Margaret BrassieurBrashier

F, #4921, b. July 1642, d. 7 October 1708
FatherRobert Brazier d. 16 Dec 1665
MotherElizabeth Fowke b. 1596
Last Edited17 Oct 2001
     Margaret BrassieurBrashier married Thomas Jordan Jr., son of Thomas Jordan. Margaret BrassieurBrashier was born in July 1642 at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, USA.
Margaret BrassieurBrashier died on 7 October 1708 at age 66.

Family

Thomas Jordan Jr. b. 1634, d. 10 Aug 1699

Richard Jordan

M, #4922, b. 1638
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Richard Jordan was born in 1638 at Chuckatuck, Nansemond Co., Virginia, USA.1 He married Elizabeth Reynolds in 1654.1
     

Citations

  1. [S615] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 16, Ed. 1, Family # 2144 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).

Elizabeth Reynolds

F, #4923
Last Edited29 May 2001
     Elizabeth Reynolds married Richard Jordan in 1654.1
     

Family

Richard Jordan b. 1638

Citations

  1. [S615] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 16, Ed. 1, Family # 2144 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).

Emma D. Burton1

F, #4924, b. circa 1847, d. 27 May 1924
Last Edited15 Dec 2017
     Emma D. Burton was born circa 1847 at Tennessee, USA; Age 77 at death.1 She married James M. Hudson, son of Washington Banks Hudson and Louisa Marksberry, on 7 December 1865 at Davidson Co., Tennessee, USA.1
Emma D. Burton died on 27 May 1924 at Nashville, Davidson Co., Tennessee, USA.1
Emma D. Burton was buried on 28 May 1924 at Spring Hill Cemetery, Nashville, Davidson Co., Tennessee, USA,

; from Find A Grave:
     Birth:      unknown, Tennessee, USA
     Death:      May 27, 1924, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, USA
     Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1950: James M Hudson married Emma D Burton December 7 1865 in Davidson CO TN
     Tennessee Death Index, 1874-1955
      Name: Emma B Hudson [Emma B Burton]
      Birth Date: abt 1847
      Birth Place: Tennessee
      Age: 77
      Death Date: 27 May 1924
      Death Place: Nashville, Davidson, Tennessee
      Burial Date: 28 May 1924
      Cemetery Name: Springhill
      Gender: Female
      Race: White
      Marital Status: Widowed
      Father's name: Robt Burton
      Father's Birth Place: Tennessee
      Mother's name: Donoldson
      Mother's Birth Place: Tennessee
     1910 Davidson CO TN, James W(M) Hudson, age 68, Emma B, age 63. James born in KY, Emma in TN. In Census 1880-1900-1910. None show any children.
     Family links: Spouse: James M. Hudson (1842 - 1918)
     Burial: Spring Hill Cemetery, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, USA
     Created by: MN
     Record added: Feb 12, 2016
     Find A Grave Memorial# 158087426.1
     Emma D. Burton and James M. Hudson appeared in the census of 7 June 1880 at District 20, Davidson Co., Tennessee, USA; p. 310-B, Lines 1-2, dwelling 44, family 52
     1 HUDSON, Jas. M. W M 38 [1842] Married Farmer KY KY KY
     2 " , Emma C. W F 31 [1849] Wife Married Keeping House TN NC TN
     3 THOMPSON, Logan Black M 22 [1858] Servant Single Servant TN TN TN
     4 JOINER, Betty Black F 25 [1855] Servant Single Servant TN TN TN
     5 " , Nick Black M 1 Mar 1879 Single TN TN TN.2

Emma D. Burton and James M. Hudson appeared in the census of 7 July 1880 at District 20, Goodlettsville, Davidson Co., Tennessee, USA; p. 106-B, lines 30-31, dwelling 168, family 178
     30 HUDSON, James 28 [1842] M W Farmer $3620 $700 KY
     31 " , Emma 21 [1849] F W Keeping House TN.3

Emma D. Burton and James M. Hudson appeared in the census of 18 June 1900 at Ward 18, District 110, 811 Boscoball St., Nashville, Davidson Co., Tennessee, USA; [James and Emma appear to be living in the house of Robert N. NEIL and his family, a wholesale grocery
p. 20-B, lines 99-100, dwelling 373, family 459
     99 HUDSON, James M. Head W M Apr 1842 58 Married Married 35yrs KY KY KY Retired Merchant
     100 " , Emma Wife W F July 1848 51 Married 35yrs TN NC TN.4

Emma D. Burton and James M. Hudson appeared in the census of 26 April 1910 at Civil District 10, Davidson Co., Tennessee, USA; p. 10-B, lines 99-100, dwelling 203, family 203
     99 HUDSON, James W. Head M W 68 [1842] Married 1x 45yrs TN KY KY Farner Own Farm
     100 " , Emma B. Wife F W 63 [1847] Married 1x 45yrs TN KY TN.5

Family

James M. Hudson b. 20 Mar 1842, d. 4 Sep 1918

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Emma D. Burton Hudson: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=158087426. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  2. [S3884] 1880 Federal Census, 1880 Census TN Davidson Co District 20, Year: 1880; Census Place: District 20, Davidson, Tennessee; Roll: 1251; Family History Film: 1255251; Page: 310B; Enumeration District: 079
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1880usfedcen&indiv=try&h=15358706
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/6742/4244541-00625?pid=15358706&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3D1880usfedcen%26indiv%3Dtry%26h%3D15358706&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true
  3. [S3885] 1870 Federal Census, 1870 Census TN Davidson Co District 20, Year: 1870; Census Place: District 20, Davidson, Tennessee; Roll: M593_1522; Page: 106B; Family History Library Film: 553021
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1870usfedcen&indiv=try&h=11930837
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/7163/4276591_00217?pid=11930837&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3D1870usfedcen%26indiv%3Dtry%26h%3D11930837&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true
  4. [S3886] 1900 Federal Census, 1900 Census TN Davidson Co Nashville, Year: 1900; Census Place: Nashville Ward 18, Davidson, Tennessee; Roll: 1565; Page: 20B; Enumeration District: 0110; FHL microfilm: 1241565
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1900usfedcen&indiv=try&h=69889277
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/7602/4118952_00352?pid=69889277&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3D1900usfedcen%26indiv%3Dtry%26h%3D69889277&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true#?imageId=4118952_00352
  5. [S3887] 1910 Federal Census, 1910 Census TN Davidson Co Civil Dist 10, Year: 1910; Census Place: Civil District 10, Davidson, Tennessee; Roll: T624_1497; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 0105; FHL microfilm: 1375510
    Info: https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1910USCenIndex&indiv=try&h=27086622
    Image: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/7884/4449673_00177?pid=27086622&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db%3D1910USCenIndex%26indiv%3Dtry%26h%3D27086622&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&usePUBJs=true

Thomas Lee1

M, #4925, b. 29 May 1622
FatherJohn Lee1 b. b 12 Jul 1590, d. Feb 1629/30
MotherJane Hancock1 b. c 1593, d. bt 31 May 1635 - 26 Mar 1639
Last Edited25 Oct 2020
     Thomas Lee was baptized on 29 May 1622 at St. Martin Church, Worcester, City of Worcester, Worcestershire, England.1,2
     ; NB: I have recently "discovered" the research dating from the 1988 article by William Thorndale, regarding the "truth" of the ancestry of the colonial immigrant, Col. Richard LEE, and disproving any evident link to the LEE family of CotonHall, Shropshire. Thorndale's work was extended by Townsend in 2002. One of my original sources for this line, the 7th ed. of Weis (1992), included the link from the Coton Hall LEEs to Co. Richard LEE, but the 8th ed. (2004) deletes the link citing Thomason (2002).
     The note in Weis (2004) reads: "Gen. 36 through 38, in previous editions, has been proven to be in error. See Neil Thompason, "Lees of Northumberland and Worcester," NGSQ 90 (2002)l213-217)."
Images of the full Thorndale and Thompson articles are attached. GA Vaut.1,3,4,5,6
In Jane Hancock's will dated 31 May 1634, Thomas Lee was named as an heir.7 He was living in May 1635; Mentioned in his mother's will.2
In Walter Heminge (Sr.)'s will dated between 6 February 1636 and 1637, Thomas Lee was named as an heir; Per Thompson:
"Drawn 6 February 1636/7
Probate date unstated, but possibly 9 June 1637

Clothier of Worcester, names his wife Susanna as his executor and his father Richard Heminge as an overseer. He also cites his mother Alice as still alive. Bequests are to Richard and Thomas Lee, sons of his "brother-in-lawe" [halfbrother] John Lee, de­ ceased; his "brother-in-lawe"[halfbrother] Richard Lee; and Henry Turner, "father-in­ lawe" of Richard Lee. [18]
[18] Worcester Consistory Court, Original Wills, 1637, no. 71; FHL 0,098,054. An undated inventory attached to the will was filed 9 June 1637; this would very likely be the probate date.“. He was listed as a beneficiary in Jane Hancock's will on 26 March 1639 at Worcester Consistory Court, Worcester, City of Worcester, Worcestershire, England; From Thorndale (emphasis added):
     "(Probated 26 March 1639. Worcester Consistory Court 1639, No. 147, transcribed from the British film collection, Film 098,058, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.)
     "31 May 1635. In the name of God Amen. I Jane Manning of the parish of St Martin in Worcester being in perfect memory make and ordaine this my last will and testament in manner and forme following. First I commend my soule into the hands of Almighty god my maker and redeemer, and my body to be buried in the parish church of St Martin aforesaid. Item I give and bequeath to John my eldest sonne [various house furnishings, cloth for a mourning suit] and my gold ring which I weare on my finger for a token in remembrance of me his mother, and for the better preserving of these things I likewise give and bequeath unto him my great wainscoat chest to receive and keepe them in the house and custody of Thomas Hancocks my brother untill he be full 24 years of age and then and not before then deliver them fully and wholly to my sayd sonne John Lyes aforesayd. Item I give and bequeath to my sonne Thomas the remnant of the same cloatb before mentioned towards the making of a suit of apparell for him, and a fine old peece of gold for a token in remembrance of me his mother. And the rest of goods, chattells, householdstuffe and implements whatsoever I will and require to be sold and the mony received for them to be divided by such portions as that Thomas may have two parts and my sonne Richard the third part. As concerning the rents of my now dwelling house, the tenement and Garden adjoyning and the debts due to me as upon bill appeareth, my owne debts and funeral! thinges being payd, and the yearly rent of foure pounds to my Landlord duly discharged, I will and ordaine that whatsoever remaineth of the same be equally devided betweene my sayd two last sonnes Richard and Thomas. To this purpose I desire that my now dwelling house with the tenement adjoyning may be let out for the best to their benefitt, but the garden I will that Thomas Prichard still hold and continue during the lease for the usual! rent of 4s yearely. Those portions thus bequeathed I will and desire to remaine in the custody of my brother Thomas Hancocks untill they be each of them 24 yeares of age excepting only that thecloath before mentioned be presently after my decease so divided as is specified to John and Thomas. Provided always that if John my eldest sonne be deceased before he come to the said age of 24 years that then the sayd portion and legacy now bequeathed to him shall come to Thomas my youngest sonne if he be then living but at the age of 24 yeares to bedelivered to him together with his owne portion. So likewise if Thomas be deceased before he be of the sayd age that then the portion go now bequeathed to him goe in like manner to John if he be then living. If both be deceased before either of them come to the sayd age, that then their portions shall goe entirely to my sonne Richard but at the age of 24 yeares as is before mentioned. If Richard be deceased before he come to the full age required, that then his portion shalbe equally divided between his surviving brothers at their full age, or goe wholly to one if but one be living. And for the better performance hereof I commit the letting of my house, the selling of my goods and the preserving of the severall portions to the trust of my brother Thomas Hancocks whom I make sole executor of this my last will and testament, desiring likewise my brothers Walter Heming, Richard Lyes and Thomas Savage to be his assistants for the good of my children . Dated the day and yeare above written. Jane Maning
     "Witnesses     Philip Tinker     Thomas Sanby['?]     Gilbert Cox."8

Citations

  1. [S4833] William Thorndale, "The Parents of Colonel Richard Lee of Virginia", National Genealogical Society Quarterly (NGSQ) 76, pp. 253-67 (Dec. 1988). Hereinafter cited as "Thorndale (1988) - Parents of Col Richard Lee."
  2. [S4832] Ph.D., CG, FASG Neil D. Thompson, "Common Roots for the Lees of Virginia? Colonel Richard of Northumberland and John of Nansemond", National Genealogical Society Quarterly (NGSQ) 90, pp. 211-223 (2002): p. 216. Hereinafter cited as "Thompson (2002) - Common Roots Lees of VA?"
  3. [S4832] Ph.D., CG, FASG Neil D. Thompson, "Thompson (2002) - Common Roots Lees of VA?"
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), Line 258-36/37, p. 233. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Note at end of Line 258, p. 250. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  6. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 23 Oct 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  7. [S4832] Ph.D., CG, FASG Neil D. Thompson, "Thompson (2002) - Common Roots Lees of VA?", p. 215.
  8. [S4833] William Thorndale, "Thorndale (1988) - Parents of Col Richard Lee", pp. 261-262.

Robert I "le Fort" (?) Cte de Paris, de Angers et de Tours1,2

M, #4926, b. circa 820, d. 15 September 866
FatherRutpert/Robert III (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau1,3,4,5,2 b. 800, d. b 19 Feb 834
MotherWaldrada/Wiltrud (?)1,2 b. 801
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Robert I "le Fort" (?) Cte de Paris, de Angers et de Tours was born circa 820 at France.6,7,1,8 He married Agane (?);
His 1st wife.1,8 Robert I "le Fort" (?) Cte de Paris, de Angers et de Tours married Aelis/Adelaide (?) de Tours, daughter of Hugues III 'le Méfiant' (?) Comte de Tours and Ava/Bava (?) Countess Sundgau (Upper Alsace), Countess of Tours, circa 864;
Her 2nd husband; his 2nd wife.9,1,10,8
Robert I "le Fort" (?) Cte de Paris, de Angers et de Tours died on 15 September 866 at Battle of Brissarthe, Brissarthe, Anjou, Normandy, France; Killed in battle; The Henry Project says d. 866, possibly 15 Sept.9,1,8,2
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Rutpert IV was born about 820, son of Rutpert III, Graf in Wormsgau, and Waldrada/Vaudree of Orléans.
     "His first marriage was with Agane, about whom nothing is known. About 864 he married as his second wife Aelis de Tours, daughter of Hugues, comte de Tours, and widow of Konrad I, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau.
     "From 836 to 840 Rutpert was count in the Worms region. In 852 he became lay abbot of Saint-Martin-de-Marmoutier near Tours in Anjou. At the end of the 9th century, Charles 'the Bald', king of _Francia occidentalis_ and later Holy Roman Emperor, allied himself to the duke of Brittany and expelled the Vikings from Anjou, the region originally known as the _pasus andecavis_ named after the Gaul tribe of Andecaves. In 853 he appointed Rutpert _missus dominicus_ for the regions of Tours and Angers in Anjou. Later Rutpert became commander in the Autunois, which in 856 was threatened by would-be successors after the death of Emperor Lothar I, and in 863 in connection with the division of the kingdom of Charles de Provence.
     "In 858 Rutpert and Archbishop Ganelon were the leaders of the nobility in opposition to Charles 'the Bald'; they wanted to offer the crown of _Francia occidentalis_ to his half-brother Ludwig II 'the German', king of the East-Franks.
     "Rutpert became duke of Francia, the lands between the Seine and the Loire, and as such he was responsible for the struggle against the Vikings and Bretons. He fell against the Vikings at Brissarthe on 15 September 866."8 GAV-30 EDV-30 GKJ-31.

; This is the same person as ”Robert "le Fort" (Rotbertus Fortis, Robert "the Strong") at the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.2

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Robert the Strong (c.?830 – 866) was the father of two kings of West Francia Odo (or Eudes) and Robert I of France. His family is named after him and called the Robertians. In 853 he was named missus dominicus by Charles the Bald, King of West Francia. Robert the Strong was the great-grandfather of Hugh Capet and thus the ancestor of all the Capetians.
Origins and rise to power
     "The parentage of Robert "le Fort" is obscure. While very little is known about the beginnings of the Robertian family, speculative proposals have been made. According to one proposal, Robert was a son of Robert III of Worms.[1] Far more speculatively, mainly based on the use of the name Robert, or similar names, it has been proposed for example that his family had its origins in the Hesbaye region in present-day eastern Belgium, or perhaps descended from the family of Chrodegang of Metz. However these proposals are unproven.[citation needed]
     "According to the Worms proposal, during the reign of Louis the German in East Francia, the Robertian family emigrated from East Francia to West Francia. After their arrival in his realm Charles the Bald rewarded the family defecting from his enemy by assigning to Robert the lay abbacy of Marmoutier in 852. And in 853 he granted the position of missus dominicus in the provinces of Maine, Anjou, and Touraine to Robert, giving him de facto control of the ancient ducatus Cenomannicus, a large duchy centred on Le Mans and corresponding to the ancient realm of regnum Neustriae. Robert's rise came at the expense of the established family of the Rorigonids and was designed to curb their regional power and to defend Neustria from Viking and Breton raids.[citation needed]
Revolt
     "In 858 Robert joined a rebellion against Charles the Bald. With the Bretons under Salomon he led the Frankish nobles of Neustria and invited Louis the German to invade West Francia and receive their homage. The revolt had been sparked by a marriage alliance between Charles and Erispoe, King of Brittany, and by the investment of Charles’ son, Louis the Stammerer, with the regnum Neustriae, all which significantly curtailed the powers of both Salomon and Robert. Charles had given Robert the counties of Autun and Nevers in Burgundy; and in 856 Robert had defended Autun from Louis the German. But following Erispoe's assassination in November 857, he and Salomon rebelled against Charles.[citation needed]
     "Robert’s Neustrians chased Louis the Stammerer from Le Mans in 858. Later that year, Louis the German reached Orléans and received delegations from the Breton and Neustrian leaders, as well as from Pepin II. In 861, Charles made peace with Robert and appointed him Count of Anjou. Thereafter Robert successfully defended the northern coast against a Viking invasion.[citation needed]
     "In 862 Charles granted Louis the Stammerer, his son, the lay abbacy of Saint Martin of Tours—a worthy benefice but small in comparison with the kingdom he had received in 856, and lost in 858. The young Louis rebelled and, befriended by Salomon who supplied him with troops, mounted war against Robert.[citation needed]
     "In 862 two Viking fleets converged on Brittany; one had recently been forced out of the Seine by Charles the Bald, the other was returning from a Mediterranean expedition. Salomon hired the Mediterranean fleet to ravage the Loire valley in Nuestria.[2] Robert captured twelve of their ships, killing all on board save a few who fled. He then hired the former Seine Vikings to attack Salomon’s realm for 6,000 pounds silver.[citation needed]
     "Robert’s apparent purpose was to prevent the Vikings from serving Salomon. at an unknown age He presumably collected a large amount in taxes for a (non-tributary) Danegeld to pay for keeping the Vikings out of Neustria.[b] But peace between the Franks and the Vikings did not last long: in 863 Salomon made his peace, but the Vikings, now deprived of enemy lands to loot, proceeded to ravage Neustria. Charles now made Robert Lay abbot of the influential abbey St. Martin at Tours.[3]
     "Robert warred with Pepin II in his later years. In 863 he again defended Autun from Louis the German; he campaigned in Neustria in 865 and again in 866, shortly before his death, dealing with Bretons and Vikings ravaging the environs of Le Mans.[citation needed]
Death and legacy
     "On 2 July 866, Robert was killed at the Battle of Brissarthe while defending Francia against a joint Breton-Viking raiding party led by Salomon, King of Brittany and the Viking chieftain Hastein. During the battle the Viking commander was entrapped in a nearby church. Robert removed his armour to start to besiege the church; the Vikings then launched a surprise attack and Robert died in the subsequent melee.[3] He left behind a nine-year-old son, Odo (who would later be King of France), as his heir. His heroic successes against the Vikings led to his characterization as "a second Maccabaeus" in the Annales Fuldenses.[citation needed]
Family
     "Robert married Adelaide of Tours, daughter of Hugh of Tours.[3] They had:
** Odo of France (c.857-898), King of Western Francia[1]
** Robert I of France (c.866-923), King of Western Francia.[1]

Notes
a. Robert probably expected Salomon to hire them to replace the defeated Mediterranean Vikings, then to attack Neustria from two sides: with the Viking ships ascending the Loire and Breton troops invading by land.
b. In 860–1 Charles the Bald had collected a general tax to pay a Danegeld of 5,000 pounds. The king had probably authorised Robert's payment.
References
Inline citations

1. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 10
2. Einar Joranson (1923), The Danegeld in France (Rock Island: Augustana), 59–61.
3. Jim Bradbury, The Capetians, Kings of France 987-1328, (London: Hambledon Continuum, 2007), 24. ISBN 978-1-85285-528-4
General references
** Smith, Julia M. H. Province and Empire: Brittany and the Carolingians. Cambridge University Press: 1992. ISBN 0-521-38285-8
** Hummer, Hans J. Politics and Power in Early Medieval Europe: Alsace and the Frankish Realm 600 – 1000. Cambridge University Press: 2005. ISBN 0-521-85441-5
External links
Baldwin, Stewart (26 July 2008). "Robert 'le Fort' (Rotbertus Fortis, Robert 'the Strong')". Henry Project.11 Robert I "le Fort" (?) Cte de Paris, de Angers et de Tours was also known as Rutpert IV 'the Strong' (?) Graf in Wormsgau, Duke of Francia, Comte de Tours, Margrave of Anjou.8

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. 1961.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) tafel 10.12,7,9,8
Robert I "le Fort" (?) Cte de Paris, de Angers et de Tours was also known as Rutpert IV "FortisThe Strong" (?) Duke of France, Count in Wormgau.13

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT "le Fort", son of --- ([815/30]-killed in battle Brissarthe 2 Jul 866). Robert´s birth date range is estimated assuming that his known sons were born in [850/60] as shown below. The parentage of Robert "le Fort" is obscure. Some general indications of his origin are found in near contemporary sources, but these are contradictory. An unspecific Franconian origin is favoured by the Annales Xantenses which name him “Ruodbertus…ortus de Francia, dux Karoli” when recording his death[3], and by Widukind who refers to his son King Eudes as “ex orientalibus Francia”[4]. A Saxon origin is suggested by two sources: firstly, Richer names “ex equestre ordine Rotbertum” as father of King Eudes and his “avum…paternum Witichinum advenam Germanum”[5]; secondly, the Miracula Sancti Benedicti names “Robertus, Andagavensis comes, Saxonici generis vir”[6]. Abbon refers to his son Eudes King of France as "Neustrien…fils de la Neustrie"[7]. Other early sources specifically state that nothing is known of the origins of Robert, for example Rodulphus Glaber ("cuius genus…oscurum")[8]. The possible identity of Robert´s mother is suggested by the charter dated 20 Feb "anno XXVII regnante domino Carolo…rege" under which "Robertus…beati Martini abbas…et comes" confirmed donations to Tour Saint-Martin made "olim…ab Odone quondam comite Aurelianensi avunculo nostro et Willelmo eius filio"[9]. However, there are two possible interpretations of the dating clause of this document. If it refers to Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks, whose reign is normally dated from the death of his father in Jun 840, the year would be [867] the year after Robert "le Fort" died. Another possibility is that the clause refers to Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, in which case the year would be 920, indicating that the donor was the future Robert I King of France, rather than Robert "le Fort", although this would not change the significance of the relationship described ("avunculus" could also have been used in the document in the sense of "great-uncle"). As discussed further below, Anatole de Barthélemy uses this document as part of his argument for identifying Guillaume Comte de Blois as the father of Robert "le Fort". However, "avunculus" in its strict sense indicates "maternal uncle" and, while the terms "patruus" (paternal uncle) and "avunculus" (maternal uncle) are frequently used interchangeably in contemporary primary source documentation, it is possible that the relationship was through a sister of the two brothers Eudes Comte d´Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois, who could have been the mother of Robert "le Fort". If this is correct, he would have been Robert "le Fort", son of --- & his wife ---. It should be emphasised that this hypothesis is speculative. Another possibility is that, assuming that the donor was the future Robert I King of France as suggested, the relationship could have been through his mother, the wife of Robert "le Fort", who could have been the niece of the brothers Eudes Comte d´Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois.
     "Four more specific suggestions about Robert´s paternal ancestry have been made:
     "Firstly, many modern secondary sources identify him as Robert [Rodbert], son of Rodbert Graf im Wormsgau & his wife Wiltrud ---, who was first named in Germany in 836 as "son of the late Rodbert Graf von Wormsgau", in a donation to Mettenheim[10]. No primary source has yet been found which points specifically towards this suggested co-identity, although it is consistent with the Franconian origin referred to by the Annales Xantenses and by Widukind, as noted above. It is assumed that the suggestion is based primarily on onomastics, although the first secondary source which proposed the connection has not yet been identified and therefore has not been checked. The author in question may have assumed that Robert was a unique name among noblemen in France in the first half of the 9th century, although this ignores Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau en Berry, who was the possible brother of the wife of Pepin I King of Aquitaine (see the document CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY). The timing of the supposed arrival of Robert from Franconia, assuming that the co-identity is correct, is not ideal either. Robert would presumably have fled Germany after opting to support Charles II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks in the latter´s fight against his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche” King of the East Franks. This dispute is dated to 858/59: King Ludwig invaded in Aug 858, when King Charles was faced with widespread rebellion, and was defeated in Jan 859. However, Robert "le Fort" is already named as missus in Maine, Anjou and Touraine in Nov 853, in a document issued by King Charles II (see below), unless of course this document refers to Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau, which is not impossible.
     "Secondly, there is a possible connection between Robert "le Fort" and the family of Aledramn [I] Comte de Troyes, who died in [852] (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY). Such indications are provided by Regino who names "Waltgerius comes, nepos Odonis regis, filius scilicet avunculi eius Adalhelmi in Aquitanien" when recording his battle against "Ramnulfum et fratrem eius Gozbertum et Ebulonem abbatum de sancto Dionysio " in Jul 892, and names "Megingaudus comes, nepos supradicti Odonis regis [son of Robert "le Fort"]" when recording his death, also in 892[11]. A further indication is found in the charter dated 14 Sep 937, under which Robert "le Fort"´s grandson "Hugues abbé de Saint-Martin" donated "son alleu de Lachy…dans le comté de Meaux" to Tours Saint-Martin, specifying that he had inherited the property from "comte Aledramnus" who had been granted it by Charlemagne[12]. It should be noted, however, that all these sources would be consistent with the family connection between Robert "le Fort" and Adalhelm being through the female line, or even through Robert´s wife.
     "Thirdly, an interesting possibility is indicated by Europäische Stammtafeln which names the first wife of Comte Robert as "[Agane]"[13]. It cites no corresponding primary source, but presumably the suggestion is based on the Miraculis Sancti Genulfi which names "Agana filia…Byturicensium comes…Wifredus [et]…Oda coniux" as wife of "Roberto viro primoque palatii Pipini regis"[14]. This "Roberto" can probably be identified as Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau en Berry, the supposed brother of the wife of Pepin I King of Aquitaine (this relationship is referred to by Settipani, but he neither quotes nor cites the corresponding source[15]). Could it be possible therefore that he was the same person as Robert "le Fort"? If this was the case, it would be consistent with the Saxon origin which is suggested by Richer and by the Miracula Sancti Benedicti (see above). The supposed father of Robert de Sesseau was Theodebert Comte de Madrie who, it is suspected, was related to the family of Nibelung and Childebrand (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY). The Saxon connection of the latter family is suggested by the name Theoderic (nine different individuals named Theoderic have been identified in the family), which was first recorded in Saxony in the family of Widukind by Einhard in 782 (see the document SAXONY).
     "Fourthly, Anatole de Barthélemy suggests that Robert was the son of Guillaume Comte de Blois, who was killed in battle in Jun 834 (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY)[16]. This suggestion was accepted by René Merlet[17]. Barthélemy bases his theory on the exchange of property in the county of Blois made by Comte Robert dated 865 (see below), concluding that Robert "avait son principal établissement à Blois…en pleine Neustrie, ce qui confirme singulièrement l´allégation d´Abbon" (who refers to Robert´s Neustrian origin, see above)[18]. Barthélemy also quotes a charter under which "Robertus…beati Martini abbas…et comes" confirmed donations to Tour Saint-Martin made "olim…ab Odone quondam comite Aurelianensi avunculo nostro et Willelmo eius filio", dated 20 Feb "anno XXVII regnante domino Carolo…rege"[19]. As noted above, the dating clause of this document may either refer to King Charles II "le Chauve" or to Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, in the latter case the donor being the future Robert I King of France not Robert "le Fort", although this would not change the significance of the relationship described ("avunculus" could also have been used in the document in the sense of "great-uncle"). As discussed further above, the term "avunculus" reminds us that the relationship, as described in this charter, could also have been through a sister of the two brothers Eudes Comte d´Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois.
     "Whatever the truth about Robert´s parentage, his career in France is recorded with certainty from 853, although Merlet suggests that he was named in a charter dated I Oct 845[20]: Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks restored property to Hincmar Archbishop of Reims which he had previously granted to his supporters, including property granted to "…Rotbertus…", by charter dated 1 Oct 845[21]. This co-identity is not beyond doubt. A document issued by King Charles II "le Chauve" dated Nov 853 names "Dodo episcopus, Hrotbertus et Osbertus" as missi in "Cinnomannio, Andegavensi, atque Turonico, Corboniso, et Sagiso"[22]. The Annales Bertiniani record that "Pippinus" joined with "Rotberto comiti et Britonibus" in 859[23], which suggests that Robert had earlier rebelled against King Charles II in Brittany. Robert submitted to the king's authority, when he was given command of the march of Neustria, which had been confiscated from the Rorgonid family for supporting the revolt of Louis (later King Louis II) against his father[24]. Regino records that King Charles II "le Chauve" invested "Rodberto comiti" with "ducatum inter Ligerim et Sequanam adversum Brittones" in 861[25]. The Annales Bertiniani record that "Rodbertus" attacked "Salomone duce" [duke of Brittany] in 862[26]. The Annales record that King Charles´s son, the future King Louis II "le Bègue", rebelled against his father in 862 and, heading an army of Bretons, defeated "Rotbertum patris fidelem" in 862, after which he burned Angers yet again[27]. Count in the march of Anjou [862/63]: the creation of the "march" of Anjou is probably dated to the early 860s, as the Annales Bertiniani name "Rodberto, qui marchio in Andegavo fuerat" in 865[28]. This change of jurisdictional status must have been insufficient to control the Bretons and the Vikings because Robert is named in the Annales Bertiniani in 865 in the context of King Charles imposing direct rule in the area by sending "Hludowicum filium suum" into "Neustriam" and granting him "comitatum Andegavensem et abbatiam Maioris-monasterii et quasdam villas illi", while recording that Robert was compensated with "comitatum Autissiodorensem et comitatum Nivernensem". "Le comte Robert" donated "certains biens…situés dans le comté de Blois, dans la viguerie d´Averdon au village dit Gabrium et faisant partie du domaine de Saint-Lubin" to Actard Bishop of Nantes in exchange for other property "situés au même lieu et dépendant aussi du domaine de Saint-Lubin" by charter dated May 865[29]. Merlet suggests that this charter indicates that Robert "le Fort" was Comte de Blois at the time[30]. However, another possibility is that the county indicated was the "march of Anjou" to which Robert had been appointed count some years before (see above). Comte d'Auxerre and Comte de Nevers 865. The Annales Bertiniani name "Rodbertus et Odo" as "præfecti" in the Seine valley area in 866 when recording that they repelled the Vikings who had sailed up river as far as "castrum Milidunum"[31]. "Odo" is presumably identified as Eudes Comte de Troyes, who died 1 Aug 871 (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY) and who, according to René Merlet, may have been the brother of Robert "le Fort"[32]. The Annales Bertiniani record that "Rotbertum et Ramnulfum, Godtfridum quoque et Heriveum comites" were defeated by the Vikings at "Brieserta" in 866, where Robert was killed[33]. The Adonis Continuatio records that "Robertus quoque atque Ramnulfus…inter primos ipsi priores" were killed by the Vikings in 866[34].
     "The name of Comte Robert's wife or wives is not known, but there are indications that he married more than once, maybe three times. One possibility can be dismissed immediately: one passage in the Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Regine, que cum esset iuvencula fuit concubina Karoli Magni iam senioris" as wife of "Roberti Fortis marchionis"[35]. This is chronologically impossible as Regina must have been born in [785] at the latest (the birth of her older son is recorded in 801), and therefore was far too old to have been Robert´s wife. Three possibilities remain:
     "[m [firstly] ---. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[36], the first wife of Comte Robert was "[Agane]". The primary source on which this is based is not noted, but as stated above, it is probably the Miraculis Sancti Genulfi which names "Agana filia…Byturicensium comes…Wifredus [et]…Oda coniux" as wife of "Roberto viro primoque palatii Pipini regis"[37]. As discussed above, this would mean that Robert "le Fort" was the same person as Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau en Berry. If this co-identity is correct, Agane would have been too old to have been the mother of the recorded children of Robert "le Fort". It would therefore be consistent for her to have been Robert´s first wife.]
     "[m [secondly] ---. If the theories relating to Robert´s possible first and third marriages are correct as set out in the present document, the chronology dictates that the wife who was the mother of his children, born in [850/60], must have been a different person. There is no indication who she might have been, apart from the charter dated 20 Feb "anno XXVII regnante domino Carolo…rege" which is discussed above. If, in accordance with one of the possibilities suggested above, the dating clause in this document refers to the reign of Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, the donor must have been the future Robert I King of France. In this case, the relationship "avunculus" described in the document could have been through the donor´s mother, the wife of Robert "le Fort" which, if correct, would mean that Robert´s second wife could have been the niece of the brothers Eudes Comte d´Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois.]
     "[m [thirdly] ---. Some secondary works[38] assert that the wife of Robert was Adelais [de Tours], widow of Conrad Comte de Paris et d'Auxerre [Welf], daughter of Hugues Comte de Tours & his wife Ava ---. If this is correct, Adelais must have been Comte Robert's second or third wife as Conrad died after 862, by which date Robert's known children were already born. The assertion appears to be based on the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which names "duo filii Rotberti Andegavorum comitis, frs Hugonis abbatis, senior Odo…Robertus alter"[39], "Hugonis abbatis" being the son of Conrad Comte de Paris and assuming that "frs" is an abbreviation for "fratres". Settipani states that the passage is a 12th century interpolation and has little historical value, although he does suggest that it is likely that the wife of Comte Robert was a close relation of Adelais (without providing the reasoning for his statement)[40]. A family connection between Comte Robert and Conrad Comte de Paris is also suggested by the former being invested with the county of Auxerre in 865, after this county was confiscated from the latter (as recorded by Hincmar[41]), on the assumption that there was some basis of heredity behind the transmission of counties in France at that time (which is probable, but remains unproven). "
Med Lands cites:
[3] Annales Xantenses 867, MGH SS II, p. 232.
[4] Widukind I, 29, MGH SS III, p. 430.
[5] Richeri Historia I, 5, MGH SS III, p. 570.
[6] Certain, E. de (ed.) (1858) Miracula Sancti Benedicti (Paris) II, p. 93.
[7] Guizot, M. (1824) Collection des mémoires relatifs à l´histoire de France (Paris), Siège de Paris par les Normands, poème d´Abbon, Livre II, p. 58.
[8] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum I.2, MGH SS VII, p. 53.
[9] Barthélemy, A. de ´Origines de la maison de France´, Revue des questions historiques, Tome XIII, 1 (1873), p. 121, quoting Lecointe, C. (1673) Annales ecclesiastici francorum, Vol. VIII, p. 101 (not yet consulted).
[10] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 399, which does not cite the source reference.
[11] Reginonis Chronicon 892, MGH SS I, pp. 604 and 605.
[12] Mabille, E. (ed.) (1866) La pancarte notre de Saint-Martin de Tours brulée en 1793 (Paris, Tours) ("Tours Saint-Martin") LVIII, p. 95.
[13] ES II 10.
[14] Miraculis Sancti Genulfi 6, MGH SS XV.2, p. 1206.
[15] Settipani (1993), p. 354 footnote 1111.
[16] Barthélemy ´Origines de la maison de France´, p. 120-22.
[17] Merlet, R. ´Origine de Robert le Fort´, Mélanges Julien Havet (Paris, 1895), p. 108.
[18] Barthélemy ´Origines de la maison de France´, p. 120.
[19] Barthélemy ´Origines de la maison de France´, p. 121, quoting Lecointe, C. (1673) Annales ecclesiastici francorum, Vol. VIII, p. 101 (not yet consulted).
[20] Merlet, R. ´Les comtes de Chartres, de Châteaudun et de Blois aux IX et X siècles´, Mémoires de la Société archéologique d´Eure-et-Loir, Tome XII, 1895-1900 (Chartres, 1901), p. 28.
[21] RHGF VIII, Diplomata, LV, p. 478.
[22] Karoli II Conventus Silvacensis, Missi…et pagi… 8, MGH LL 1, p. 426.
[23] Annales Bertiniani 859, MGH SS I, p. 453.
[24] McKitterick, R. (1983) Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians 751-987 (Longman, London and New York), p. 266.
[25] Reginonis Chronicon 861, MGH SS I, p. 571.
[26] Annales Bertiniani 862, MGH SS I, p. 456.
[27] Annales Bertiniani 862, MGH SS I, p. 457.
[28] Annales Bertiniani 865, MGH SS I, p. 470.
[29] Tours Saint-Martin LX, p. 96.
[30] Merlet ´Les comtes de Chartres´, p. 27.
[31] Annales Bertiniani 866, MGH SS I, p. 471.
[32] Merlet, R. ´Origine de Robert le Fort´, Mélanges Julien Havet (Paris, 1895), pp. 106-7.
[33] Annales Bertiniani 866, MGH SS I, p. 473.
[34] Adonis Continuatio Prima, Auctore Anonymo 866, MGH SS II, p. 324.
[35] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 988, MGH SS XXIII, p. 774.
[36] ES II 10.
[37] Miraculis Sancti Genulfi 6, MGH SS XV.2, p. 1206.
[38] Including ES II 10.
[39] Abbé E. Bougaud ( ed.) (1875) Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon ( Dijon) ("Chronicle St-Bénigne de Dijon"), p. 109.
[40] Settipani (1993), p. 400.
[41] Hincmari Remensis Annales 865, MGH SS I, p. 470.14
He was Duke of Maine between 851 and 856.11 He was Count of Anjou between 861 and 866.11 He was Count of Nantes between 861 and 866.11 He was Margrave of Neustria - See attached map of Neustria and Austrasia from Wikipedia (By Internet Archive Book Images - https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/14580277120/, No restrictions, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=52290412) between 861 and 866.11

