] Bannatyne Club (1837) Liber Sancte Marie de Melros: Munimenta Vetustiora Monasterii Cisterciensis de Melros (Edinburgh) ("Melrose Liber"), Tome I, 1, p. 3.
[422] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1153, p. 274.
[423] Skene (1867), XXIX, Chronicle of the Picts and Scots 1251, p. 175.
[424] Chronicle of Melrose, 1153, p. 10.
[425] Johannis de Fordun (Goodall), Vol. I, Lib. VIII, Cap. I, p. 447.
[426] Riley, H. (ed.) (1854) Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland (London) ("Ingulph's Chronicle"), p. 146.
[427] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 402.
[428] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1125, p. 172.
[429] Early Scottish Charters XXXV, p. 26.
[430] Kelso, Tome I, 1, p. 3.
[431] Early Scottish Charters L, p. 46.17


; Per Genealogy.EU (Dunkeld): “[2m.] David I "the Saint" (Daibhidh I), Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton, King of Scotland (1124-53), *ca 1083/84, +Carlisle, Cumbria 24.5.1153, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife; m.1113/14 Matilda (*ca 1074, +23.4.1130/22.4.1131, bur Scone Abbey, Perthshire), dau.of Waltheof, Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton”.5

; This is the same person as ”Maud, Countess of Huntingdon” at Wikipedia.3

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:89.20 She was Countess of Huntingdon and Northumberland.21 GAV-24 EDV-23 GKJ-24.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Maud was born about 1074, the daughter of Waltheof, earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton, and Judith of Lens. Her father was the last of the major Anglo-Saxon earls to remain powerful after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, no doubt due to the fact that Judith of Lens was a niece of William 'the Conqueror'.
     “About 1090 Maud was married to Simon de St.Liz, son of the Norman Raudoul 'le Riche'. Before the end of that year Simon received the earldom of Huntingdon (including Northampton) from William Rufus, king of England, probably in right of his wife. Maud and Simon had three known children, of whom Maud and Simon would have progeny.
     “Simon died in 1099, and about Christmas 1113 Maud married Dabid mac Máil Choluim, David I 'the Saint', who became king of Scots in 1124, the son of Máel Coluim mac Donnchada, Malcolm III Canmore, king of Scots, and St. Margaret of Wessex. She and David had four children of whom Henry would have progeny.
     “Maud died in 1130 or 1131, and was succeeded to the earldom of Huntingdon by her son Simon. However in 1135 the earldom was bestowed on his half-brother Henry, as well as the promise of the earldom of Northumberland, as the price of peace after Henry's father King David penetrated into England as far as Durham on the side of the Empress Matilda.”.20

Reference: Weis [1992:130] Line 148-24.12

; Per Med Lands:
     "MATILDA [Matilda] of Huntingdon ([1071/74]-[23 Apr 1130/22 Apr 1131], bur Scone Abbey, Perthshire). Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Matilda eldest daughter of Judith and "Earl Simon[674]. Orderic Vitalis records that David King of Scotland married “filiam...Guallevi comitis et Judith consobrinæ regis” who brought him “binosque comitatus Northamtonæ et Huntendonæ” which “Simon Silvanectensis comes” had possessed with her[675]. Robert of Torigny records that the wife of "David [rex Scotiæ] frater [Alexandri]" was "filiam Gallevi comitis et Judith consobrini regis", naming "Symon Silvanectensis comes" as her first husband[676]. "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1120] under which "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk[677]. "Matildis comitissa…" witnessed inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow[678].
     "m firstly ([1090]) SIMON de Senlis [Saint Lis], son of RANOUL "le Riche" & his wife --- (-Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire [1111], bur Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire). Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton de iure uxoris.
     "m secondly (1113) DAVID of Scotland Prince of Cumbria, son of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England ([1080]-Carlisle 24 May 1153, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife). Earl of Northampton and Huntingdon de iure uxoris. He succeeded his brother in 1124 as DAVID I King of Scotland."
Med Lands cites:
[674] Ingulph's Chronicle, p. 146.
[675] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 402.
[676] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1125, p. 172.
[677] Early Scottish Charters XXXV, p. 26.
[678] Early Scottish Charters L, p. 46.8


; Per Med Lands:
     "SIMON de Senlis [Saint Lis], son of RANOUL "le Riche" & his wife --- (-Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire [1111], bur Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire). A manuscript narrating the foundation of St Andrew’s Priory, Northampton records that “duo fratres…Garnerius dictus le Ryche et Simon de Seynlyz filii Raundoel le Ryche” accompanied William “the Conqueror” to England[683]. He was created Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton in [1087/90] after his marriage, presumably de iure uxoris, although his late father-in-law's earldom must have been forfeited in [1075] implying that a new grant would have been necessary. He witnessed a charter to Bath Abbey as "Earl Simon" in 1090[684]. He built the castle of Northampton. “Symon et uxor mea Matildis” founded the St Andrew’s, Northampton by undated charter, subscribed by “…Johannis nepotis comitis…Symonis nepotis comitis, Warneri nepotis comitis…Petri nepotis comitis…”[685]. "…Symonis comitis…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[686]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of St Andrew’s Priory, Northampton records that Simon died “apud Caritatem” while returning from a journey to “terram sanctam” and was buried there[687].
     "m ([1087/90]) as her first husband, MATILDA [Matilda] of Huntingdon, daughter of WALTHEOF Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland & his wife Judith de Lens [Boulogne] ([1071/76]-[23 Apr 1130/22 Apr 1131], bur Scone Abbey, Perthshire). Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Matilda eldest daughter of Judith and "Earl Simon[688]. She married secondly (1113) David of Scotland Prince of Cumbria, who succeeded in 1124 as David I King of Scotland. Orderic Vitalis records that David King of Scotland married “filiam...Guallevi comitis et Judith consobrinæ regis” who brought him “binosque comitatus Northamtonæ et Huntendonæ” which “Simon Silvanectensis comes” had possessed with her[689]. Robert of Torigny records that the wife of "David [rex Scotiæ] frater [Alexandri]" was "filiam Gallevi comitis et Judith consobrini regis", naming "Symon Silvanectensis comes" as her first husband[690]. "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1120] under which "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk[691]. "Matildis comitissa…" witnessed inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow[692]. "
Med Lands cites:
[683] Dugdale Monasticon V, Priory of St Andrew, Northampton, I, Incipit de Fundatione Domus nostræ, p. 190.
[684] CP VI 640.
[685] Dugdale Monasticon V, Priory of St Andrew, Northampton, II, p. 190.
[686] Bath St Peter 42, p. 46.
[687] Dugdale Monasticon V, Priory of St Andrew, Northampton, I, Incipit de Fundatione Domus nostræ, p. 190.
[688] Ingulph's Chronicle, p. 146.
[689] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 402.
[690] Robert de Torigny I, 1125, p. 172.
[691] Early Scottish Charters XXXV, p. 26.
[692] Early Scottish Charters L, p. 46.14

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 113-114, HUNTINGDON 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maud,_Countess_of_Huntingdon. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#Waltheofdied1076. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Waltheof: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108320&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#Matildadied1131
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Huntingdon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049982&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith of Lens: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108321&tree=LEO
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 113-114, HUNTINGDON 3: "aged 18 in 1090."
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 148-24, p. 130. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon de St.Liz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286792&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#SimonHuntingdondied1111
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 226, SCOTLAND 23:viii.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002908&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#DavidIdied1153B
  18. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 04 July 2020), memorial page for Matilda of Huntingdon (1074–1130), Find a Grave Memorial no. 9457518, citing Scone Abbey, Scone, Perth and Kinross, Scotland; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9457518. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  19. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 170-22, p. 147-148.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049982&tree=LEO
  21. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 148-23, p. 130.
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde|Maud de St.Liz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286798&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#MaudHuntingdondiedbefore1163
  25. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 113-114, HUNTINGDON 3:v.
  26. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 113-114, HUNTINGDON 3:vi.
  27. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 113-114, HUNTINGDON 3:iii.