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  2. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Robert "le Fort" (Rotbertus Fortis, Robert "the Strong"): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/rober100.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_III_of_Worms. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020385&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#RobertIIIdied834. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S636] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0043 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert IV 'Robert the Strong': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020387&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 48-17, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aelis de Tours: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020389&tree=LEO
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_the_Strong
  12. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  13. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 63. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Robertdied866B
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020109&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#RobertIdied923B

Aelis/Adelaide (?) de Tours1,2

F, #4927, b. 819, d. after September 866
FatherHugues III 'le Méfiant' (?) Comte de Tours2,3,4,5 b. c 780, d. 4 Nov 839
MotherAva/Bava (?) Countess Sundgau (Upper Alsace), Countess of Tours6,7,3,5 b. 769, d. a 839
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited27 Nov 2020
     Aelis/Adelaide (?) de Tours was born in 819 at Tours, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France; Genealogy.EU (Capet 1 page) says b. 824.8,9,1 She married Konrad I 'the Elder' (?) Count of Auxerre, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau, son of Welf I (?) Graf in Swabia and Heilwig/Hedwig/Eigilwich (?) of Saxony, between 834 and 838;
Her 1st husband.3,10,2,11,12,13 Aelis/Adelaide (?) de Tours married Robert I "le Fort" (?) Cte de Paris, de Angers et de Tours, son of Rutpert/Robert III (?) Count in Wormsgau and Oberrheinsgau and Waldrada/Wiltrud (?), circa 864;
Her 2nd husband; his 2nd wife.9,8,3,14
Aelis/Adelaide (?) de Tours died after September 866.9,8,1,3,15
Aelis/Adelaide (?) de Tours was buried after September 866 at Saint-Étienne Cathedral, Sens, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     805
     DEATH     866 (aged 60–61)
     Family Members
     Parents
          Hugues de Tours 775–837
          Ava de Morvois de Tours 769–839
     Spouse
          Conrad de Bourgogne 800–862
     Siblings
          Ermengarde Of Tours unknown–851
          Adelaide Of Tours
          Hugues Comte de Bourges
          Berthe de Tours de Roussillon 800–871
     Children
          Conrad de Bourgogne 824–876
     BURIAL     Saint-Étienne Cathedral, Sens, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France
     Created by: Our Family History
     Added: 1 Jun 2018
     Find A Grave Memorial 190253182.16
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT "le Fort", son of --- ([815/30]-killed in battle Brissarthe 2 Jul 866). Robert´s birth date range is estimated assuming that his known sons were born in [850/60] as shown below. The parentage of Robert "le Fort" is obscure. Some general indications of his origin are found in near contemporary sources, but these are contradictory. An unspecific Franconian origin is favoured by the Annales Xantenses which name him “Ruodbertus…ortus de Francia, dux Karoli” when recording his death[3], and by Widukind who refers to his son King Eudes as “ex orientalibus Francia”[4]. A Saxon origin is suggested by two sources: firstly, Richer names “ex equestre ordine Rotbertum” as father of King Eudes and his “avum…paternum Witichinum advenam Germanum”[5]; secondly, the Miracula Sancti Benedicti names “Robertus, Andagavensis comes, Saxonici generis vir”[6]. Abbon refers to his son Eudes King of France as "Neustrien…fils de la Neustrie"[7]. Other early sources specifically state that nothing is known of the origins of Robert, for example Rodulphus Glaber ("cuius genus…oscurum")[8]. The possible identity of Robert´s mother is suggested by the charter dated 20 Feb "anno XXVII regnante domino Carolo…rege" under which "Robertus…beati Martini abbas…et comes" confirmed donations to Tour Saint-Martin made "olim…ab Odone quondam comite Aurelianensi avunculo nostro et Willelmo eius filio"[9]. However, there are two possible interpretations of the dating clause of this document. If it refers to Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks, whose reign is normally dated from the death of his father in Jun 840, the year would be [867] the year after Robert "le Fort" died. Another possibility is that the clause refers to Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, in which case the year would be 920, indicating that the donor was the future Robert I King of France, rather than Robert "le Fort", although this would not change the significance of the relationship described ("avunculus" could also have been used in the document in the sense of "great-uncle"). As discussed further below, Anatole de Barthélemy uses this document as part of his argument for identifying Guillaume Comte de Blois as the father of Robert "le Fort". However, "avunculus" in its strict sense indicates "maternal uncle" and, while the terms "patruus" (paternal uncle) and "avunculus" (maternal uncle) are frequently used interchangeably in contemporary primary source documentation, it is possible that the relationship was through a sister of the two brothers Eudes Comte d´Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois, who could have been the mother of Robert "le Fort". If this is correct, he would have been Robert "le Fort", son of --- & his wife ---. It should be emphasised that this hypothesis is speculative. Another possibility is that, assuming that the donor was the future Robert I King of France as suggested, the relationship could have been through his mother, the wife of Robert "le Fort", who could have been the niece of the brothers Eudes Comte d´Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois.
     "Four more specific suggestions about Robert´s paternal ancestry have been made:
     "Firstly, many modern secondary sources identify him as Robert [Rodbert], son of Rodbert Graf im Wormsgau & his wife Wiltrud ---, who was first named in Germany in 836 as "son of the late Rodbert Graf von Wormsgau", in a donation to Mettenheim[10]. No primary source has yet been found which points specifically towards this suggested co-identity, although it is consistent with the Franconian origin referred to by the Annales Xantenses and by Widukind, as noted above. It is assumed that the suggestion is based primarily on onomastics, although the first secondary source which proposed the connection has not yet been identified and therefore has not been checked. The author in question may have assumed that Robert was a unique name among noblemen in France in the first half of the 9th century, although this ignores Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau en Berry, who was the possible brother of the wife of Pepin I King of Aquitaine (see the document CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY). The timing of the supposed arrival of Robert from Franconia, assuming that the co-identity is correct, is not ideal either. Robert would presumably have fled Germany after opting to support Charles II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks in the latter´s fight against his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche” King of the East Franks. This dispute is dated to 858/59: King Ludwig invaded in Aug 858, when King Charles was faced with widespread rebellion, and was defeated in Jan 859. However, Robert "le Fort" is already named as missus in Maine, Anjou and Touraine in Nov 853, in a document issued by King Charles II (see below), unless of course this document refers to Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau, which is not impossible.
     "Secondly, there is a possible connection between Robert "le Fort" and the family of Aledramn [I] Comte de Troyes, who died in [852] (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY). Such indications are provided by Regino who names "Waltgerius comes, nepos Odonis regis, filius scilicet avunculi eius Adalhelmi in Aquitanien" when recording his battle against "Ramnulfum et fratrem eius Gozbertum et Ebulonem abbatum de sancto Dionysio " in Jul 892, and names "Megingaudus comes, nepos supradicti Odonis regis [son of Robert "le Fort"]" when recording his death, also in 892[11]. A further indication is found in the charter dated 14 Sep 937, under which Robert "le Fort"´s grandson "Hugues abbé de Saint-Martin" donated "son alleu de Lachy…dans le comté de Meaux" to Tours Saint-Martin, specifying that he had inherited the property from "comte Aledramnus" who had been granted it by Charlemagne[12]. It should be noted, however, that all these sources would be consistent with the family connection between Robert "le Fort" and Adalhelm being through the female line, or even through Robert´s wife.
     "Thirdly, an interesting possibility is indicated by Europäische Stammtafeln which names the first wife of Comte Robert as "[Agane]"[13]. It cites no corresponding primary source, but presumably the suggestion is based on the Miraculis Sancti Genulfi which names "Agana filia…Byturicensium comes…Wifredus [et]…Oda coniux" as wife of "Roberto viro primoque palatii Pipini regis"[14]. This "Roberto" can probably be identified as Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau en Berry, the supposed brother of the wife of Pepin I King of Aquitaine (this relationship is referred to by Settipani, but he neither quotes nor cites the corresponding source[15]). Could it be possible therefore that he was the same person as Robert "le Fort"? If this was the case, it would be consistent with the Saxon origin which is suggested by Richer and by the Miracula Sancti Benedicti (see above). The supposed father of Robert de Sesseau was Theodebert Comte de Madrie who, it is suspected, was related to the family of Nibelung and Childebrand (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY). The Saxon connection of the latter family is suggested by the name Theoderic (nine different individuals named Theoderic have been identified in the family), which was first recorded in Saxony in the family of Widukind by Einhard in 782 (see the document SAXONY).
     "Fourthly, Anatole de Barthélemy suggests that Robert was the son of Guillaume Comte de Blois, who was killed in battle in Jun 834 (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY)[16]. This suggestion was accepted by René Merlet[17]. Barthélemy bases his theory on the exchange of property in the county of Blois made by Comte Robert dated 865 (see below), concluding that Robert "avait son principal établissement à Blois…en pleine Neustrie, ce qui confirme singulièrement l´allégation d´Abbon" (who refers to Robert´s Neustrian origin, see above)[18]. Barthélemy also quotes a charter under which "Robertus…beati Martini abbas…et comes" confirmed donations to Tour Saint-Martin made "olim…ab Odone quondam comite Aurelianensi avunculo nostro et Willelmo eius filio", dated 20 Feb "anno XXVII regnante domino Carolo…rege"[19]. As noted above, the dating clause of this document may either refer to King Charles II "le Chauve" or to Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, in the latter case the donor being the future Robert I King of France not Robert "le Fort", although this would not change the significance of the relationship described ("avunculus" could also have been used in the document in the sense of "great-uncle"). As discussed further above, the term "avunculus" reminds us that the relationship, as described in this charter, could also have been through a sister of the two brothers Eudes Comte d´Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois.
     "Whatever the truth about Robert´s parentage, his career in France is recorded with certainty from 853, although Merlet suggests that he was named in a charter dated I Oct 845[20]: Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks restored property to Hincmar Archbishop of Reims which he had previously granted to his supporters, including property granted to "…Rotbertus…", by charter dated 1 Oct 845[21]. This co-identity is not beyond doubt. A document issued by King Charles II "le Chauve" dated Nov 853 names "Dodo episcopus, Hrotbertus et Osbertus" as missi in "Cinnomannio, Andegavensi, atque Turonico, Corboniso, et Sagiso"[22]. The Annales Bertiniani record that "Pippinus" joined with "Rotberto comiti et Britonibus" in 859[23], which suggests that Robert had earlier rebelled against King Charles II in Brittany. Robert submitted to the king's authority, when he was given command of the march of Neustria, which had been confiscated from the Rorgonid family for supporting the revolt of Louis (later King Louis II) against his father[24]. Regino records that King Charles II "le Chauve" invested "Rodberto comiti" with "ducatum inter Ligerim et Sequanam adversum Brittones" in 861[25]. The Annales Bertiniani record that "Rodbertus" attacked "Salomone duce" [duke of Brittany] in 862[26]. The Annales record that King Charles´s son, the future King Louis II "le Bègue", rebelled against his father in 862 and, heading an army of Bretons, defeated "Rotbertum patris fidelem" in 862, after which he burned Angers yet again[27]. Count in the march of Anjou [862/63]: the creation of the "march" of Anjou is probably dated to the early 860s, as the Annales Bertiniani name "Rodberto, qui marchio in Andegavo fuerat" in 865[28]. This change of jurisdictional status must have been insufficient to control the Bretons and the Vikings because Robert is named in the Annales Bertiniani in 865 in the context of King Charles imposing direct rule in the area by sending "Hludowicum filium suum" into "Neustriam" and granting him "comitatum Andegavensem et abbatiam Maioris-monasterii et quasdam villas illi", while recording that Robert was compensated with "comitatum Autissiodorensem et comitatum Nivernensem". "Le comte Robert" donated "certains biens…situés dans le comté de Blois, dans la viguerie d´Averdon au village dit Gabrium et faisant partie du domaine de Saint-Lubin" to Actard Bishop of Nantes in exchange for other property "situés au même lieu et dépendant aussi du domaine de Saint-Lubin" by charter dated May 865[29]. Merlet suggests that this charter indicates that Robert "le Fort" was Comte de Blois at the time[30]. However, another possibility is that the county indicated was the "march of Anjou" to which Robert had been appointed count some years before (see above). Comte d'Auxerre and Comte de Nevers 865. The Annales Bertiniani name "Rodbertus et Odo" as "præfecti" in the Seine valley area in 866 when recording that they repelled the Vikings who had sailed up river as far as "castrum Milidunum"[31]. "Odo" is presumably identified as Eudes Comte de Troyes, who died 1 Aug 871 (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY) and who, according to René Merlet, may have been the brother of Robert "le Fort"[32]. The Annales Bertiniani record that "Rotbertum et Ramnulfum, Godtfridum quoque et Heriveum comites" were defeated by the Vikings at "Brieserta" in 866, where Robert was killed[33]. The Adonis Continuatio records that "Robertus quoque atque Ramnulfus…inter primos ipsi priores" were killed by the Vikings in 866[34].
     "The name of Comte Robert's wife or wives is not known, but there are indications that he married more than once, maybe three times. One possibility can be dismissed immediately: one passage in the Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Regine, que cum esset iuvencula fuit concubina Karoli Magni iam senioris" as wife of "Roberti Fortis marchionis"[35]. This is chronologically impossible as Regina must have been born in [785] at the latest (the birth of her older son is recorded in 801), and therefore was far too old to have been Robert´s wife. Three possibilities remain:
     "[m [firstly] ---. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[36], the first wife of Comte Robert was "[Agane]". The primary source on which this is based is not noted, but as stated above, it is probably the Miraculis Sancti Genulfi which names "Agana filia…Byturicensium comes…Wifredus [et]…Oda coniux" as wife of "Roberto viro primoque palatii Pipini regis"[37]. As discussed above, this would mean that Robert "le Fort" was the same person as Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau en Berry. If this co-identity is correct, Agane would have been too old to have been the mother of the recorded children of Robert "le Fort". It would therefore be consistent for her to have been Robert´s first wife.]
     "[m [secondly] ---. If the theories relating to Robert´s possible first and third marriages are correct as set out in the present document, the chronology dictates that the wife who was the mother of his children, born in [850/60], must have been a different person. There is no indication who she might have been, apart from the charter dated 20 Feb "anno XXVII regnante domino Carolo…rege" which is discussed above. If, in accordance with one of the possibilities suggested above, the dating clause in this document refers to the reign of Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, the donor must have been the future Robert I King of France. In this case, the relationship "avunculus" described in the document could have been through the donor´s mother, the wife of Robert "le Fort" which, if correct, would mean that Robert´s second wife could have been the niece of the brothers Eudes Comte d´Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois.]
     "[m [thirdly] ---. Some secondary works[38] assert that the wife of Robert was Adelais [de Tours], widow of Conrad Comte de Paris et d'Auxerre [Welf], daughter of Hugues Comte de Tours & his wife Ava ---. If this is correct, Adelais must have been Comte Robert's second or third wife as Conrad died after 862, by which date Robert's known children were already born. The assertion appears to be based on the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which names "duo filii Rotberti Andegavorum comitis, frs Hugonis abbatis, senior Odo…Robertus alter"[39], "Hugonis abbatis" being the son of Conrad Comte de Paris and assuming that "frs" is an abbreviation for "fratres". Settipani states that the passage is a 12th century interpolation and has little historical value, although he does suggest that it is likely that the wife of Comte Robert was a close relation of Adelais (without providing the reasoning for his statement)[40]. A family connection between Comte Robert and Conrad Comte de Paris is also suggested by the former being invested with the county of Auxerre in 865, after this county was confiscated from the latter (as recorded by Hincmar[41]), on the assumption that there was some basis of heredity behind the transmission of counties in France at that time (which is probable, but remains unproven). "
Med Lands cites:
[3] Annales Xantenses 867, MGH SS II, p. 232.
[4] Widukind I, 29, MGH SS III, p. 430.
[5] Richeri Historia I, 5, MGH SS III, p. 570.
[6] Certain, E. de (ed.) (1858) Miracula Sancti Benedicti (Paris) II, p. 93.
[7] Guizot, M. (1824) Collection des mémoires relatifs à l´histoire de France (Paris), Siège de Paris par les Normands, poème d´Abbon, Livre II, p. 58.
[8] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum I.2, MGH SS VII, p. 53.
[9] Barthélemy, A. de ´Origines de la maison de France´, Revue des questions historiques, Tome XIII, 1 (1873), p. 121, quoting Lecointe, C. (1673) Annales ecclesiastici francorum, Vol. VIII, p. 101 (not yet consulted).
[10] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 399, which does not cite the source reference.
[11] Reginonis Chronicon 892, MGH SS I, pp. 604 and 605.
[12] Mabille, E. (ed.) (1866) La pancarte notre de Saint-Martin de Tours brulée en 1793 (Paris, Tours) ("Tours Saint-Martin") LVIII, p. 95.
[13] ES II 10.
[14] Miraculis Sancti Genulfi 6, MGH SS XV.2, p. 1206.
[15] Settipani (1993), p. 354 footnote 1111.
[16] Barthélemy ´Origines de la maison de France´, p. 120-22.
[17] Merlet, R. ´Origine de Robert le Fort´, Mélanges Julien Havet (Paris, 1895), p. 108.
[18] Barthélemy ´Origines de la maison de France´, p. 120.
[19] Barthélemy ´Origines de la maison de France´, p. 121, quoting Lecointe, C. (1673) Annales ecclesiastici francorum, Vol. VIII, p. 101 (not yet consulted).
[20] Merlet, R. ´Les comtes de Chartres, de Châteaudun et de Blois aux IX et X siècles´, Mémoires de la Société archéologique d´Eure-et-Loir, Tome XII, 1895-1900 (Chartres, 1901), p. 28.
[21] RHGF VIII, Diplomata, LV, p. 478.
[22] Karoli II Conventus Silvacensis, Missi…et pagi… 8, MGH LL 1, p. 426.
[23] Annales Bertiniani 859, MGH SS I, p. 453.
[24] McKitterick, R. (1983) Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians 751-987 (Longman, London and New York), p. 266.
[25] Reginonis Chronicon 861, MGH SS I, p. 571.
[26] Annales Bertiniani 862, MGH SS I, p. 456.
[27] Annales Bertiniani 862, MGH SS I, p. 457.
[28] Annales Bertiniani 865, MGH SS I, p. 470.
[29] Tours Saint-Martin LX, p. 96.
[30] Merlet ´Les comtes de Chartres´, p. 27.
[31] Annales Bertiniani 866, MGH SS I, p. 471.
[32] Merlet, R. ´Origine de Robert le Fort´, Mélanges Julien Havet (Paris, 1895), pp. 106-7.
[33] Annales Bertiniani 866, MGH SS I, p. 473.
[34] Adonis Continuatio Prima, Auctore Anonymo 866, MGH SS II, p. 324.
[35] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 988, MGH SS XXIII, p. 774.
[36] ES II 10.
[37] Miraculis Sancti Genulfi 6, MGH SS XV.2, p. 1206.
[38] Including ES II 10.
[39] Abbé E. Bougaud ( ed.) (1875) Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon ( Dijon) ("Chronicle St-Bénigne de Dijon"), p. 109.
[40] Settipani (1993), p. 400.
[41] Hincmari Remensis Annales 865, MGH SS I, p. 470.17


; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says Adelaide was the daughter of Louis I "the Fair."18



; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adelaide (Aelis) of Tours (c.820-c.866) was a daughter of Hugh of Tours[1] and his wife Ava.
     "She married Conrad I, Count of Auxerre,[2] with whom she had at least two children, Hugh and Conrad the Younger. Additionally legend of the later Swabian branch of the House of Welf assigns to Conrad and Adelaide an additional son, Welf I, a relationship considered probable.
     "After her husband's death around 864, she married Robert the Strong,[1] and had two children, Odo and Robert I of France.
     "Robert's grandson was Hugh Capet, the first King of the House of Capet.
Notes
1. Bradbury 2007, p. 24.
2. Bouchard 1999, p. 340.
References
** Bradbury, Jim (2007). The Capetians: Kings of France, 987-1328. Continuum Books. ISBN 978-1-85285-528-4.
** Bouchard, Constance Brittain (1999). "Burgundy and Provence, 879-1032". In Reuter, Timothy (ed.) The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume 3, C.900-c.1024. III. Cambridge University Press."19



; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELAIS (-after 866). The Miraculis Sancti Germani name "Adheleid" as wife of "Chuonradus princeps", noting that she was “primorum et ipsa natalium perinde titulus gloriosa”[158]. A poem by Walahfridus Strabus records the epitaph of "Adelheidam"[159]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. Some secondary works[160] assert that the second husband of Adelais was Robert "le Fort" [Capet]. If this is correct, Adelais must have been Comte Robert's second or third wife as Conrad died after 862 by which date Robert's known children were already born. The assertion appears based on the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which names "duo filii Rotberti Andegavorum comitis, frs Hugonis abbatis, senior Odo…Robertus alter"[161]. Settipani states that the passage is a 12th century interpolation and has little historical value, although he does suggest that it is likely that the wife of Comte Robert was a close relation of Adelais without providing the basis for this statement[162]. A family connection between Comte Robert and Conrad Comte de Paris is also suggested by the former being invested with the county of Auxerre in 865, after this county was confiscated from the latter (as recorded by Hincmar[163]), on the assumption that there was some basis of heredity behind the transmission of counties in France at that time (which is probable, but remains unproven).
     "m CONRAD "l'Ancien" Comte de Paris, son of WELF I Graf in Swabia & his wife Heilwig --- (-22 Mar [862/66])."
Med Lands Cites:
[158] Ex Heirici Miraculis S. Germani 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 401, footnote 1 citing v. Dümmler Ostfr. Reich I, p. 422, as stating her origin.
[159] Walahfridi Strabi Carmen, MGH Poetæ Latini ævi Carolini II, p. 391.
[160] Including ES II 10.
[161] Abbé E. Bougaud ( ed.) (1875) Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon (Dijon) ("Chronicle St-Bénigne de Dijon"), p. 109.
[162] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 400.
[163] Hincmari Remensis Annales 865, MGH SS I, p. 470.15
GAV-30 EDV-30 GKJ-31.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1961 9.3

; Per Med Lands:
     "CONRAD "l'Ancien" (-22 Mar [862/66]). Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names (in order) "Chuonradum et Ruodolfum" as brothers of Empress Judith[1765]. Graf von Linz- und Argengau. Dux. Nithard records that Conrad and his brother Rudolf were forcibly tonsured in [Apr 830] by their sister's stepson, Lothar, then in revolt against his father, and sent to Aquitaine "to be held by Pepin"[1766]. Comte de Paris. The Miraculis Sancti Germani record that "Chuonradus princeps" was cured of an eye problem by the saint, and that he built the church of Saint-Germain at Auxerre in thanks[1767]. An agreement between Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks and his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks dated Jun 860 names "nobilis ac fidelibus laicis…Chuonradus, Evrardus, Adalardus, Arnustus, Warnarius, Liutfridus, Hruodolfus, Erkingarius, Gislebertus, Ratbodus, Arnulfus, Hugo, item Chuonradus, Liutharius, Berengarius, Matfridus, Boso, Sigeri, Hartmannus, Liuthardus, Richuinus, Wigricus, Hunfridus, Bernoldus, Hatto, Adalbertus, Burchardus, Christianus, Leutulfus, Hessi, Herimannus, item Hruodulfus, Sigehardus"[1768]. "Ludowicus…rex" confirmed an exchange between Grimald abbot of St Gallen and "quidam comis…Chuonratus" relating to property in Linzgau and Argengau, by charter dated 1 Apr 861[1769]. A poem by Walahfridus Strabus records the epitaph of "Chonradum comitem"[1770]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 22 Mar of "Conradus comes"[1771].
     "m ADELAIS [de Tours], daughter of HUGUES Comte [de Tours] & his wife Ava ---. The Miraculis Sancti Germani name "Adheleid" as wife of "Chuonradus princeps"[1772]. A poem by Walahfridus Strabus records the epitaph of "Adelheidam"[1773]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. Some secondary works[1774] assert that the second husband of Adelais was Robert "le Fort" [Capet]. If this is correct, Adelais must have been Comte Robert's second or third wife as his known children were already born by the time Adelais's husband Conrad died. The assertion appears based on the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which names "duo filii Rotberti Andegavorum comitis, frs Hugonis abbatis, senior Odo…Robertus alter"[1775]. Settipani states that the passage is a 12th century interpolation and has little historical value, although he does suggest that it is likely that the wife of Comte Robert was a close relation of Adelais without providing the basis for this statement[1776]. A family connection between Comte Robert and Conrad Comte de Paris is also suggested by the former being invested with the county of Auxerre in 865, after this county was confiscated from the latter (as recorded by Hincmar[1777]), on the assumption that there was some basis of heredity behind the transmission of counties in France at that time (which is probable, but remains unproven)."
Med Lands Cites:
[1765] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 36, MGH SS II, p. 597.
[1766] Nithard I.3, p. 131.
[1767] Ex Heirici Miraculis S. Germani 3, MGH SS XIII, p. 401.
[1768] Adnuntatio domni Karoli, MGH LL 1, p. 469.
[1769] D LD 103, p. 149.
[1770] Walahfridi Strabi Carmen, MGH Poetæ Latini ævi Carolini II, p. 387.
[1771] L'abbé Lebeuf (1855) Mémoires concernant l'histoire civile et ecclésiastique d'Auxerre et de son ancient diocese (Auxerre) (“Histoire d´Auxerre”), IV, p. 11.
[1772] Ex Heirici Miraculis S. Germani 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 401, footnote 1 citing v. Dümmler Ostfr. Reich I, p. 422, as stating her origin.
[1773] Walahfridi Strabi Carmen, MGH Poetæ Latini ævi Carolini II, p. 391.
[1774] Including ES II 10.
[1775] Abbé E. Bougaud ( ed.) (1875) Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon ( Dijon) ("Chronicle St-Bénigne de Dijon"), p. 109.
[1776] Settipani (1993), p. 400.
[1777] Hincmari Remensis Annales 865, MGH SS I, p. 470.20

Family 1

Konrad I 'the Elder' (?) Count of Auxerre, Graf in Argengau und Linzgau b. c 810, d. 16 Feb 863
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aelis de Tours: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020389&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Welf 1 page - The House of Welfen: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aelis de Tours: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020389&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues 'le Méfiant': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020433&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ALSACE.htm#_Toc508299222. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2019), memorial page for Ava de Morvois de Tours (769–4 Nov 839), Find A Grave Memorial no. 146961315, ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664) Unknown, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/146961315/ava-de_tours. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ava: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020434&tree=LEO
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 48-17, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020396&tree=LEO
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_I,_Count_of_Auxerre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Welf I page (The House of Welfen): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf1.html
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#ConradAuxerreMWaldrada
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rutpert IV 'Robert the Strong': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020387&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ALSACE.htm#Adelaisdiedafter866
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 18 November 2019), memorial page for Adelaide de Tours de Bourgogne (805–866), Find A Grave Memorial no. 190253182, citing Saint-Étienne Cathedral, Sens, Departement de l'Yonne, Bourgogne, France ; Maintained by Our Family History (contributor 47719401), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/190253182/adelaide-de_bourgogne
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Robertdied866B
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Tours
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/WURTTEMBERG.htm#ConradIParisdiedafter862
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Welf I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020418&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugo: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020417&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Konrad II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020419&tree=LEO
  24. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_II,_Duke_of_Transjurane_Burgundy.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020109&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#RobertIdied923B

Bertha (?) de Morvois, Countess of Vermandois1,2,3

F, #4928
FatherGuerri I (?) Cte de Morvois2
MotherEve (?) of Roussillon3,2
ReferenceGAV29
Last Edited29 Aug 2020
     Bertha (?) de Morvois, Countess of Vermandois was born at Vermandois, Normandy, France.4 She married Heribert I (?) Cte de Vermandois, sn de Senlis, de Peronne et de St.Quentin, son of Pepin II Quentin (?) Cte de Vermandois, sn de Senlis, de Peronne et de St.Quentin, circa 872; NB: See Note on The Henry Project for a discussion on unlikeliness that Heribert actually married this Bertha de Morvois.
     Genealogics reports this marriage to Bertha, citing:
1. Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried. 105.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis. 51.

     Med Lands reports that me married an otherwise unidentified "Lietgardis".
     Racines et Histoire reports this marriage to Bertha, as well as a second marriage to "Hildebrande (fille de Robert Le Fort)".
I have chosed to include the marriage, but show the mother of Heribert's children as unidentified. GA Vaut.1,2,5,6,7,8,9
     ; Leo van de Pas cites:
1. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 105
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to Amercia bef.1700 7th Edition, Frederick Lewis Weis, Reference: 51.3 GAV-29.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-17, p. 51. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha de Morvois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020188&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heribert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020187&tree=LEO
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/herib001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#HeribertIdied900907. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 4 April 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertha de Morvois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020188&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, (Cunegonde|Kunigunde) de Vermandois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00726527&tree=LEO

Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Bretagne1,2,3,4

F, #4929, b. between 958 and 965, d. circa 1024
FatherGeoffroi I "Grisegonelle" (?) Comte d'Anjou1,8,5,9,10,4,11 b. bt 938 - 940, d. 21 Jul 987
MotherAdèle de Troyes5,6,4,7
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited11 Dec 2020
     Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Bretagne was born between 958 and 965 at Pays de la Loire, France (now); Genealogy.EU says b. ca 952; Racines et Histoire says b. 952/60; Genealogics says b. ca 965; Wikipedia says b. ca 956; Find A Grave says b. 11 Nov 958; Med Lands says b. bef 965.1,3,9,12,13,14 She married Conan I "Le Tort" (?) Duc de Bretagne, Cte de Rennes, son of Juhel (Judicaël) Bérenger (?) Comte de Rennes and Gerberge (?), in 973;      According to The Henry Project: "Rodulfus Glaber [ii, 3 (pp. 30-1)] states that Conan married a sister of count Foulques of Anjou, the Cronicle of S. Florent says that Geoffrey was son of Conan by a sister of Foulques [Lobineau (1707), 2: 85], and the Angevin genealogical collection states that Judith, wife of Richard of Normandy, was the daughter of Conan by his wife Ermengarde, daughter of Geoffroy of Anjou [Poupardin (1900), 208]."15,1,2,9,16,14,17
Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Bretagne died circa 1024 at Pays de la Loire, France (now); Wikipedia says d. ca 1024; Racines et Histoire says d. 27 June 992; Genealogy.EU says d. aft 982. Since she apparently m. again around 1000 and (per Wikipedia) had at least 6 more children, she apparently lived past 1000. So I choose to use "ca 1024" as the death date for now. GA Vaut.12,8,1,18,19,13
Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Bretagne was buried circa 1024 at Saint Aubin Abbey, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     11 Nov 958, Pays de la Loire, France
     DEATH     27 Jun 1022 (aged 63), Pays de la Loire, France
     Ermangarde D'Anjou Bretagne. Ermengarde - Also Known As: "Elizabeth", "Irmgard", "Ermengard", "Gotfredsdatter", "Ermengarde /D Anjou/", "Duchess", "Ermengarde /d Anjou/", "Ermengard /De Anjou/", "Ermengarde-Gerberga of Anjou", "Countess of Rennes", "Regent of Brittany (992-994)", "Countess of Angouleme", "Duchess Ermangarde Bretagne"
     Birthdate: November 11, 958
     Birthplace: Duchy of Anjou (now Pays de la Loire, France)
     Death: Died June 27, 1022 in Duchy of Anjou (now Pays de la Loire, France)
     Cause of death: MZC5-D28
     Place of Burial: Anjou, Maine-et-Loire, Normandy, France
     Immediate Family:
     Daughter of Geoffrey I "Greymantle", count of Anjou and Adele de Vermandois, Comtesse de Châlons & de Beaune
     Wife of Conan I le Fort, duc de Bretagne
     Mother of Geoffroy I, duc de Bretagne; Judith of Brittany; Catuallon de Bretagne; Hernod de Bretagne; Alain Glanderius and 1 other
     Family Members
     Parents
          Geoffroy I de Anjou unknown–987
          Adele of Meaux
     Spouse
          Conan De Rennes 944–992
     Siblings
          Fulk III Anjou unknown–1040
          Maurice de Anjou unknown–1012
     Children
          Geoffroi de Bretagne unknown–1008
          Judith De Rennes 983–1017
     BURIAL     Saint Aubin Abbey, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
     Created by: Our Family History
     Added: 19 Jan 2017
     Find A Grave Memorial 175521139.13
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Ermengarde-Girberge of Anjou, also called Ermengarde of Anjou, was the daughter of Geoffrey I, comte d'Anjou, and Adelais de Vermandois. She is called Ermengarde in northern (French) sources, but at least one early southern source calls her Girberge. Angevins were known to give daughters two names, as evidenced by her aunt, called Adelaide-Blanche.
     "In 973 Ermengard-Girberge married Conon I 'le Tort', duc de Bretagne, son of Judicael Berengar, comte de Rennes. Of their four children, Geoffrey I and Judith would have progeny. Her husband Conon opposed her father and brother Foulques III even though the marriage was apparently designed for a political alliance between Anjou and Brittany. Even after Conon had been killed by Foulques at the second Battle of Conquereuil in 992, and during the period 992-994 when Ermengarde-Girberge was regent for their son Geoffrey, she remained loyal to her brother Foulques. In 992 following the interests of her brother, and functioning as regent, she accepted Capetian over-lordship for Rennes while rejecting that of Eudes I, comte de Blois.
     "About 1000 her brother Foulques arranged for his widowed sister to marry secondly Guillaume IV Taillefer, comte d'Angoulême, one of his close allies, son of Arnauld Mancer, comte d'Angoulême, and his first wife Raingarde. They had about six sons of whom Geoffroy is recorded with progeny. The eldest son Alduin II married Alaisia de Gasçogne and had progeny, and a son Foulques also married, though the details are not recorded.
     "Ermengarde-Girberge is thought to have died after 1 May 1041, though some sources suggest that she died about 1024."9 GAV-27 EDV-27.