Simon I de St. Liz 1st Earl of Huntingdon & Northampton1

M, #4735, b. circa 1060, d. circa 1111
FatherRanulph "The Rich" (?)2,3
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited16 Jul 2020
     Simon I de St. Liz 1st Earl of Huntingdon & Northampton was born circa 1060.4 He married Maude (Matilda) de Huntingdon Queen of the Scots, Countess of Huntingdon & Northumberland, daughter of Waltheof II (?) Earl of Huntingdon, Northampton & Northumberland and Judith (?) of Lens, circa 1090;
Her 1st husband. Med Lands says m. 1087/90.5,1,6,7,2,3
Simon I de St. Liz 1st Earl of Huntingdon & Northampton was buried circa 1111 at Notre Dame de La Charité-sur-Loire, Scone, Perth and Kinross, Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1068, France
     DEATH     1111 (aged 42–43), La Charite-sur-Loire, Departement de la Nièvre, Bourgogne, France
     Birth Abt 1068 Normandy, France.
     1111 La Charite-Sur-Loir, Nievre Department, Burgundy Region, France
     Father Ranulph, "The Rich"
     Wife Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon*^, b. Abt 1072, Huntington, Huntingdonshire, England , d. 1130
     Children:
1. Simon de Senlis, 4th Earl of Northampton^, b. Abt 1098, County Northamptonshire, England , d. Aug 1153
2. Maud de St. Liz, *^, b. 1094, County Hampshire, Isle Of Wight, England , d. 1140

     Simon I de Senlis (or Senliz), 2nd Earl of Northampton and 2nd Earl of Huntingdon jure uxoris (died between 1111 and 1113) was a Norman nobleman.
     In 1098 he was captured during the Vexin campaign of King William Rufus and was subsequently ransomed. He witnessed King Henry I's charter of liberties issued at his coronation in 1100. He attested royal charters in England from 1100–03, 1106–07, and 1109–011. Sometime in the period, 1093–1100, he and his wife, Maud, founded the Priory of St. Andrew's, Northampton. He witnessed a grant of King Henry I to Bath Abbey 8 August 1111 at Bishop's Waltham, as the king was crossing to Normandy. Simon de Senlis, Earl of Northampton and Huntingdon, subsequently went abroad and died at La Charité-sur-Loire, and was buried there in the new priory church. The date of his death is uncertain.
     He reportedly built Northampton Castle and the town walls.[1] He also built one of the three remaining Round churches in England, The Holy Sepulchre, Sheep Street, Northampton). He was the third son of Laudri de Senlis, sire of Chantilly and Ermenonville (in Picardy), and his spouse, Ermengarde.[2] He married in or before 1090 Maud of Huntingdon, daughter of Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria, Northampton, and Huntingdon, by Judith, daughter of Lambert, Count of Lens. They had two sons, Simon II de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon-Northampton, and Waltheof of Melrose, and one daughter, Maud de Senlis, who married (1st) Robert Fitz Richard (of the De Clare family), of Little Dunmow, Essex. Following Simon's death, his widow, Maud, married (2nd) around Christmas 1113, David I nicknamed the Saint, who became King of Scots in 1124. David was recognized as Earl of Huntingdon to the exclusion of his step-son, Simon; the earldom of Northampton reverted to the crown. Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon, the Queen of Scots, died in 1130/31
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Matilda of Huntingdon 1074–1130
     Children
          Waltheof Of Melrose 1095–1159
          Simon II de Senlis 1103–1153
     BURIAL     Cremated, Other, Specifically: was buried in the Notre-Dame church of la Prieuré de La Charité-sur-Loire, Nièvre, Bourgogne
     Created by: kenny fitzwater
     Added: 18 Nov 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 100861946.8
Simon I de St. Liz 1st Earl of Huntingdon & Northampton died circa 1111 at Notre Dame de La Charité-sur-Loire, La Charité-sur-Loire, Departement de Nièvre, Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, France (now).5,9,1,4,3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "MATILDA [Matilda] of Huntingdon ([1071/74]-[23 Apr 1130/22 Apr 1131], bur Scone Abbey, Perthshire). Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Matilda eldest daughter of Judith and "Earl Simon[674]. Orderic Vitalis records that David King of Scotland married “filiam...Guallevi comitis et Judith consobrinæ regis” who brought him “binosque comitatus Northamtonæ et Huntendonæ” which “Simon Silvanectensis comes” had possessed with her[675]. Robert of Torigny records that the wife of "David [rex Scotiæ] frater [Alexandri]" was "filiam Gallevi comitis et Judith consobrini regis", naming "Symon Silvanectensis comes" as her first husband[676]. "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1120] under which "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk[677]. "Matildis comitissa…" witnessed inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow[678].
     "m firstly ([1090]) SIMON de Senlis [Saint Lis], son of RANOUL "le Riche" & his wife --- (-Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire [1111], bur Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire). Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton de iure uxoris.
     "m secondly (1113) DAVID of Scotland Prince of Cumbria, son of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England ([1080]-Carlisle 24 May 1153, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife). Earl of Northampton and Huntingdon de iure uxoris. He succeeded his brother in 1124 as DAVID I King of Scotland."
Med Lands cites:
[674] Ingulph's Chronicle, p. 146.
[675] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 402.
[676] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1125, p. 172.
[677] Early Scottish Charters XXXV, p. 26.
[678] Early Scottish Charters L, p. 46.7
GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-24.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Simon de St.Liz was the son of a Norman, Raudoul 'le Riche'. About 1090 he married Maud of Huntingdon, daughter of Waltheof, earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton, and Judith of Lens. Maud's father was the last of the major Anglo-Saxon earls to remain powerful after the Norman conquest of England in 1066; her mother was a niece of William 'the Conqueror'. Before the end of 1090 Simon received the earldom of Huntingdon (including Northampton) from William Rufus, king of England, probably in right of his wife. Simon and Maud had three known children, of whom Maud and Simon would have progeny.
     “The elder Simon reportedly built Northampton Castle and the town walls. He also built one of the three remaining round churches in England, the Holy Sepulchre, in Sheep Street, Northampton.
     “In 1098 Simon was captured during the Vexin campaign of King William Rufus in that year, and was subsequently ransomed. He witnessed King Henry I's charter of liberties issued at his coronation in 1100. He attested royal charters in England from 1100 to 1103, in 1106 and 1107, and from 1109 to 1111. Sometime in the period 1093-1100 he and his wife Maud founded the priory of St. Andrew's, Northampton. He witnessed a grant of King Henry I to Bath Abbey on 8 August 1111 at Bishop's Waltham, as the king was crossing to Normandy.
     “Simon subsequently went abroad on crusade 'cruce signatus' or on pilgrimage. He died at La Charité-sur-Loise in France either late in 1111 or the following year, and was buried there in the new priory church.
     “About Christmas 1113 his widow Maud married Dabid mac Máil Choluim, David I 'the Saint', who became King of Scots in 1124. Maud died in 1130 or 1131, and was succeeded to the earldom of Huntingdon by her son Simon. However in 1135 the earldom was bestowed on her son Henry from her second marriage, as well as the promise of the earldom of Northumberland, as the price of peace after Henry's father King David penetrated into England as far as Durham on the side of the Empress Matilda.”.2

; This is the same person as ”Simon I de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon-Northampton” at Wikipedia.10

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. 6:640; additions John Ravilious.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/4:701B.2


Reference: Weis [1992:130] Line 148-24.5 Simon I de St. Liz 1st Earl of Huntingdon & Northampton was also known as Simon I de Senlis 1st Earl of Huntingdon & Northampton.10

; Per Med Lands:
     "SIMON de Senlis [Saint Lis], son of RANOUL "le Riche" & his wife --- (-Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire [1111], bur Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire). A manuscript narrating the foundation of St Andrew’s Priory, Northampton records that “duo fratres…Garnerius dictus le Ryche et Simon de Seynlyz filii Raundoel le Ryche” accompanied William “the Conqueror” to England[683]. He was created Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton in [1087/90] after his marriage, presumably de iure uxoris, although his late father-in-law's earldom must have been forfeited in [1075] implying that a new grant would have been necessary. He witnessed a charter to Bath Abbey as "Earl Simon" in 1090[684]. He built the castle of Northampton. “Symon et uxor mea Matildis” founded the St Andrew’s, Northampton by undated charter, subscribed by “…Johannis nepotis comitis…Symonis nepotis comitis, Warneri nepotis comitis…Petri nepotis comitis…”[685]. "…Symonis comitis…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[686]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of St Andrew’s Priory, Northampton records that Simon died “apud Caritatem” while returning from a journey to “terram sanctam” and was buried there[687].
     "m ([1087/90]) as her first husband, MATILDA [Matilda] of Huntingdon, daughter of WALTHEOF Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland & his wife Judith de Lens [Boulogne] ([1071/76]-[23 Apr 1130/22 Apr 1131], bur Scone Abbey, Perthshire). Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Matilda eldest daughter of Judith and "Earl Simon[688]. She married secondly (1113) David of Scotland Prince of Cumbria, who succeeded in 1124 as David I King of Scotland. Orderic Vitalis records that David King of Scotland married “filiam...Guallevi comitis et Judith consobrinæ regis” who brought him “binosque comitatus Northamtonæ et Huntendonæ” which “Simon Silvanectensis comes” had possessed with her[689]. Robert of Torigny records that the wife of "David [rex Scotiæ] frater [Alexandri]" was "filiam Gallevi comitis et Judith consobrini regis", naming "Symon Silvanectensis comes" as her first husband[690]. "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1120] under which "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk[691]. "Matildis comitissa…" witnessed inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow[692]. "
Med Lands cites:
[683] Dugdale Monasticon V, Priory of St Andrew, Northampton, I, Incipit de Fundatione Domus nostræ, p. 190.
[684] CP VI 640.
[685] Dugdale Monasticon V, Priory of St Andrew, Northampton, II, p. 190.
[686] Bath St Peter 42, p. 46.
[687] Dugdale Monasticon V, Priory of St Andrew, Northampton, I, Incipit de Fundatione Domus nostræ, p. 190.
[688] Ingulph's Chronicle, p. 146.
[689] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXII, p. 402.
[690] Robert de Torigny I, 1125, p. 172.
[691] Early Scottish Charters XXXV, p. 26.
[692] Early Scottish Charters L, p. 46.3
He was Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton - Burke's Peerage: "[Waltheof's] son-in-law Simon de St Liz was the next holder of the Earldom, the family connections of Simon's wife Maud making the transition a natural one under the terms prevailing then. Indeed the history of the Earldom over the next few decades amply illustrates the almost chattel-like nature of such a title at this time, a quasi-hereditary post which was nevertheless as often as not held from the king at pleasure and which could be transferred between members of the same family like a parcel of land." between 1080 and 1111.11,5,12,10 He was Crusader in 1095.5,13

Citations

  1. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon de St.Liz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286792&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#SimonHuntingdondied1111. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286792&tree=LEO
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 148-24, p. 130. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Huntingdon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049982&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#Matildadied1131
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 04 July 2020), memorial page for Simon de Senlis, I (1068–1111), Find a Grave Memorial no. 100861946,; Maintained by kenny fitzwater (contributor 47969585) Cremated, Other, who reports a was buried in the Notre-Dame church of la Prieuré de La Charité-sur-Loire, Nièvre, Bourgogne, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/100861946. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 113-114, HUNTINGDON 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_I_de_Senlis,_Earl_of_Huntingdon-Northampton. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  12. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Huntingdon Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  13. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 49. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde|Maud de St.Liz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286798&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#MaudHuntingdondiedbefore1163

Mathilde/Maude de St. Liz1,2,3,4,5

F, #4736, d. before 1163
FatherSimon I de St. Liz 1st Earl of Huntingdon & Northampton3,4,5,6,7,8 b. c 1060, d. c 1111
MotherMaude (Matilda) de Huntingdon Queen of the Scots, Countess of Huntingdon & Northumberland3,4,5,6,9 b. c 1074, d. bt 23 Apr 1130 - 1131
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Mathilde/Maude de St. Liz married Robert Fitz Richard de Clare Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex, son of Richard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare and Rohese Giffard, in 1112; her 1st husband.10,11,2,12,3,4,13,14,5,6 Mathilde/Maude de St. Liz married Saher de Quincy Lord of Daventry after 1136; her 2nd husband.15,11,2,16,17,3,4,5,6,18,19
Mathilde/Maude de St. Liz died in 1140; Richardson says d. aft 1158/63.10,2,12,3
Mathilde/Maude de St. Liz died before 1163; Per Racines et Histoire possibly d. in 1140; per Genealogics d. 1158/1163; Med Lands says d. 1157/1163.4,5,6
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:701B.5 GAV-23 EDV-24 GKJ-23.

; Per Racines et Histoire: "Maud (Mahaud) de Senlis ° ~1094/96 ou 1102 (Tobridge, Kent) + 1140 (ou 1158/63 ?) Lady Braham ép. 1) ~1112/14 Robert FitzRichard de Clare, seigneur de Wodhamwater et de Dunmonn (fils de Richard FitzGilbert, Lord of Clare and Tonbridge, et de Rohaise Giffard)
     ép. 2) William d’Aubigny, earl of Albermale
     ép. 3) ~1134 Sahier de Quincy of Bushby, Lord Bladenham."20

; Per Med Lands:
     "MATILDA de Senlis (-[1157/63]). Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland names "Simon, Waldev and Matilda" as the children of Simon Earl of Huntingdon and his wife Matilda, commenting that they "are still young and in their infancy"[700]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Daventre priory records that “Symonis de Seynliz” had two sisters “quarum una…Matildis Seynliz” married “Robertus filius Ricardi”[701]. A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the marriage in 1112 of “Robertus filius Ricardi” and “Matildam de Sancto Lisio”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[702]. The Complete Peerage records her second marriage, citing Hatton’s Book of Seals for “proof of this marriage”, and in a later passage that “her charter of dower lands in Essex and London, bearing her seal, is witnessed by her sons Walter FitzRobert and Saher”[703]. The 1157/58 Pipe Roll records "Matildi de Seinliz" in Essex and Hertfordshire under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones", suggesting that this related to her dower land soon after the death of her husband[704]. A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1140 of “Matildis de Sancto Licio uxor Roberti filii Ricardi”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[705].
     "m firstly ([1112]) ROBERT FitzRichard de Clare Lord of Dunmow, son of RICHARD Lord of Clare and Tonbridge & his wife Rohese Giffard (-[1134], bur Priory of St Neot).
     "m secondly (1136) SAHER [I] de Quincy, son of --- (-[1156/58])."
Med Lands cites:
[700] Ingulph's Chronicle, p. 146.
[701] Dugdale Monasticon V, Davintre Priory, Northamptonshire, I, De prima Fundatione eiusdem, p. 178.
[702] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 147.
[703] CP XII/2 745, footnote e, citing Loyd, L. C. & Stenton, D. M. (1950) Christopher Hatton’s Book of Seals (Clarendon), no. 282 note [not yet consulted], and CP XII/2 746, footnote c quoting Loyd & Stenton (1950), no. 145.
[704] Pipe Roll 4 Hen II (1157), Essex and Hertfordshire, p. 133.
[705] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 147.6


Reference: Weis [1992:130] 148-25.10

Family 2

Saher de Quincy Lord of Daventry d. bt 1156 - 1157
Children

Citations

  1. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 157-1, p. 187. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 113-114, HUNTINGDON 3:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  3. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde|Maud de St.Liz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286798&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#MaudHuntingdondiedbefore1163. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon de St.Liz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286792&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#SimonHuntingdondied1111
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud of Huntingdon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00049982&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 148-25, p. 130. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 52, de CLARE 6.
  12. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, FitzWalter Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286797&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3D-K.htm#RobertFitzRichardClaredied1134
  15. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 49. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  16. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 209, de QUINCY 1.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Saher de Quency: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286799&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#SaherQuincydied1156
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Saher de Quency: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286799&tree=LEO
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs & Vidames de Senlis, Bouteiller de Senlis, p. 15: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Senlis.pdf
  21. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis MCS-5, line 157-2, p. 188.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice de Senlis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00397930&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Quency: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106757&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#RobertQuincydied1197
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Quincy - Cuinchy, Quinchy, Quincey, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Quincy.pdf
  26. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 209, de QUINCY 1:i.