; Per Med Lands:
     "ERMENGARDE d'Anjou (before 965-after 982). Rodulfus Glaber records that Conan married the sister of Foulques of Anjou but does not name her[103]. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. She was presumably born before 965 if it is correct that her first child was born in 980.
     "m (973) CONAN Comte de Rennes, son of JUDICAËL BERENGAR Comte de Rennes & his wife Gerberge --- (-killed in battle Conquereil 27 Jun 992). He succeeded in 990 as CONAN I "le Tort" Duke of Brittany."
Med Lands cites: [103] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum II.4, p. 59.4

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3/1:75 Neu.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis. 42.9


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Ermengarde-Gerberga of Anjou, also called Ermengarde of Anjou (c.?956 - c.?1024), at an unknown age was the Countess of Rennes, Regent of Brittany (992–994) and also Countess of Angoulême.
Life
     "Ermengarde-Gerberga was born c.?956,[1] the daughter of Geoffrey I, Count of Anjou and Adele of Meaux.[2] She married Conan I of Rennes, Count of Rennes, in 973.[3] Her husband Conan of Rennes opposed her father and brother Fulk even though the marriage was apparently designed to form a political alliance between Anjou and Brittany.[4] Even after Conan had been killed by Fulk at the Battle of Conquereuil in 992, and during the period 992-994 when Ermengarde was Regent for their son Geoffrey, she remained loyal to her brother Fulk III, Count of Anjou.[4] In 992, following the interests of her brother, and functioning as Regent, she accepted Capetian over-lordship for Rennes while rejecting that of Odo I, Count of Blois.[5]
     "About 1000[6] her brother Fulk III arranged his widowed sister to marry, secondly, William II of Angoulême, one of his close allies.[7]
Issue
     "By her first husband Conan I 'le Tort' Count of Rennes, she had the following children:
** Judith (982–1017), married Richard II, Duke of Normandy.[3]
** Geoffrey I, Duke of Brittany, the eventual heir to Conan I.[3]
** Judicael, count of Porhoët (died 1037).[3]
** Hernod.[3]

     "By her second husband William II 'Taillefer' Count of Angoulême, she had the following children:
** Alduin, Count of Angoulême (d. 1032), married Alaisia de Gasçogne.[6]
** Geoffrey, Count of Angoulême (d.1048), married 1stly Petronille d'Archiac, 2ndly Anceline.[6]
** Fulk of Angoulême, married Aynors.[6]
** Odon (flourished c. 1030).[6]
** Arnauld (died young).[6]
** William (died young).[6]

Notes
a. She is called Ermengarde in northern [French] sources however at least one early southern source calls her Gerberga. Angevins were known to give daughters two names as evidenced by her aunt, called Adelaide-Blanche. See: Bachrach, 'Henry II and the Angevin Tradition', Albion, Vol. 16, No. 2, (1984), p. 117 n. 35; Crisp, 'Consanguinity and the Saint-Aubin Genealogies, Haskins Society Journal 14 (2005), p. 114; also: Bachrach, ""Fulk Nerra, (1993), p. 42.
References
1. Bernard S. Bachrach, Fulk Nerra the Neo-Roman Consul, 987-1040 (University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1993), p. 9
2. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1 (Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, Marburg, Germany, 1984), Tafel 49
3. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, Marburg, Germany, 1984), Tafel 75
4. Bernard S. Bachrach, Henry II and the Angevin Tradition of Family Hostility, Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, Vol. 16, No. 2, (Summer, 1984), p. 117
5. Bernard S. Bachrach, Henry II and the Angevin Tradition of Family Hostility, Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, Vol. 16, No. 2, (Summer, 1984), p. 117 n. 38
6. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 4 (Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, Marburg, Germany. 1989), Tafel 817
7. Archibald R. Lewis, The Development of Southern French and Catalan Society, 718-1050 (University of Texas Press, 1965, p. 337) Online copy viewable here: https://libro.uca.edu/lewis/sfcatsoc.htm."12

; Per Racines et Histoire (Anjou): "1) Ermengarde d’Anjou ° ~952/60 + 27/06/992
     ép. 1) 973/93 Conan 1er «Le Tort» de Rennes comte de Rennes (970), duc de Bretagne (988) ° 944 +X 27/06/992 (Conquereuil.)15 "

; Per Med Lands:
     "CONAN de Rennes, son of JUDICAËL [Juhael] Comte de Rennes & his wife Gerberge --- (-killed in battle Conquereil 27 Jun 992). The Chronicle of Nantes names "Conano filio Judicael Berengarii Redonensi comite" when recording that he held a large part of Brittany from Thibaut [II] Comte de Blois and fought with Hoël Comte de Nantes[115]. His parentage is confirmed by the Chronico Sancti Michaelis which records the death of his grandson "Gaufridus Dux Britanniæ filius Conani filii Juhelli Berengarii" in 1008[116]. Comte de Rennes. He succeeded in [970] as CONAN I "le Tort" Duke of Brittany. Rodulfus Glaber records that Conan "crowned himself with a royal diadem", was defeated by his brother-in-law Foulques Comte d'Anjou, and surrendered after his right hand had been cut off[117]. The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records that "Conanus Brito…filius Juhelli Berengarii" was killed in battle "V Kal Jul 992" against Foulques Comte d'Anjou[118]. The Chronicle of Nantes reports that he was killed at the battle of Conquereuil[119], dated "992 V Kal Jul" in the Chronicon britannicum[120]. The Chronicon Kemperlegiense records the death "in bello Conçurruç…V Kal Jul" of "Conanus comes, filius Iudicaëlis Berengarii Comitis Redonensis"[121].
     "m (973) ERMENGARDE d'Anjou, daughter of GEOFFROY I "Grisegonelle" Comte d'Anjou & his first wife Adela de Meaux [Vermandois-Carolingian] (before 965-after 982). Rodulfus Glaber records that Conan married the sister of Foulques of Anjou but does not name her[122]. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[115] Chronique de Nantes XXXIX, p. 112.
[116] Chronico Sancti Michaelis in periculo maris, RHGF, Tome X, p. 175.
[117] Rodulfus Glaber Opera, II.4, p. 59.
[118] Chronico Sancti Michaelis in periculo maris, RHGF, Tome X, p. 175.
[119] Chronique de Nantes XLV, p. 132.
[120] Chronicon britannicum 992, cited in Chronique de Nantes, p. 132 footnote 2.
[121] Chronicon Kemperlegiense, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber I, Collectio Veterum, p. 520.
[122] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum II.4, p. 59.14

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html#C1
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#ErmengardeMConanIBretagnedied992. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020193&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelais de Vermandois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020194&tree=LEO
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adèle de Troyes: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adele001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.3.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermengarde-Girberge d'Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020197&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#GeoffroyIdied987B.
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Geoffroy I "Grisegonelle" (Geoffrey Greycloak, Gaufridus/Gauzfredus Grisegonella): http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/geoff001.htm
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ermengarde-Gerberga_of_Anjou. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 November 2019), memorial page for Ermengarde D'Anjou Bretagne De Rennes (11 Nov 958–27 Jun 1022), Find A Grave Memorial no. 175521139, citing Saint Aubin Abbey, Angers, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France ; Maintained by Our Family History (contributor 47719401), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/175521139/ermengarde-rennes. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#ConanIdied992
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Conon I 'le Tort': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020196&tree=LEO
  17. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Conan I: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/conan000.htm
  18. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 8 Nov 2019; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  19. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/conan000.htm
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html
  21. [S1813] Stewart Baldwin, "Baldwin email 14 Oct 2004 "Loose ends: children of Conan I of Brittany"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 14 Oct 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Baldwin email 14 Oct 2004."
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conan_I_of_Rennes
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Normandie, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Normandie.pdf
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith de Bretagne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020198&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#JudithBretagnedied1017
  26. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Judith de Bretagne: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/judit001.htm

Simon I “le Vieux” de Montfort seigneur de Montfort L'Amaury1,2,3,4,5,6,7

M, #4930, b. circa 1030, d. 25 September 1087
FatherAmaury II de Montfort Comte d'Evreux, Comte de Montfort8,9,10,2,4,7,5 b. c 1000, d. 1053
MotherBertrade/Berteis de GomezGometz(?)11,10,2,4,5,7 b. c 1001, d. bt 1029 - 1095
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited3 Oct 2020
     Simon I “le Vieux” de Montfort seigneur de Montfort L'Amaury married Unknown (?);
His 2nd wife. Per The Henry Project: "GND (Robert of Torigny) viii, 17 (vol. 2, pp. 232-5), which states that there were two wives before Agnes."
GND = Guillaume de Jumièges, Gesta Normannorum Ducum, as edited in Elisabeth van Houts, ed. & trans., The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumièges, Orderic Vitalis and Robert of Torigni, 2 vols., (Oxford, 1992). Citation is by book and chapter of Guillaume's work, with the volume and page number of the edition by van Houts in parentheses. Unless otherwise stated, references are to Guillaume's work, and not to later additions by such authors as Orderic Vitalis and Robert de Torigni.10,2,7,5 Simon I “le Vieux” de Montfort seigneur de Montfort L'Amaury was born circa 1030 at Montfort, Eure, France.5,6,2 He married Isabeau/Isabelle de Broyes Dame de Nogent, daughter of Hugues I Bardoul de Broyes Seigneur de Broyes Beaufort, Pithiviers et Nogent, circa 1055;
His 1st wife. Leo van de Pas shows his wife as "Isabel de Broyes."1,10,2,7,12,5,13,4,14 Simon I “le Vieux” de Montfort seigneur de Montfort L'Amaury married Agnès d'Évreux, daughter of Richard d'Evreux 2nd Comte d'Evreux and Godehilde (?), before 1070;
His 3rd wife; Med Lands and Racines et Histoire (Montfortand Evreux pages) say m. bef 1070; Roglo says m. 1060
Per the Henry Project: "GND = Guillaume de Jumièges, Gesta Normannorum Ducum, as edited in Elisabeth van Houts, ed. & trans., The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumièges, Orderic Vitalis and Robert of Torigni, 2 vols., (Oxford, 1992). Citation is by book and chapter of Guillaume's work, with the volume and page number of the edition by van Houts in parentheses. Unless otherwise stated, references are to Guillaume's work, and not to later additions by such authors as Orderic Vitalis and Robert de Torigni."
OV = Marjorie Chibnall, ed. & trans., The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, 6 vols. (Oxford, 1969-80).1,15,10,2,7,12,4,16,17,18,19
Simon I “le Vieux” de Montfort seigneur de Montfort L'Amaury died on 25 September 1087; The Henry Project says d. "in or soon after 1087."1,10,2,4,6,5,7
Simon I “le Vieux” de Montfort seigneur de Montfort L'Amaury was buried after 25 September 1087 at Prieure Saint-Thomas, Epernon, Departement d'Eure-et-Loir, Centre, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1038, Montfort-l'Amaury, Departement des Yvelines, Île-de-France, France
     DEATH     25 Sep 1087 (aged 48–49), France
     Nobility, third seigneur de Montfort l'Amaury. Born the son of Amaury I de Montfort and Bertrade de Gometz. He was married twice, first to Isabelle de Broyes who bore him three children and second to Agnes de Evreux with whom he had four more.
     Family Members
     Spouses
          Isabelle de Broyes Montfort 1034–1058
          Agnès d'Évreux de Montfort 1030–1116
     Children
          Amaury IV Montfort unknown–1137
          Richard de Montfort 1065–1092
          Bertrade de Montfort 1070–1117
     BURIAL     Prieure Saint-Thomas, Epernon, Departement d'Eure-et-Loir, Centre, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 23 Apr 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 89015330.1,20,7,21
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "AGNES d'Evreux . Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia” kidnapped “Agnetem uterinam sororem suam, Ricardi Ebroicensium comitis filiam” by night and married her to “Simoni de Monteforti”, who in exchange granted “filiam eiusdem Simonis...Isabel” to Raoul[683]. In other passages Orderic names her and specifies that she was the daughter of Richard and sister of Guillaume[684]. The date of her marriage is estimated from the marriage of her daughter which is dated to 1089.
     "m ([before 1070]) as his third wife, SIMON Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury, son of AMAURY Seigneur de Montfort & his wife Bertrade --- (-25 Sep [1087], bur Epernon)."
Med Lands cites:
[683] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XIII, pp. 403-4.
[684] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 167, and Book XII, p. 189.17


; Per Racines et Histoire (Evreux): “Agnès d’Evreux ° 1030/32 (Evreux)
     ép. 1) avant 1070 Simon de Montfort ° ~1025 + 25/09/1087 (fils d’Amauri et de Bertrade de Gometz)
     postérité des comtes d’Evreux de la maison de Montfort ”.18

; Per Genealogics:
     “Simon was the son of Amaury II, comte de Montfort, and his wife Bertrade/Berteis. He continued the work begun by his father and grandfather, and built the church of Saint-Pierre and the chapel of Saint-Laurent in the village.
     “With his first wife Isabel de Broyes, dame de Nogent, daughter of Hugues Bardoul, seigneur de Broyes et de Pithivers, he had two sons, Amaury II and Simon II, and a daughter Elizabeth who would have progeny, marrying Radulf III de Tosny, sire de Conches.
     “A widower, Simon asked Richard, comte d'Evreux, for the hand of his daughter Agnes, but he was refused (the reason is not recorded). Then Radulf III de Tosny, seigneur de Conches, who was the half-brother of Agnes through their mother Godehildis, widow of his father Roger I Hispanicus, seigneur de Tosny, kidnapped her at night and brought her to Simon; he and Agnes were then married, and from a grateful Simon, Radulf received the hand of Elisabeth, Simon's daughter from his first marriage. Simon and Agnes had four children of whom Amaury III and Bertrade would have progeny, Bertrade with both her husbands, Foulques IV 'Rechin', comte d'Anjou, and Philippe I, king of France.
     “Simon may have been married a third time, but nothing is recorded of this wife, and no progeny is recorded. He died in 1087.”.2

; This is the same person as ”Simon I de Montfort l'Amaury” at The Henry Project.


This is the same person as ”Simon I de Montfort” at Wikipedia and as ”Simon Ier de Montfort” at Wikipédia (FR).10,22,23

; Per Racines et Histoire (Epernon): “Simon 1er “Le Vieux” de Montfort ° ~1030 + 25/09/1087 seigneur de Montfort”.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "SIMON [I] de Montfort, son of AMAURY [I] Seigneur de Montfort & his wife Bertrade --- (-25 Sep [1087], bur Epernon[488]). "Ivo de Curba villa" dedicated "ecclesiæ Sanctorum Martyrum Gervasii et Protasii Cheonis" by charter dated to [1048/61], witnessed by “...Amalricus de Sparnoto, Simon et Mainerius filii eius...”[489]. "Amalricus miles" founded the priory of Saint-Thomas d’Epernon, with the consent of "conjugis mee…Bertredis…et filiorum meorum…Simonis…atque Mainerii", by charter dated [11 Apr 1052/Jul 1053][490]. He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Montfort and completed the construction of the castle known as Montfort-l'Amaury which was started by his father[491]. "…Simon de Monte forti…" witnessed the charter dated 29 May 1067 under which Philippe I King of France confirmed the possessions of Saint-Martin-des-Champs[492]. Orderic Vitalis records the death of “Simon de Monteforti, gener Ricardi comitis Ebroicensium”, dated to 1087 from the context[493]. "Mainerium, fratrem Symonis de Monte Forti" donated property, with the consent of "Simone fratre eius comiteque Belli Montis Ivonis", by charter dated to before 1091, which also names "domnus Simon, filio suo Amalrico"[494].
     "m firstly ISABELLE de Broyes dame de Nogent-le-Roi, daughter of HUGUES [I] "Bardoul" de Broyes & his [first wife ---]. Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1160 under which Louis VII King of France confirmed donations to the abbey of Colombs near Nogent, including donations made by "Hugo…Bardulfus…et Simon de Monteforti gener eius et successor"[495]. The primary source which confirms her name has not been identified. The Historia of Monk Aimon records that "dominam de Novigento" married the lord of "Montifortem et Sparnomum", although the passage is confused as it appears to refer to the paternal grandparents of Simon, husband of Isabelle[496].
     "m secondly ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not been identified.
     "m thirdly ([before 1070]) AGNES d'Evreux, daughter of RICHARD Comte d'Evreux [Normandie] & his wife Godechildis ---. Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia” kidnapped “Agnetem uterinam sororem suam, Ricardi Ebroicensium comitis filiam” by night and married her to “Simoni de Monteforti”, who in exchange granted “filiam eiusdem Simonis...Isabel” to Raoul[497]. In other passages he names her and specifies that she was the daughter of Richard and sister of Guillaume[498]. The date of her marriage is estimated from the marriage of her daughter which is dated to 1089."
Med Lands cites:
[488] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 217.
[489] Marmoutier-Dunois CIX, p. 100.
[490] Epernon Saint-Thomas I, p. 1.
[491] CP VII Appendix D, p. 708.
[492] Liber Paris Saint-Martin-des-Champs, XII, p. 28.
[493] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, I, p. 258.
[494] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Octavus, Cap. X, p. 235.
[495] Duchesne (1631), Broyes et Châteauvillain, Preuves, p. 6.
[496] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF, Tome XI, p. 275.
[497] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XIII, pp. 403-4.
[498] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 167, and Book XII, p. 189.7


Reference: Genealogics cites: Les seize quartiers des Reines et Imperatrices Francaises. 1977., Jacques Saillot, Reference: 183.24 GAV-25 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

; Per Genealogy.EU (Montfort): “A2. Simon sn de Montfort-l'Amaury, +1087; 1m: ca 1055 Isabel de Broyes, Dame de Nogent; 2m: Csse Agnes d'Evreux”.25

; Per Racines et Histoire (Montfort): “Simon 1er “le Vieux” de Montfort ° ~1030 + 25/09/1087 (inh. à Epernon) seigneur de Montfort (~1060) (charte de Philippe 1er du 29/05/1067 à Saint-Martin-des-Champs ; charte de Louis VII en 1160 pour Coulombs)
     ép. 1) ~1055 Isabelle de Broyes, dame de Nogent-Le-Roi (Broyes, près Nogent-le-Roi) ° ~1034 (fille d’Hugues 1er «Bardoul», seigneur de Broyes, Capitaine de Montfort, et d’Alvidis)
     ép. 2) ?
     ép. 3) avant 1070 Agnès d’Evreux ° ~1030/42 (fille de Richard, comte d’Evreux et de Godehilde (Godechildis) de Tosny ; demi-soeur de Raoul, son gendre ; veuve de Guillaume de Beny, seigneur de Conches)”.12

; Per Racines et Histoire (Beynes): “Simon 1er de Montfort + 1087 fonde 1072 le Prieuré Saint-Laurent de Montfort
     ép.1) Elisabeth, dame de Nogent (fille d’Hugues Bardoul)
     ép.2) Agnès d’Evreux (fille de Richard, comte d’Evreux)”.4

; Per Genealogy.EU (Broyes 1): “C3. Isabeau de Broyes; m.ca 1055 Simon de Montfort (+1087)”.26

; Per Med Lands:
     "ISABELLE de Broyes . Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1160 under which Louis VII King of France confirmed donations to the abbey of Colombs near Nogent, including donations made by "Hugo…Bardulfus…et Simon de Monteforti gener eius et successor"[44]. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. Dame de Nogent-le-Roi.
     "m as his first wife, SIMON Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury, son of AMAURY de Montfort & his wife Bertrade --- (-25 Sep [1087], bur Epernon)."
Med Lands cites:
[44] Duchesne (Dreux, Broyes et Châteauvillain) (1631), Broyes et Châteauvillain, Preuves, p. 6.4


; Per Racines et Histoire (Broyes): “Isabelle (Elisabeth, Isabeau) de Broyes ° ~1034/35 dame de Nogent
     ép. ~1055 Simon 1er «Le Vieux» de Montfort ° ~1030 + 25/09/1087 seigneur de Montfort (fils d’Amauri de Montfort et de Bertrade)”.27

Family 1

Unknown (?)

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 158-159, de MONTFORT 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079533&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/simon000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Beynes, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Beynes.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2164] Roglo Genealogical database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Simon l'Aîné: http://roglo.eu/roglo?lang=en&m=NG&n=Simon+l%27A%C3%AEn%C3%A9&fn=&sn=. Hereinafter cited as Roglo Database.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs d’ Epernon, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Epernon.pdf
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PARIS%20REGION%20NOBILITY.htm#SimonIIMontfortAmaurydied1087B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amaury II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079545&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PARIS%20REGION%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc40424601
  10. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Simon I de Montfort l'Amaury: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/simon000.htm
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrade/Berteis: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079546&tree=LEO
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montfort (act. -L’Amaury, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montfort.pdf
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel de Broyes: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079534&tree=LEO
  14. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Isabel de Broyes: http://roglo.eu/roglo?lang=en;i=1714583.
  15. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Simon l'Aîné: http://roglo.eu/roglo?lang=en&m=NG&n=Simon+l%27A%C3%AEn%C3%A9&fn=&sn=
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes d'Evreux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079536&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#AgnesEvreuxMSimonMontfortAmaurydied1087
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d’ Evreux, & Famille Devereux, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Evreux.pdf
  19. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Agnès d'Évreux: http://roglo.eu/roglo?lang=en;i=1386771.
  20. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/simon000.htm
  21. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 08 September 2020), memorial page for Simon I de Montfort (1038–25 Sep 1087), Find a Grave Memorial no. 89015330, citing Prieure Saint-Thomas, Epernon, Departement d'Eure-et-Loir, Centre, France; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/89015330/simon_i-de_montfort. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_I_de_Montfort. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  23. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Simon Ier de Montfort: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Ier_de_Montfort. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079533&tree=LEO
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Montfort Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/montfort.html#S2
  26. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/broyes1.html#IH1
  27. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, seigneurs de Broyes & Commercy, Sarrebrücken, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Broyes.pdf
  28. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 159, de MONTFORT 3:i.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amaury II de Montfort: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177611&tree=LEO
  30. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Beynes.pdf, p. 2.
  31. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Stafford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth (Isabella) de Montfort: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177610&tree=LEO
  33. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Isabeau de Montfort: http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=82968.
  34. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 159, de MONTFORT 3:iv.
  35. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 118-23, p. 106. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  36. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  37. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  38. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bertrade de Montfort-l'Amaury: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007642&tree=LEO
  39. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PARIS%20REGION%20NOBILITY.htm#BertradeMontfortdied1115
  40. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 156, de MONTFORT of Leicester 4.
  41. [S2164] Roglo Database, online http://roglo.eu/roglo, Simon l'Aîné: http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=121577.
  42. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amaury III de Montfort: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120972&tree=LEO
  43. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#AmauryIIIEvreuxdiedafter1136B
  44. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 159, de MONTFORT 3:iii.

Adelaide (Adela, Blanche) (?) d'Anjou, Countess of Toulouse1,2,3

F, #4932, b. between 942 and 947, d. 29 May 1026
FatherFoulques II "le Bon" (?) Comte d'Anjou1,2,4,5,3,6,7 b. bt 905 - 910, d. 11 Nov 958
MotherGerberge (?) d'Arles, du Maine1,2,4,5,3,8 b. bt 913 - 915, d. b 952
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited25 Sep 2020
     Adelaide (Adela, Blanche) (?) d'Anjou, Countess of Toulouse was born between 942 and 947 at Anjou, France.1,3,9 She married Etienne I de Brioude Comte de Gévaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude, son of Bertrand (?) vicomte de Gévaudan and Emilde/Emilgarde (?) de Brioude, circa 955;
Her 1st husband. His 2nd wife.
     Genealogics says m. bef 960; Wikipedia says m. c 955; Med Lands says m. 950/960.1,5,3,10,11,12,13 Adelaide (Adela, Blanche) (?) d'Anjou, Countess of Toulouse married Raimond V (?) Comte de Toulouse, son of Raimund IV (?) comte de Toulouse and Emilde/Emnilde (?) de Rouerge, circa 975;
Her 2nd husband.14,15,16,3,12,11 Adelaide (Adela, Blanche) (?) d'Anjou, Countess of Toulouse married Louis V "le Fainéant" (?) King of the West Franks, son of Lothair IV (?) King of the West Franks and Emma (?) d'Arles, Queen of the Franks, in 982 at Vieille-Brioude, Haute-Loire, Haute-Loire, France (now); her 3rd husband; his 2nd wife.17,1,2,3,18,19,12 Adelaide (Adela, Blanche) (?) d'Anjou, Countess of Toulouse and Louis V "le Fainéant" (?) King of the West Franks were divorced in 984.17,1,3 Adelaide (Adela, Blanche) (?) d'Anjou, Countess of Toulouse married Guillaume II 'le Liberateur' de Taillefer (?) Cte d'Arles et Provence, Toulouse, son of Boson II (?) Comte d'Avignon et Arles, Cte de Provence and Constance (?) de Provence, between 984 and 986;
Her 4th husband; his 2nd wife.1,20,2,21,3,22
Adelaide (Adela, Blanche) (?) d'Anjou, Countess of Toulouse died on 29 May 1026 at Avignon, Departement du Vaucluse, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France (now); Bunot says d. aft 1026.23,1,20,5,3,10,24
Adelaide (Adela, Blanche) (?) d'Anjou, Countess of Toulouse was buried after 29 May 1026 at Abbaye de Montmajour, Arles, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     940, France
     DEATH     1026 (aged 85–86), Avignon, Departement du Vaucluse, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
     Adelaide called the White, was the daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine. She was therefore the sister of Geoffrey Greymantle. She was married five times to some of France's most important noblemen.
     Her first marriage, probably before 960, was to Stephen, Viscount of Gévaudan. Her second marriage was to Raymond III, Count of Toulouse and Prince of Gothia, in 975. He died in 978.
     In 982, she married Louis, the young son of Lothair of France, and the two were jointly crowned Monarchs of Aquitaine on the same day at Brioude. The large difference in age between the spouses was cause for a quick divorce in 984.
She fled then to Arles, where she contracted, against papal advice, a marriage with William I of Provence in 984. She gave him a daughter, Constance of Arles, who later married Robert II of France.
     Her final marriage was to Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy.
     Her children with Stephen:
** William, (c.?955-975).
** Pons, Count of Gévaudan and Forez. He died aft. 26 February 1011.
** Bertrand, Count of Gévaudan.
** Almodis of Gévaudan, she married Adalbert I de Charroux, Count de la Haute March.

     Her children with William I of Provence:
** Constance of Arles, who later married Robert II of France.
** Ermengarde, she married Robert I, Count of Auvergne.
** Tota-Adelaide, she married Bernard I, Count of Besalú.

     Adelaide died in 1026, aged approximately eighty-six. The location of her death was probably at Avignon, since the year of her death is recorded by Arnoux, a monk of the abbey of Saint-André, near Avignon. She was buried in Montmajour Abbey, near Arles, considered at the time as the burial place of the family of counts of Provence.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Fulk II of Anjou 909–960
          Gerberge du Maine 913–952
     Spouses
          Louis V King of France 967–987
          William I Taillefer 950–993
     Siblings
          Geoffroy I de Anjou unknown–987
     Children
          Constance d'Arles unknown–1032
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Montmajour, Arles, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 6 Jul 2013
     Find A Grave Memorial 113422258
     SPONSORED BY Billie Jasper.25
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GUGLIELMO di Ivrea, son of ADALBERTO II associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge [de Chalon] ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026, bur Dijon, Abbaye de Saint-Bénigne). Rodulfus Glaber names "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" and records that, as a boy, he was secretly stolen from the land of the Lombards and restored to his mother "with no small cunning by a certain monk"[60]. "Einricus…imperator" confirmed the property of the abbey of Fruttuaria, referring to property donated by "Otto qui et Vuillielmus comes filius Adalberti nepos Berengarii regis", by charter dated 1014[61]. It is assumed therefore that Guillaume was imprisoned as a child by Emperor Otto I in Italy after his father and paternal grandfather were deposed as kings of Italy. The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Guilelmum Ottonem et eius matrem Gerbergam" when recording that he was adopted by his mother's second husband "dux Burgundie Henricus"[62]. He adopted the name OTHON-GUILLAUME. He succeeded in [981] as Comte de Mâcon, by right of his first wife. He was declared heir to the duchy of Burgundy and installed as Comte de Nevers by his stepfather in 986. He was recognised as duke of Burgundy on the death of his stepfather in 1002, but deprived of his inheritance by Robert II King of France in Spring 1003 when the latter invaded Burgundy with troops lent by Richard II Duke of Normandy. Rodulfus Glaber records that "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" rebelled against the king [Robert II] on one occasion, supported by his son-in-law Landry Comte de Nevers[63]. "Comes Otto" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon for the souls of "Heinrici ducis qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genetricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti ducis ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis" by charter dated 1004[64]. Comte Othon continued to claim the duchy of Burgundy, but reconciled himself with the king of France in 1005, finally renouncing his claims in 1015. He was designated comes Burgundiæ[65], presumably a descriptive title with no precise territorial significance at that time although Othon did own extensive territories in Burgundy. “Comes Octo cognomento Vuillelmus” donated property “mihi secundum parentum successionem...infra alpes Pinninarum et flumen Padum et flumen Duriæ Bauticæ quod iuxta urbem Euoreiam” to Fruttuaria monastery, for the souls of “meæ et uxoris et filiorum et filiarum”, by charter dated 28 Oct 1019[66]. The Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon records the death in 1027 of "Otto qui et Willelmus dictus est comes" and his burial at St Bénigne[67]. The memorial on the tomb of "Nobiliter natus Guillelmus et Otho vocatus" records his death "1027 XI Kal Oct"[68]. The necrology of Autun Saint-Martin records the death “XVI Id Dec” of “Guillelmus dux Burgundie, anno 1025”[69].
     "m firstly (before [981/82]) as her second husband, ERMENTRUDE, widow of AUBRY [II] Comte de Mâcon, daughter of RAGENOLD Comte de Roucy & his wife Alberade of Lotharingia ([947/52]-[5 Oct 1002/1004]). "Ermentrudis" is named as daughter of "Alberada filia …Gerbergæ" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which does not name either her father or her husband but specifies that Ermentrude was the mother of Agnes[70], the latter naming both her parents in charters (see below). Bouchard highlights the absence of proof that the husband of Alberade of Lotharingia was Ragenold Comte de Roucy[71]. Her birth date is estimated from her son by her first marriage being named in 971. "Ermentrudis conjuge sua" consented to the donation of land "in Aponiaco villa" by "Albericus comes Matisconensis" to Cluny by charter dated 14 Jan 971[72]. The genealogy of the Comtes de Mâcon, included in the cartulary of Saint-Vincent de Mâcon, records the marriage of "dominus Guillelmus comes" with the wife of "Albericus filius Letaudi comitis"[73]. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" married the sister of "Brunone Lingonensi episcopo" who supported him in his rebellion against the king [Robert II][74]. "Otto comes, Irvis comitissa" subscribed a charter dated to [994] under which "Milo…uxoris mee Ermengarde" donated property to Cluny[75]. It is assumed that "Irvis" is a copyist error or abbreviation for "Ermentrudis" as no other reference to a countess of this name has been found. Her date of death is indicated by the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which records a donation by "Otto comes cognomento Willelmus" with "filii eius Rainaldi" dated 1004 "pro anima Hinrici Ducis, qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genitricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti Ducis, ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis"[76]. This is presumably the donation recorded in the charter dated 1004 under which "Comes Otto" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon for the souls of "Heinrici ducis qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genetricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti ducis ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis"[77].
     "m secondly (before 1016) ADELAIS, daughter of --- (-29 May 1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles). "Otto comes et uxor mea Adila" donated property to Saint-Vincent de Mâcon by two charters dated to 1015 or before (during the reign of Robert I King of France) both subscribed by "Rainaldi filii sui"[78]. "Otto comes et uxor mea Adeleidis et filius meus Rainaldus atque Otto nepos meus" donated property to Cluny by charter dated to [1015][79]. "Otto comes qui nominatur Willelmus" issued a charter dated 2 Nov 1023 subscribed by "Raynardi comitis, Adheleydis uxoris eius"[80]. The origin of Otto-Guillaume's second wife is not known with certainty. Most secondary source genealogies assume that she was Adelais [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow firstly of Etienne de Brioude, widow secondly of Raymond Comte de Toulouse, divorced wife thirdly of Louis V King of the Franks, widow fourthly of Guillaume [II] Comte de Provence, daughter of Foulques II "le Bon" Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge ---. Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's wife is named Adelais in several charters[81], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband[82], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelaide-Blanche d’Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn. It is perfectly possible that Adelais-Blanche was named in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume’s daughter. If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly sixty years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely. Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon. These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[83]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[84]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[85]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[86]."
Med Lands cites:
[60] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, pp. 105-7.
[61] D H II 305, p. 379.
[62] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1002, MGH SS XXIII, p. 778.
[63] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 105.
[64] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 228, p. 24.
[65] Bouchard (1987), p. 265, although the author does not cite her primary source for this statement.
[66] Historiæ patriæ monumenta, Chartarum, Tome I, CCXLIX, col. 428.
[67] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 181.
[68] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 181 footnote 2 which quotes the memorial but comments that it has since disappeared from the church.
[69] Autun Saint-Martin, Tome II, Extrait du nécrologe de Saint-Martin d’Autun, p. 383.
[70] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[71] Bouchard (1987), p. 169.
[72] Cluny, Tome II, 1291, p. 368.
[73] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 7, p. 6.
[74] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 105.
[75] Cluny, Tome III, 2267, p. 398.
[76] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 163.
[77] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 228, p. 24.
[78] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 471 and 490, pp. 271 and 284.
[79] Cluny, Tome III, 2694, p. 721.
[80] Cluny, Tome III, 2782, p. 807.
[81] Mâcon 471, 490, pp. 271, and 284-5, and Cluny Tome IV, 2694, p. 721-22.
[82] Bouchard (1987), p. 270, citing Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, quoted in Manteyer (1908), p. 274.
[83] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[84] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 225, p. 252.
[85] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo.
[86] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482.26

; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1): “E1. Othon Guillaume, adopted by his stepfather, whereby he became Cte de Bourgogne (995-1026), Cte de Nevers (980-989), Cte de Besançon (982-1026), Cte de Mâcon (982-1006), pretender to the Duchy of Bourgogne (1002-05); *958/9, +21.9.1026; 1m: 975/980 Ermentrude de Roucy (*ca 950 +1002/5), dau.of Ragenold de Roucy; 2m: before 1016 Adelaide=Blanche d'Anjou (+1026); all kids were by 1m.”.27

; Per Genealogics:
     "Adelaide also called Blanche, was born about 947, the daughter of Foulques II 'the Good', comte d'Anjou, and Gerberge de Tours. She was therefore the sister of Geoffrey I 'Greymantle', who succeeded his father as comte d'Anjou. She was married five times to some of France's most important noblemen.
     "Her first marriage, probably before 960, was to Etienne, comte de Gévaudan, son of Bertrand de Gévaudan and Emilgarde. Of their three children Pons and Almodis would have progeny. Her second marriage, in about 975, was to Raimond V, comte de Toulouse and prince of Gothia, the son of Raimond IV, comte de Toulouse. Raimond V died at Garazo in battle about 978.
     "Between 979 and 982 Adelaide married Louis, the young son of Lothar I, king of France, and the two were jointly crowned monarchs of Aquitaine on their wedding day at Brioude. The large difference in age between the spouses was cause for a quick divorce in 984. There was no progeny.
     "Adelaide fled to Arles, where between 984 and 986 she contracted, against papal advice, a marriage with Guillaume II 'le Liberateur', comte de Provence et Arles, son of Boso II, comte d'Avignon et Arles, and Constance de Provence. Their son Guillaume III and their daughter Constance both would have progeny. Constance would marry Robert II 'le Pieux', king of France. Shortly before his death in 994 Guillaume II entered a monastery.
     "Some sources give 990 as the year of Adelaide's death, others give 1026, when her last husband died."10



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Edinburgh, 1977., Gerald Paget, Reference: 139.
2. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 176.10


; This is the same person as ”Adélaïde/Alix (Adelaidis, Alaiz, Adelax, Alaicis) alias Blanche (Blanca, Candida) of Anjou” at The Henry Project.28

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adelaide-Blanche of Anjou at an unknown age (c.? 940 –1026) was the countess consort by marriage of Gévaudan and Forez, of Toulouse, of Provence, and of Burgundy; and queen consort of Aquitaine. She was the regent of Gevaudan during the minority of her sons in the 960s, and the regent of Provence during the minority of her stepson from 994 until 999.
Life
     "She was the daughter of Fulk II, Count of Anjou, and Gerberga, and sister of Geoffrey Greymantle.[1] She successfully increased Angevin fortunes, being married a total of five times.[2] Her family had become upwardly mobile to the point that, as a member of just the third generation from Ingelger, Adelaide-Blanche had married into the highest ranks of the older nobility of western Francia.[2]
     "Her first marriage was to Stephen, the powerful Count of Gévaudan[3] and Forez in eastern Aquitaine.[4] She was no more than fifteen at the time[5] and he was much older. Still, they had three children who survived to adulthood.[4] Stephen died in the early 960s[4] and after his death she ruled the lands as regent for her sons William, Pons and Bertrand.[6] She continued to govern Gevaudan and Forez while her remaining two sons learned to rule their father's counties.[6] Additionally, after her oldest son William's death in 975 she raised his infant son Stephen.[6] Her brother Guy (a.k.a. Guido II) was made Count-Bishop of le Puy in 975 amidst local opposition and at his request Adelaide, acting for her sons Guy and Bertrand, led an army to aid him in establishing the "Peace of God" in le Puy.[6]
     "In 982, as the widow of her second husband, Raymond, count of Toulouse, she wed Louis, son of King Lothair of France.[7] The two were crowned King and Queen of Aquitaine at Brioude by her brother Bishop Guy of le Puy.[7] The marriage lasted just over a year due to the couple being unable to peacefully live together.[7] There was also a significant age difference—he being fifteen and Adelaide-Blanche being over forty.[7] Adelaide found herself in a precarious situation with King Lothair but was rescued by Count William I of Provence[b][8] whom she subsequently married in c.?984.[9] Count William of Provence died in 994 shortly after becoming a monk at Avignon.[10]
     "In 1010 king Robert II of France along with Odo II, Count of Blois went to Rome to secure an annulment from Robert's second wife, Constance of Arles, Adelaide-Blanche's daughter by William I. Pope Sergius IV, a friend to the Angevin counts, upheld the marriage and additionally upheld Adelaide's struggle to maintain control of lands at Montmajour Abbey.[11] These lands, at Perth, had been donated by Count William I of Provence with his wife Adelaide-Blanche, as well as by a previous donation by William's father, Boson.[12] A dispute over these lands arose by four brothers, sons of Nevolongus, who pope Sergius threatened with excommunication if they did not withdraw their claim.[12] The claim was withdrawn and the lands remained under the control of Adelaide-Blanche acting as regent for her son William II of Provence.[12]
     "It has been suggested that she married a fifth time, to Otto-William, Count of Burgundy, whose second wife was named Adelaide.[13][14] However, it is disputed whether his wife Adelaide was the same as Adelaide-Blanche.[15][16]
     "Adelaide-Blanche died in 1026, aged approximately eighty-six.[3] The location of her death was probably at Avignon, since the year of her death is recorded by Arnoux, a monk of the abbey of Saint-André, near Avignon. She was buried in Montmajour Abbey, near Arles, considered at the time as the burial place of the family of counts of Provence.
Marriages and children
     "She married first, c.? 955, Stephen, Count of Gévaudan.[17][18] Children of this marriage were:
** William, (c.? 955–975).[6]
** Pons, Count of Gévaudan and Forez. He died aft. 26 February 1011.[19]
** Bertrand, Count of Gévaudan.[19]
** Almodis of Gévaudan, she married Adalbert I de Charroux, Count de la Haute March.[19]

     "Her second marriage was to Raymond III, Count of Toulouse and Prince of Gothia,[2] in 975. He died in 978. She had by him at least one child:
** William III, Count of Toulouse

     "She married, as her third husband, Louis V of France. The two were crowned King and Queen of Aquitaine, but the marriage ended in annulment.[7][18]
     "As her fourth husband she married, c.?984, William I of Provence[10][18] Together they had:
** William II of Provence
** Constance of Arles,[18] who later married Robert II of France.[10]
** Ermengarde, she married Robert I, Count of Auvergne.[10]
** Tota-Adelaide, she married Bernard I, Count of Besalú.[10]

Notes
a. The majority of historians refer to her as Adélaïde d'Anjou, for example see Stasser (1997). Bernard Bachrach refers to her as Adelaide-Blanch throughout his book Fulk Nerra (1993), and in his article 'Henry II and the Angevin Tradition', Albion, 16, 2, (1984), p. 117 n. 35 in writing of Ermengarde-Gerberga of Anjou states that Angevins were known to give daughters two names, giving her aunt Adelaide-Blanche (the subject of this article) as an example, without explaining that his novel theory has no contemporary documentation. Constance Bouchard, in Those of My Blood (2001) consistently refers to her as Adelaide-Blanche, parroting Bachrach. In Europäische Stammtafeln (citations below) she is correctly called either Adelaide or Adelaide (Blanche). At least two chronicles, the Chronicle S. Albin and the Chronicle S. Maxent. call her Blanche, See: Norgate, Eng. Under the Angevin Kings, Vol. 1 (1887), p. 191. In the work Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum libri quinque, Ed. & Trans. John France (2002), on pp. 16–17 n. 5 she is referred to as "Adelaide, also called Blanche" while on pp. 106–7 n. 5 she is called "Adelaide-Blanche." Also see the reference to the letter by pope Benedict VIII addressing her as Countess Adelaide, "cognomento Blanche" in the note below. The name Adelaide-Blanche has clearly become the preferred version of her name among a subset of modern historians. Nevertheless Adelaide-Blanche was not her contemporary name; her given name was Adelaide and the "pet" name/nickname used by her closest family and friends was Blanche. At the height of her political power, she is explicitly named as the still living 'Adelaix' in a 992 charter of her son William III and his wife Emma.
b. Rodulfus Glaber had a somewhat different version. That Lothar's son Louis was wed to a woman from Aquitaine (Adelaide also called Blanche), and she wanting a separation and being a clever woman lured her young husband to Aquitaine where she deserted him and returned to her own family; that it was Lewis who was rescued by his father king Lothar. See: Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum libri quinque, Ed. & Trans. John France (2002), on pp. 16–17 & n. 5.
References
1. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1 (Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, Marburg, Germany, 1984), Tafel 116
2. Constance Brittain Bouchard, Those of My Blood: Constructing Noble Families in Medieval Francia (University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 2001), p. 23
3. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, Marburg, Germany, 1984), Tafel 1
4. Bernard S. Bachrach, 'The Idea of the Angevin Empire', Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, Vol. 10, No. 4 (Winter,1978), p. 296
5. Bernard S. Bachrach, Fulk Nerra the Neo-Roman Consul, 987-1040 (University of California Press, 1993), p. 9
6. Jerome Kroll, Bernard S. Bachrach, Medieval Dynastic Decisions: Evolutionary Biology and Historical Explanation, The Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 21, No. 1 (Summer, 1990), p. 9
7. Bernard S. Bachrach, Fulk Nerra the Neo-Roman Consul, 987-1040 (University of California Press, 1993), p. 15
8. Bernard S. Bachrach, Fulk Nerra the Neo-Roman Consul, 987-1040 (University of California Press, 1993), p. 51
9. Kate Norgate, England under the Angevin Kings, Volume 1 (Macmillan & Co., London & New York, 1887), p. 191
10. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, Marburg, Germany, 1984), Tafel 187
11. Bernard S. Bachrach, Fulk Nerra the Neo-Roman Consul, 987-1040 (University of California Press, 1993), p. 115
12. F de Marin de Carranrais, L'Abbaye de Montmajour. E'tude historique, etc. (Marseille, 1877), pp. 33–4
13. Constance B. Bouchard, Those of My Blood (2001), pp. 24–5; Constance B. Bouchard, "The Origins of the French Nobility: A Reassessment", The American Historical Review, Vol. 86, No. 3 (Jun., 1981), p. 516 n. 42; Bouchard, Sword, Miter, and Cloister: Nobility and the Church in Burgundy, 980-1198, (1987), p. 270.
14. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, Marburg, Germany, 1984), Tafel 59
15. Thierry Stasser, "Adélaïde d'Anjou, sa famille, ses unions, sa descendance - Etat de las question", Le Moyen Age 103 (1997): 9-52
16. Christian Settipani, La Noblesse du Midi Carolingien (Prosopographia et Genealogica 5, 2004), p. 313, note 2
17. Bernard S. Bachrach, Fulk Nerra the Neo-Roman Consul, 987-1040 (University of California Press, 1993), pp. 8,9
18. Rodulfus Glaber, The Five Books of the Histories, ed. & trans. John France (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1989), p. 107 n. 5
19. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 4 (Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, Marburg, Germany, 1989), Tafel 819
Sources
** Thierry Stasser, "Adélaïde d'Anjou, sa famille, ses unions, sa descendance - État de la question", Le Moyen Age 103 (1997): 9-52
External links
** Medieval Lands Project on Adelaide of Anjou: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/adela000.htm
** Baldwin, Stewart, FASG, Adélaïde/Alix alias Blanche of Anjou, Henry Project: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#AdelaisM1M2LouisVFranksdied987M3M4.11 "



; Per Genealogy.EU: "Adelaide dit Alix dit Blanche, *ca 942, +1026; 1m: Cte Etienne de Gevaudan (+979); 2m: 982 (div 984) King Louis V of the West Franks (+987); 3m: 984/6 Ct William I of Arles (*ca 955 +by 998); 4m: before 1016 Othon Guillaume, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, Ct in Burgundy (+1026.)1"

GAV-27 EDV-27 GKJ-28.

; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELAIS [Blanche] d'Anjou ([940/50]-[29 May 1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles]). Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy which names "comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella…Pontius et Bertrandus eius nepotes…matre eorum Adalaide sorore ipsius"[60], the brothers Pons and Bertrand being confirmed in other sources as the sons of Etienne de Brioude (for example the charter dated 1000 under which "duo germani fratres…Pontius, alter Bertrandus" donated property to Saint-Chaffre for the souls of "patris sui Stephani matrisque nomine Alaicis")[61]. Adelais's second and third marriages are confirmed by Richer who records the marriage of Louis and "Adelaidem, Ragemundi nuper defuncti ducis Gothorum uxorem" and their coronation as king and queen of Aquitaine[62]. The Chronicon Andegavensi names "Blanchiam filiam Fulconis Boni comitis Andegavensis" as wife of the successor of "Lotharius rex Francorum", but confuses matters by stating that the couple were parents of "filiam Constantiam" wife of Robert II King of France[63]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Blanchiam" as the wife of "Lotharius rex…Ludovicum filium" but does not give her origin[64]. She was crowned Queen of Aquitaine with her third husband on the day of their marriage. The Libro de Otiis Imperialibus names "Blanchiam" as wife of "Ludovicus puer [filius Lotharii]"[65]. Rodulfus Glaber refers to the unnamed wife of "Ludowicum" as "ab Aquitanis partibus uxorem", recounting that she tricked him into travelling to Aquitaine where "she left him and attached herself to her own family"[66]. Richer records her marriage with "Wilelmum Arelatensem" after her divorce from Louis[67]. Her fourth marriage is confirmed by the Historia Francorum which names "Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of "Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis"[68]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as mother of "Constantia [uxor Robertus rex]", specifying that she was "soror Gaufridi Grisagonelli"[69]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Blanca sorore eius" ("eius" referring incorrectly to Foulques III "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou) as wife of "Guillelmi Arelatensis comitis" and as mother of Constance, wife of Robert II King of France[70]. "Adalaiz comitissa" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated 1003[71]. This charter is subscribed by "Emma comitissa…Wilelmus comes", the second of whom was presumably the son of Adelais but the first of whom has not been identified. "Pontius…Massiliensis ecclesie pontifex" issued a charter dated 1005 with the consent of "domni Rodhbaldi comitis et domne Adalaizis comitisse, domnique Guillelmi comitis filii eius"[72]. "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018 (this document makes no mention of Adelais’s supposed fifth husband)[73]. No explanation has been found for her having been named Adelais in some sources and Blanche in others: it is difficult to interpret all these documents to mean that they referred to two separate individuals. Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's second wife is named Adelais in several charters[74], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband in a document dated Sep 1016[75], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelais-Blanche d’Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn. It is perfectly possible that the Pope named Adelais-Blanche in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume’s daughter. If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly sixty years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely. Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon. These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[76]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[77]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[78]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[79]. An enquiry dated 2 Jan 1215 records that "comitissa Blanca" was buried "apud Montem Majorem"[80].
     "m firstly ([950/60]) as his second wife, ETIENNE de Brioude, son of BERTRAND --- & his wife Emilgarde [Emilde] --- (-before [970/75]).
     "m secondly ([970/75]) RAYMOND IV Comte de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND III Comte de Toulouse & his wife Gundinildis --- ([945/55]-killed "Carazo" [972/79]).
     "m thirdly (Vieux-Brioude, Haute-Loire 982, divorced 984) LOUIS associate King of the Franks, son of LOTHAIRE King of the Franks & Emma d'Arles [Italy] ([966/67]-Compiègne 21 May 987, bur Compiègne, église collégiale de Saint-Corneille). Crowned King of Aquitaine the day of his marriage in 982. He succeeded his father in 986 as LOUIS V King of the Franks.
     "m fourthly ([984/86]) as his second wife, GUILLAUME [II] "le Libérateur" Comte d'Arles Marquis de Provence, son of BOSON [II] Comte d'Arles & his wife Constantia [de Vienne] ([955]-Avignon 993 after 29 Aug, bur Sarrians, église de Sainte-Croix).
     "[m fifthly (before 1016) as his second wife, OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté], son of ADALBERTO associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge de Chalon ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026).]"
Med Lands cites:
[60] Saint-Chaffre, Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152.
[61] Saint-Chaffre CXLIV, p. 70.
[62] Richer, III.XCII and XCIV, pp. 112 and 114.
[63] Chronico Andegavensi 987, RHGF X, p. 271.
[64] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d’Anjou, p. 382.
[65] Libro Otiis Imperialibus, RHGF IX, p. 45.
[66] Rodulfus Glaber, Historiarum I.7, p. 17.
[67] Richer III.XCV, p. 116.
[68] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.
[69] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780.
[70] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 110.
[71] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 653, p. 645.
[72] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 15, p. 18.
[73] Marseille Saint-Victor I, 630, p. 626.
[74] Mâcon, 471, 490, pp. 271, 284-5, and Cluny, Tome IV, 2694, p. 721.
[75] Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 270, and quoted in Manteyer (1908), p. 274.
[76] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[77] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 225, p. 252.
[78] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo.
[79] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482.
[80] Manteyer (1908), p. 274, quoting Biblioth. Méjanes ms. 812, recueil Bouquier, t. 1, pp. 145-6, Catal. des mss. Départements, t. XVI, Aix, 1894 ms. 915.12

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME [II] “le Libérateur”, son of BOSON Comte [d´Arles] & his wife Constantia --- ([955]-Avignon 993 after 29 Aug, bur Sarrians, église de Sainte-Croix). "Boso comes et uxor sua Constantia…illorum filii…Willelmus comes, Rotbaldus comes, Pontius juvenis" signed the charter dated May [963] under which "Gencius et uxor mea Aiburga" donated property "in pago Aquense superiore ad castrum…Ansoyse" to Monmajour[215]. The order of birth of the two older sons of Boson is unclear. The May [963] charter suggests that Guillaume was his older son. However, the name order is reversed inthe charter dated Mar 965 under which "eius filio Rothboldo et fratre eius Wilelmo comite" consented to the charter of "Bosoni comitis, filii Rothboldi quondam"[216], which suggests that Rotbald was older. Comte de Provence, charters showing that both he and his brother Rotbald were recorded as counts during the same period, although it is not known whether this was a joint countship or whether there was a geographical split between their jurisdictions. Marquis de Provence. "Vuilelmus marchius Arelatense Provintie" donated property "in comitatu Avinionense, in agro Rupiano, in loco…la Lona" to Saint-Victor, Marseille by charter dated 17 Apr 979, signed by "Arsinda comitissa"[217]. "Willelmus comes" donated property to Cluny by charter dated 28 Aug [990] signed by "Rodbaldus comes, Adalaix comitissa, Wilelmus comes et filius eius Wilelmus"[218]. "Dominus princeps et marchio istius provinciæ…Willelmus cum coniuge sua…Adelaix et filio suo…Willelmo" restored property to the abbey of Saint-Césaire d´Arles by charter dated 992, subscribed by "Domnus Rotbaldus comes…Willelmus comes filius Rotbaldi et uxor sua Lucia, Wilelmus comes Tolosanus et uxor sua Ema…"[219]. He became a monk.
     "m firstly (before Apr 970) ARSINDE, daughter of --- (-after 17 Apr 979). "Wilelmus comes Provincie et coniunx mea Arsinna" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated Apr 970[220]. "Vuilelmus marchius Arelatense Provintie" donated property "in comitatu Avinionense, in agro Rupiano, in loco…la Lona" to Saint-Victor, Marseille by charter dated 17 Apr 979, signed by "Arsinda comitissa"[221]. Szabolcs de Vajay suggests that the first wife of Guillaume was the sister of Adelais, whose first testament dated 4 Oct 978 names her, basing the hypothesis on onomastics and favorable chronology[222]. Under this testament of "Adelais", she donated her foundation "Narbonam…sanctique Salvatoris" to "sororibus meis et domnæ Arsindæ comitissæ", bequeathed "mea hereditas de Vidiliano" to "Arsindi sorori meæ", "alodes de Tolomiano" to "Ermesindi", and "mea hereditas de Artimiciano" to "Garsindi"[223]. The wording suggests that "Arsindi…Ermesindi…Garsindi" were all sisters of the testator. It is probable that "domnæ Arsindæ comitissæ" in this document was the wife of Guillaume [II] Comte de Provence as no other Ctss Arsende has been identified at the time. However, the wording of the passage in which she is named suggests that she was a different person from "Arsindi sorori meæ". Szabolcs de Vajay suggests (as reported by Settipani: the Szabolcs article has not yet been consulted) that the testator was the possible daughter of Arnaud [I] Comte de Comminges. She can be identified as Adelais, widow of Matfried Vicomte de Narbonne, as the document names the couple´s two sons whose affiliation is confirmed by other primary sources. As explained more fully in the document TOULOUSE, KINGS, DUKES & COUNTS, other primary source documentation suggests that the wife of Vicomte Matfried may have been the daughter of Raymond Pons Comte de Toulouse. If this is correct, the chronology suggests that her sister would have been too old to have married Guillaume [II] Comte de Provence.
     "m secondly ([984/86]) as her fourth husband, ADELAIS [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow firstly of ETIENNE de Brioude, secondly of RAYMOND IV Comte de Toulouse, divorced wife (thirdly) of LOUIS V King of the West Franks, daughter of FOULQUES II "le Bon" Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge --- ([945/50]-1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles). Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy which names "comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella…Pontius et Bertrandus eius nepotes…matre eorum Adalaide sorore ipsius"[224], the brothers Pons and Bertrand being confirmed in other sources as the sons of Etienne de Brioude, for example the charter dated 1000 under which "duo germani fratres…Pontius, alter Bertrandus" donated property to Saint-Chaffre for the souls of "patris sui Stephani matrisque nomine Alaicis"[225]. Adelais's second and third marriages are confirmed by Richer who records the marriage of Louis and "Adelaidem, Ragemundi nuper defuncti ducis Gothorum uxorem" and their coronation as king and queen of Aquitaine[226]. The Chronicon Andegavensi names "Blanchiam filiam Fulconis Boni comitis Andegavensis" as wife of the successor of "Lotharius rex Francorum", but confuses matters by stating that the couple were parents of "filiam Constantiam" wife of Robert II King of France[227]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Blanchiam" as the wife of "Lotharius rex…Ludovicum filium" but does not give her origin[228]. She was crowned Queen of Aquitaine with her third husband on the day of their marriage. The Libro de Otiis Imperialibus names "Blanchiam" as wife of "Ludovicus puer [filius Lotharii]"[229]. Rodulfus Glaber refers to the unnamed wife of "Ludowicum" as "ab Aquitanis partibus uxorem", recounting that she tricked him into travelling to Aquitaine where "she left him and attached herself to her own family"[230]. Richer records her marriage with "Wilelmum Arelatensem" after her divorce from Louis[231]. Her fourth marriage is confirmed by the Historia Francorum which names "Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of "Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis"[232]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as mother of "Constantia [uxor Robertus rex]", specifying that she was "soror Gaufridi Grisagonelli"[233]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Blanca sorore eius" ( "eius" referring incorrectly to Foulques "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou) as wife of "Guillelmi Arelatensis comitis" and as mother of Constance, wife of Robert II King of France[234]. "Dominus princeps et marchio istius provinciæ…Willelmus cum coniuge sua…Adelaix et filio suo…Willelmo" restored property to the abbey of Saint-Césaire d´Arles by charter dated 992, subscribed by "Domnus Rotbaldus comes…Willelmus comes filius Rotbaldi et uxor sua Lucia, Wilelmus comes Tolosanus et uxor sua Ema…"[235]. "Adalaiz comitissa" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated 1003[236]. This charter is subscribed by "Emma comitissa…Wilelmus comes", the second of whom was presumably the son of Adelais but the first of whom has not been identified. "Pontius…Massiliensis ecclesie pontifex" issued a charter dated 1005 with the consent of "domni Rodhbaldi comitis et domne Adalaizis comitisse, domnique Guillelmi comitis filii eius"[237]. "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[238]. No explanation has been found for her having been named Adelais in some sources and Blanche in others, as it is difficult to interpret the documentation as meaning that they refer to two separate individuals. [Adelais may have married fifthly (before Sep 1016) as his second wife, Othon Guillaume Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté]. Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's wife is named Adelais in several charters[239], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed fifth husband in a document dated Sep 1016[240], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelaide-Blanche d´Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn. It is perfectly possible that the Pope named Adelais-Blanche in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume´s daughter. If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly sixty years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely. Another difficulty is presented by the entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026, quoted above and below, which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon.] "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[241]. A manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[242]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[243]. An enquiry dated 2 Jan 1215 records that "comitissa Blanca" was buried "apud Montem Majorem"[244].
Med Lands cites:
[215] Manteyer (1908), p. 225, quoting Chantelou Histoire de Monmajour, Revue Historique de Provence, 1ère année, p. 37.
[216] Gallia Christiana Novissima, Marseille, Col. 47-48, no. 66, and Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 29, p. 40.
[217] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome II, Appendix, 1042, p. 509.
[218] Cluny, Tome III, 1837, p. 80.
[219] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 153, col. 325.
[220] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 598, p. 590.
[221] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome II, Appendix, 1042, p. 509.
[222] Settipani (2004), p. 63 footnote 1, citing Vajay, S. de 'Comtesses d'origine occitane dans la Marche d'Espagne aux 10e et 11e siècles', Hidalguia 28 (1980), p. 756.
[223] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 130, col. 284.
[224] Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152.
[225] Saint-Chaffre CXLIV, p. 70.
[226] Richer III.XCII and XCIV, pp. 112 and 114.
[227] Chronico Andegavensi 987, RHGF X, p. 271.
[228] Marchegay, P. and Mabille, E. (eds.) (1869) Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou (Paris) Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, p. 382.
[229] Libro Otiis Imperialibus, RHGF IX, p. 45.
[230] Rodulfus Glaber Opera, I.7, p. 17.
[231] Richer III.XCV, p. 116.
[232] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.
[233] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780.
[234] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, p. 110.
[235] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 153, col. 325.
[236] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 653, p. 645.
[237] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 15, p. 18.
[238] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[239] Mâcon Saint-Vincent, 471, 490, pp. 271, 284-5, and Cluny, Tome IV, 2694, p. 721.
[240] Bouchard (1987), p. 270, Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, and quoted in Manteyer (1908), p. 274.
[241] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 225, p. 252.
[242] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo.
[243] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482.
[244] Manteyer (1908), p. 274, quoting Biblioth. Méjanes ms. 812, recueil Bouquier, t. 1, pp. 145-6, Catal. des mss. Départements, t. XVI, Aix, 1894 ms. 915.29

; Per Bunot email:
     “In his recent La Noblesse du Midi Carolingien,Christian Settipani has a slightly different version for the ancestry of Ermengarde d’Auvergne, comtesse of Blois. You will notice that Settipani proposes the existence of another new daughter of Guillaume le Pieux, comte d’Auvergne and duc d’Aquitaine, an Engelberge, married to Dalmatius, vicomte et abbe de Brioude. I am not summarizing his (rather convincing though circumstancial) argument in favor of this hypothesis because of its exceptional density and invite you simply to read it and make yourself an opinion. It is based (as usual) on onomastics and also the transmission of important properties in Auvergne. Jean Bunot.
     “It goes like this :
1. Ermengarde d’Auvergne (+ 1042), m. 1005, Eudes II, comte de Blois, Chartres, Tours, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre (+ 1037)
2. Robert I, comte d’Auvergne 1010/16 (+ 1022/43)
3. m. c. 990/95, Ermengarde de Gevaudan (+ after 1010), half-sister of Constance d’Arles, queen of France
4. Guillaume, vicomte de Clermont, comte d’Auvergne 989 (+ 1003/13)
5. Humberge (+ 1016)
6. Etienne, comte de Gevaudan, vicomte-abbé de Brioude (+ c. 975)
7. m. c. 970, Adelaide d’Anjou (+ after 1026)
8. Robert II, vicomte de Clermont 962 (+ 962/74)
9. Engelberge de Brioude, dame en partie de Beaumont (+ after 962)
12. Bertrand, vicomte de Gevaudan 925/39 (+939/54)
13. Emilgarde de Brioude
14. Foulques II le Bon, comte d’Anjou (+ 958)
15. m. 937, Gerberge de Gatinais (+ c. 952)
16. Robert I, vicomte de Clermont 915/62
17. Adalgarde/Aldearde
18. Dalmatius, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 922/47 (+ 947/54)
19. Engelberge (possibly d’Auvergne) (+ after 962)
24. Heraclius, seigneur d’Antoing 892/926
25. Goda
26. Etienne, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 903
27. Ermengarde, sister of a Dalmatius, noble d’Auvergne
32. Eustorge, noble d’Auvergne
33. Arsinde de Velay
34. Hubert, noble d’Auvergne
35. ép. Ermengarde
36. Etienne, vicomte-abbe de Brioude 903
37. Ermengarde, sister of a Dalmatius, noble d’Auvergne
38. possibly Guillaume le Pieux, comte d’Auvergne et de Macon, duc d’Aquitaine, abbe laique de Brioude (+ 918)
39. possibly Engelberge de Provence
48. Vivien, seigneur d’Antoing (+ after 898)
52. Rigaud, noble d’Auvergne (+ before 903)
53. Ne... de Velay
66. Armand, vicomte de Velay 895 (+ c. 913)
67. Bertilde d’Antoing 895 (+ 913/26)
72. Rigaud, noble d’Auvergne (+ before 903)
73. Ne... de Velay
76. Bernard II Plantevelue, comte d’Auvergne et de Toulouse, marquis de Gothie (+ after 883)
77. ép. Ermengarde d’Auvergne
78. Boson, roi de Provence
79. Ermengarde d’Italie
96. Berteland, noble d’Auvergne
97. Viviana
106. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 877/900 (+ c. 900)
107. Engelmode
132. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 877/900 (+ c. 900)
133. Engelmode
134. Berteland, noble d’Auvergne
135. Viviana
146. Claudius, vicomte de Velay 977/900 (+ c. 900)
147. Engelmode
152. Bernard, comte d’Auvergne, marquis de Gothie 824/44, s/o saint Guillaume, comte et duc de Toulouse and Cunegonde
153. Dhuoda/Doda de Gascogne
154. Bernard, comte d’Auvergne (+ 868)
155. Liedgarde (+ after 868)
156. Buvinus, comte de Metz, abbe laique de Gorze 842/62
157. Ne... d/o Boson le Vieux, comte d’Arles et en Italie
158. Louis II, roi d’Italie, empereur
159. Engelberge”.5
; Per Med Lands:
     "ETIENNE de Brioude, son of BERTRAND & his wife Emilde --- (-before [970/75]). "Bertrandus et uxor mea Emildis et Stephanus filius noster" donated property "in villa…Antonio" to Saint-Julien de Brioude for the souls of "genitoris mei et genetricis meæ Godanæ" by charter dated 937[16]. "Stephanus filius quondam Bertrandi et Emildis" restored property "manso…Lacus" to Saint-Julien de Brioude which he had usurped after his father died by undated charter, signed by "domina Adalaiz…mariti sui Stephani atque filiorum suorum Poncii et Bertranni"[17]. According to Settipani, Etienne was not "Comte de Gévaudan", although his descendants by his second wife later possessed the counties of Gévaudan, Brioude and Forez[18].
     "m firstly ANNE, daughter of ---. "Bertrandus et et Emilgardis uxor eius et Stephanus, eorum filius et uxor eius Annanis" donated property "in villa…Antonio" to Saint-Julien de Brioude by charter dated 943[19].
     "m secondly ([950/60]) as her first husband, ADELAIS d'Anjou, daughter of FOULQUES II "le Bon" Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge --- ([940/50]-1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles). Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy which names "comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella…Pontius et Bertrandus eius nepotes…matre eorum Adalaide sorore ipsius"[20], the brothers Pons and Bertrand being confirmed in other sources as the sons of Etienne de Brioude, for example the charter dated 1000 under which "duo germani fratres…Pontius, alter Bertrandus" donated property to Saint-Chaffre for the souls of "patris sui Stephani matrisque nomine Alaicis"[21]. "Stephanus filius quondam Bertrandi et Emildis" restored property "manso…Lacus" to Saint-Julien de Brioude which he had usurped after his father died by undated charter, signed by "domina Adalaiz…mariti sui Stephani atque filiorum suorum Poncii et Bertranni"[22]. Adelais's second and third marriages are confirmed by Richer who records the marriage of Louis and "Adelaidem, Ragemundi nuper defuncti ducis Gothorum uxorem" and their coronation as king and queen of Aquitaine[23]. The Chronicon Andegavensi names "Blanchiam filiam Fulconis Boni comitis Andegavensis" as wife of the successor of "Lotharius rex Francorum", but confuses matters by stating that the couple were parents of "filiam Constantiam" wife of Robert II King of France[24]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Blanchiam" as the wife of "Lotharius rex…Ludovicum filium" but does not give her origin[25]. She was crowned Queen of Aquitaine with her third husband on the day of their marriage. The Libro de Otiis Imperialibus names "Blanchiam" as wife of "Ludovicus puer [filius Lotharii]"[26]. Rodulfus Glaber refers to the unnamed wife of "Ludowicum" as "ab Aquitanis partibus uxorem", recounting that she tricked him into travelling to Aquitaine where "she left him and attached herself to her own family"[27]. Richer records her marriage with "Wilelmum Arelatensem" after her divorce from Louis[28]. Her fourth marriage is confirmed by the Historia Francorum which names "Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of "Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis"[29]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as mother of "Constantia [uxor Robertus rex]", specifying that she was "soror Gaufridi Grisagonelli"[30]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Blanca sorore eius" ( "eius" referring incorrectly to Foulques "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou) as wife of "Guillelmi Arelatensis comitis" and as mother of Constance, wife of Robert II King of France[31]. "Adalaiz comitissa" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated 1003[32]. This charter is subscribed by "Emma comitissa…Wilelmus comes", the second of whom was presumably the son of Adelais but the first of whom has not been identified. "Pontius…Massiliensis ecclesie pontifex" issued a charter dated 1005 with the consent of "domni Rodhbaldi comitis et domne Adalaizis comitisse, domnique Guillelmi comitis filii eius"[33]. "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[34]. No explanation has been found for her having been named Adelais in some sources and Blanche in others, as it is difficult to interpret these documents to mean that they referred to two separate individuals. Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's wife is named Adelais in several charters[35], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband in a document dated Sep 1016[36], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelaide-Blanche d´Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn. It is perfectly possible that the Pope named Adelais-Blanche in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume´s daughter. If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly sixty years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely. Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon. These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[37]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[38]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[39]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[40]. She married secondly ([970/75]) [as his second wife,] Raymond IV Comte de Toulouse, thirdly (Vieux-Brioude, Haute-Loire 982, divorced 984) Louis associate King of the Franks [later Louis V King of the Franks], fourthly ([984/86]) as his second wife, Guillaume II "le Libérateur" Comte d'Arles Marquis de Provence, and fifthly (before 1016) as his second wife, Othon Guillaume Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté].] An enquiry dated 2 Jan 1215 records that "comitissa Blanca" was buried "apud Montem Majorem"[41]."
Med Lands cites:
[16] Brioude 74, p. 94.
[17] Brioude 105, p. 122.
[18] Settipani (1993), p. 336 footnote 996.
[19] Brioude 293, p. 300.
[20] Saint-Chaffre, Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152.
[21] Saint-Chaffre CXLIV, p. 70.
[22] Brioude 105, p. 122.
[23] Richer, Tome III.XCII and XCIV, pp. 112 and 114.
[24] Chronico Andegavensi 987, RHGF X, p. 271.
[25] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, p. 382.
[26] Libro Otiis Imperialibus, RHGF IX, p. 45.
[27] Rodulfus Glaber, I.7, p. 17.
[28] Richer III.XCV, p. 116.
[29] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.
[30] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780.
[31] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, p. 110.
[32] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 653, p. 645.
[33] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 15, p. 18.
[34] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[35] Mâcon 471, 490, pp. 271, and 284-5, and Cluny, Tome IV, 2694, p. 721-22.
[36] Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 270, and quoted in Manteyer (1908), p. 274.
[37] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[38] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 225, p. 252.
[39] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo.
[40] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482.
[41] Manteyer (1908), p. 274, quoting Biblioth. Méjanes ms. 812, recueil Bouquier, t. 1, pp. 145-6, Catal. des mss. Départements, t. XVI, Aix, 1894 ms. 915.30
She witnessed the marriage of Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy and Adélaïde/Adèle (?) before 1016;
His 2nd wife.
     Per Med Lands regarding Adelaide d'Anjou: "[m fifthly (before 1016) as his second wife, OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté], son of ADALBERTO associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge de Chalon ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026).]"
     However, per The Henry Project: "Conjectured fifth husband (very improbable): Otte-Guillaume, d. 1026×7, count of Burgundy.
     Otte-Guillaume is known to have had a second wife named Adélaïde or Adèle [Cart. Cluny 3: 721-2 (#2694); Cart. Mâcon, 271 (#471), 284-5 (#490)]. The suggestion that Otte-Guillaume's second wife was the same person as the several times widowed Adélaïde/Blanche goes back to René Poupardin, who himself referred back to an unspecified unpublished work of Ferdinand Lot [Poupardin (1907), 418 n. 6], and the suggestion was later also adopted by Constance Bouchard and Christian Settipani [Bouchard (1987), 270; Settipani (1997), 249].
     The hypothesis is based on a letter of Pope Benedict VIII, which mentions both [Otte-]Guillaume and Adélaïde/Blanche (under both of her names) "Sed et seniori quam reverendo domno Willelmo comiti, necnon praecipuae honitatis et dulcedinis domno Hugoni comiti, domnoque Rainaldo comiti filio supranominati Willelmi, bonae quoque indolis, ac totius affectu dilectionis amplectendo domno Ottoni comiti; [omni etiam reverentia et veneratione dignissime domnae Adeleidi comitissae, cognomento Blanchae, nuruque ejus domnae Gerberg[e] comitissae... et caeteris principibus et optimatibus totius Burgundiae, Aquitaniae et Provinciae ..." PL 139, 1603-4]. This letter does not mention any direct genealogical connection between [Otte-]Guillaume and Adélaïde/Blanche, but does call a countess Gerberge the nurus (daughter-in-law) of Adélaïde/Blanche. This Gerberge can be identified without any difficuly with Gerberge, daughter of Otte-Guillaume and wife of Guillaume II (or (III) of Provence, son of Adélaïde/Blanche.
     In his 1997 article on Adélaïde d'Anjou, Thierry Stasser emphasized that the letter made no mention of any relationship between Otte-Guillaume and Adélaïde/Blanche. In a posting on 18 June 2002 to the internet newsgroup/mailing list soc.genealogy.medieval/GEN-MEDIEVAL, Peter Stewart argued that the interpretation making Otte-Guillaume the husband of Adélaïde/Blanche was based on a misunderstanding of the word nurus [Stewart (2002)], and Settipani accepted this argument, reversing his earlier opinion [Settipani (2004), 313, n. 2]."