Robert Fitz Richard de Clare Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex1,2

M, #4737, b. circa 1065, d. between 1134 and 1137
FatherRichard de Tonbridge ftiz Gilbert de Clare3,4,5,6,7,8 b. b 1035, d. c 1090
MotherRohese Giffard2,7,8 b. 1034, d. 1118
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     Robert Fitz Richard de Clare Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex was born circa 1065.2 He married Mathilde/Maude de St. Liz, daughter of Simon I de St. Liz 1st Earl of Huntingdon & Northampton and Maude (Matilda) de Huntingdon Queen of the Scots, Countess of Huntingdon & Northumberland, in 1112; her 1st husband.9,1,10,3,11,2,7,8,12,13
Robert Fitz Richard de Clare Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex was buried between 1134 and 1137 at St. Neots Priory, St. Neots, Huntingdonshire district, Cambridgeshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1064, Tonbridge, Tonbridge and Malling Borough, Kent, England
     DEATH     1136 (aged 71–72), Little Dunmow, Uttlesford District, Essex, England
     Robert Fitzrichard, Lord of Little Dunmow, Baron of Baynard, was a Norman landowner in England. His estates near Little Dunmow are said to have been given to him after confiscation from Ralph Baynard, who had them earlier. He was steward under Henry I of England and under Stephen of England. He served for a period as High Sheriff of Yorkshire. He was the son of Sir Richard Fitz Gilbert, Lord of Clare and Tonbridge (c. 1035–1090) and Rohese Giffard, (b. c. 1034), daughter of Sir Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville, and Agnes Flatel. He married (c. 1114), Maud de St. Liz, daughter of Sir Simon de St Liz, Earl of Northampton, and Maud de Huntingdon. Children were:
** Sir Walter Fitzrobert, (b. c. 1124).
** Maud Fitzrobert, (b. c. 1132), Essex, who married (c. 1146, William d'Aubigny, son of Sir William d'Aubigny, Lord of Belvoir, and Cecily Bigod.

     Family Members
     Parents
          Richard FitzGilbert 1030–1091
          Rohese De Giffard De Clare 1034–1118
     Siblings
          Gilbert De Clare 1055–1117
          Rohese FitzRichard 1060–1121
          Richard fitz Richard de Clare 1062–1107
          Walter De Clare 1075–1138
     Children
          Walter Fitzrobert 1130–1198
     BURIAL     St. Neots Priory, St Neots, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England
     Maintained by: Plantagenet Princess
     Originally Created by: Amanda
     Added: 14 Jun 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 112332279.14
Robert Fitz Richard de Clare Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex died between 1134 and 1137; Med Lands and Weis say d. 1134; Richardson says d. 1137; Racines et histoire says 1134; Genealogics says d. 1134/1136; Med Lands.15,1,11,2,7,8
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Robert Fitz Richard (1064–1136) was an Anglo-Norman feudal baron of Little Dunmow, Essex and constable of Baynard's Castle in the City of London. His feudal barony, the caput of which was at Little Dunmow in Essex, was granted to him by the king after it had been forfeited in 1110 by William Baynard, whose grandfather Ralph Baynard was the first holder and the builder of Baynard's Castle in the City of London.[1][2]
     "Robert was steward under King Henry I (1100–1135)[3] and under King Stephen (1135–1154).[4]
Family
     "Robert was the son of Sir Richard Fitz Gilbert, Lord of Clare and Tonbridge (c. 1030–1091) and Rohese Giffard, (b. c. 1034), daughter of Sir Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville, and Agnes Flatel. at an unknown age
     "Robert married (c. 1114), Matilda de St. Liz (Maud), daughter of Sir Simon de St Liz, Earl of Northampton, and Maud de Huntingdon.
     "Children were:
** Sir Walter Fitz Robert, (b. c. 1124), married Maud de Lucy. The Magna Carta surety, Robert Fitzwalter, was their son.
** Maud Fitz Robert, (b. c. 1132), Essex, who married (c. 1146), William d'Aubigny, son of Sir William d'Aubigny, Lord of Belvoir, and Cecily Bigod. Another Magna Carta surety, William d'Aubigny, was their son.[b]
Notes
Footnotes
a. Agnes Flatel was the daughter of Girard Flatel. [5]
b. See Thaler, D. -- Descendants of William D'Aubigny
Citations
1. Sanders 1960, p. 129-130.
2. Domesday Survey .
3. DNB 1889, p. 19:219.
4. Amt 1993, p. 66.
5. Butler 1997, p. 570.
References
** Amt, Emilie (1993). The Accession of Henry II in England: Royal Government Restored, 1149–1159. Boydell & Brewer. p. 66. ISBN 0-85115-348-8.
** Butler, Edward (1997). The Descendants of Thomas Pincerna, Progenitor of the Butler Family. E.F. Butler with assistance by GenPub. p. 570.
** Sanders, I.J. (1960). English Baronies, Little Dunmow. Oxford. pp. 129–130.
** Stephen, Leslie, ed. (1889). "Fitzwalter, Robert" . Dictionary of National Biography. 19. London: Smith, Elder & Co. p. 219."16

Robert Fitz Richard de Clare Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex lived at Little Dunmow, co. Essex, England.9 He was Steward to King Henry I, Lord of Dunmow.7

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT FitzRichard de Clare, son of RICHARD de Brionne Lord of Clare and Tonbridge [Normandy] & his wife Rohese Giffard (-[1134], bur Priory of St Neot). Guillaume of Jumièges names “Richardum strenuissimum militem” as the son of “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis”, adding that he donated property to Bec with “filii eius Gislebertus, Rogerius, Walterius, Rodbertus”[159]. Orderic Vitalis names “Rogerium et Gislebertum, Gualterium et Rodbertum atque Ricardum” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filium] Ricardum” and his wife “Roaldem Gualterii Gifardi filiam”[160]. Henry I King of England granted him the fiefdom of Little Dunmow, Essex[161]. A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1134 of “Robertus filius Ricardi, primus patronus canonicorum de Dunmawe” and his burial “apud Sanctum Neotum”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[162].
     "m ([1112]) as her first husband, MATILDA de Senlis, daughter of SIMON de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton & his wife Matilda of Huntingdon (-before 1163). Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland names "Simon, Waldev and Matilda" as the children of Simon Earl of Huntingdon and his wife Matilda, commenting that they "are still young and in their infancy"[163]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Daventre priory records that “Symonis de Seynliz” had two sisters “quarum una…Matildis Seynliz” married “Robertus filius Ricardi”, but does not name the second sister[164]. A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the marriage in 1112 of “Robertus filius Ricardi” and “Matildam de Sancto Lisio”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[165]. She married secondly (1136) Saher de Quincy. The Complete Peerage records her second marriage, citing Hatton’s Book of Seals for “proof of this marriage”, and in a later passage that “her charter of dower lands in Essex and London, bearing her seal, is witnessed by her sons Walter FitzRobert and Saher”[166]. The 1157/58 Pipe Roll records "Matildi de Seinliz" in Essex and Hertfordshire under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones", suggesting that this related to her dower land soon after the death of her husband[167]. A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1140 of “Matildis de Sancto Licio uxor Roberti filii Ricardi”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[168].
     "Robert FitzRichard & his wife had [four] children."
Med Lands cites:
[159] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber IV, XVIII, p. 247.
[160] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XIII, p. 344.
[161] Domesday Descendants, p. 399.
[162] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 147.
[163] Ingulph's Chronicle, p. 146.
[164] Dugdale Monasticon V, Davintre Priory, Northamptonshire, I, De prima Fundatione eiusdem, p. 178.
[165] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 147.
[166] CP XII/2 745, footnote e, citing Loyd, L. C. & Stenton, D. M. (1950) Christopher Hatton’s Book of Seals (Clarendon), no. 282 note [not yet consulted], and CP XII/2 746, footnote c quoting Loyd & Stenton (1950), no. 145.
[167] Pipe Roll 4 Hen II (1157), Essex and Hertfordshire, p. 133.
[168] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 147.8


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard. 119.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:701B.7


Reference: Weis [1992] 148-25.17

; Per Racines et Histoire: "Robert FitzRichard de Clare ° ~1065 + 1134 Steward du roi Henri 1er, créé Lord of Little Dunmow (Essex) par le roi,
     ép. 1112 Maud (Mathilde) de Saint-Liz ou St Liz (Senlis) + avant 1163 (1140 ?) (fille de Simon, earl of Huntingdon and Northampton, et de Maud de Huntingdon ; elle ép. 2) 1136 Saher de Quincy)
     postérité FitzRichard."4 GAV-23 EDV-24 GKJ-23.18 He was steward of King Henry II.9 He was (an unknown value) at Lord Little Dunmow, co. Essex, England.18

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 52, de CLARE 6. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, FitzWalter Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Eu.pdf
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106210&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntac.htm#RichardBrionneClaredied1090B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286797&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3D-K.htm#RobertFitzRichardClaredied1134
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 148-25, p. 130. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 113-114, HUNTINGDON 3:ii.
  11. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde|Maud de St.Liz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286798&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#MaudHuntingdondiedbefore1163
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 March 2020), memorial page for Robert FitzRichard De Clare (1064–1136), Find A Grave Memorial no. 112332279, citing St. Neots Priory, St Neots, Huntingdonshire District, Cambridgeshire, England ; Maintained by Plantagenet Princess (contributor 49922906), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/112332279/robert-fitzrichard-de_clare. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 157-1, p. 187. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Fitz_Richard. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, Line 148-25.
  18. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  19. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis MCS-5, line 157-2, p. 188.

Saher de Quincy Lord of Daventry1,2

M, #4738, d. between 1156 and 1157
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Saher de Quincy Lord of Daventry married Asceline Peverel; his 2nd wife.3 Saher de Quincy Lord of Daventry married Mathilde/Maude de St. Liz, daughter of Simon I de St. Liz 1st Earl of Huntingdon & Northampton and Maude (Matilda) de Huntingdon Queen of the Scots, Countess of Huntingdon & Northumberland, after 1136; her 2nd husband.4,5,6,1,2,3,7,8,9,10,11
Saher de Quincy Lord of Daventry died between 1156 and 1157.3,10
     ; Per Racines et Histoire: "Sahier 1er de Quincy ° ~ 1090/96 ou 1100 (Quincy) + 1156/57 Lord of Bradenham (ou Bradham)
     ép. après 1136 Mathilde de Senlis (alias Maud of St.-Liz) ° ~1091/94 + 1140 (fille de Simon 1er et de Mathilda, comtesse de Huntingdon et de Northumberland ; belle-fille de David 1er d’Ecosse.)12"

; Per Genealogics:
     "The family of de Quincy had arrived in England after the Norman Conquest, and took their name from Cuinchy in the _arrondisement_ of Béthune; the personal name 'Saer' was used by them over several generations. Both names are variously spelled in primary sources and older modern works, the first name being sometimes rendered Saher or Seer, and the surname as Quency or Quenci.
     "The first recorded Saher de Quency was lord of the manor of Long Buckby in Northamptonshire in the earlier twelfth century, and second husband of Mathilde/Maud de St.Liz, stepdaughter of David I 'the Saint', king of Scots, by Maud of Huntingdon. This marriage produced two sons, Saher and Robert, and a daughter Alice, who would all have progeny. It was Robert, the younger son, who was the father of the Saher de Quincy, who eventually became earl of Winchester. By her first husband Robert de Clare, lord of Dynmow and steward to King Henry I, Mathilde was also the paternal grandmother of Earl Saher's close ally, Robert FitzWalter, baron of Little Dunmow, like Earl Saher a Magna Carta Surety.
     "Saher died between 1156 and 1158."11

; Per Med Lands:
     "SAHER [I] de Quincy, son of --- (-[1156/57]). He held land at Long Buckley, Northamptonshire in [1124/29][5]. “Seherus de Quinci” donated property to Dunmow Priory, for the soul of “Saheri filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by “Richardus, et Quincy…”[6]. His date of death is indicated by the 1157 Pipe Roll which records "Sahero de Quenci" in Northamptonshire under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones", presumably referring to his son who had newly inherited his father´s lands[7].
     "m (after 1136) as her second husband, MATILDA de Senlis, widow of ROBERT FitzRichard de Clare, daughter of SIMON de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton & his wife Matilda [Maud] of Huntingdon (-[1157/63]). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Daventre priory records that “Symonis de Seynliz” had two sisters “quarum una…Matildis Seynliz” married “Robertus filius Ricardi”[8]. A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the marriage in 1112 of “Robertus filius Ricardi” and “Matildam de Sancto Lisio”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[9]. The Complete Peerage records her second marriage, citing Hatton´s Book of Seals for “proof of this marriage”, and in a later passage that “her charter of dower lands in Essex and London, bearing her seal, is witnessed by her sons Walter FitzRobert and Saher”[10]. The 1157/58 Pipe Roll records "Matildi de Seinliz" in Essex and Hertfordshire under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones", suggesting that this related to her dower land soon after the death of her husband[11]. A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1140 of “Matildis de Sancto Licio uxor Roberti filii Ricardi”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[12].
     "Saher [I] & his wife had [three] children."
Med Lands cites:
[5] CP XII/2 745, and Domesday Descendants, p. 652.
[6] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, II, p. 148.
[7] Pipe Roll 4 Hen II (1157), Northamptonshire, p. 142.
[8] Dugdale Monasticon V, Davintre Priory, Northamptonshire, I, De prima Fundatione eiusdem, p. 178.
[9] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 147.
[10] CP XII/2 745, footnote e, citing Loyd, L. C. & Stenton, D. M. (1950) Christopher Hatton’s Book of Seals (Clarendon), no. 282 note [not yet consulted], and CP XII/2 746, footnote c quoting Loyd & Stenton (1950), no. 145.
[11] Pipe Roll 4 Hen II (1157), Essex and Hertfordshire, p. 133.
[12] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 147.10
He was Lord of Buckley & Daventry.13 GAV-23 EDV-24 GKJ23.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: III 701B/708.2

Reference: Weis [1992:58] 53-27.14

Family 1

Asceline Peverel

Family 2

Mathilde/Maude de St. Liz d. b 1163
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 209, de QUINCY 1. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Saher de Quency: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286799&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  4. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 49. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  5. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 52, de CLARE 6.
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 113-114, HUNTINGDON 3:ii.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 10. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde|Maud de St.Liz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286798&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#MaudHuntingdondiedbefore1163. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#SaherQuincydied1156
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Saher de Quency: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286799&tree=LEO
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Quincy, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Quincy.pdf
  13. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 53-27, p. 58. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice de Senlis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00397930&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Quency: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106757&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#RobertQuincydied1197
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Quincy - Cuinchy, Quinchy, Quincey, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Quincy.pdf
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 209, de QUINCY 1:i.