Conclusion: I have changed my databse to sever the link beteween Adelaide d'Anjou and substitute an otherwise unidentified Adelaide as Otto-Guillaume's second wife. GA Vaut.31,32,33,34,35,36,26,37,38

Family 2

Raimond V (?) Comte de Toulouse b. c 955, d. bt 978 - 979

Family 3

Louis V "le Fainéant" (?) King of the West Franks b. bt 966 - 967, d. 21 May 987

Family 4

Guillaume II 'le Liberateur' de Taillefer (?) Cte d'Arles et Provence, Toulouse b. c 950, d. 994
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020247&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005: "Ahnentafel Petronille de Comminges-Bigorre"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/soc.genealogy.medieval/YzUpz3CDrCM/zTYWP3a3pRkJ;context-place=forum/soc.genealogy.medieval) to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005."
  5. [S1779] J Bunot, "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005: "Re: d'Auvergne -> Toulouse or Arles"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v7pU1OHfzao/m/Q7W2eWudpCAJ) to e-mail address, 24 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 24 Jan 2005."
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Foulques II 'the Good': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020237&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#FoulquesIIdied958B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberge de Tours: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020238&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelaide dite Blanche d'Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020247&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid d'Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020247&tree=LEO
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide-Blanche_of_Anjou. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Comtes d'Anjou: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#AdelaisM1M2LouisVFranksdied987M3M4.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Etienne I de Brioude: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331118&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelaide dite Blanche d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020247&tree=LEO
  15. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005, 160. Raymond IV, comte de Toulouse, marquis de Gothie (+ 978/79) m. vers 975, Adelaide dite Blanche d’Anjou (+ 1026).
  16. [S1868] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Jan 2005: "Toulouse according to Settipani"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Jan 2005, Bunot cites Christian Settipani, La Noblesse du Midi Carolingien. Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 26 Jan 2005."
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#L5
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331117&tree=LEO
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_V_of_France
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume II 'le Liberateur: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00094928&tree=LEO
  22. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Guillaume I (or II) "le Libérateur": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/willi002.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  23. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 30-9.
  24. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 November 2019), memorial page for Adelaide d'Anjou (940–1026), Find A Grave Memorial no. 113422258, citing Abbaye de Montmajour, Arles, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France ; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/113422258/adelaide-d_anjou. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  25. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 November 2019), memorial page for Adelaide d'Anjou (940–1026), Find A Grave Memorial no. 113422258, citing Abbaye de Montmajour, Arles, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France ; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397) , at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/113422258/adelaide-d_anjou
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#OthonIMacondied1026
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#OG
  28. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adélaïde/Alix (Adelaidis, Alaiz, Adelax, Alaicis) alias Blanche (Blanca, Candida) of Anjou: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adela000.htm
  29. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#GuillaumeIIArlesProvencedied993
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/toulnoreast.htm#Etiennedied975
  31. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  32. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#OG
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#AdelaisM1M2LouisVFranksdied987M3M4.
  34. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adélaïde/Alix (Adelaidis, Alaiz, Adelax, Alaicis) alias Blanche (Blanca, Candida) of Anjou: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/adela000.htm
  35. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes Guillaume: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036188&tree=LEO
  36. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  37. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Otto alias Guillaume, or Otte-Guillaume: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/otwil000.htm
  38. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 24 July 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  39. [S1778] Roger Tansey, "Tansey email 24 Jan 2005 "Re: d'Auvergne -> Toulouse or Arles"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/v7pU1OHfzao/m/FYPj-jP7R0sJ) to e-mail address, 24 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Tansey email 24 Jan 2005."
  40. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Étienne de Gévaudan: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tienne_de_G%C3%A9vaudan. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  41. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/toulnoreast.htm#PonsGevaudandied10161018
  42. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almodis de Gévaudan: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196680&tree=LEO
  43. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120777&tree=LEO
  44. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Arsenda de Comminges: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120776&tree=LEO
  45. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005, 496. Guillaume II le Liberateur, comte d’Arles, marquis de Provence (+994) 497. m. 984, Adelaide dite Blanche d’Anjou (+ 1026).
  46. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#GuillaumeIIIProvencedied1018B
  47. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#ConstanceArlesMRobertIIFrancedied1031
  48. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Constance of Arles: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/const000.htm

Giselbert (Gilbert) I (?) Comte de Roucy1,2

M, #4933, b. circa 951, d. between 991 and 1000
FatherRenaud/Ragenold/Ragnvald (?) comte de Roucy & Rheims2 b. c 900, d. 10 May 967
MotherAlberade (?) de Lorraine2,3 b. bt 929 - 930, d. 15 Mar 973
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Giselbert (Gilbert) I (?) Comte de Roucy was born circa 951 at Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France (now).2,4 He married unknown (?) d'Aquitaine, daughter of Guillaume I/III "Tête-d'Étoupe" (?) Duc d'AquitaineComte de Poitou, Auvergne et Limoges and Gerloc/Adèle (?) of Normandy, Comtesse de Poitiers, Duchesse d'Aquitaine, in 972.1,2
Giselbert (Gilbert) I (?) Comte de Roucy was buried in 990 at Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France (now).5,2


Giselbert (Gilbert) I (?) Comte de Roucy died between 991 and 1000 at Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France (now); Genealogics says d. aft 991. Find A Grave says d. 19 Apr 1000.2,4
Giselbert (Gilbert) I (?) Comte de Roucy was buried between 991 and 1000 at Saint Remi Badsilica, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     DEATH     19 Apr 1000, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     Gislebert de Roucy, was born about 955 in Reims, he was the son of Renaud, count de Roucy and of Rheims, and Albérade de Lotharingie. He became the count de Roucy, upon the death of his father in 967. He was probably still child when his father died. He had various honors, but he only accepted the county of Roucy, while the county of Rheims being entrusted to Herbert III of Vermandois. Later, Eudes I, count de Blois and successor of Herbert will entrust the Viscount of Rheims to Gislebert.
     In 987, with the death of the king Louis V, Gislebert seems to be rejoined without difficulty with Hugues Capet, but he however agreed to lend an oath of allegiance in 990 to Charles of Lorraine. He died between April 19, 991 and 1000, and is buried in the abbey of Saint-Remi of Rheims. Giselbert, comté de Roucy, was the father of Ebles I, who married Beatrix de Hainaut; and Yvette de Roucy, who married Manasses III, comté de Rethel.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Renaud de Roucy unknown–967
      Alberade de Roucy 930–973
     Siblings
      Ermentrude De Roucy Bourgogne unknown–1005
     Children
      Ebles De Roucy & De Reims unknown–1033
      Judith de Roucy unknown–1081
     BURIAL     Saint Remi Basilica, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 8 Mar 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 86443343.2
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried, Reference: 156
     2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: III/4 675A.2
; NB: There are at least two theories concerning the ancestry of Judith and her siblings, Lietaud and Ebles I. These are outlined by Genealogics:
     “This NN person is being shown to separate the children from the traditional view that their father was Giselbert, Comte de Roucy (I00020519). Ebles succeeded Giselbert and is documented to have the siblings shown. Thus, this fatherhood was widely assumed. Giselbert's wife was conjectured to have been a daughter of Guillaume III de Poitiers and Adela de Normandy in order to explain the name Ebles.
     “A more recent conjectures suggest the children are those of Ebles de Poitiers (I00020505), younger son of Guillaume IV de Poitiers and Emma de Blois, a daughter of Aubry II de Macon and Ermentrude de Roucy, Giselbert's sister. That could explain the rare name Liétaud, whose appearance as both the father-in-law of a sister of Gisbelbert de Roucy and a brother of his successor is striking, the name Eudes and the succession to the Blois lands of Rumigny and Coucy. [Reference] _'La Succession au comté de Roucy aux environs se l'an mil', in 'Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval'_, by Jean-Noël Mathieu.”

Conclusion: I have followed Genealogics' "more recent conjectures", assigning Judith and her siblings as children of Ebles de Poitiers. GA Vaut
     There is also confusion about the line of the various men named Manasses who were comtes de Rethel and their wives (Judity de Roucy, Judith, Yvetter de Roucy, etc.)
I. Weis states unequivocally Manasses III m. "Yvette de Roucy, dau. of Giselbert (151-20), Count of Roucy". In addition to this Yvette, Weis also assigns Ebles I as a child of this Giselbert. Weis does not show any ancestry for Manasses III.
II. Genealogics offers the following (showing no parents for Manasses I):
II.1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel m. Judith de Roucy
II.2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel m. Judith b. Est 1020
II.3 Hugues I, Comte de Réthel

III. Med Lands offers a different descent:
III.1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel d. aft 989 m. Oradela de Castres
III.2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel b. 942/960 d. aft 1026 m. Dada
(unclear relation to Manasses III, possibly grandson)
III.3 Manasses III, Comte de Réthel m. Judith, one of three possible women:
(1) JUDITH [de Roucy, daughter of --- & his wife ---]. Given the estimated birth date of Judith, wife of Comte Manassès, as shown above, it is chronologically impossible for her to have been the daughter of Giselbert Comte de Roucy, who died in the last years of the 10th century. However, it is not impossible that she was the uterine half-sister of Ebles Comte de Roucy, assuming that their mother remarried after the death of her husband Giselbert.
(2) [IDA] [de Boulogne, daughter of EUSTACHE I Comte de Boulogne & his wife Mathilde de Louvain.]
(3) [JUDITH] of Lotharingia, daughter of GODEFROI "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia & his first wife Doda ---
III.4 Hugues, Comte de Réthel

IV. Genealogy.EU (Rethel Family) offers the following:
IV.1 Menasses I, Ct de Rethel, *935, +after 974; m.Odélie (*940)
IV.2 Menasses II, Ct de Rethel, *965, +990; 1m: Yvette de Roucy (*976/985); 2m: 1026 Dada N
IV.3 Menasses III, Ct de Rethel, *990, +1056, fl 1081; m.Judith de Roucy (his mother younger sister) (*990 +? 1081
IV.4 Hugues I, Cte de Rethel, *1030

V. Racines et Histoire (Rethel) shows two variants:
R&H Variant I:
V.I.1 Manasses I de Réthel, Ct de Réthel , +after 989
V.I.2 Manasses II de Réthel , Ct de Réthel m: 1026 Dada N
R&H Variant II:
V.II.1 Manasses I d'Omont, (935-aft 989) Ct de Réthel , +after 989
V.II.2 Roger
V.II.3 Manasses II, (965-aft 1026) Ct de Rethel, m Dada/Doda/Yvette de Roucy
V.II.4 Manasses III, (990-1056) Ct de Rethel m. Judith/Ida de Boulogne
V.II.5 Hugues I, Cte de Rethel
Conclusion: In trying to construct a reasonable lineage, I have settled, for the moment, on two unconnected lines, mostly for chronological consistency:
1 Manasses I, Comte de Réthel d. aft 989 m. Oradela de Castres
2 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel b. 942/960 d. aft 1026 m. Dada

and (with no direct connection):
1 Manasses II, Comte de Réthel m. Judith de Roucy
2 Manasses III, Comte de Réthel m.
Judith b. Est 1020
3 Hugues I, Comte de Réthel

This is not entirely satisfactory and I continue to research issue. GA Vaut.6,7,8,9,10

Family

unknown (?) d'Aquitaine b. c 950

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Giselbert: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020519&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alverade de Lorraine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020518&tree=LEO
  4. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 October 2019), memorial page for Gilbert de Roucy (unknown–19 Apr 1000), Find A Grave Memorial no. 86443343, citing Saint Remi Basilica, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/86443343/gilbert-de_roucy. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 151-20, p. 133. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00476655&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/descendtext.php?personID=I00122044&tree=LEO&generations=
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/champorret.htm#_Toc52775944. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rethel Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/rethel1.html
  10. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 16 Dec 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."

Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) de Lotharingie, Dss of Mosselle1,2,3,4,5,6

F, #4934, b. between 826 and 830, d. between 849 and 864
FatherLothair I (?) King of Italy, Holy Roman Emperor, King of Bavaria7,3,8,6,9,5 b. 795, d. 29 Sep 855
MotherIrmgard/Ermengarde (?) Countess of Tours, Queen of Italy4,6,10,3,5 b. c 800, d. 20 Mar 851
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited24 Aug 2020
     Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) de Lotharingie, Dss of Mosselle was born between 826 and 830 at Alsace, Lorraine, France; Genealogics says b. 826/30; Med Lands says b. 825-30.2,4,3,6,5 She married Giselbert II (?) Graf im Maasgau, Gf im Lommegau, son of Giselbert (?) Count in the Massgau and NN de Hesbaie, before March 846 at Aquitaine, France (now).11,2,12,6,13,14,3,5
Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) de Lotharingie, Dss of Mosselle died between 849 and 864.2,15,16
     GAV-30 EDV-30 GKJ-31.

; This is the same person as ”Irmengarde de Germanie” at Wikipédia (FR).17

; Per Genealogics: "her first name is not certain”.3 Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) de Lotharingie, Dss of Mosselle was also known as Helletrude/Ermengarde (?) of Lorraine.18 Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) de Lotharingie, Dss of Mosselle was also known as Irmgard.11

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. 1961.
2. Kwartieren Greidanus-Jaeger in Stamreeksen, 1994, 's-Gravenhage, Wimersma Greidanus, Mr. G. J. J. van. 751.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 1.1:4.3
Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) de Lotharingie, Dss of Mosselle and Giselbert II (?) Graf im Maasgau, Gf im Lommegau lived at an unknown place ; Per Med Lands:
     "daughter ([825/30]-). The Gesta Francorum records that "Gisalbertus, vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and took her to Aquitaine where they were married[21]. The Annales Fuldenses also record that "Gisalbertus vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and married her in Aquitaine in 846[22]. The Annales Mettenses also date this event in 846[23]. Settipani states that the emperor recognised the marriage in 849[24]. Rösch says that this daughter is often named Ermengarde in secondary sources but that there is no contemporary proof that this is correct[25].
     "m (Aquitaine 846) GISELBERT Graf von Maasgau, son of --- (-after 14 Jun 877)."
Med Lands cites:
[22] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 846, MGH SS I, p. 364.
[23] Annales Mettenses, RCGF 7, p. 186.
[24] Settipani (1993), p. 264.
[25] Rösch, S. (1977) Caroli Magni Progenies (Verlag Degener & Co, Neustadt an der Aisch), p. 89.5


; Per Genealogy.EU (Brabant 1): “Giselbert, Gf im Maasgau 841, Gf im Lommegau 866, *ca 830, +892; m.ca 846 Irmgard (*830, +after 849), a dau.of Emperor Lothar I”


Per Genealogy.EU (Carol 1): “C2. [1m.] Ermengarde, Dss of Moselle, *830, +after 849; m.846 Ct Giselbert II von Maasgau (*830 +892)”.19,20

; Per Weis (240-16): "Giselbert, Count of Darnau 846-863; m. Helletrude of Lorraine (also called Ermengarde) (140-16), dau. of Emperor Lorthair I”


Per Weis (140-16): "Helletrude (perhaps Ermengarde) of Lorraine; m. 846 Count Giselbert (240-16), count of darnau."18

; Per Racines et Histoire (Brabant): “Giselbert 1er (ou Gislebert) ° ~820/30 + après 14/06/877 et sans doute après 06/09/885 (892 ?) peut-être d’origine Viking (le prénom de son fils Reginar=Ragnar) graf im Maasgau (841), im Lommegau (866) (investi par l’Empereur d’un comté sur le cours moyen de la Meuse, Darnau ou Maasgau mais en est chassé par le traité de Verdun de 843 pour son soutien aux rois francs de l’ouest ; revient dans la grâce impériale 849 ; cité chartes royales et impériales 06/860, 14/06/877 ; reçoit des terres de Karl III par charte 06/09/885)
     ép. 846 (Aquitaine, mariage reconnu par l’Empereur en 849) ? de Lotharingie (Irmgard, Ermengarde ?) ° ~825/30 + après 849 (dès 864) (fille de l’Empereur Lothaire 1er et d’Ermengarde de Tours) ”.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "Both banks of the Maas valley, from Maastricht to the county of Teisterbant and as far as the county of Tettuaria on the right bank, comprised two counties, Upper and Lower Maasgau (or Masau). The division of Lotharingian territories agreed 8 Aug 870 between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks allocated "…comitatum…Masau subterior…[et] Masau superior…" between King Ludwig King Charles[1445]. Giselbert was installed as count in Maasgau, probably in the late 830s/early 840s, although no record has been found to indicate whether the county was still divided into two parts at that time and if so which of the parts was ruled by Giselbert. He was dispossessed briefly, between 846 and 849, after his dispute with Emperor Lothaire concerning his abduction of the emperor's daughter. Giselbert was also appointed count in Darnau, identified in the area of Namur, before 863. It is assumed that he retained his interests in Maasgau.
     "The origin of Count Giselbert is unknown. He is one of many aristocrats who appear suddenly in contemporary sources, but whose elevated status in imperial court circles is best explained by existing aristocratic connections which are unrecorded in the surviving primary source documentation. In the specific case of Giselbert, he was sufficiently influential to have had access to the emperor's daughter, whom he married although the marriage was at first unsanctioned by her father. The similarity of the name "Reginar", given to many of his descendants, to the Nordic "Ragnar" suggests Viking connections, especially bearing in mind the increasing number of Viking raids south of Frisia from [825/30] and Frankish concessions of territory in the low countries to Danish leaders[1446]. The Annales Hanoniæ of Jacques de Guise suggest a different origin, although this is not a wholly reliable source[1447]. Chapter VIII of the Annales includes a summarised descent of the counts of Hainaut from the Merovingian King Clovis, expanded with commentary in Chapters IX to XIV. The earlier generations are evidently pure fantasy, starting with an invented younger son of Clovis named "Albericus" supposedly married to the sister of the Roman Emperor Zenon. The last link in the chain before the Annales pass to the counts named Reginar is Manassès Comte de Rethel, whom Jacques de Guise states was father or uncle of "Raginerus", but this is uncorroborated in any other source and is unlikely to be correct.
     "After Giselbert's death, the influence of his family suffered a temporary eclipse. Arnulf King of Germany granted the abbey of St Servatius "in comitatu Maselant" to Trier cathedral by charter dated 1 Jul 889[1448], a loss of property which, it is suggested, would have been unlikely if the family had maintained their authority throughout Giselbert's territories. Vanderkindere suggests that the dispute concerning jurisdiction over St Servatius may have been the cause of Reginar [I]'s rupture with Zwentibold King of Lotharingia in 898[1449]. The fortunes of the Reginar family revived in the early years of the 10th century. Reginar [I] must have resumed possession of Maasgau after his reconciliation with Ludwig IV "das Kind" King of Germany as his death is recorded at Meerssen, near Maastricht, in the county of Maasgau. Reginar's son Giselbert [II] is also recorded as holding extensive lands in Maasgau, before he was elevated to the position of duke of Lotharingia in 928. Gislebert [II] was created dux (in effect duke of Lotharingia) in 928 by Heinrich I King of Germany, whose daughter he married. The rise of Giselbert [II] was cut short by his own lawlessness. Maasgau was inherited by Duke Giselbert's nephew, Rudolf, but he and his brother Reginar [III] were disgraced and banished to Bohemia in [958] by Bruno Duke of Lotharingia. It is probable that by that time the county of Maasgau had ceased to exist as an entity as several different counts are recorded as holding property in the area: Nibelung, son of Ricfried Graaf van Betuwe, received Ruremonde, Linne, Vlodrop and Melick from Baldric Bishop of Utrecht[1450], several areas were held by Comte Ansfrid [III], the future bishop of Utrecht, while much of the former county probably passed into ecclesiastical hands. The lordships of Cuyk (see the document HOLLAND & FRISIA, and DUTCH NOBILITY), Horn (see DUTCH NOBILITY), and Kessel (see LOWER RHINE, NOBILITY) emerged on the left bank of the Maas and Wassenberg, Valkenburg (see LIMBURG) and Heinsberg (see LOWER RHINE, NOBILITY) on the right bank[1451].
1. GISELBERT [I], son of --- (-after 14 Jun 877, maybe after 6 Sep 885). Giselbert's origin is unknown. However, Viking connections are suggested by his supposed son's name, similar to the Nordic "Ragnar", especially bearing in mind the increasing number of Viking raids south of Frisia after [825/30] and Frankish concessions of territory in the low countries to Danish leaders[1452]. Another possibility is that Giselbert was related to Reginar [Reginhere] son of Meginhere. Graf von Maasgau. Nithard names "Giselbert count of the Maasgau" ("comes Mansuariorum") as one of the supporters of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks against his half-brother Emperor Lothaire[1453]. He was obliged to leave his county, attributed to him by Emperor Lothaire after the treaty of Verdun in 843[1454]. Giselbert supported Pépin King of Aquitaine, but after the latter fell from power found refuge with Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks. He abducted and married Emperor Lothaire's daughter without her father's consent (see below), but was finally pardoned by the emperor in 849 and authorised to return to his lands. An agreement between Charles II "le Chauve" and his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche" dated Jun 860 names "nobilis ac fidelibus laicis…Gislebertus…"[1455]. Comte in Darnau: "Ansfridus…comes…et Hildiwardus filius meus" donated property "in pago Darnau, in marca vel villa Sodoia…super fluvium Geldiun, in comitatu Giselberti" to Lorsch by charter dated 5 Oct 863[1456]. An agreement dated 14 Jun 877 of Emperor Charles II "le Chauve", presumably written with his own death in mind, names "Arnulfus comes, Gislebertus, Letardus, Matfridus, Widricus, Gotbertus, Adalbertus, Ingelgerus, Rainerus" as those willing to support the emperor's son if he travels across the Meuse[1457]. Emperor Karl III granted property "in pago Condruscio…Alnith" to "Gislebertus…comes…fidelis suis Teodone" by charter dated 6 Sep 885[1458]. Although it is not certain that this refers to Count Giselbert [I], no other contemporary individual of the same name has so far been identified. m (Aquitaine 846) --- of Lotharingia, daughter of Emperor LOTHAIRE I & his wife Ermengarde de Tours ([825/30]-). The Gesta Francorum records that "Gisalbertus, vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and took her to Aquitaine where they were married[1459]. The Annales Fuldenses also record that "Gisalbertus vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and married her in Aquitaine in 846[1460]. The Annales Mettenses also date this event in 846[1461]. Settipani states that the emperor recognised the marriage in 849[1462]. Rösch says that this daughter is often named Ermengarde but that there is no contemporary proof that this is correct[1463]."

Med Lands cites:
[1445] MGH LL Capitularia regum Francorum II, pp. 194-5.
[1446] McKitterick (1983), p. 230.
[1447] Iacobi de Guisia Annales Hanoniæ, MGH SS XXX Part 1, pp. 44-384.
[1448] D Arn 53, p. 75.
[1449] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 266.
[1450] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 268, citing Muller Het oudste cartularium van het sticht Utrecht, 48.
[1451] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 270.
[1452] McKitterick, p. 230.
[1453] Scholz, B. W. with Rogers, B. (2000) Carolingian Chronicles: Royal Frankish Annals and Nithard's Histories (University of Michigan Press) (“Nithard”), III.2, p. 158.
[1454] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 264.
[1455] Adnuntatio domni Karoli, MGH LL 1, p. 469.
[1456] Chronicon Laureshamense, MGH SS XXI, p. 370.
[1457] Karoli II Imp. Conventus Carisiacensis, MGH LL 1, p. 537.
[1458] D Karl 130, p. 208, headed "verunechtet" in the compilation.
[1459] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 846, MGH SS I, p. 364.
[1460] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 846, MGH SS I, p. 364.
[1461] Annales Mettenses, RHGF VII, p. 186.
[1462] Settipani (1993), p. 264.
[1463] Rösch (1977), p. 89.14

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 1 page (Dukes of Brabant and Landgraves of Hesse): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmingard/Irmgard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020430&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#dauLotharMGiselbert. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 1 page (Dukes of Brabant and Landgraves of Hesse): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant1.html
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lothar I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020431&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmgard de Tours: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020432&tree=LEO
  11. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Giselbert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020429&tree=LEO
  13. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 240-17, p. 217. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc43878539
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmingard/Irmgard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020430&tree=LEO
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 2.
  17. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Irmengarde de Germanie: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irmengarde_de_Germanie. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  18. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Lines, 140-16, p. 134 and 240-17, p. 217.
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dukes of Brabant and Landgraves of Hesse (Brabant 1): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant1.html#G2
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolingian 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#ELo1

Gerberga (?) von Sachsen1,2,3,4,5

F, #4935, b. between 913 and 914, d. 5 May 984
FatherHeinrich I "der Vogelsteller/The Fowler/l'Oiseleur" (?) Emperor of Germany, Duke of Saxony, Brunswick and Zelle6,7,8,4,9,5,10,11 b. c 876, d. 2 Jul 936
MotherSaint Mathilde von Ringelheim Countess von Ringelheim, Queen of Germany6,12,7,4,9,13,11,14,15 b. c 890, d. 14 Mar 968
ReferenceGAV28 EDV28
Last Edited10 Oct 2020
     Gerberga (?) von Sachsen was born between 913 and 914 at Nordhausen, Thüringen, Germany (now); Genealogics says b. ca 913; Med Lands says b. 913/14; Racines et Histoire (brabant) says b. 913/17; The Henry Project says b. 913x4.16,3,4,9,5 She married Giselbert II (?) Duc de Lorraine, Graf im Maasgau, son of Reginar/Regnier I "Langhals" (?) graf im Hennegau, duc de Lotharingie and Alberade (?) of Mons (), between 928 and 929;
Her 1st husband. Genealogics says m. 928; Med Lands says m. 928/9; Racines et Histoire (Brabant) says m. 928/9.17,18,1,16,9,3,4,19,20,21,5 Gerberga (?) von Sachsen married Louis IV "d'Outre-Mer" (?) King of West Franks, Holy Roman Emperor, son of Charles III "The Simple" (?) King of West Franks, Holy Roman Emperor and Eadgifu/Edgiva/Ogive (?) of Wessex, in 939;
Her 2nd husband. Genealogics says m. ca 939.22,16,23,3,24,4,5,25,26
Gerberga (?) von Sachsen was buried after 5 May 969 at Saint Remi Badsilica, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     913
     DEATH     5 May 969 (aged 55–56)
     Duchess of Lorraine. Queen of the West Franks. Daughter of King Heinrich I. and Mathilde of Ringelheim, and sister of Emperor Otto I. She is described as well educated and intelligent. She was married to Duke Giselbert of Lotharingia around 929 and had four children. After a lost battle in October 939 against Otto he tried to flee and drowned in the Rhine. A few months later she married King Louis IV. She always stood beside her husband. She organized the defense of the besieged city of Laon against the troops of Hugh "the Great" and freed, with the help of her brother, her husband in 954 from imprisonment. After Louis death in 954 she reigned the kingdom for her young son Lothaire IV. with the support of her sister Hadwig, widow of Hugh "the Great," and her brother Brun, Archbishop of Cologne. She arranged the marriage of her son to Emma d'Italie, her step-niece, that was celebrated in 966. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Heinrich I of Germany 876–936
          Mathilde von Ringelheim 895–968
     Spouses
          Louis IV 920–954
          Gilbert Of Lorraine
     Siblings
          Hedwig of Saxony
          Otto I The Great 912–973
          Heinrich I von Bayern 920–955
          Bruno 925–965
     Children
          Gerberge of Lorraine
          Charles Of Lower Lorraine
          Alberade de Roucy 930–973
          Lothaire 941–986
          Mathilde de France 943–992
     BURIAL     Saint Remi Basilica, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Mike Reed
     Added: 6 Mar 2002
     Find a Grave Memorial 6240885.27,5
Gerberga (?) von Sachsen died on 5 May 984 at Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France; Racines et Histoire says d. after 968, possibly 984; Genealogics says d. 5 May 984.28,29,8,24,4
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Brabant 1): “B1. Giselbert, Duke of Lotharingia (924-939), +drowned in the Rhine 2.10.939; m.928/9 Gerberga of Saxony (+984)”.30

; Per Racines et Histoire (Brabant): “Giselbert II ° ~880 + 02/10/939 (noyé dans le Rhin, près Andernach, pendant un raid de pillage le long du Rhin avec Eberhard, ex-duc de Franconie et Heinrich, frère d’Otto(n) 1er, Roi de Germanie) Abbé de Stablo (915-925) rebelle à Charles III «Le Simple» (918), Abbé laïc d’Echternach (924-939), Abbé de Saint-Maximin de Trier (Trêves, 925-934), créé duc (928) par Heinrich 1er, Roi de Germanie qui l’investit du duché de Lotharingie (924-939)
     ép. 928/29 Gerberga de Saxe (Germanie) abbesse de Notre-Dame de Soissons (959) ° 913/17 (Nordhausen) + après 968 (984 ?) (fille d’Heinrich 1er, Roi de Germanie et de Mathilde ; ép. 2) fin 939 Louis IV «d’Outremer», Roi de Francie) (reçoit de son second mari l’Abbaye de Notre-Dame de Laon 951)”.9

; Per Weis: “Giselbert (240-18), Duke of Lorraine, b. abt. 880, d. 939; m. 929, Gerberga of Saxony (142-18), d. 5 May 984. (she m. 2nd, 939, Louis IV, d'Outre-Mer (148-18) King of France).”.31

; Per Med Lands:
     "GISELBERT [II] ([885/900]-drowned in the Rhine, near Andernach 2 Oct 939). Richer records that "Gisleberto eius filio" succeeded on the death of "Ragenerus vir consularis et nobilis cognomento Collo-Longus"[1484]. The Miraculæ S. Maximi names "Gisilbertus admodum iuvenis dux", in a passage dated to the early 10th century[1485]. Abbot of Stablo 915/925. On the death of Giselbert's father in [915/16], Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks refused to install Giselbert as marchio[1486]. Giselbert rebelled against King Charles III in 918 and took refuge with Heinrich Duke of Saxony (later king of Germany). Flodoard records in 920, in relation to the dispute between "Hilduinum episcopum et Richarium abbatem" relating to “episcopatu Tungrensi”, that “Gisleberto” (who at first supported the appointment of “Hilduinum” as bishop) had left “Karolo rege” and been appointed “principi” by “plurimi Lotharienses”[1487]. The Breve Chronicon Epternacense records that “Giselbertus filius eius” succeeded “Reinerus” as abbot of Echternach in 924, although the dating of this passage appears faulty[1488]. King Charles III "le Simple" restored Kloster Susteren to the abbey of Prüm by charter dated 19 Jan 916 which names "fidelium nostrorum…Widricus comes palatii, Richuuinus comes, Gislebertus, Matfridus, Beringerius comites, Theodericus comes, Reinherus comes, Erleboldus"[1489]. Giselbert rebelled against King Charles III in 918, and sought help from Heinrich of Saxony (later king of Germany). He later opposed Heinrich after his accession in Germany, and maybe planned to install himself as independent ruler in Lotharingia in 920[1490]. Richer records that Giselbert was awarded the vacant properties "Traiectum, Iuppilam, Harstalium, Marsnam, Littam, Capræmontem" after he returned to favour[1491]. Widukind records that "Isilberhtum…adolescentem" was "nobili genere ac familia antiqua natus" when Heinrich I King of Germany betrothed his daughter to him, maybe dated to [925][1492]. Flodoard's Annals record that "Berengarius" captured "Giselbertum" and only freed him after receiving "filiis Ragenarii fratris ipsius Gisleberti" as hostages, after which Giselbert ravaged the lands of "Berengarii, Ragenariique fratris sui et Isaac comitis"[1493]. The king's forces under Eberhard [Konradiner] secured Lotharingia's submission to German overlordship in 925[1494]. Abbot of St Maximin at Trier 925/934. Created dux in 928 by Heinrich I King of Germany, effectively creating him GISELBERT Duke of Lotharingia. Liutprand names him "Gislebertum Lotharingorum ducem" when recording his marriage[1495]. "Gysalbertus dux rectorque S. Traiectenses ecclesie" donated property "Gulisam…in pago [Ardunensi] in comitatu Everhardi" to Trier by charter dated 928, subscribed by "Walgeri comitis, Thiedrici comitis, Cristiani comitis, Folcoldi comitis"[1496]. "Heinricus…rex" granted property to the canons of Crespin at the request of "Gisleberti ducis" by charter dated 24 Oct 931[1497]. He took part in a campaign of pillaging along the Rhine with Eberhard ex-Duke of Franconia and Heinrich, brother of Otto I King of Germany, and was drowned[1498]. Flodoard's Annals record that "Gislebertus…dux et Otho, Isaac atque Theodericus comites" offered the French crown to Louis IV "d'Outremer" King of the West Franks in 939[1499]. Regino records that "Gisalbertus" was drowned in the Rhine in 939[1500].
     "m ([928/929]) as her first husband, GERBERGA of Germany, daughter of HEINRICH I King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde [Immedinger] (Nordhausen [913/14]-Reims 5 May 984, bur Abbaye de Reims). Richer records the marriage of "Gisleberto eius filio [Rageneri…Collo-Longus]" and "Heinrici Saxoniæ ducis filiæ Gerbergæ"[1501]. Liutprand states that the wife of "Gislebertum Lotharingorum ducem" was "regis sororem"[1502]. As her marriage to Giselbert coincided approximately with her husband being created dux, it is assumed that the marriage was arranged as part of the terms confirming Giselbert's submission to King Heinrich. Gerberga married secondly (end 939) Louis IV "d'Outremer" King of France. Flodoard names her "Gerbergam" when recording her second marriage[1503]. Her second husband gave her the Abbey of Notre-Dame de Laon in 951, taken from his mother on her second marriage. Abbess of Notre Dame de Soissons in 959[1504]. "Gerberga…Francorum regina" donated "alodo…Marsnam in comitatu Masaugo" to Reims Saint-Rémy, confirmed by "comitibus Emmone et Ansfrido", for the souls of "senioris nostri piæ memoriæ Gisleberti suique…patris…et matris Rageneri et Albradæ", by charter dated 10 Feb 968, signed by "Arnulfi comitis…Emmonis comitis, Ansfridi comitis…"[1505]."
Med Lands cites:
[1484] Richer I.XXXIV, p. 70.
[1485] Ex Sigehardi Miraculis S. Maximini 11, MGH SS IV, p. 231.
[1486] McKitterick (1983), p. 309.
[1487] Flodoard 920, MGH SS III, p. 369.
[1488] Breve Chronicon Epternacense, Veterum Scriptorum IV, col. 507.
[1489] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 159, p. 222.
[1490] Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), p. 140.
[1491] Richeri Historiæ I, 39, MGH SS III, p. 580.
[1492] Widukindi I, 30, MGH SS III, p. 430.
[1493] Flodoardi Annales 924, MGH SS III, p. 373.
[1494] Reuter, T. (1991) Germany in the early middle ages c.800-1056 (Longman), pp. 140-1.
[1495] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.20, MGH SS III, p. 321.
[1496] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 169, p. 233.
[1497] D H I 30, p. 65.
[1498] Thietmar 2.34, p. 117.
[1499] Flodoardi Annales 939, MGH SS III, p. 386.
[1500] Reginonis Chronicon, Continuator Reginonis Trevirensis 939, MGH SS I, p. 618.
[1501] Richer I.XXXV, p. 70.
[1502] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.20, MGH SS III, p. 321.
[1503] Flodoard 939, MGH SS III, p. 386.
[1504] Settipani (1993), p. 330.
[1505] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, XXXVII, p. 48.20