Robert I de Quincy Lord of Buckley and Fawside1

M, #4739, b. circa 1138, d. before 29 September 1197
FatherSaher de Quincy Lord of Daventry2,3,4,5,6 d. bt 1156 - 1157
MotherMathilde/Maude de St. Liz7,4,5,6 d. b 1163
ReferenceGAV22 EDV23
Last Edited10 Aug 2020
     Robert I de Quincy Lord of Buckley and Fawside married Eve Fitz Uchtred of Galloway, daughter of Uchtred (?) Lord of Galloway and Gunnild (?) of Dunbar;
His 2nd wife; her 1st husband.1,8,4,5,9 Robert I de Quincy Lord of Buckley and Fawside was born circa 1138; Genealogics says b. ca 1138; Med Lands says b. 1140; Racines et Histoire (Quincy) says b. ca 1125.4,5,6 He married Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers, daughter of Nes (?) of Leuchers, in 1162;
His 1st wife; her 1st husband.10,8,4,5,6,11 Robert I de Quincy Lord of Buckley and Fawside and Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers were divorced.8
Robert I de Quincy Lord of Buckley and Fawside died before 29 September 1197; Genealogics says d. 1197; Med Lands says d. aft 1200; Boyer says d. 29 Sep 1197; Racines et Histoire (Quicny) says d. bef Mar 1197.1,4,5,6
     GAV-22 EDV-23 GKJ-22.

; This is the same person as ”Robert de Quincy” at Wikipedia (DK).12

; Per Genealogics:
     “Robert was the son of Saher de Quency, lord of Daventry, and Mathilde/Maud de St.Liz. He seems to have inherited no English lands from his father, and pursued a knightly career in Scotland, where he is recorded from around 1160 as a close companion of his cousin William 'the Lion', king of Scots. He had married Orable, heiress of the Scottish lordship of Leuchars, and through her he became lord of an extensive complex of estates north of the border which included lands in Fife, Strathearn and Lothian. They had two sons, Saher and Robert, who would have progeny.
     “Robert is recorded with a second wife Eve, but no progeny is recorded. Some records give as 1197 when he died.”.4 He was Lord of Buckley & Fawside.13

Reference: Genealogics cites: The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XII 747.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT ([1140]-after 1200). He went to Scotland and through his first marriage obtained lands in Fife, Perth and Lothian, and was granted the castle of Forfar by his cousin (through his mother) William "the Lion" King of Scotland. He accompanied Richard I King of England on crusade in 1190 and participated in the capture of Antioch in Jul 1191[20]. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "in perdonis Roberto de Quency, xl s de scutagio suo de Bukkeby" in Northamptonshire and granted delay in payment per brevia in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[21]. "…Robertus de Quinci, Seierus de Quinci…" were the first two lay witnesses (signing before the members of the donors´ family) of the charter dated 1200 which records the foundation of Inchaffray Abbey by "Gilbertus filius Ferthead…comes de Stradern et…Matilidis filia Willelmi de Aubengni comitissa"[22]. The connection between the Quincy family and the earls of Strathearn has not yet been established.
     "m firstly ([1160/70], separated) as her first husband, ORABILIS, daughter of NES of Mar & his wife --- (-before 30 Jun 1203). "Nesius filius Willi et Orabile filia sua heres" donated "ecclesiam de Losresc" to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter[23]. Her first marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Seherus de Quency comes Wintonie" donated "totam terram de Duglyn", held by "Nesus filius Willelmi avus meus" to Cambuskenneth priory[24]. She married secondly [Morgund] Earl of Mar. Her second marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Orabilis comitissa de Mar filia Nesii filii Willi" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Lochres" made by "pater meus Nesius filius Willi" to St Andrew´s priory, witnessed by "Duncano comite de Fif…"[25]. The question of the precise identity of Orabilis´s second husband is discussed in the document SCOTLAND MORMAERS, EARLS & LORDS. She married thirdly Adam of Fife. Her third marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Nesius filius Willelmi" donated "ecclesiam de Lochres" to St Andrew´s priory witnessed by "Dunecano comite de Fif…Adam filio Dunec et Horabili sponsa sua…"[26]. There seems little doubt that the witness was Orabilis, daughter of the donor, and her third husband as the name is so unusual. "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated property to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…Patricio filio Nesii, Dunc filio Elin…"[27]. "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated "Davach ictar Hathyn" to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…G. com de Mar…Patricio filio Nesii, Duncan filio Emelin…"[28]. Pope Innocent III confirmed the possessions of Inchaffray Abbey, including the donation of land "in territorio de Gasgt" by "quondam Orable matris Seer de Quinci", by bull dated 30 Jun 1203[29]. Orabilis presumably died before her first husband, given the undated charter under which her son "Seerus de Quinci" confirmed the donation of "Davac Icthar Hathyn" made by "matris mea" to St Andrew´s priory which was witnessed by "…Roberto de Quincy patre meo…"[30].
     "m secondly as her first husband, EVA, daughter of ---. "Eua quondam uxor Roberti de Quinci" donated property "de Edmundesten" to Melrose abbey, for the souls of "dominorum meorum Robti de Quinci et Walteri de Berkeley et Rolandi fratris mei et Johis filii mei et Christine sororis mee", to Melrose abbey by undated charter[31]. Eva was the sister of Christine, wife of William de Brus of Annandale (see the document SCOTLAND KINGS) and second wife of Patrick Earl of Dunbar (see SCOTLAND, MORMAERS, EARLS & LORDS). She married secondly Walter de Berkeley."
Med Lands cites:
[20] CP XII/2 747.
[21] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 82 and 91.
[22] Inchaffray, IX, p. 6.
[23] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 254.
[24] Cambuskenneth, 70, p. 92.
[25] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 287.
[26] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 287.
[27] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 290.
[28] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 290.
[29] Inchaffray, XXI, p. 19.
[30] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 291.
[31] Melrose Liber, Tome I, 49, p. 40.5


; Per Racines et Histoire (Quincy): “Robert 1er de Quincy ° ~ 1125 (Winchester ou Long Buckleys, Northants) + avant 03/1197 Lord of Buckley, réside à Winchester (Hampshire), seigneur de Tranent (East Lothian) et de terres dans le Fife et le Strathearn
     ép.1138 Orabella Leuchars de Mar ° ~1131 (Leuchars, Ecosse) + 30/06/1203 (fille de Ralph Ness)”.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "ORABILIS (-before 30 Jun 1203). "Nesius filius Willi et Orabile filia sua heres" donated "ecclesiam de Losresc" to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter[393]. Her first marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Seherus de Quency comes Wintonie" donated "totam terram de Duglyn", held by "Nesus filius Willelmi avus meus" to Cambuskenneth priory[394]. Her second marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Orabilis comitissa de Mar filia Nesii filii Willi" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Lochres" made by "pater meus Nesius filius Willi" to St Andrew’s priory, witnessed by "Duncano comite de Fif…"[395]. Her third marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Nesius filius Willelmi" donated "ecclesiam de Lochres" to St Andrew’s priory witnessed by "Dunecano comite de Fif…Adam filio Dunec et Horabili sponsa sua…"[396]. There seems little doubt that the witness was Orabilis, daughter of the donor, and her third husband, as the name is so unusual. "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated property to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…Patricio filio Nesii, Dunc filio Elin…"[397]. "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated "Davach ictar Hathyn" to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…G. com de Mar…Patricio filio Nesii, Duncan filio Emelin…"[398]. Pope Innocent III confirmed the possessions of Inchaffray Abbey, including the donation of land "in territorio de Gasgt" by "quondam Orable matris Seer de Quinci", by bull dated 30 Jun 1203[399]. Orabilis presumably died before her first husband, given the undated charter under which her son "Seerus de Quinci" confirmed the donation of "Davac Icthar Hathyn" made by "matris mea" to St Andrew’s priory which was witnessed by "…Roberto de Quincy patre meo…"[400].
     "m firstly ([1160/70], separated) as his first wife, ROBERT de Quincy, son of SAHER de Quincy & his wife Maud de Senlis ([1140]-after 1200).
     "m secondly --- Earl of Mar, son of ---. The Complete Peerage says that "it has been asserted" that Orabilis’s second husband was Gilchrist Earl of Mar, but adds that "the chronology is difficult"[401]. The chronology in fact appears impossible: Earl Gilchrist is recorded up to 1199, whereas Orabilis is named with her [third] husband in a charter of her father which, although undated, is probably not dated much later than 1177. It seems more likely that Orabilis’s second husband was Morgund Earl of Mar (-[1177/30 Mar 1183]), which if correct means that she was his second wife. An alternative possibility is that Orabilis’s second and third husbands were in fact reversed, which is the assumption of Balfour Paul[402].
     "m thirdly ADAM of Fife, son of DUNCAN Macduff Earl of Fife & his wife ---."
Med Lands cites:
[393] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 254.
[394] Fraser, W. (ed.) (1872) Registrum Monasterii S. Marie de Cambuskenneth (Edinburgh) ("Cambuskenneth"), 70, p. 92.
[395] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 287.
[396] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 287.
[397] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 290.
[398] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 290.
[399] Inchaffray, XXI, p. 19.
[400] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 291.
[401] CP VIII 399.
[402] Balfour Paul The Scots Peerage, Vol. IV, Fife, p. 6.14
He was Crusader - accompanied King Richard I of England to the Holand Land in 1190, was Constable of a force to take aid to Antioch in July 1191, and was sent with the Duke of Burgundy to Tyre to collect prisoners from Philip Augustus that August. in 1190.1

Family 3

Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers b. c 1135, d. b 30 Jun 1203
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 209, de QUINCY 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#SaherQuincydied1156. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Saher de Quency: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286799&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Quency: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106757&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#RobertQuincydied1197
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Quincy - Cuinchy, Quinchy, Quincey, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Quincy.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde|Maud de St.Liz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00286798&tree=LEO
  8. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eve: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106759&tree=LEO
  10. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 49. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Orable: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106758&tree=LEO
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Quincy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#OrabilisMRobertQuincy
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 209, de QUINCY 2:iv.
  16. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 209, de QUINCY 2:iii.
  17. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 60-28, pp. 65-66. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Saher de Quency: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106762&tree=LEO
  19. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 209, de QUINCY 2:ii.

Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers1,2,3

F, #4740, b. circa 1135, d. before 30 June 1203
FatherNes (?) of Leuchers1,4,5,6 b. c 1107, d. a 1177
ReferenceGAV22 EDV23
Last Edited23 Dec 2020
     Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers married Morgund MacGylocher (?) Earl of Mar, son of Gille Chlerig (?) Earl of Mar;
His 2nd wife; her 1st husband.4 Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers married Adam Macduff of Fife, son of Duncan I "Dhonnchad" Macduff Mormaer (Earl) of Fife;
Her 3rd husband.7,4 Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers was born circa 1135 at Leuchars, Scotland; Racines et Histoire (Quincy) says b. ca 1131.8,9 She married Robert I de Quincy Lord of Buckley and Fawside, son of Saher de Quincy Lord of Daventry and Mathilde/Maude de St. Liz, in 1162;
His 1st wife; her 1st husband.10,11,12,13,9,5 Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers and Robert I de Quincy Lord of Buckley and Fawside were divorced.11
Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers died before 30 June 1203.10,9
Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers died before 30 June 1203.4
     ; Per Racines et Histoire (Quincy): “Robert 1er de Quincy ° ~ 1125 (Winchester ou Long Buckleys, Northants) + avant 03/1197 Lord of Buckley, réside à Winchester (Hampshire), seigneur de Tranent (East Lothian) et de terres dans le Fife et le Strathearn
     ép.1138 Orabella Leuchars de Mar ° ~1131 (Leuchars, Ecosse) + 30/06/1203 (fille de Ralph Ness)”.9

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT ([1140]-after 1200). He went to Scotland and through his first marriage obtained lands in Fife, Perth and Lothian, and was granted the castle of Forfar by his cousin (through his mother) William "the Lion" King of Scotland. He accompanied Richard I King of England on crusade in 1190 and participated in the capture of Antioch in Jul 1191[20]. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "in perdonis Roberto de Quency, xl s de scutagio suo de Bukkeby" in Northamptonshire and granted delay in payment per brevia in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[21]. "…Robertus de Quinci, Seierus de Quinci…" were the first two lay witnesses (signing before the members of the donors´ family) of the charter dated 1200 which records the foundation of Inchaffray Abbey by "Gilbertus filius Ferthead…comes de Stradern et…Matilidis filia Willelmi de Aubengni comitissa"[22]. The connection between the Quincy family and the earls of Strathearn has not yet been established.
     "m firstly ([1160/70], separated) as her first husband, ORABILIS, daughter of NES of Mar & his wife --- (-before 30 Jun 1203). "Nesius filius Willi et Orabile filia sua heres" donated "ecclesiam de Losresc" to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter[23]. Her first marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Seherus de Quency comes Wintonie" donated "totam terram de Duglyn", held by "Nesus filius Willelmi avus meus" to Cambuskenneth priory[24]. She married secondly [Morgund] Earl of Mar. Her second marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Orabilis comitissa de Mar filia Nesii filii Willi" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Lochres" made by "pater meus Nesius filius Willi" to St Andrew´s priory, witnessed by "Duncano comite de Fif…"[25]. The question of the precise identity of Orabilis´s second husband is discussed in the document SCOTLAND MORMAERS, EARLS & LORDS. She married thirdly Adam of Fife. Her third marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Nesius filius Willelmi" donated "ecclesiam de Lochres" to St Andrew´s priory witnessed by "Dunecano comite de Fif…Adam filio Dunec et Horabili sponsa sua…"[26]. There seems little doubt that the witness was Orabilis, daughter of the donor, and her third husband as the name is so unusual. "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated property to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…Patricio filio Nesii, Dunc filio Elin…"[27]. "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated "Davach ictar Hathyn" to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…G. com de Mar…Patricio filio Nesii, Duncan filio Emelin…"[28]. Pope Innocent III confirmed the possessions of Inchaffray Abbey, including the donation of land "in territorio de Gasgt" by "quondam Orable matris Seer de Quinci", by bull dated 30 Jun 1203[29]. Orabilis presumably died before her first husband, given the undated charter under which her son "Seerus de Quinci" confirmed the donation of "Davac Icthar Hathyn" made by "matris mea" to St Andrew´s priory which was witnessed by "…Roberto de Quincy patre meo…"[30].
     "m secondly as her first husband, EVA, daughter of ---. "Eua quondam uxor Roberti de Quinci" donated property "de Edmundesten" to Melrose abbey, for the souls of "dominorum meorum Robti de Quinci et Walteri de Berkeley et Rolandi fratris mei et Johis filii mei et Christine sororis mee", to Melrose abbey by undated charter[31]. Eva was the sister of Christine, wife of William de Brus of Annandale (see the document SCOTLAND KINGS) and second wife of Patrick Earl of Dunbar (see SCOTLAND, MORMAERS, EARLS & LORDS). She married secondly Walter de Berkeley."
Med Lands cites:
[20] CP XII/2 747.
[21] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 82 and 91.
[22] Inchaffray, IX, p. 6.
[23] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 254.
[24] Cambuskenneth, 70, p. 92.
[25] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 287.
[26] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 287.
[27] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 290.
[28] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 290.
[29] Inchaffray, XXI, p. 19.
[30] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 291.
[31] Melrose Liber, Tome I, 49, p. 40.13