; Per Genealogics:
     "Gerberga was born about 913, the oldest daughter of Emperor Heinrich I 'the Fowler' and his second wife Mathilde von Ringelheim; she was a member of the Ottonian dynasty and a descendant of Charlemagne. Contemporary sources describe her as a highly educated, intelligent and forceful political player.
     "In 928 Gerberga married her first husband Giselbert, duke of Lorraine, son of Reginar I, duke of Lorraine, count in Hainault, and his wife Alberade, They had four children, of whom Alverade and Gerberge would have progeny.
     "Jocundus, a Lotharingia chronicler writing in the 1070s, recorded that Gerberga was the driving force behind Giselbert's decision to support her younger brother Heinrich when he rebelled against her older brother Otto I about 936. Giselbert was defeated by Otto I in 939 at the Battle of Andernach and, while trying to escape, he drowned in the Rhine.
     "Gerberga was about 26 when Giselbert died. That year she married Louis IV 'd'Outremer', king of France, son of Charles III 'the Simple', king of France, and Eadgifu of Wessex, a daughter of Edward 'the Elder', king of England. They had eight children, of whom Lothar I, Charles and Mahaut would have progeny.
     "Louis died in 954, when their son Lothar was only thirteen. Gerberga took action to ensure that Lothar could succeed his father. She reached an agreement with her brother-in-law Hugues 'the Great', duke of The Franks, comte de Paris, who had been an adversary to Lothar's father. In exchange for supporting Lothar's rule Hugues was given rule over Aquitaine and much of Burgundy. Gerberga did not seek the support of her brother, Emperor Otto I, because the interference of the East-Frankish emperor in West-Frankish affairs would have placed the West-Frankish kingdom in a weak position politically and angered the West-Frankish nobles.
     "After the death of Hugues 'the Great' in 956, Gerberga and her sister Hadevich, Hugues' widow, were the heads of the two most powerful dynasties in West Francia. Along with their brother Bruno, who was both archbishop of Cologne and duke of Lotharingia, Gerberga and Hadevich ruled the kingdom until Lothar came of age.
     "In 959, after Lothar had come of age, Gerberga became abbess of the Benedictine monastery of Notre Dame in Soissons. Nevertheless she remained politically active. In 961 she was involved in choosing the new archbishop of Reims, Odalric. In 965 she was present at the imperial court in Cologne, when her son Lothar married Emma of Italy, the step-daughter of her brother Emperor Otto I.
     "There is some debate about when Gerberga died. She is last documented in May 968. Since necrology records indicate that she died on 5 May, her date of death is often given as 968 or 969, but others maintain that Gerberga did not die until 984. She is buried in the Abbey of Saint-Remi in Reims, Champagne.“.3

; This is the same person as ”Gerberga of Saxony” at Wikipedia, as ”Gerberge de Saxe” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Gerberga (Frankreich)” at Wikipedia (DE).32,33,34

; This is the same person as ”Gerberga” at The Henry Project.5

Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1961.3 GAV-28 EDV-28 GKJ-29. Gerberga (?) von Sachsen was also known as Gerpirga (?) of Saxony.35

; Per Genealogy.EU (Liudolfing): “C5. Gerberge, *ca 914/925, +5/14.5.984; 1m: 929 Duke Giselbert of Lorraine (+939); 2m: 939 King Louis IV of West Franks (*921 +954)”.36

; Per Med Lands:
     "GERBERGA (Nordhausen [913/14]-Reims 5 May 984, bur Abbaye de Reims). Liutprand states that the wife of "Gislebertum Lotharingorum ducem" was "regis sororem"[171]. Flodoard names her "Gerbergam" when recording her second marriage[172]. Her first husband had been a rival of King Heinrich I and maybe planned to establish himself as independent ruler in Lotharingia in 920[173]. As the marriage coincided with Giselbert being created dux, it was presumably arranged to confirm Giselbert's submission to King Heinrich. King Louis married Gerberga without the permission of her brother Otto I King of Germany, probably to increase his hold on Lotharingia (ruled by her first husband). Gerberga was active in the defence of Laon in 941 and of Reims in 946, accompanied her husband on expeditions to Aquitaine in 944 and Burgundy in 949, and was active during his period of imprisonment in 945/46[174]. An educated person, she commissioned from Adso of Moutier-en-Der the De ortu et tempore antichristi[175]. Her second husband gave her the abbey of Notre-Dame de Laon in 951, taken from his mother on her second marriage. Abbess of Notre Dame de Soissons in 959[176]. "Gerberga…Francorum regina" donated "alodo…Marsnam in comitatu Masaugo" to Reims Saint-Rémy, confirmed by "comitibus Emmone et Ansfrido", for the souls of "senioris nostri piæ memoriæ Gisleberti suique…patris…et matris Rageneri et Albradæ", by charter dated 10 Feb 968, signed by "Arnulfi comitis…Emmonis comitis, Ansfridi comitis…"[177].
     "m firstly ([928/29]) GISELBERT Graf [von Maasgau], son of REGINAR [I] "Langhals" Graaf [van Maasgau] Comte de Hainaut & his wife Alberada --- (-drowned in the River Rhine Oct 929). He was created dux in 928 by Heinrich I King of Germany, which effectively created him GISELBERT Duke of Lotharingia.
     "m secondly (end 939) LOUIS IV "d'Outremer" King of the West Franks, son of CHARLES III "le Simple" King of the West Franks & his second wife Eadgifu [Ogive] of England ([10 Sep 920/10 Sep 921]-Reims Oct 954, bur Reims St Remy)."
Med Lands cites:
[171] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.20, MGH SS III, p. 321.
[172] Flodoard 939, MGH SS III, p. 386.
[173] Reuter (1991), p. 140.
[174] McKitterick, R. (1983) Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians 751-987 (Longman, London and New York), p. 318.
[175] McKitterick (1983), p. 278.
[176] Settipani (1993), p. 330.
[177] Miraeus (Le Mire), A. (1723) Opera diplomatica et historica, 2nd edn. (Louvain), Tome I, XXXVII, p. 48.4


; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1): “E1. [2m.] Louis IV "d'Outre Mer", King of West Franks (936-954), Emperor, *10.9.921, +Reims 10.9.954; m.939/940 Gerpirga of Saxony (*925 +5.5.984)”.35

; Per Med Lands:
     "LOUIS, son of CHARLES III "le Simple" King of the Franks & his second wife Eadgifu of England ([10 Sep 920/10 Sep 921]-Reims 10 Sep 954, bur Reims, Abbaye de Saint-Rémi). Rodulfus Glaber names "Ludowicum filium…regis Caroli"[375]. After his father was deposed in 923, his mother fled with Louis to England where he was brought up at the court of Æthelstan King of Wessex. His return to France after the death of King Raoul in early 936 was negotiated by Hugues "le Grand" [Capet]. He was crowned 19 Jun 936 at Laon by the Archbishop of Reims as LOUIS IV "d’Outremer" King of the Franks. He asserted his autonomy from Hugues "le Grand", to whom he awarded the title dux francorum, by establishing himself with his mother at Laon in 937[376]. His reign was characterised by constant disputes with his nobles, in particular Hugues "le Grand", Héribert II Comte de Vermandois, Arnoul Count of Flanders and Guillaume "Longuespée" Comte [de Normandie]. Despite constant military activity, he only increased the territory directly held by the kings of France by the counties of Laon (captured in 938 from Héribert II Comte de Vermandois) and Reims. He also temporarily held Amiens and Ponthieu. Following a revolt in Lotharingia against Otto I "der Große" King of Germany, Louis was offered the crown of Lotharingia in 939 by Duke Giselbert. King Otto responded by raiding Frankish territory, allying himself with Hugues "le Grand", Héribert II Comte de Vermandois, Arnoul I Count of Flanders and Guillaume "Longuespée" Comte [de Normandie], and obliged King Louis to renounce Lotharingia. Héribert and Hugues besieged Reims, forcing the restoration of Héribert's son as archbishop, and besieged King Louis at Laon. After the murder of Guillaume "Longuespée" Comte [de Normandie], King Louis detained Richard his heir, but was held captive himself by the people of Rouen after Richard escaped. King Otto launched a revenge attack, but was defeated by the Normans. After Louis was released by Hugues "le Grand", he was transferred to the custody of Thibaut Comte de Blois who held him captive for a year in 945/46[377]. King Louis died after falling from his horse on his way from Reims to Laon[378].
     "m (end 939) as her second husband, GERBERGA of Germany, widow of GISELBERT Graf [im Maasgau] Duke of Lotharingia, daughter of HEINRICH I King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde von Ringelheim [Immedinger] (Nordhausen [913/14]-Reims 5 May 984, bur Abbaye de Reims). Liutprand states that the wife of "Gislebertum Lotharingorum ducem" was "regis sororem"[379]. Flodoard names her "Gerbergam" when recording her second marriage[380]. King Louis married her without the permission of her brother Otto I King of Germany, presumably to increase his hold on Lotharingia (which had been ruled by her first husband). She was active in the defence of Laon in 941 and of Reims in 946, accompanied her husband on expeditions to Aquitaine in 944 and Burgundy in 949, and was active during his period of imprisonment in 945/46[381]. An educated person, she commissioned from Adso of Moutier-en-Der the De ortu et tempore antichristi[382]. Her husband gave her the abbey of Notre-Dame de Laon in 951, taken from his mother on her second marriage. Abbess of Notre Dame de Soissons in 959[383]. "Gerberga…Francorum regina" donated "alodo…Marsnam in comitatu Masaugo" to Reims Saint-Rémy, confirmed by "comitibus Emmone et Ansfrido", for the souls of "senioris nostri piæ memoriæ Gisleberti suique…patris…et matris Rageneri et Albradæ", by charter dated 10 Feb 968, signed by "Arnulfi comitis…Emmonis comitis, Ansfridi comitis…"[384]. The necrology of Reims Saint-Rémi records the death "III Non Feb" of "Gerberga Francorum regina"[385]."
Med Lands cites:
[375] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum I.7, p. 15.
[376] McKitterick (1983), p. 315.
[377] McKitterick (1983), p. 316.
[378] Settipani (1993), pp. 328-9.
[379] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.20, MGH SS III, p. 321.
[380] Flodoard 939, MGH SS III, p. 386.
[381] McKitterick (1983), p. 318.
[382] McKitterick (1983), p. 278.
[383] Settipani (1993), p. 330.
[384] Miraeus (Le Mire), A. (1723) Opera diplomatica et historica, 2nd edn. (Louvain), Tome I, XXXVII, p. 48.
[385] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 273.26
She was abbesse de Notre-Dame de Soissons in 959.37

Family 1

Giselbert II (?) Duc de Lorraine, Graf im Maasgau b. c 880, d. 2 Oct 939
Children

Family 2

Louis IV "d'Outre-Mer" (?) King of West Franks, Holy Roman Emperor b. 10 Sep 920, d. 10 Sep 954
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 1 page (Dukes of Brabant and Landgraves of Hesse): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfer page (Liudolfing): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberga von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020067&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#GerbergaM1GiselbertLorraineM2LouisIVFran. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/gerbe000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberga of Saxony: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020067&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberga von Sachsen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020067&tree=LEO
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 04 November 2019), memorial page for Heinrich I “The Fowler” of Germany (c.876–c.2 Jul 936), Find A Grave Memorial no. 14938819, citing Stiftskirche Saint Servatius, Quedlinburg, Landkreis Harz, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/14938819/heinrich_i-of_germany. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heinrich I 'the Fowler': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020483&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIGermanydied936B.
  12. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Matilda: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10049a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Gerberga: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/gerbe000.htm
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Ringelheim: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020486&tree=LEO
  15. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Mathilde: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/mathi003.htm
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfer page (Liudolfing): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html
  17. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 151-18, p. 147. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  18. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Giselbert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020488&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#Giselbertdied939
  21. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/gisel101.htm
  22. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 140-18, p. 123. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis IV 'd'Outremer': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020063&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#LouisIVFranceB
  27. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 19 August 2020), memorial page for Gerberga of Saxony (913–5 May 969), Find a Grave Memorial no. 6240885, citing Saint Remi Basilica, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6240885/gerberga_of_saxony
  28. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 151-18, p. 133.
  29. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 132. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  30. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant1.html#G1
  31. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 140-18, p. 134.
  32. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerberga_of_Saxony. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  33. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Gerberge de Saxe: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerberge_de_Saxe. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  34. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Gerberga (Frankreich): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerberga_(Frankreich). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  35. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#L4W
  36. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfing: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html#GH1
  37. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 2.
  38. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alverade de Lorraine: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020518&tree=LEO
  39. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  40. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberga de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020493&tree=LEO
  41. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#Gerbergadied978
  42. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Hainaut, Hennegau, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Hainaut.pdf
  43. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mahaut de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020130&tree=LEO
  44. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331121&tree=LEO
  45. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis IV 'd'Outremer': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020063&tree=LEO
  46. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331123&tree=LEO
  47. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020064&tree=LEO
  48. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#CharlesdukeLowerLothringiadied991
  49. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331119&tree=LEO

Reginar/Regnier I "Langhals" (?) graf im Hennegau, duc de Lotharingie1,2,3

M, #4936, b. circa 850, d. between 25 October 915 and 19 January 916
FatherGiselbert II (?) Graf im Maasgau, Gf im Lommegau2,4,5,6,7 b. bt 820 - 830, d. 892
MotherErmengarde/Irmgard (?) de Lotharingie, Dss of Mosselle2,4,8,7 b. bt 826 - 830, d. bt 849 - 864
ReferenceGAV29 EDV30
Last Edited24 Nov 2020
     Reginar/Regnier I "Langhals" (?) graf im Hennegau, duc de Lotharingie married Alberade (?) of Mons ().9,2,3 Reginar/Regnier I "Langhals" (?) graf im Hennegau, duc de Lotharingie was born circa 847.10 He was born circa 850 at Hainaut, Belgium (now).9,2,3
Reginar/Regnier I "Langhals" (?) graf im Hennegau, duc de Lotharingie died between 25 October 915 and 19 January 916 at Meersen.2,11,10,3
     ; REGINAR/REGNIER I, Margrave between the Meuse and the Scheldt, also Count of Hainault, the Hesbaye and several other areas in Lotharingia (modern Lorraine); b c 847; lay Abbot or temporal guardian of the Abbeys of St Servais de Maestricht, St Maximin, Chevremont, Echternach and Stavelot; m Alberada - and d 915, leaving, with a dau (m Berenger, Count of Namur and Count in the Lommagau and Maifeld): GISELBERT, DUKE OF LORRAINE.10 GAV-29 EDV-30 GKJ-30. He was Count of Hainault at Hainaut, France. He was per Racines et Histoire: "fait marquis par Charles III «Le Simple» (915), abbé laïc d’Echternach (897-915), de Saint-Servatius de Maastricht(avant 05/898), de Stablo et de Malmédy (900-902.)4" Reginar/Regnier I "Langhals" (?) graf im Hennegau, duc de Lotharingie was also known as Reginar I.10 Reginar/Regnier I "Langhals" (?) graf im Hennegau, duc de Lotharingie was also known as Reginar I "Langhals" (?) Graf im Hennegau, Duke of Lotharingia.2

; Weis line 240-17, p. 204.12,13 He was Lay abbot of Echternach between 875 and 915 at Luxembourg.9

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 1 page (Dukes of Brabant and Landgraves of Hesse): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant1.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Giselbert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020429&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc43878539. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Lines, 140-16, p. 134 and 240-17, p. 217. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmingard/Irmgard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020430&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 240-17, p. 204. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 155-17, p. 135; line 240-17, p. 204.
  12. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  13. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Giselbert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020488&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#Giselbertdied939
  16. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/gisel101.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 2 page (The Luxemburg Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg2.html
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#dauReginarIMBerengarNamur

Giselbert II (?) Graf im Maasgau, Gf im Lommegau1,2,3,4,5

M, #4937, b. between 820 and 830, d. 892
FatherGiselbert (?) Count in the Massgau6
MotherNN de Hesbaie6
ReferenceGAV30 EDV31
Last Edited24 Aug 2020
     Giselbert II (?) Graf im Maasgau, Gf im Lommegau was born between 820 and 830; Genealogy.EU says b. ca 830; Racines et Histoire says v. ca 820/30; Genealogics says b. ca 810.2,7,8 He married Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) de Lotharingie, Dss of Mosselle, daughter of Lothair I (?) King of Italy, Holy Roman Emperor, King of Bavaria and Irmgard/Ermengarde (?) Countess of Tours, Queen of Italy, before March 846 at Aquitaine, France (now).9,2,8,7,10,11,12,13
Giselbert II (?) Graf im Maasgau, Gf im Lommegau died in 892; Racines et Histoire says d. aft 6/9/885, possibly 8; Genealogics says d. aft 877; Genealogy says d. 892; Med Lands says d. "after 14 Jun 877, maybe after 6 Sep 885."2,8,7,11
     Giselbert II (?) Graf im Maasgau, Gf im Lommegau and Ermengarde/Irmgard (?) de Lotharingie, Dss of Mosselle lived at an unknown place ; Per Med Lands:
     "daughter ([825/30]-). The Gesta Francorum records that "Gisalbertus, vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and took her to Aquitaine where they were married[21]. The Annales Fuldenses also record that "Gisalbertus vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and married her in Aquitaine in 846[22]. The Annales Mettenses also date this event in 846[23]. Settipani states that the emperor recognised the marriage in 849[24]. Rösch says that this daughter is often named Ermengarde in secondary sources but that there is no contemporary proof that this is correct[25].
     "m (Aquitaine 846) GISELBERT Graf von Maasgau, son of --- (-after 14 Jun 877)."
Med Lands cites:
[22] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 846, MGH SS I, p. 364.
[23] Annales Mettenses, RCGF 7, p. 186.
[24] Settipani (1993), p. 264.
[25] Rösch, S. (1977) Caroli Magni Progenies (Verlag Degener & Co, Neustadt an der Aisch), p. 89.13


; Per Genealogics:
     “Giselbert was born about 828. In 840 he became Graf im Maasgau (count of the Moselle), and in 866 he became Graf im Lommengau. He abducted Irmingard, daughter of the Emperor Lothar, and married her in Aquitaine before March 846. The emperor eventually made peace with him, but only after the diet in Thionville in October 848. In 863 Giselbert also became Graf von Darnau. He died after 14 July 877. One source gives his year of death as 892.”.8

; Per Burke's: "GISELBERT, Count in the valley of the Meuse, ruling Masau/Maasgau in what is now Belgium 841; m 846 Irmgard, dau of the HOLY ROMAN EMPEROR LOTHAIR (gs of CHARLEMAGNE), who granted his s-in-law the Countship of Darnau 863“.9

; This is the same person as ”Gilbert, Count of the Maasgau” at Wikipedia, as ”Gislebert de Maasgau” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Giselbert von Maasgau” at Wikipedia (DE).14,15,16

Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1961.8 GAV-30 EDV-31 GKJ-31.

; Per Med Lands:
     "Both banks of the Maas valley, from Maastricht to the county of Teisterbant and as far as the county of Tettuaria on the right bank, comprised two counties, Upper and Lower Maasgau (or Masau). The division of Lotharingian territories agreed 8 Aug 870 between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks allocated "…comitatum…Masau subterior…[et] Masau superior…" between King Ludwig King Charles[1445]. Giselbert was installed as count in Maasgau, probably in the late 830s/early 840s, although no record has been found to indicate whether the county was still divided into two parts at that time and if so which of the parts was ruled by Giselbert. He was dispossessed briefly, between 846 and 849, after his dispute with Emperor Lothaire concerning his abduction of the emperor's daughter. Giselbert was also appointed count in Darnau, identified in the area of Namur, before 863. It is assumed that he retained his interests in Maasgau.
     "The origin of Count Giselbert is unknown. He is one of many aristocrats who appear suddenly in contemporary sources, but whose elevated status in imperial court circles is best explained by existing aristocratic connections which are unrecorded in the surviving primary source documentation. In the specific case of Giselbert, he was sufficiently influential to have had access to the emperor's daughter, whom he married although the marriage was at first unsanctioned by her father. The similarity of the name "Reginar", given to many of his descendants, to the Nordic "Ragnar" suggests Viking connections, especially bearing in mind the increasing number of Viking raids south of Frisia from [825/30] and Frankish concessions of territory in the low countries to Danish leaders[1446]. The Annales Hanoniæ of Jacques de Guise suggest a different origin, although this is not a wholly reliable source[1447]. Chapter VIII of the Annales includes a summarised descent of the counts of Hainaut from the Merovingian King Clovis, expanded with commentary in Chapters IX to XIV. The earlier generations are evidently pure fantasy, starting with an invented younger son of Clovis named "Albericus" supposedly married to the sister of the Roman Emperor Zenon. The last link in the chain before the Annales pass to the counts named Reginar is Manassès Comte de Rethel, whom Jacques de Guise states was father or uncle of "Raginerus", but this is uncorroborated in any other source and is unlikely to be correct.
     "After Giselbert's death, the influence of his family suffered a temporary eclipse. Arnulf King of Germany granted the abbey of St Servatius "in comitatu Maselant" to Trier cathedral by charter dated 1 Jul 889[1448], a loss of property which, it is suggested, would have been unlikely if the family had maintained their authority throughout Giselbert's territories. Vanderkindere suggests that the dispute concerning jurisdiction over St Servatius may have been the cause of Reginar [I]'s rupture with Zwentibold King of Lotharingia in 898[1449]. The fortunes of the Reginar family revived in the early years of the 10th century. Reginar [I] must have resumed possession of Maasgau after his reconciliation with Ludwig IV "das Kind" King of Germany as his death is recorded at Meerssen, near Maastricht, in the county of Maasgau. Reginar's son Giselbert [II] is also recorded as holding extensive lands in Maasgau, before he was elevated to the position of duke of Lotharingia in 928. Gislebert [II] was created dux (in effect duke of Lotharingia) in 928 by Heinrich I King of Germany, whose daughter he married. The rise of Giselbert [II] was cut short by his own lawlessness. Maasgau was inherited by Duke Giselbert's nephew, Rudolf, but he and his brother Reginar [III] were disgraced and banished to Bohemia in [958] by Bruno Duke of Lotharingia. It is probable that by that time the county of Maasgau had ceased to exist as an entity as several different counts are recorded as holding property in the area: Nibelung, son of Ricfried Graaf van Betuwe, received Ruremonde, Linne, Vlodrop and Melick from Baldric Bishop of Utrecht[1450], several areas were held by Comte Ansfrid [III], the future bishop of Utrecht, while much of the former county probably passed into ecclesiastical hands. The lordships of Cuyk (see the document HOLLAND & FRISIA, and DUTCH NOBILITY), Horn (see DUTCH NOBILITY), and Kessel (see LOWER RHINE, NOBILITY) emerged on the left bank of the Maas and Wassenberg, Valkenburg (see LIMBURG) and Heinsberg (see LOWER RHINE, NOBILITY) on the right bank[1451].
1. GISELBERT [I], son of --- (-after 14 Jun 877, maybe after 6 Sep 885). Giselbert's origin is unknown. However, Viking connections are suggested by his supposed son's name, similar to the Nordic "Ragnar", especially bearing in mind the increasing number of Viking raids south of Frisia after [825/30] and Frankish concessions of territory in the low countries to Danish leaders[1452]. Another possibility is that Giselbert was related to Reginar [Reginhere] son of Meginhere. Graf von Maasgau. Nithard names "Giselbert count of the Maasgau" ("comes Mansuariorum") as one of the supporters of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks against his half-brother Emperor Lothaire[1453]. He was obliged to leave his county, attributed to him by Emperor Lothaire after the treaty of Verdun in 843[1454]. Giselbert supported Pépin King of Aquitaine, but after the latter fell from power found refuge with Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks. He abducted and married Emperor Lothaire's daughter without her father's consent (see below), but was finally pardoned by the emperor in 849 and authorised to return to his lands. An agreement between Charles II "le Chauve" and his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche" dated Jun 860 names "nobilis ac fidelibus laicis…Gislebertus…"[1455]. Comte in Darnau: "Ansfridus…comes…et Hildiwardus filius meus" donated property "in pago Darnau, in marca vel villa Sodoia…super fluvium Geldiun, in comitatu Giselberti" to Lorsch by charter dated 5 Oct 863[1456]. An agreement dated 14 Jun 877 of Emperor Charles II "le Chauve", presumably written with his own death in mind, names "Arnulfus comes, Gislebertus, Letardus, Matfridus, Widricus, Gotbertus, Adalbertus, Ingelgerus, Rainerus" as those willing to support the emperor's son if he travels across the Meuse[1457]. Emperor Karl III granted property "in pago Condruscio…Alnith" to "Gislebertus…comes…fidelis suis Teodone" by charter dated 6 Sep 885[1458]. Although it is not certain that this refers to Count Giselbert [I], no other contemporary individual of the same name has so far been identified. m (Aquitaine 846) --- of Lotharingia, daughter of Emperor LOTHAIRE I & his wife Ermengarde de Tours ([825/30]-). The Gesta Francorum records that "Gisalbertus, vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and took her to Aquitaine where they were married[1459]. The Annales Fuldenses also record that "Gisalbertus vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and married her in Aquitaine in 846[1460]. The Annales Mettenses also date this event in 846[1461]. Settipani states that the emperor recognised the marriage in 849[1462]. Rösch says that this daughter is often named Ermengarde but that there is no contemporary proof that this is correct[1463]."

Med Lands cites:
[1445] MGH LL Capitularia regum Francorum II, pp. 194-5.
[1446] McKitterick (1983), p. 230.
[1447] Iacobi de Guisia Annales Hanoniæ, MGH SS XXX Part 1, pp. 44-384.
[1448] D Arn 53, p. 75.
[1449] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 266.
[1450] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 268, citing Muller Het oudste cartularium van het sticht Utrecht, 48.
[1451] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 270.
[1452] McKitterick, p. 230.
[1453] Scholz, B. W. with Rogers, B. (2000) Carolingian Chronicles: Royal Frankish Annals and Nithard's Histories (University of Michigan Press) (“Nithard”), III.2, p. 158.
[1454] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 264.
[1455] Adnuntatio domni Karoli, MGH LL 1, p. 469.
[1456] Chronicon Laureshamense, MGH SS XXI, p. 370.
[1457] Karoli II Imp. Conventus Carisiacensis, MGH LL 1, p. 537.
[1458] D Karl 130, p. 208, headed "verunechtet" in the compilation.
[1459] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 846, MGH SS I, p. 364.
[1460] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 846, MGH SS I, p. 364.
[1461] Annales Mettenses, RHGF VII, p. 186.
[1462] Settipani (1993), p. 264.
[1463] Rösch (1977), p. 89.11


; Per Genealogy.EU (Brabant 1): “Giselbert, Gf im Maasgau 841, Gf im Lommegau 866, *ca 830, +892; m.ca 846 Irmgard (*830, +after 849), a dau.of Emperor Lothar I”


Per Genealogy.EU (Carol 1): “C2. [1m.] Ermengarde, Dss of Moselle, *830, +after 849; m.846 Ct Giselbert II von Maasgau (*830 +892)”.17,18

; Per Weis (240-16): "Giselbert, Count of Darnau 846-863; m. Helletrude of Lorraine (also called Ermengarde) (140-16), dau. of Emperor Lorthair I”


Per Weis (140-16): "Helletrude (perhaps Ermengarde) of Lorraine; m. 846 Count Giselbert (240-16), count of darnau."19

; Per Racines et Histoire (Brabant): “Giselbert 1er (ou Gislebert) ° ~820/30 + après 14/06/877 et sans doute après 06/09/885 (892 ?) peut-être d’origine Viking (le prénom de son fils Reginar=Ragnar) graf im Maasgau (841), im Lommegau (866) (investi par l’Empereur d’un comté sur le cours moyen de la Meuse, Darnau ou Maasgau mais en est chassé par le traité de Verdun de 843 pour son soutien aux rois francs de l’ouest ; revient dans la grâce impériale 849 ; cité chartes royales et impériales 06/860, 14/06/877 ; reçoit des terres de Karl III par charte 06/09/885)
     ép. 846 (Aquitaine, mariage reconnu par l’Empereur en 849) ? de Lotharingie (Irmgard, Ermengarde ?) ° ~825/30 + après 849 (dès 864) (fille de l’Empereur Lothaire 1er et d’Ermengarde de Tours) ”.7 Giselbert II (?) Graf im Maasgau, Gf im Lommegau was Ruler in 841 at Masau/Maasgau, Belgium.9

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 1 page (Dukes of Brabant and Landgraves of Hesse): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Giselbert: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020429&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 240-16, p. 217. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Brabant grafen im Maasgau, comtes de Louvain (Leuven), seigneurs de Perwez et Lovain(e) (Angleterre), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Giselbert: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020429&tree=LEO
  9. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  10. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 240-17, p. 217.
  11. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc43878539. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Irmingard/Irmgard: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020430&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#dauLotharMGiselbert
  14. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Gislebert de Maasgau: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gislebert_de_Maasgau. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert,_Count_of_the_Maasgau. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Giselbert von Maasgau: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giselbert_von_Maasgau. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dukes of Brabant and Landgraves of Hesse (Brabant 1): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant1.html#G2
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolingian 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#ELo1
  19. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Lines, 140-16, p. 134 and 240-17, p. 217.
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 1 page (Dukes of Brabant and Landgraves of Hesse): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant1.html

Reginar/Regnier II (?) comte de Hainaut1,2

M, #4938, b. 882, d. between 931 and 932
FatherReginar/Regnier I "Langhals" (?) graf im Hennegau, duc de Lotharingie1 b. c 850, d. bt 25 Oct 915 - 19 Jan 916
MotherAlberade (?) of Mons ()1 b. c 870, d. 916
ReferenceGAV28 EDV29
Last Edited24 Nov 2020
     Reginar/Regnier II (?) comte de Hainaut was born in 882; Racines et Histoire says b. 880.3,2 He married Alix/Alice/Adelaide (?) de Bourgogne, daughter of Richard II "le Justicier" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre, Cte de Châlons, de Mâcon, d'Autun, de Sens et de Nevers and Adelheid d'Auxerre (?) Princess of Burgundy.4,5,3,1
Reginar/Regnier II (?) comte de Hainaut died between 931 and 932.6,5,3,2
     GAV-28 EDV-29 GKJ-29. He was Count of Hainault at Hainaut, France. Reginar/Regnier II (?) comte de Hainaut was also known as Reginar II (?) Count of Hainault.5,1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 1 page (Dukes of Brabant and Landgraves of Hesse): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant1.html
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Boson page (Bosonides): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/boson.html
  4. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  5. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Milford Haven Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 155-18, p. 135. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 3.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reginar III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020425&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HAINAUT.htm#ReginarIIIdied973. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Hersent (?) of France1

F, #4939, b. 865
FatherCharles II "The Bald" (?) King of West Franks, King of Aquitaine, Holy Roman Emperor2 b. 13 Jun 823, d. 6 Oct 877
MotherRichilde (Richaut) (?) d'Ardennes, Queen of the West Franks2 b. c 845, d. 2 Jun 910
Last Edited24 Nov 2020
     Hersent (?) of France was born in 865.2

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 144. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html