Reference: Weis [1992:58] Line 53-27.14

Reference: Genealogics cites: The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XII 747.5 GAV-22 EDV-23 GKJ-22. Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers was also known as Orabilis (?)4 Orabella fiiz Ness (?) of Leuchers was also known as Orabel fitz Ness.11

; Per Med Lands:
     "ORABILIS (-before 30 Jun 1203). "Nesius filius Willi et Orabile filia sua heres" donated "ecclesiam de Losresc" to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter[393]. Her first marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Seherus de Quency comes Wintonie" donated "totam terram de Duglyn", held by "Nesus filius Willelmi avus meus" to Cambuskenneth priory[394]. Her second marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Orabilis comitissa de Mar filia Nesii filii Willi" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Lochres" made by "pater meus Nesius filius Willi" to St Andrew’s priory, witnessed by "Duncano comite de Fif…"[395]. Her third marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Nesius filius Willelmi" donated "ecclesiam de Lochres" to St Andrew’s priory witnessed by "Dunecano comite de Fif…Adam filio Dunec et Horabili sponsa sua…"[396]. There seems little doubt that the witness was Orabilis, daughter of the donor, and her third husband, as the name is so unusual. "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated property to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…Patricio filio Nesii, Dunc filio Elin…"[397]. "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated "Davach ictar Hathyn" to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…G. com de Mar…Patricio filio Nesii, Duncan filio Emelin…"[398]. Pope Innocent III confirmed the possessions of Inchaffray Abbey, including the donation of land "in territorio de Gasgt" by "quondam Orable matris Seer de Quinci", by bull dated 30 Jun 1203[399]. Orabilis presumably died before her first husband, given the undated charter under which her son "Seerus de Quinci" confirmed the donation of "Davac Icthar Hathyn" made by "matris mea" to St Andrew’s priory which was witnessed by "…Roberto de Quincy patre meo…"[400].
     "m firstly ([1160/70], separated) as his first wife, ROBERT de Quincy, son of SAHER de Quincy & his wife Maud de Senlis ([1140]-after 1200).
     "m secondly --- Earl of Mar, son of ---. The Complete Peerage says that "it has been asserted" that Orabilis’s second husband was Gilchrist Earl of Mar, but adds that "the chronology is difficult"[401]. The chronology in fact appears impossible: Earl Gilchrist is recorded up to 1199, whereas Orabilis is named with her [third] husband in a charter of her father which, although undated, is probably not dated much later than 1177. It seems more likely that Orabilis’s second husband was Morgund Earl of Mar (-[1177/30 Mar 1183]), which if correct means that she was his second wife. An alternative possibility is that Orabilis’s second and third husbands were in fact reversed, which is the assumption of Balfour Paul[402].
     "m thirdly ADAM of Fife, son of DUNCAN Macduff Earl of Fife & his wife ---."
Med Lands cites:
[393] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 254.
[394] Fraser, W. (ed.) (1872) Registrum Monasterii S. Marie de Cambuskenneth (Edinburgh) ("Cambuskenneth"), 70, p. 92.
[395] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 287.
[396] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 287.
[397] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 290.
[398] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 290.
[399] Inchaffray, XXI, p. 19.
[400] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 291.
[401] CP VIII 399.
[402] Balfour Paul The Scots Peerage, Vol. IV, Fife, p. 6.4


; Per Med Lands:
     "ADAM ). "William Masculus de Foules" donated "capellam de Foules" to the church of St Andrew’s by undated charter witnessed by "Comite Duncano, Adam fratre comitis…"[292]. "Dunecanus comes de Fif" donated "ecclesiam de Cupre" to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter witnessed by "Hela comitissa, Adam fratre comitis…"[293]. "Dunecanus comes de Fif" donated "ecclesiam de Marchinch" to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter witnessed by "Hela comitissa…Adam clerico fratre comitis…"[294]. "Malcolmus filius Dunecani comitis de Fif" confirmed the donations of "ecclesiam de Cupre…Marking…Sconin, capellam de Katel" made to St Andrew’s priory by "Dunecanus comes pater meus", by undated charter but presumably dated to soon after his father’s death, witnessed by "…Adam fratre comitis…"[295]. "Nesius filius Willelmi" donated "ecclesiam de Lochres" to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter witnessed by "Dunecano comite de Fif…Adam filio Dunec et Horabili sponsa sua…"[296]. The date of his death is not known.
     "m as her [third] husband, ORABILIS, separated wife firstly of ROBERT de Quincy, widow [secondly] of [MORGUND] Earl of Mar, daughter of NES of Mar and his wife --- (-before 30 Jun 1203). "Nesius filius Willi et Orabile filia sua heres" donated "ecclesiam de Losresc" to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter[297]. Her first marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Seherus de Quency comes Wintonie" donated "totam terram de Duglyn", held by "Nesus filius Willelmi avus meus" to Cambuskenneth priory[298]. Her second marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Orabilis comitissa de Mar filia Nesii filii Willi" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Lochres" made by "pater meus Nesius filius Willi" to St Andrew’s priory, witnessed by "Duncano comite de Fif…"[299]. The question of the precise identity of Orabilis’s second husband is discussed below. Her third marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Nesius filius Willelmi" donated "ecclesiam de Lochres" to St Andrew’s priory witnessed by "Dunecano comite de Fif…Adam filio Dunec et Horabili sponsa sua…"[300]. There seems little doubt that the witness was Orabilis, daughter of the donor, and her third husband, as the name is so unusual. "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated property to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…Patricio filio Nesii, Dunc filio Elin…"[301]. "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated "Davach ictar Hathyn" to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…G. com de Mar…Patricio filio Nesii, Duncan filio Emelin…"[302]. Pope Innocent III confirmed the possessions of Inchaffray Abbey, including the donation of land "in territorio de Gasgt" by "quondam Orable matris Seer de Quinci", by bull dated 30 Jun 1203[303]. Orabilis presumably died before her first husband, given the undated charter under which her son "Seerus de Quinci" confirmed the donation of "Davac Icthar Hathyn" made by "matris mea" to St Andrew’s priory which was witnessed by "…Roberto de Quincy patre meo…"[304]."
Med Lands cites:
[292] Stuart, J. (ed.) (1874) Registrum de Panmure compiled by Harry Maule of Kelly 1733 (Edinburgh), Vol. II, p. 79.
[293] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 241.
[294] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 242.
[295] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 244.
[296] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 287.
[297] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 254.
[298] Fraser, W. (ed.) (1872) Registrum Monasterii S. Marie de Cambuskenneth (Edinburgh) ("Cambuskenneth"), 70, p. 92.
[299] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 287.
[300] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 287.
[301] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 290.
[302] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 290.
[303] Lindsay, W. A., Dowden, D. Thomson, J. M. (eds.) (1908) Charters, Bulls and other documents relating to the Abbey of Inchaffray, Publications of the Scottish History Society Vol. LVI (Edinburgh) ("Inchaffray"), XXI, p. 19.
[304] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 291.7

Family 2

Robert I de Quincy Lord of Buckley and Fawside b. c 1138, d. b 29 Sep 1197
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 209, de QUINCY 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Orable: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106758&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 60-28, pp. 65-66. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#OrabilisMRobertQuincy. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Orable: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106758&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Nes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106761&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#AdamFifediedafter1203
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I1102
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Quincy - Cuinchy, Quinchy, Quincey, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Quincy.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 49. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  11. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Quency: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106757&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#RobertQuincydied1197
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, p. 58.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Saher de Quency: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106762&tree=LEO
  16. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 209, de QUINCY 2:ii.