Luitgarde/Ledgarde (?) Cts de Vermandois, Duchess of Normandy1,2,3,4,5

F, #4940, b. between 915 and 920, d. after 9 February 978
FatherHeribert II (?) Cte de Vermandois et de Troyes2,1,4,6,7,8,5 b. bt 879 - 880, d. 23 Feb 943
MotherAdela/Hildebrante/Liegarde (?) of Neustria, Princess of France1,4,9,5 b. c 895, d. a 931
ReferenceGAV31 EDV28
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Luitgarde/Ledgarde (?) Cts de Vermandois, Duchess of Normandy was born between 915 and 920 at Vermandois, Normandy, France; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1) says b. ca 914; Racines et Histoire (Blois-Chartres & Vermandois pages) say b. bef 925; Wikipedia says b. ca 914; Genealogics says b. 915/20; Med Lands says b. bef 925.10,11,12,13,14,15,5 She married Guillaume I "Longsword" (?) Duke of Normandy, son of Rollo (Ganger Rolf, Rollon) "The Viking" (?) Duke of Normandy and Poopa (Poppa, Pope) (?) de Bayeux, Duchess of Normandy, circa 940;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife. Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says m. 943/4;
Genealogics says m. ca 940.16,1,4,17,18,19 Luitgarde/Ledgarde (?) Cts de Vermandois, Duchess of Normandy married Thibault I/II "Le Tricheur" (?) comte de Blois, etc., son of Thibaud (Thibaut, Tetbald) dit «L’Ancien» (?) vicomte de Tours, comte de Blois and Richilde (?) de Bourges, between 943 and 944;
Her 2nd husband. Med Lands says m. 943/444.20,3,2,21,4,22,12,5
Luitgarde/Ledgarde (?) Cts de Vermandois, Duchess of Normandy was buried after 9 February 978 at Abbaye de Marmoutier, Tours, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     914
     DEATH     14 Nov
     Nobility. Born before 925 as the fifth child of Heribert II de Vermandois. She married Guillaume I de Normandie in 935 and after his death, she remarried to Thibaut de Blois whom she bore five children. She died on a Nov. 14 after 985 and was buried with her second husband.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Herbert II Of Vermandois 884–943
     Spouses
          William of Normandy 893–942
          Thibaut I de Blois
     Siblings
          Adele Of Vermandois
          Adalbert I of Vermandois
          Heribert III de Vermandois
     Robert de Vermandois 910–968
     Children
     Hugues de Blois unknown–986
     Eudes I de Blois unknown–996
     Emma of Blois unknown–1003
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Marmoutier, Tours, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 16 Mar 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 126438082.23
Luitgarde/Ledgarde (?) Cts de Vermandois, Duchess of Normandy died after 9 February 978; Med Lands says d. 14 Nov aft 985.24,2,1,4,5
     ; Per Weis: “Theobald I, 'The Devious," Count of Chartres and Blois, d. 16 Jan 975; m. 942/5 as 2nd husb. Luitgarde de Vermandois (136-19), d. 978, wid. of William I (121E-19) of Normandy, d. 942, and dau. of Hert II de Vermandois (50-18)/ (Gens. 16-19: G.A. Moriary; "The Robertins" in NEHGRH 99:130-131, 101; 112 chart, corrrected by Moriarty, The Plantagent Ancestry, p. 36; ES II/46, III/48; Seversmith 2,488-9; West Winter, VII.6).”.25

; Per Genealogy.EU (Blois 1): "Thibaut I "le Tricheur", Cte de Blois, de Rennes, de Chartres et de Châteaudun, Vcte de Tours, sn de Chino, Samur et de Beaugency, *910, +16.1.975; m.943/4 Ledgard de Vermandois (*ca 920 +27.5.977/after 978); they had issue..."26

; Per Med Lands:
     "THIBAUT [II] de Blois, son of THIBAUT [I] "l'Ancien" Vicomte de Tours & his first wife --- ([910]-16 Jan [975/77]). "Le comte Thibault père de Thibault" relinquished rights relating to "les terres de Vancé, de Joué, de Martigny et de Berthenay" to Tours Saint-Martin and paid for his future burial in the abbey by charter dated to [944][35]. “Ledgardis comitissa necnon Hugo episcopus et filius meus et item filius meus Odo comes” donated property to Saint-Martin de Tours, for the souls of “Theobaldi comitis quondam senioris mei…Richildis quondam sanctimonialis, eiusque filii Richardi episcopi” (referring to “dicti comitis et fratris sui Theobaldi”, in relation to Bishop Richard), by charter dated to [980][36]. This confirms that Richildis was the mother of Richard and that Richard was the brother of Thibaut. However, the absence of a phrase in the text such as “matris sui” linking “Richildis” to “Theobaldi comitis” suggests that she was his mother and that therefore the brothers were born from different marriages of the same father. He succeeded [his father] in [944] as THIBAUT I "le Tricheur" Comte de Blois, Vicomte de Tours. He dominated Brittany as guardian of his nephew Drogo, after the death of his brother-in-law Alain II Duke of Brittany in 952[37]. The Gesta Normannorum records that he plotted against Richard I Comte [de Normandie], who defeated Thibaut’s forces in [955] after the French captured Evreux[38]. "Domnus Tetbaldus comes Turonis" withdrew his claims to a serf in favour of the monks of Saint-Martin de Tours by charter dated 957, signed by "domni Tetbaldi comitis, Tetbaldi filii ipsius…Alberici Aurelianensium vicecomitis…"[39]. "Teutbaldi comitis, Teutbaldi junioris, Gausfredi comitis, Hugonis comitis Cenomannorum…" subscribed the charter dated Sep 960 under which "Aremburgis" donated property to Saint-Florent de Saumur[40]. He gained control of the counties of Chartres and Châteaudun in [960], and became the vassal of Lothaire King of the West Franks in 963. He was excommunicated by Odalric Archbishop of Reims in 964 for taking Coucy and other estates from the archbishopric[41]. Seigneur de Chino, de Saumur et de Baugency. A charter dated May 974 records a donation by "comes Teutbaldus" to Saint-Florent de Saumur[42].
     "m ([943/44]) as her second husband, LUITGARDIS de Vermandois, widow of GUILLAUME I “Longuespée” Comte [de Normandie], daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois [Carolingian] & his wife Adela [Capet] (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[43]. The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum refers to the wife of "Tetbaudi comitis" as "sorore Herberti Trecorum comitis"[44]. "Theobaldi comitis…Ledgardis comitisse" subscribed the charter dated 950 under which Ragnfred Bishop of Chartres donated property to Chartres Saint-Père, although the relationship between the two is not specified[45]. "Ledgardis" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis ecclesiam", for the souls of "senioris mei…comitis Tedbaldi…patris mei Heirberti, Trecassini comitis", with the consent of "archipresule…Hugone et…comite Odone, filiis meis", by charter dated 5 Feb 978, signed by "…Emma comitissa Pictavæ urbis…"[46]. “Ledgardis comitissa necnon Hugo episcopus et filius meus et item filius meus Odo comes” donated property to Saint-Martin de Tours, for the souls of “Theobaldi comitis quondam senioris mei…Richildis quondam sanctimonialis, eiusque filii Richardi episcopi” (referring to “dicti comitis et fratris sui Theobaldi”, in relation to Bishop Richard), by charter dated to [980][47]. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[48]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[49]."
Med Lands cites:
[35] Tours Saint-Martin CXLIII, p. 144.
[36] Arbois de Jubainville (1859), Tome I, p. 461.
[37] Settipani (1993), p. 229.
[38] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 54-5.
[39] Mabille (1871), Pièces justificatives, X, p. cix.
[40] Latouche (1910), Pièces Justificatives 1, p. 161.
[41] McKitterick (1983), p. 322.
[42] Lex (1892), p. 59, quoting Housseau Collection de Touraine XII, no. 10335, from Cartulaire noir de Saint-Florent de Saumur, fo. XXXVII vo.
[43] Rodulfus Glaber, III.39, p. 165.
[44] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 387.
[45] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome II, Liber Primus, 130, p. 351.
[46] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Tertius, Cap. VIII, p. 63.
[47] Arbois de Jubainville (1859) Tome I, p. 461.
[48] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.
[49] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 23.27


; Per Weis: “William I, 'Longsword,' b. abt 891, prob. Rouen, abt 927 succ. to County of Normandy, abt 930 the bretons rebelled, he subdued them, taking Brittany, the channel Islands, the Contentin, and the Averanchin, killed in treacherous ambush 17 Dec. 942 by servants of Theobald of Blois and arnulf of Flanders. (Isenburg; Onslow, pp. 46-62). He m. (1) Sprota; m. (2) Luitgarde de Vermandois (136-19), n.i., dau. of Herbert II (50-18), Count of Vermandois and Troyes.”.16
; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME (Rouen [900/05]-murdered Pequigny 17 Dec 942, bur ---, transferred [1064] to Rouen Cathedral[47]). Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo captured “Baiocasensem urbem” [Bayeux] along with "nobilissimam puellam...Popam filiam...Berengarii illustris viri" whom he married “more Danico” and by whom he had “Willelmum...filiamque...Gerloc”[48]. However, the Planctus for William Longsword[49], composed shortly after the murder of Guillaume, states that he had a Christian mother of overseas origin. Orderic Vitalis names "Willelmum cognomento Longam-Spatam" as the son of “Rollo dux” by his wife “Berengarium comitem...Popam...filiam eius”[50]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin states that he was born in Rouen and, in a later passage, describes him as a "young man" one year before his father's death[51]. His birth date is estimated based on the estimated birth date of his own son. His father chose him as heir one year before his death[52]. Flodoard records that "filius Rollonis" did homage to ex-king Charles III "le Simple" at "castellum…Auga" in 927[53]. He succeeded his father in [928/33] as GUILLAUME I "Longuespee" Comte [de Normandie]. Flodoard names "Willelmus princeps Nortmannorum" in 933[54]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin records that he quelled a rebellion led by the Viking chief Riulf after the latter besieged Rouen[55]. In return for swearing allegiance to Raoul King of France, Guillaume appears to have been granted rights to further territory along the coast in 933, maybe the Cotentin and Avranchin. If this is correct, it would have created rivalry with the dukes of Brittany. Dudo of Saint-Quentin describes Comte Guillaume's invasion of Brittany shortly after his accession to quell a rebellion against him, and his defeat of the rebels at Bayeux[56]. Responding to raids by Comte Guillaume, Arnoul I Count of Flanders invaded Ponthieu and in 939 captured Montreuil from Herluin Comte de Ponthieu, although it was recaptured by Comte Guillaume's forces. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis comes” captured "castrum...Monasteriolum" from “comiti...Herluino”, who sought help from “Normanniæ dominum” who recaptured the castle for Herluin[57]. In 939, Guillaume joined the alliance against Louis IV King of France which was led by Otto I "der Große" King of Germany who raided Frankish territory. Comte Guillaume, however, met King Louis at Amiens, receiving a confirmation of the grant of his lands in Normandy. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis” tricked "duci Willelmo" into a meeting to settle the dispute concerning Montreuil “apud Pinchiniacum”, where Guillaume was killed by “Henricus necnon Balzo, Robertus quoque atque Ridulphus quatuor diaboli filii” on “XVI Kal Jan” 943[58]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Willelmus dux" was killed in 942 “fraude Arnulphi Flandrensis satrapæ”[59]. The Annalibus Rotomagensibus record that "Willermus dux Normannorum filius Rollonis" was killed "943 XVI Kal Jan"[60]. The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rollo et Willelmus filius eius" were buried "apud Rothomagum in ecclesia beatæ Mariæ"[61]. Orderic Vitalis implies that the transfer of his body to Rouen Cathedral took place after the "the ninth year" in office of Archbishop Maurilius, who had succeeded Mauger de Normandie[62], which would date the event to [1064].
     "Per Med Lands: [:TAB:]"GUILLAUME (Rouen [900/05]-murdered Pequigny 17 Dec 942, bur ---, transferred [1064] to Rouen Cathedral[47]). Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo captured “Baiocasensem urbem” [Bayeux] along with "nobilissimam puellam...Popam filiam...Berengarii illustris viri" whom he married “more Danico” and by whom he had “Willelmum...filiamque...Gerloc”[48]. However, the Planctus for William Longsword[49], composed shortly after the murder of Guillaume, states that he had a Christian mother of overseas origin. Orderic Vitalis names "Willelmum cognomento Longam-Spatam" as the son of “Rollo dux” by his wife “Berengarium comitem...Popam...filiam eius”[50]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin states that he was born in Rouen and, in a later passage, describes him as a "young man" one year before his father's death[51]. His birth date is estimated based on the estimated birth date of his own son. His father chose him as heir one year before his death[52]. Flodoard records that "filius Rollonis" did homage to ex-king Charles III "le Simple" at "castellum…Auga" in 927[53]. He succeeded his father in [928/33] as GUILLAUME I "Longuespee" Comte [de Normandie]. Flodoard names "Willelmus princeps Nortmannorum" in 933[54]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin records that he quelled a rebellion led by the Viking chief Riulf after the latter besieged Rouen[55]. In return for swearing allegiance to Raoul King of France, Guillaume appears to have been granted rights to further territory along the coast in 933, maybe the Cotentin and Avranchin. If this is correct, it would have created rivalry with the dukes of Brittany. Dudo of Saint-Quentin describes Comte Guillaume's invasion of Brittany shortly after his accession to quell a rebellion against him, and his defeat of the rebels at Bayeux[56]. Responding to raids by Comte Guillaume, Arnoul I Count of Flanders invaded Ponthieu and in 939 captured Montreuil from Herluin Comte de Ponthieu, although it was recaptured by Comte Guillaume's forces. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis comes” captured "castrum...Monasteriolum" from “comiti...Herluino”, who sought help from “Normanniæ dominum” who recaptured the castle for Herluin[57]. In 939, Guillaume joined the alliance against Louis IV King of France which was led by Otto I "der Große" King of Germany who raided Frankish territory. Comte Guillaume, however, met King Louis at Amiens, receiving a confirmation of the grant of his lands in Normandy. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis” tricked "duci Willelmo" into a meeting to settle the dispute concerning Montreuil “apud Pinchiniacum”, where Guillaume was killed by “Henricus necnon Balzo, Robertus quoque atque Ridulphus quatuor diaboli filii” on “XVI Kal Jan” 943[58]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Willelmus dux" was killed in 942 “fraude Arnulphi Flandrensis satrapæ”[59]. The Annalibus Rotomagensibus record that "Willermus dux Normannorum filius Rollonis" was killed "943 XVI Kal Jan"[60]. The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rollo et Willelmus filius eius" were buried "apud Rothomagum in ecclesia beatæ Mariæ"[61]. Orderic Vitalis implies that the transfer of his body to Rouen Cathedral took place after the "the ninth year" in office of Archbishop Maurilius, who had succeeded Mauger de Normandie[62], which would date the event to [1064]. [:TAB:]"[m] firstly SPROTA, daughter of ---. Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the rebel “Riulfus” was defeated at the battle of "Pratum-belli", a messenger arrived “a...Fiscannensis castri” and reported to Guillaume the birth of his son to “nobilissima puella Danico more sibi iuncta...Sprota”[63]. This passage suggests that Sprota was Count Guillaume's concubine rather than wife, particularly as no reference has been found to a dissolution of any marriage before she married Esperleng or before Guillaume married his second wife. She married Esperleng de Pîtres. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures”[64]. [:TAB:]"m secondly ([935]) as her first husband, LUITGARDIS de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[65]. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “Normannorum Dux” and "Herbertus...filiam suam", encouraged by “Hugone Magno”, after the marriage of Guillaume´s sister Gerloc [which would date the marriage to [935] if that report is accurate][66]. She married secondly Thibaut [I] Comte de Blois. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[67]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[68]." Med Lands cites: [LIND:][47] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91. [48] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber II, XII, p. 229. [49] The Planctus for William Longsword, Verse 2. [50] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 7. [51] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapters 15 and 16-17. [52] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 17. [53] Flodoardi Annales, 927, MGH SS III, p. 378. [54] Flodoardi Annales, 933, MGH SS III, p. 381. [55] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18. [56] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18. [57] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, X, p. 237. [58] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, XI, XII, p. 238. [59] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 9. [60] Annalibus Rotomagensibus 943, MGH SS XXVI, p. 498. [61] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 14. [62] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91. [63] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, II, p. 234. [64] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. [65] Rodulfus Glaber, Historiarum III.39, p. 165. [66] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234. [67] Chartres Saint-Père, Vol. I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.[:LIND] firstly SPROTA, daughter of ---. Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the rebel “Riulfus” was defeated at the battle of "Pratum-belli", a messenger arrived “a...Fiscannensis castri” and reported to Guillaume the birth of his son to “nobilissima puella Danico more sibi iuncta...Sprota”[63]. This passage suggests that Sprota was Count Guillaume's concubine rather than wife, particularly as no reference has been found to a dissolution of any marriage before she married Esperleng or before Guillaume married his second wife. She married Esperleng de Pîtres. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures”[64].
     "m secondly ([935]) as her first husband, LUITGARDIS de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[65]. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “Normannorum Dux” and "Herbertus...filiam suam", encouraged by “Hugone Magno”, after the marriage of Guillaume´s sister Gerloc [which would date the marriage to [935] if that report is accurate][66]. She married secondly Thibaut [I] Comte de Blois. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[67]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[68]."
Med Lands cites:
[47] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91.
[48] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber II, XII, p. 229.
[49] The Planctus for William Longsword, Verse 2.
[50] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 7.
[51] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapters 15 and 16-17.
[52] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 17.
[53] Flodoardi Annales, 927, MGH SS III, p. 378.
[54] Flodoardi Annales, 933, MGH SS III, p. 381.
[55] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18.
[56] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18.
[57] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, X, p. 237.
[58] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, XI, XII, p. 238.
[59] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 9.
[60] Annalibus Rotomagensibus 943, MGH SS XXVI, p. 498.
[61] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 14.
[62] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91.
[63] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, II, p. 234.
[64] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288.
[65] Rodulfus Glaber, Historiarum III.39, p. 165.
[66] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234.
[67] Chartres Saint-Père, Vol. I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.28


Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 150.29

; This is the same person as ”Luitgarde of Vermandois” at Wikipedia and as ”Liutgarde de Vermandois” at Wikipédia (FR).14,19 GAV-31 EDV-28 GKJ-29.

; Per Weis: “Luitgarde de Vermandois, d. aft 978; m. (2) Theobald I (49-19), 'le Tricheur,' d. 978, Count of Blois (Saillot, 45).”.30

; Per Racines et Histoire (Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 9):
     "Luitgarde (Luitgardis, Ledgarde) de Vermandois ° avant 925 + un 14/11 avant 977 (souscrit une charte de donation en 950 de Ragnfred, Evêque de Chartres à Saint-Père de Chartres) ép. 1) 940 Guillaume 1er «Longuespée», comte de Normandie ° 885/890 +X 17/12/942 (ass. à Picquigny-sur-Somme) (fils de Robert 1er (Rollon), comte de Normandie, et de Poppa de Bayeux) ép. 2) 942/45 Thibaud «Le Tricheur», comte de Blois + 16/01/975 (fils de Thibaud «L’Ancien», comte de Blois, vicomte de Tours)"
Per Racines et Histoire (Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 2):
     "Thibaud 1er «Le Tricheur» ° 910 + 16/01/975 comte de Blois, de Rennes (959/60), vicomte puis comte de Tours (942), comte de Chartres et de Châteaudun (960), seigneur de Chinon, Saumur et Beaugency, Régent de Bretagne pour son neveu Dreu (Drogo) à la mort d’Alain II (952), vassal du Roi Lothaire (963), excommunié par l’Archevêque de Reims Odalric (964) pour la prise de Coucy, X contre Richard 1er de Normandie, battu (955) après la prise d’Evreux
ép. ~942/45 Luitgardis (Ledgarde, Liégard(e)) de Vermandois ° avant 925 (~915/920) + après 09/02/977/78 (peut-être un 14/11 ou un 27/05 ou peu après ?) dame d’Illiers-L’Evêque (27) (fille d’Hér(i)bert II, comte de Vermandois, et d’Adela de Francie ; veuve de Guillaume 1er «Longuespée» de Normandie, ép. ~940 + ass. 17/12/942 à Picquigny sur ordre du comte de Flandres) (souscrit charte en 950 de Ragnfred, Evêque de Chartres, en faveur de Saint-Père de Chartres.)12,13"

; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolin p. 1): "Css Luitgarde de Vermandois, *ca 914, +9.2.978; m.943/4 Theobald II "le Tricheur", Cte de Blois, Ct of Chartres and Tours (*910 +975.)10"

; Per Med Lands:
     "LUITGARDIS (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[235]. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “Normannorum Dux” and "Herbertus...filiam suam", encouraged by “Hugone Magno”, after the marriage of Guillaume’s sister Gerloc [which would date the marriage to [935] if that report is accurate][236]. The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum refers to the wife of "Tetbaudi comitis" as "sorore Herberti Trecorum comitis"[237]. "Theobaldi comitis…Ledgardis comitisse" subscribed the charter dated 950 under which Ragnfred Bishop of Chartres donated property to Chartres Saint-Père, although the relationship between the two is not specified[238]. "Ledgardis" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis ecclesiam", for the souls of "senioris mei…comitis Tedbaldi…patris mei Heirberti, Trecassini comitis", with the consent of "archipresule…Hugone et…comite Odone, filiis meis", by charter dated 5 Feb 978, signed by "…Emma comitissa Pictavæ urbis…"[239]. “Ledgardis comitissa necnon Hugo episcopus et filius meus et item filius meus Odo comes” donated property to Saint-Martin de Tours, for the souls of “Theobaldi comitis quondam senioris mei…Richildis quondam sanctimonialis, eiusque filii Richardi episcopi” (referring to “dicti comitis et fratris sui Theobaldi”, in relation to Bishop Richard), by charter dated to [980][240]. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[241]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[242].
     "m firstly ([935]) as his second wife, GUILLAUME I “Longuespée” Comte [de Normandie], son of ROBERT I [Rollo] Comte [de Normandie] & his [second] wife Poppa de Bayeux (-murdered Péquigny-sur-Somme 17 Dec 942, bur Rouen, cathédrale de Notre-Dame).
     "m secondly ([942/45]) THIBAUT [II] "le Tricheur" Comte de Blois, son of THIBAUT [I] "l'Ancien" Comte de Blois, Vicomte de Tours & his first wife --- (-16 Jan [975/77])."
Med Lands cites:
[235] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.39, p. 165.
[236] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234.
[237] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 387.
[238] Chartres Saint-Père, Liber Primus, 130, p. 351.
[239] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Tertius, Cap. VIII, p. 63.
[240] Arbois de Jubainville (1859), Tome I, p. 461.
[241] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.
[242] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 23.5

Family 1

Guillaume I "Longsword" (?) Duke of Normandy b. bt 900 - 905, d. 17 Dec 942

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liutgarde/Ledgard de Vermandois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020498&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#Luitgarddiedafter977. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Heribert II: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/herib002.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#HeribertIIdied943B
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Heribert II: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/herib002.htm
  9. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, NN: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/nn000002.htm
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Descendants of Charlemagne: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#LH2
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, House of Cerdic, p. 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luitgarde_of_Vermandois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liutgarde|Ledgard de Vermandois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020498&tree=LEO
  16. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 121E-19, p. 121.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I 'Longsword': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020058&tree=LEO
  18. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Guillaume "Longue Épée" of Normandy [William "Longsword"]: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/willi000.htm
  19. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Liutgarde de Vermandois: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liutgarde_de_Vermandois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  20. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 136-19, p. 119; line 49-18, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut I 'the Deceiver': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020499&tree=LEO
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_I,_Count_of_Blois.
  23. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 10 November 2019), memorial page for Luitgardis de Vermandois (914–14 Nov), Find A Grave Memorial no. 126438082, citing Abbaye de Marmoutier, Tours, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/126438082/luitgardis-de_vermandois. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  24. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 136-19, p. 119.
  25. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 49-19, p. 56.
  26. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Champagne-Blois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#ThibautIdied975
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#GuillaumeIdied942
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liutgarde/Ledgard de Vermandois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020498&tree=LEO
  30. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 136-19, p. 131.
  31. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut/Tetbald de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020508&tree=LEO
  33. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 3.
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020509&tree=LEO
  35. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020503&tree=LEO
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020503&tree=LEO
  37. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EmmaBloisdiedafter1003
  38. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Emma de Champagne: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I15079&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  39. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020131&tree=LEO
  40. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EudesIdied995

Adalbert/Albert I "The Pious" (?) Comte de Vermandois1,2,3,4,5

M, #4941, b. circa 915, d. 8 September 987
FatherHeribert II (?) Cte de Vermandois et de Troyes3,5,6,7,8,9,10 b. bt 879 - 880, d. 23 Feb 943
MotherAdela/Hildebrante/Liegarde (?) of Neustria, Princess of France3,5,7,8,11 b. c 895, d. a 931
ReferenceGAV28 EDV28
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Adalbert/Albert I "The Pious" (?) Comte de Vermandois married Heresinde (?);
His 1st wife.8 Adalbert/Albert I "The Pious" (?) Comte de Vermandois was born circa 915 at France; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says b. ca 915/917; Leo van der Pas says b. ca 915; Weis [AR7, line 50-19] says b. ca 920.3,12,7 He married Gerberga (?) de Lorraine, daughter of Giselbert II (?) Duc de Lorraine, Graf im Maasgau and Gerberga (?) von Sachsen, circa 954.2,12,3,5,13,7,8,14
Adalbert/Albert I "The Pious" (?) Comte de Vermandois died on 8 September 987; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says d. 9 Sept 988.12,1,3,5,7,8
     ; Per Med Lands
     "ADALBERT [Albert] [I], son of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] (-8 Sep 987). Flodoard names "Adalbertus filius Heriberti"[250]. Under the division of territories organised after his father's death in 943, he became Comte de Vermandois. Comte Albert re-established the abbey of Homblières and built Mont-Saint-Quentin[251]. When his brother Hugues was deposed as archbishop of Reims in 948, Comte Albert gave up the family's struggle with Louis IV "d'Outremer" King of France and swore allegiance to the king. He opposed the election of Hugues Capet as king of France, but eventually submitted[252]. A list of members of the Cathedral of Paris lists (in order) "Albertus comes, Girberga comitissa, Harbertus, Otto, Lewultus, Girbertus, Gondrada, Ricardus, Harbertus comes, Walerannus laicus, Gisla…", the first four individuals named apparently being Comte Albert, his wife and three sons, and the last named maybe his brother or nephew[253].
     "m firstly HERESINDE, daughter of ---. According to the Histoire de Guise, Comte Albert constructed the abbey of Saint-Michel at Rochefort in 945 "d'accord avec la comtesse Hérésinde sa femme", while in 947 Hérésinde founded the nearby Benedictine convent o[f Bucilly[254]. The source assumes that this refers to Albert Comte de Vermandois, but his supposed first marriage is not mentioned by Settipani[255]. According to the introduction to the Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Bucilly, Bucilly was founded by "Gerberge, femme d'Albert I Comte de Vermandois" although it notes that "certains auteurs ont voulu faire remonter [sa foundation] à la libéralité de Hersinde femme d'Herbert Comte de Vermandois morte en 901"[256]. The Cartulaire reproduces a French translation of a declaration by Barthélemy Bishop of Laon dated 1120 entitled "Privilegium de domino Elberto, Viromandensi comite" according to which the bishop declares that he has read the original charter under which "Elbert comte de Vermandois…et sa femme Gertrude [error for Gerberge]" founded Bucilly[257]. Further research in the original charter documentation is needed to clarify this confusion, not the least of which is that, even if Hérésinde was not the wife of Comte Albert, no other reference has been found to her being the wife of Comte Héribert [I] (see above).]
     "m [secondly] ([949/54]) GERBERGA, daughter of GISELBERT Duke of Lotharingia & his wife Gerberga of Germany ([935]-after 7 Sep 978). Settipani names her as the wife of Comte Albert, and gives her parentage, but does not cite the primary source on which this is based. A list of members of the Cathedral of Paris lists (in order) "Albertus comes, Girberga comitissa, Harbertus, Otto, Lewultus, Girbertus, Gondrada, Ricardus, Harbertus comes, Walerannus laicus, Gisla…", the first four individuals named apparently being Comte Albert, his wife and three sons, and the last named maybe his brother or nephew[258]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage more precisely has not been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[250] Flodoard 949, MGH SS III, p. 399.
[251] Pécheur Histoire de Guise, p. 47.
[252] Settipani (1993), p. 236.
[253] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Eglise cathedrale de Paris, p. 1015.
[254] Pécheur Histoire de Guise, p. 47, citing "Charte de Raoul évêque de Laon, Lelong, N. Hist. du diocèse de Laon, p. 598".
[255] Settipani (1993), p. 236.
[256] Bucilly, Introduction, p. .
[257] Bucilly I, p. 113, footnote 3 stating "Cette charte est reproduite in-extenso dans le Dictionnaire historique des communes de l'Aisne, de M. Melleville, tome I, p. 167" (which has not so far been consulted), although it is not known whether this refers to the original foundation charter or the charter dated 1120.
[258] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Eglise cathedrale de Paris, p. 1015.8


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 149.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to Amercia bef.1700 7th Edition, Frederick Lewis Weis, Reference: 51.7


; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Albert Ier de Vermandois1 dit le Pieux, né entre 931 et 934, mort le 8 septembre 987, fut comte de Vermandois de 946 à 987. Il était fils d’Herbert II, comte de Vermandois, et d’Adèle de France.
Biographie
     "Il ne reçoit le Vermandois qu’au moment du partage des terres de son père trois ans après la mort de ce dernier, c’est-à-dire en 9462.
     "Il soutient son frère Hugues pour que celui-ci conserve l’évêché de Reims, mais abandonne la lutte en 949 quand ce dernier est définitivement débouté de ses prétentions. Il se soumet alors au roi Louis IV d’Outremer et devient un de ses partisans. À la mort de Louis V, il s’oppose à l’élection d’Hugues Capet, mais doit se soumettre. Il meurt peu après.
Mariage et enfants
     "Peu avant 950, il épouse Gerberge (935-978), fille de Gislebert, duc de Lotharingie, et de Gerberge de Saxe laquelle épouse en secondes noces le roi Louis IV. Ils ont les enfants suivants3 :
** Herbert III, comte de Vermandois
** Otton, qui est probablement le même que le fondateur du comté de Chiny
** Liudolph (v.957 † av.986), évêque de Noyon.

Sources
** Christian Settipani, La Préhistoire des Capétiens (Nouvelle histoire généalogique de l'auguste maison de France, vol. 1), Villeneuve-d'Ascq, éd. Patrick van Kerrebrouck, 1993, 545 p. (ISBN 978-2-95015-093-6)
Notes et références
1. Albert (Adalbert) de Vermandois sur le site Medieval Lands [archive]
2. Tome 5, page 358 dans l’Encyclopédie des gens du monde : répertoire universel des Sciences, des Arts et des Lettres [archive] (1835) publiée par Alexis-François Artaud de Montor
3. Famille d'Albert Ier de Vermandois sur Medieval Lands [archive]"

[See Note Per Med Lands].15

; Per Wikipedia
     "Adalbert I of Vermandois (French: Albert I le Pieux, the Pious) (c.?915–c.?September 8, 987), in 946 he succeeded his father as Count of Vermandois.
Life
     "Albert was the son of Herbert II of Vermandois and Adela of France.[1] He had his men and those of his brother Count Herbert escort the mother of Louis IV of France, Queen "Ottobega" (Eadgifu of Wessex), from Laon to her marriage with his brother Herbert, which in turn enraged King Louis.[2] Louis confiscated his mother's holdings, the abbey of Saint Mary in Laon which he gave to his wife Gerberga of Saxony and the royal fisc of Attigny.[2] In 957 Albert and his brother Robert Count of Meaux and Troyes were adherents of King Lothair of France. at an unknown age [3]
     "When Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine decided to assert his rights to the throne he was aided by Albert and Albert's two nephews, Herbert III, Count of Meaux and Odo I, Count of Blois.[4] The two aided Charles in his plots and continued to make trouble for the new king even after Charles was captured and imprisoned.[4]
     "Albert was slow to acknowledge the election of Hugh Capet as King of the Franks. On learning that Hugh intended to attack him, Albert sent Dudo of Saint-Quentin to Normandy to see if Duke Richard I, Duke of Normandy would use his influence to keep the peace between them, which apparently the duke did.[4] For his part Hugh Capet had been suspicious that Albert was about to rebel against him.[5] Albert, Count of Vermandois, died c.?8 Sep 987 and was succeeded by his son Herbert III.[1]
Family
     "In 954 he married Gerberge of Lorraine († 978),[b] daughter of Giselbert, Duke of Lorraine,[1] and his wife Gerberga of Saxony.[6] Their children were:
** Herbert III of Vermandois[1]
** Otto I, Count of Chiny (c.?950/955–987)[7]
** Eudes of Vermandois (c.?956–c.?983–87)[1]
** Liudolfe of Vermandois, Bishop of Noyon and Tournai (c.?957–986)[1]

Notes
a. Albert, through his marriage to Gerberge of Lorraine became the brother-in-law to both Lothar King of France and Charles Duke of Lower Lorraine. Gerberge, Lothar and Charles were all children of Gerberga of Saxony and all three, like Albert, were Carolingians.
b. When they married, Albert and Gerberge were well within the seven degrees of consanguinity decreed by canon law at the time. They were third cousins once removed. However this branch of the Carolingians was following its own marital alliance policy irrespective of church canons. See: Régine Le Jan, Famille et pouvoir dans le monde franc (VII-X siècle) essai d'anthropologie sociale (Paris: Publications de la Sorbonne, 2003), pp. 324-25 & 325 table 41. The marriage between Adalbert and Gerberge is an example of what is called affinal "relinkings" (French: renchaînement alliance) a term for a couple descended from common ancestors with multiple marriages between the two families over several generations. These alliances were deliberately maintained outside the control of the church. See: The SAGE Handbook of Social Network Analysis, eds. John Scott; Peter J. Carrington; et al. (London; Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE, 2011), pp. 136-37; Douglas R. White and Michael Houseman, A reticular approach to kinship, l’Homme (2013), p. 1.
References
1. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1 (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 49
2. The Annals of Flodoard of Reims, 916–966, eds & trans. Steven Fanning: Bernard S. Bachrach (New York; Ontario, Can: University of Toronto Press, 2011), p. 56
3. Heather J Tanner, Families, friends and allies : Boulogne and politics in Northern France and England, c. 879-1160 (Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2004), p. 39 n. 34
4. Geoffrey Koziol, Begging Pardon and Favor: Ritual and Political Order in Early Medieval France (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1992), p. 149
5. Lea Shopkow, 'The Man from Vermandois: Dudo of St-Quentin and His Patrons', Religion, Text, and Society in Medieval Spain and Northern Europe: Essays in Honor of J.N. Hillgarth, eds. Thomas E Burman; Jocelyn N Hillgarth; Lea Shopkow (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2002), pp. 303 & n. 2
6. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band I (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1980), Tafel 3
7. Vanderkindere 1902, p. 344.
Sources
** Vanderkindere, Léon (1902). La Formation territoriale des principautés belges au Moyen Âge. Vol. 2. H. Lamertin, Libraire-Editeur."

[See Note Per Med Lands]16 GAV-28 EDV-28 GKJ-29. Adalbert/Albert I "The Pious" (?) Comte de Vermandois was also known as Albert I 'The Pious' de Vermandois Count de Vermandois.17

; Per Racines et Histoire (Vermandois): "A(da)lbert 1er «le Pieux» ° 915/921 + 09/09/988 comte de Vermandois (943) et de Beaune (charte de Saint-Quentin ~948)
     ép. ~954 Gerberge de Hainaut-Lorraine ° ~935 + 978 (fille posthume de Gislebert de Lorraine et de Gerberge de Saxe ; adoptée par Louis VI)"
Per Racines et Histoire (Hainaut): "Gerberge de Hainaut ° ~935 + 07/09/978
ép. ~954 son cousin Albert 1er (Adalbert «Le Pieux»), comte de Vermandois, Troyes et Meaux ° après 916 + 08/09/987"

[See Note Per Med Lands].18 He was Comte de Vermandois between 943 and 988.16

Family 1

Heresinde (?)

Family 2

Gerberga (?) de Lorraine b. c 935, d. a 7 Sep 978
Children

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 120. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brabant 1 page (Dukes of Brabant and Landgraves of Hesse): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brabant/brabant1.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adalbert 'the Pious': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020492&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brabant.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Heribert II: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/herib002.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adalbert 'the Pious': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020492&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#AlbertIdied987B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#HeribertIIdied943B
  10. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Heribert II: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/herib002.htm
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, NN: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/nn000002.htm
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-19, p. 51. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberga de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020493&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(LOWER)%20NOBILITY.htm#Gerbergadied978
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Albert Ier de Vermandois: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Ier_de_Vermandois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adalbert_I,_Count_of_Vermandois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I8379
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Heribert III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020494&tree=LEO
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Odo de Vermandois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020496&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liudolf de Vermandois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020497&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#LiudolfVermandoisNoyondied986

Reginhilde (?) von Friesland

F, #4942, d. 917
FatherCount Theodoricus (?)
ReferenceGAV30
Last Edited10 Oct 2020
     Reginhilde (?) von Friesland was born circa 879. She married Dietrich II (?) von Ringelheim, Count of Saxon-Hamelant, son of Reginhert (?) Count of Threkwitgau and Matilda (?) of Dreini, circa 900.1,2,3,4
Reginhilde (?) von Friesland died in 917; Genealogy.EU says d. 917; Wikipedia (De.) says d. bef 11 May 929.1,3
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "THEODERIC (-8 Nov 917[46]). Widukind names "Thiadrici" as father of Queen Mathilde, specifying that the family was "stirpis magni ducis Widukindi"[47]. The father of Queen Mathilde is named "Thietricus" in the Vita Mathildis Reginæ[48].
     "m REGINLIND [Reinhild], daughter of --- (-11 May ----). The wife of Theoderich is named "Reinhildam, Danorum Fresonumque germine procreatam" in the Vita Mathildis Reginæ[49]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[50], she was Reinhild, daughter of Gotfrid the Dane & his wife Gisela [Carolingian], which is presumably a guess based on this description in the Vita Mathildis. However, the chronology is not ideal. Regino records the marriage in 882 of "Gisla filia Hlotharii" and "rex Godofridus Nordmannorum"[51]. If this couple's daughter was the mother of Queen Mathilde, the latter's estimated birth date (see below) would need to be pushed forward by several years, which makes the chronology for her known descendants tight. A better fit may be Reginlind, [sister of Bovo Bishop of Chalons, daughter of ---]. The known sister of Bishop Bovo was Frederuna, wife of Charles III "le Simple" King of the Franks. The hypothesis that there was another sister married to Theoderic would explain (1) the name Frederuna being transmitted to Regenhild's daughter, and (2) Berenger Bishop of Cambrai, recorded elsewhere as nepos of Queen Frederuna, being described as "…Ottonis imperatoris proxime consanguineus" in the Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium[52]. If this is correct, the reference to Reginlind being "Danorum Fresonumque germine procreatam" has not been explained. A list of names in the Libri Confraternitatum Sancti Galli sets out (in order) "Thieterich, Reginhilt, *, Oto, Amalrat, Perectheid, Friderun, Pia", immediately after a list of family members of Heinrich I King of Germany and his wife, which no doubt refers to the latter's parents and sisters, "Oto" being the only person not so far identified[53]. The list is undated but was presumably written during the period [929/36] as King Heinrich's son-in-law Duke Giselbert is included (married in [928/29]) but not his son-in-law Hugues Duc des Francs (married in 937). The necrology of Merseburg records the death "11 May" of "Reinhild mater regine Mahtildis"[54]."
Med Lands cites:
[46] ES II 104.
[47] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ I.31, MGH SS III, p. 431.
[48] Vita Mathildis Reginæ 2, MGH SS IV, p. 285.
[49] Vita Mathildis Reginæ 2, MGH SS IV, p. 285.
[50] ES II 104.
[51] Reginonis Chronicon 882, MGH SS I, p. 593.
[52] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium I,80 , MGH SS VII, p. 431.
[53] Piper, P. (ed.) (Berlin) Libri confraternitatum Sancti Galli, Augiensis, Fabariensis (Berlin), p. 84.
[54] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Merseburg.5


; Per Genealogics: "Possibly a daughter of Count Godfrid and a descendant of King Radboud of the Frisians who lived in the 500s”.6 GAV-30.

Reference: Genealogics cites: The Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 1975 , Turton, Lt.Col. W. H. 23.6 Reginhilde (?) von Friesland was also known as Reginhild Ludmilla (?)6 Reginhilde (?) von Friesland was also known as Reinhilde (?)1 Reginhilde (?) von Friesland was also known as Ludmilla Reinhildis (?)7 Reginhilde (?) von Friesland was also known as Reginlind/Reinhild (?)5 Reginhilde (?) von Friesland was also known as Reinhilde (?) von Dänemark.3

; Per Med Lands:
     "[REGINLIND (-11 May ----). The wife of Theoderich is named "Reinhildam, Danorum Fresonumque germine procreatam" in the Vita Mathildis Reginæ[672]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[673], she was Reinhild, daughter of Gotfrid the Dane & his wife Gisela [Carolingian], which is presumably a guess based on this description in the Vita Mathildis. However, the chronology for this hypothesis is not ideal. Regino records the marriage in 882 of "Gisla filia Hlotharii" and "rex Godofridus Nordmannorum"[674]. If this couple's daughter was the mother of Queen Mathilde, the latter's estimated birth date would need to be pushed forward by several years, which makes the chronology for her known descendants tight. Another possibility is that Regenhild was an otherwise unrecorded sister of Bovo Bishop of Chalons. This hypothesis would explain (1) the name Frederuna being transmitted to Reginlind's daughter, and (2) Berenger Bishop of Cambrai, recorded elsewhere as nepos of Queen Frederuna, being described as "…Ottonis imperatoris proxime consanguineus" in the Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium[675]. If this is correct, the reference to Reginlind being "Danorum Fresonumque germine procreatam" has not been explained. m ([900]) THEODERICH, son of --- & his wife Mathilde --- (-8 Feb 917).]"
Med Lands cites:
[672] Vita Mathildis Reginæ 2, MGH SS IV, p. 285.
[673] ES II 104.
[674] Reginonis Chronicon 882, MGH SS I, p. 593.
[675] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium I,80 , MGH SS VII, p. 431.8

; NB: Genealogics names "Count Theodoricus" as the father of Frederuna, but gives no other children or wife. On the other hand, Med Lands states:
     "[Four] siblings. They may have been of Danish origin and based in Frisia, if the speculation about the origin of Reginlind, wife of Theoderich, is correct, as she is referred to as "Danorum Fresonumque germine procreatam" (see below).
1. BOVO [II] (-947). Bishop of Châlons [917].
2. [REGINLIND (-11 May ----). m ([900]) THEODERICH, son of --- & his wife Mathilde --- (-8 Feb 917).]
3. FREDERUNA (-10 Feb 917, bur Reims, église abbatiale de Saint-Rémi). m ([1/18] Apr 907) as his first wife, CHARLES III "le Simple" King of the West Franks,
4. --- . m ---. One child:
a) BERENGAR (-957, bur Saint-Gereon).
"
     Wikipédia (Fr.) identifies Frédérune as a sister of the Bishop Beuve II (Bovo, Bovon).9,10,11

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Norway 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dietrich: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120871&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Immedinger: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immedinger. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Theoderichdied917MReginlind. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Friderundied971
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Reginhild Ludmilla: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120872&tree=LEO
  7. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I25086
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/Reims.htm#ReginlindMTheoderich
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Count Theodoricus: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020078&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/Reims.htm#Frederunadied917
  11. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Frédérune: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fr%C3%A9d%C3%A9rune. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  12. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 63. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#AmalradaMEberhard
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Theoderichdied917MReginlind
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde von Ringelheim: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020486&tree=LEO
  16. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Mathilde: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/mathi003.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Mathildedied968

Hugues/Hugo "L'Abbe" (?) Abbot of St. Quintin, Chancellor of Louis the Pious1,2,3

M, #4943, b. 802, d. 16 June 844
FatherCharlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West2,3,4 b. 2 Apr 747, d. 28 Jan 814
MotherRegina (?)2,3 b. 770, d. 7 Jun 844
Last Edited13 Sep 2020
     Hugues/Hugo "L'Abbe" (?) Abbot of St. Quintin, Chancellor of Louis the Pious was born in 802.2,3
Hugues/Hugo "L'Abbe" (?) Abbot of St. Quintin, Chancellor of Louis the Pious died on 16 June 844 at Angoulême, Departement de la Charente, Poitou-Charentes, France (now); died in battle.2,3
     ;      There is some dispute as to the father of Petronilla/Petronelle who m. Tertulle. Genealogy.EU says that she was the dau. of Hugo "Le Abbe" (Hugo, Abbot of St. Quintin, 802-844), an illeitimate son of Charlemagne (hereinafter Hugo #2). However, Find A Grave's memorial for Petronilla/Petronelle (#147096299) says that her father was Hugo "The Abbot" Welf (unk-886), a son of Conrad I of Auxerre (hereinafter Hugo #2).
     Two articles in Wikipedia on Hugo #1 (Abbot of Saint-Quentin and son of Charlemagne), and Hugo #2 (unk-886) discusses the confusion and assigns Petronilla/Petronelle as the dau. of Hugo #2 and thus granddau. of Conrad I.
Per Wikipedia - Hugo #1:
     Hugh (abbot of Saint-Quentin) - Hugh (802–844) was the illegitimate son of Charlemagne and his concubine Regina, with whom he had one other son: Bishop Drogo of Metz (801–855). Along with Drogo and his illegitimate half-brother Theodoric, Hugh was tonsured and sent from the palace of Aachen to a monastery in 818 by his father's successor, Louis the Pious, following the revolt of King Bernard of Italy.[1] Hugh rose to become abbot of several abbacies: Saint-Quentin (822/23), Lobbes (836), and Saint-Bertin (836). In 834,[1] he was made imperial archchancellor by his half-brother.[2]
     On Louis's death in 840, his sons began to fight over the inheritance. In 841, Hugh sided with his nephew Charles the Bald against Louis and Lothair.[3] In 842, Charles spent Christmas with Hugh at Saint-Quentin on his eastern frontier.[4] Hugh's interventions probably secured Saint-Quentin for Charles's kingdom in the division that came with the Treaty of Verdun (843).[5]
     Hugh was part of the small army which, on its way south to join Charles at Toulouse, was ambushed by Pippin II in the Angoumois on 14 June 844. Hugh was killed by a lance, and according to the anonymous verse lament composed about his death—called the Rhythmus de obitu Hugonis abbatis or Planctus Ugoni abbatis[6]—Charles wept over his body.[7][8]
     Hugh is sometimes confused with Hugh the Abbot, resulting in the erroneous claim that he had a daughter, Petronilla, who married Tertullus of Anjou, the semi-legendary father of Ingelger, first count of Anjou. The late accounts of the Angevin origins actually make Petronilla a kinswoman of Hugh the Abbot, not of Charlemagne's son. (emphasis added)
Notes
1. McKitterick 1983, p. 134.
2. McKitterick 1983, p. 84.
3. Nelson 1992, p. 121.
4. Nelson 1992, p. 131.
5. Nelson 1992, p. 134.
6. MGH, Poetae II, p. 139.
7. Nelson 1992, p. 141.
8. McKitterick 1983, p. 294.
Sources
-- McKitterick, Rosamond (1983). The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians, 751–987. London: Longman.
-- Nelson, J. L. (1992). Charles the Bald. London: Longman.
Per Wikipedia - Hugo #2:
     Hugh the Abbot (died 12 May 886) was a member of the Welf family, a son of Conrad I of Auxerre and Adelaide. After his father's death, his mother apparently married Robert the Strong, the margrave of Neustria. On Robert's death in 866, Hugh became the regent and guardian for Robert's sons, Odo and Robert.
     Hugh entered the monastery and rose to become abbot of Saint-Germain d'Auxerre. Despite his vows, he was no peaceful, contemplative monk but the epitome of the warrior-monk of his age. King Charles the Bald sent him on a military expedition to the Nivernais. One can see in this the clerical tendency to support the reigning dynasty against the great vassals. Hugh welcomed Charles when the king had to flee during an 858 invasion of Louis the German, when his vassals refused him aid and rebelled under Robert the Strong. When Robert regained favour, Hugh was exiled to Lotharingia, where he became archbishop of Cologne (864). He was called back to France soon, however.
     In 866, upon Robert's death, Hugh received all the former's abbacies, including Noirmoutiers and Saint-Martin de Tours, counties, including Tours, and the margraviate between the Seine and the Loire (Neustria). The only lands the sons of Robert inherited were in Beauce and Touraine. Despite being Robert's opponent during his life, after his death Hugh became the guardian of Robert's children. Hugh was endued with great political sense and fought the Vikings vigorously. He was the archchaplain of the royal court and one of the chief ministers of the joint-kings Louis III and Carloman. Hugh tried to maintain the alliance of the related Carolingian monarchs against the Vikings. He united all the Carolingian kingdoms against the usurper Boso of Provence. He supported Charles the Fat on his succession to West Francia in 884, but he died before he could lend aid to the defence of Paris during the siege of 885–86.
Sources
-- MacLean, Simon. Kingship and Politics in the Late Ninth Century: Charles the Fat and the end of the Carolingian Empire. Cambridge University Press: 2003.1,5,6,7,8,9

Reference: Leo van de Pas cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 64.2 He was Abbe of St. Quentin.10,3

; Hugo "Le Abbe", illegitimate son of Charlemagne.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020024&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charlemagne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000001&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugo (#1) - Hugo, Abbot of St.Quintin, Chancellor of Louis the Pious: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020024&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugo (#2) - Hugo, Archbishop of Köln: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020417&tree=LEO
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 October 2019), memorial page for Petronelle d'Auxerre d'Anjou (unknown–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 147096299, citing Basilique de St-Martin, Tours, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/147096299/petronelle-d_anjou. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Hugo #2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_the_Abbot. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Hugo #1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_(abbot_of_Saint-Quentin).
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Drogo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020023&tree=LEO

Bodegeisel II (?) of Schelde1

M, #4944, d. between 585 and 588
FatherSaint Gandolfus (?) of Maastricht, Bishop of Tongres2,3
ReferenceGAV38 EDV38
Last Edited6 Sep 2020
     Bodegeisel II (?) of Schelde married Saint Oda (?) of Savoy.4
Bodegeisel II (?) of Schelde died between 585 and 588 at Carthage, Tunisia; enroute from Constantinople.4,5,6,7
     ; NB: The parents of St. Arnulf are uncertain. For example:
     Weis [2008:178] shows Arnulf as the son of Bodegeisel II.
     Genealogics: shows no parents directly connected to Arnulf, but states: "His father may have been Arnoald, who was dux of the Scheldt before becoming bishop of Metz."
     Wikipedia states:
          "Shortly after 800, most likely in Metz, a brief genealogy of the Carolingians was compiled, with no verifiable historical basis. It was modelled in style after the genealogy of Jesus in the New Testament. According to this source, Arnulf's father was a certain Arnoald, who in turn was the son of Ansbertus and Blithilt (or Blithilde), an alleged and otherwise unattested daughter of Chlothar I. This claim of royal Merovingian descent is not confirmed by the contemporary reference in the Vita. Under Salic Law no children of Blithilde would be recognized as legitimate heirs to the dynasty, so an event like this would hardly be recorded, least remembered after many centuries.
     "J. Depoin observed that Arnulf was identified as a Frank in contemporary documents, whereas Arnoald was identified by Paul the Deacon as a Roman.[2] Based on the Vita Gundolphi Arnulf's father was Bodegisel, a Frankish noble. David Humiston Kelley then proposed that Arnoald was likely an ancestor of the Carolingians through a daughter Itta, wife of Pepin of Landen. Christian Settipani revisited and expanded upon the work of Depoin and Kelley, and concurred in Arnulf's descent from Bodegisel instead of Arnoald, but noting that there was a connection between the Ripuarian Frankish royal house and the Carolingians. He argued (without dismissing the possibility of Itta's being Arnoald's daughter) that there was a connection through Arnulf's wife Doda, whom he posited as a daughter of Arnoald. Kelly then considered probable Settipani's proposed connection between the Carolingians and Arnoald."
The work by Christian Settipani referred to by Wikipedia is from:
** Christian Settipani, La Préhistoire des Capétiens (Nouvelle histoire généalogique de l'auguste maison de France, vol. 1), Villeneuve-d'Ascq, éd. Patrick van Kerrebrouck, 1993, 545 p. (ISBN 978-2-95015-093-6).
** Christian Settipani, « L'apport de l'onomastique dans l'étude des généalogies carolingiennes », dans Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval, Oxford, Linacre College, Unit for Prosopographical Research, coll. « Prosopographica et Genealogica / 3 », 2000, 310 p. (ISBN 1-900934-01-9), p. 185-229.

     Wikipédia (FR) states:
     "L’ascendance d’Arnoul fait débat depuis le ixe siècle. Les documents contemporains le disent de la plus haute noblesse franque, tandis que des généalogies ultérieures lui attribuent pour père soit Arnoald évêque de Metz, soit Bodogisel, ambassadeur franc à Constantinople.
     "Il appartient donc à une grande famille de la noblesse franque située dans la Woëvre et dont les biens s’étendaient entre Metz et Verdun. On possède sur Arnoul deux Vita Arnulfi, la première écrite peu de temps après sa mort par un moine, la seconde par un certain Ummo au xe siècle. D’après ce second texte, il est né sous Maurice Ier, dans la villa Layum probablement Lay-Saint-Christophe près de Nancy. Sa naissance remonterait donc entre 582 et 590. Il reçut l’enseignement qui était alors en vigueur dans les familles aisées 6."

[Translation by Google:
     "Arnoul’s ancestry has been debated since the ninth century. Contemporary documents say he is of the highest Frankish nobility, while later genealogies attribute to him as his father either Arnoald, Bishop of Metz, or Bodogisel, Frankish ambassador in Constantinople.
     "He therefore belongs to a large family of the Frankish nobility located in Woëvre and whose property stretched between Metz and Verdun. We have two Vita Arnulfi on Arnoul, the first written shortly after his death by a monk, the second by a certain Ummo in the tenth century. According to this second text, he was born under Maurice I, in the villa Layum, probably Lay-Saint-Christophe, near Nancy. His birth would therefore go back between 582 and 590. He received the education that was then in effect in wealthy families."

An image of the hypothetical descendance proposed by Wikipédia (FR) is attached.
Wikipédia (FR) cites: Fustel de Coulanges, Histoire des institutions politiques de l’ancienne France, vol. 6, livre II, Paris, Hachette, 1907 (lire en ligne [archive]), p. 149.
     Med Lands shows Arenulf/Arnoul, son of Arnold, son of Ansbert, but then states: "Another genealogy from the same period does not attempt to trace Arnoul's ancestors further than naming "Buotgisus" as father of "Arnulfum…episcopum urbis Metensium", although the editor of the Monumenta Germaniæ in which this is published cites another source which names "Burtgisus, qui a multis cognominatur Arnoaldus" although the dating of the latter is unclear [417].
Med Lands cites: [417] Genealogiæ Karolorum III, MGH SS XIII, p. 246, footnote 1 citing Meurisse Hist. de Metz, p. 85.
Conclusion: I have chosen to follow the lineage proposed by Settipani and laid out in the Wikipédia (FR) article. GA Vaut.8,9,10,11 GAV-38 EDV-38 GKJ-38. He was probably Gov. of Aquitaine.5

; This is the same person as ”Bodogisel” at Wikipedia and as ”Bodogisel” at Wikipédia (FR).6,7 Bodegeisel II (?) of Schelde was also known as Baudgise II Duke of Aquitaine.12

; Per Weis: “Bodegeisel II, m. Oda, a Suevian."1

; Per Nilsen: “Bodogisel, ambassador to Byzantium, 589. m. to Chrodoare (St. Oda), abbess of Amay, aft. 589-bef. 634. (ibid., pp. 63-65)."13,7 He was Bishop of Metz between 601 and 611.14

Family

Saint Oda (?) of Savoy d. 640
Child

Citations

  1. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Lines 190-7, p. 178. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  2. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, line 190-6, p. 178.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gondulph_of_Maastricht. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. cv. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodegisel
  7. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Bodogisel: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodogisel. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  8. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Lines 190-7 & 8, p. 178.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Arnulf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020922&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnulf_of_Metz
  11. [S4742] Wikipédia (FR), online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Arnoul de Metz: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnoul_de_Metz
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 05 November 2019), memorial page for Saint Gondolfus (unknown–6 Jul), Find A Grave Memorial no. 57738460, citing Sint-Servaasbasiliek, Maastricht, Maastricht Municipality, Limburg, Netherlands ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/57738460/saint-gondolfus. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1718] Curt Nilsen, "Nilsen email 3 July 2005 "A dumb question about Sex, King Herod, and Settipani"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/L__1rC5cvbA/m/6SL92gNXo1AJ) to e-mail address, 3 July 2005, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/L__1rC5cvbA/m/6SL92gNXo1AJ. Hereinafter cited as "Nilsen email 3 July 2005."
  14. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 50-7.
  15. [S4753] Christian Settipani, La Préhistoire des Capétiens, 481-987, première partie - Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (n.p.: Van Kerrebrouck, 1993). Hereinafter cited as Settipani [1993] La Préhistoire des Capétiens.
  16. [S4797] Christian Settipani, "L'apport de l'onomastique dans l'étude des généalogies carolingiennes », dans Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval", Prosopographica et Genealogica Vol. 3; pp. 185-229 (2000). Hereinafter cited as "Settipani [2000] L'apport de l'onomastique."

Saint Oda (?) of Savoy1

F, #4945, d. 640
ReferenceGAV38 EDV38
Last Edited6 Sep 2020
     Saint Oda (?) of Savoy married Bodegeisel II (?) of Schelde, son of Saint Gandolfus (?) of Maastricht, Bishop of Tongres.2
Saint Oda (?) of Savoy died in 640.
     ; Per Weis: “Bodegeisel II, m. Oda, a Suevian."3 Saint Oda (?) of Savoy was also known as Chrodoare (?)1 GAV-38 EDV-38 GKJ-38.2

; Per Nilsen: “Bodogisel, ambassador to Byzantium, 589. m. to Chrodoare (St. Oda), abbess of Amay, aft. 589-bef. 634. (ibid., pp. 63-65)."4,5 She was abbess of Amay between 589 and 634.1

Family

Bodegeisel II (?) of Schelde d. bt 585 - 588
Child

Citations

  1. [S1718] Curt Nilsen, "Nilsen email 3 July 2005 "A dumb question about Sex, King Herod, and Settipani"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/L__1rC5cvbA/m/6SL92gNXo1AJ) to e-mail address, 3 July 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Nilsen email 3 July 2005."
  2. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  3. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Lines 190-7, p. 178. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  4. [S1718] Curt Nilsen, "Nilsen email 3 July 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 3 July 2005, https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/L__1rC5cvbA/m/6SL92gNXo1AJ
  5. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Bodogisel: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodogisel. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).

Ansbert (?)1,2

M, #4946, d. 570
FatherSenator Ferreolus (?) of Rodez3 b. c 485
MotherDodeDeuteria (?) b. b 509
ReferenceGAV38 EDV39
Last Edited31 May 2020
     Ansbert (?) married BlithildesBilichilde (?), daughter of Clothaire I "le Vieux" (?) King of Soissons, King of the Franks and Ingunde/Ingonde (?) des Francs.4,5
Ansbert (?) died in 570.6
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef. 1700, Baltimore, 1995, Weis, Frederick Lewis; Sheppard, Walter. 163.4 GAV-38 EDV-39 GKJ-39.

; This is the same person as "Ansbertus" at Wikipedia.7

; Per Med Lands:
     "ANSBERT . The Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude names “Ansberto Duci nobili in Germania” when recording his marriage[403]. A 9th century genealogy names "Ansbertus…ex genere senatorum", his brothers "Deotarium, Firminum, Gamardum, Aigulfum episcopum et Ragnifridum" and their supposed descendants, Ansbert's marriage to "filiam Hlotarii regis Francorum…Blithildem" and their children as shown below[404].
     "m BILICHILDIS, daughter of CLOTAIRE I [Chlothachar] King of the Franks & his third wife Ingundis [Ingonde] ([525/40]-). The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Chlotharius…rex" had seven children by "Ingunde", the same six as are named in Gregory of Tours with a marginal note adding "Blitchildim" as the seventh child and specifying that she married "Ansbertus nobilissimus" and by him was mother of "Arnoldum"[405]. An alternative origin for Bilichildis is provided by the Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude which names “Dagobertum Regem et Blithildem sororem eius” as children of “Lotharius…[et] Beretrudam” (chronologically impossible if she was the grandmother of Arnoul Bishop of Metz, see below), but commenting that “others say” that Bilichildis was the daughter of “primi Lotharii avi istius”, adding that Bilichildis married “Ansberto Duci nobili in Germania”[406]. The Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum names "Hlotharius [rex]…filia…Blithild" and records her marriage to "Ansbertus"[407]. The recorded names of the alleged children of Bilichildis do not have a Merovingian ring about them. It is uncertain whether Bilichildis existed at all or whether she and her family were invented for the purposes of compiling a Merovingian descent for the Carolingian dynasty, an enterprise undertaken in Metz from the late 8th century onwards (see below, under her alleged grandson). Her absence from the list of the children of King Clotaire given by Gregory of Tours certainly suggests that she was a spurious later invention, although Gregory's treatment of the families of the early Merovingians was not exhaustive, as can be seen from the examples of Berthoara, daughter of King Theodebald I, and Theodechildis sister of the same king (see above), whom Gregory does not mention at all. Settipani demonstrates convincingly that there are sufficient indications in other primary sources that parts, if not all, these reconstructions may be based on historical fact[408]. The situation is further confused by the Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude which names “Adabaldus Dux, et fratres eius Herchenaldus Major-domus Occidentalis Franciæ et Sigebertus Comes” as the sons of “Ansberto Duci nobili in Germania” and Bilichildis[409]. The Chronico omits Arnold, although the mention of Erchinoald makes it clear that this source is completely incompatible from a chronological point of view with the descent reported in the Carmen. Sifting the fact from the fiction in these two sources is inevitably speculative."
Med Lands cites:
[403] Ex Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude, RHGF III, p. 522.
[404] Genealogiæ Karolorum I, MGH SS XIII, p. 245.
[405] Liber Historiæ Francorum 27, MGH SS rer Merov, Tome II, p. 285.
[406] Ex Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude, RHGF III, p. 522.
[407] Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum, MGH Poetæ Latini ævi Carolini II, pp. 142-3.
[408] Settipani, C. 'L'apport de l'onomastique dans l'étude des genealogies carolingiennes', Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. and Settipani, C. (eds.) (2000) Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident medieval (Prosopographica et Genealogica, Vol. 3), pp. 185-229.
[409] Ex Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude, RHGF III, p. 522.2


; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Ansbert serait l'époux de la princesse Blitilde prétendue fille du roi Clotaire Ier ou Clotaire II. Ils seraient les parents d'un fils nommé Arnold, selon plusieurs documents médiévaux dont le premier d'entre eux est la Commemoratio genealogiae domni Karoli gloriossimi imperatoris établie par les scribes de l'évêché de Metz vers 810B 1. Les premières versions de cette généalogie donnent Clotaire Ier comme père de Blitilde et c'est vers 870 que l'on voit apparaître Clotaire II comme père.
     "Personnage probablement réel (Ansbert n'est pas nommé dans les documents contemporains, mais n'apporte rien aux généalogies - c'est sa femme qui transmettrait le sang mérovingien - et comme la racine Ans se retrouve dans Anségisel, on considère son existence comme possible) mais mal relié généalogiquement par les scribes de l'évêché de Metz à la fin du ixe siècle. En effet, ces scribes ont probablement repris des documents authentiques pour établir la généalogie, mais en ont fait des lectures erronées. Même le nom de Blitilde n'est pas forcément faux, c'est sa qualité de maillon entre les Mérovingiens et les Carolingiens qui est suspecte et est rejetéeB 2.
     "Grégoire de Tours donne une liste assez complète des enfants de Clotaire Ier où Blitilde ne figure pas. Quant à la thèse qui propose Blitilde comme une fille de Clotaire II, c'est une aberration chronologique : Arnould est un contemporain et probablement du même âge que Clotaire II : il s'ensuit que ce dernier ne peut pas être le père d'une grand-mère de ce même ArnouldB 2
Références :
1. Anspertus, qui était de race sénatoriale, homme célèbre et noble, prit pour femme la fille de Hlotharius, roi des Francs, appelée Blîthilt et eut trois fils et une fille. L'aîné s'appelait Arnoldus, le second Feriolus, le troisième Modéric et la fille Tarcisia. Feriolus fut évêque dans la ville d'Uzès. Moderic fut ordonné évêque d'Aristum. Arnoldus, l'aîné, engendra le seigneur (évêque) Arnulf. Le seigneur Arnulf engendra Flodulfus et Anchisus. Flodulfus est ordonné évêque. Ansichus engendra Pipinus. Pipinus engendra Karolus. Karolus quant à lui engendra le seigneur roi Pipinus. Pipinus engendra le glorieux César et très noble prince Carolus
2. Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne : 2° édition, revue et corrigée, Oxford, P & G, Prosopographia et Genealogica, coll. « Occasional Publications / 16 », 2014 (1re éd. 1989), 347 p. (ISBN 978-1-900934-15-2.)8,2"

; Per Wikipedia: "Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne, father of the Gallo-Roman Senator Ansbertus. Settipani here cites Paul the Deacon in his work on the Bishops of Metz where Agilulf, Bishop of Metz, brother of Ansbert and uncle of Arnoald Bishop of Metz, was referred to as the "son of a senator".[9] Metz was in the Kingdom of Austrasia and Austrasia controlled Provence which included Uzes. Although Tonantius Ferreolus who was attested at Narbo likely took the side of the Goths before the death of Alaric II, by the mid 6th century his family had clearly relocated to within Frankish territory which began west of Uzes and extended Eastward. Nîmes, just to the south and a little west of Uzes was in Visigothic hands until the Arab capture in the 8th century. Settipani, based on his reading of Paul the Deacon and the fact that the name Ferreolus was associated with the name Ansbert in two Autun Bishops in a Burgundian see that was regarded as both being hereditary and having ties with the Syagrii-Ferreoli, was persuaded apparently to accept the slightly confused 9th century account stating that the senator in question was a "Ferreolus." Settipani suggests this Ferreolus tentatively as a son of Tonantius Ferreolus and Industria. Settipani further suggests that this son married to a daughter of Frankish Ripuarian Royal house which had survived through the clemency of Theoderic of Austrasia who was thought to have been a son of Clovis' 1st wife, an unattested daughter of Sigebert, the penultimate Ripuarian Frankish king. Kelley had come to the same or a similar conclusion in 1947 [10] but it appears from those who cite him that the original idea was that Ansbertus was a son of Tonantius Ferreolus and not a grandson."
Wikipedia cites:
[9] Settipani, 2000, p. 221
[10] NEGHR, 1947
References:
** Christian Settipani, Continuite Gentilice et Continuite Familiale Dans Les Familles Senatoriales Romaines A L'epoque Imperiale, Mythe et Realite, Addenda I - III (juillet 2000- octobre 2002) (n.p.: Prosopographica et Genealogica, 2002).


; Per Med Lands:
     "BILICHILDIS . The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Chlotharius…rex" had seven children by "Ingunde", the same six as are named in Gregory of Tours with a marginal note adding "Blitchildim" as the seventh child and specifying that she married "Ansbert[us nobilissimus" and by him was mother of "Arnoldum"[218]. An alternative origin for Bilichildis is provided by the Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude which names “Dagobertum Regem et Blithildem sororem eius” as children of “Lotharius…[et] Beretrudam” (chronologically impossible if she was the grandmother of Arnoul Bishop of Metz), but commenting that “others say” that Bilichildis was the daughter of “primi Lotharii avi istius”, adding that Bilichildis married “Ansberto Duci nobili in Germania”[219]. The Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum names "Hlotharius [rex]…filia…Blithild" and records her marriage to "Ansbertus"[220]. The recorded names of the alleged children of Bilichildis do not have a Merovingian ring about them. It is uncertain whether Bilichildis existed at all or whether she and her family were invented for the purposes of compiling a Merovingian descent for the Carolingian dynasty, an enterprise undertaken in Metz from the late 8th century onwards. Her absence from the list of the children of King Clotaire given by Gregory of Tours certainly suggests that she was a spurious later invention, although Gregory's treatment of the families of the early Merovingians was not exhaustive, as can be seen from the examples of Berthoara, daughter of King Theodebald I, and [Theodechildis] sister of the same king (see above), whom Gregory does not mention at all. Settipani demonstrates convincingly that there are sufficient indications in other primary sources that parts, if not all, these reconstructions may be based on historical fact[221]. Sifting the fact from the fiction is inevitably speculative.
     "m ANSBERT, son of ---. A 9th century genealogy names "Ansbertus…ex genere senatorum", his brothers "Deotarium, Firminum, Gamardum, Aigulfum episcopum et Ragnifridum" and their supposed descendants, Ansbert's marriage to "filiam Hlotarii regis Francorum…Blithildem" and their children as shown below[222].]"
Med Lands cites:
[218] Liber Historiæ Francorum 27, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 285.
[219] Ex Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude, RHGF 3, p. 522.
[220] Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum, MGH Poetæ Latini ævi Carolini II, pp. 142-3.
[221] Settipani, C. 'L'apport de l'onomastique dans l'étude des genealogies carolingiennes', Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. and Settipani, C. (eds.) (2000) Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident medieval (Prosopographica et Genealogica, Vol. 3), pp. 185-229.
[222] Genealogiæ Karolorum I, MGH SS XIII, p. 245.9

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ansbertus: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00294137&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKSMaiordomi.htm#AnsbertMBilichildis. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 50-3.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ansbertus: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00294137&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blithilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00294138&tree=LEO
  6. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ansbertus. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faux_M%C3%A9rovingiens#Ansbert_le_s%C3%A9nateur. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#BilichildisMAnsbert
  10. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents, line 50-6.

Senator Ferreolus (?) of Rodez1

M, #4947, b. circa 485
FatherSenator Tonantius (II) Ferreolus1 b. c 450, d. a 517
MotherIndustria (?)1
ReferenceGAV38
Last Edited31 May 2020
     Senator Ferreolus (?) of Rodez was born circa 485.1 He married DodeDeuteria (?), daughter of Chloderic "the Parricide" (?) King of Cologne, circa 520.2
     GAV-38.

; This is the same person as "Ferreolus of Rodez" at Wikipedia.1

; Per Wikipedia: "Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne, father of the Gallo-Roman Senator Ansbertus. Settipani here cites Paul the Deacon in his work on the Bishops of Metz where Agilulf, Bishop of Metz, brother of Ansbert and uncle of Arnoald Bishop of Metz, was referred to as the "son of a senator".[9] Metz was in the Kingdom of Austrasia and Austrasia controlled Provence which included Uzes. Although Tonantius Ferreolus who was attested at Narbo likely took the side of the Goths before the death of Alaric II, by the mid 6th century his family had clearly relocated to within Frankish territory which began west of Uzes and extended Eastward. Nîmes, just to the south and a little west of Uzes was in Visigothic hands until the Arab capture in the 8th century. Settipani, based on his reading of Paul the Deacon and the fact that the name Ferreolus was associated with the name Ansbert in two Autun Bishops in a Burgundian see that was regarded as both being hereditary and having ties with the Syagrii-Ferreoli, was persuaded apparently to accept the slightly confused 9th century account stating that the senator in question was a "Ferreolus." Settipani suggests this Ferreolus tentatively as a son of Tonantius Ferreolus and Industria. Settipani further suggests that this son married to a daughter of Frankish Ripuarian Royal house which had survived through the clemency of Theoderic of Austrasia who was thought to have been a son of Clovis' 1st wife, an unattested daughter of Sigebert, the penultimate Ripuarian Frankish king. Kelley had come to the same or a similar conclusion in 1947 [10] but it appears from those who cite him that the original idea was that Ansbertus was a son of Tonantius Ferreolus and not a grandson."
Wikipedia cites:
[9] Settipani, 2000, p. 221
[10] NEGHR, 1947
References:
** Christian Settipani, Continuite Gentilice et Continuite Familiale Dans Les Familles Senatoriales Romaines A L'epoque Imperiale, Mythe et Realite, Addenda I - III (juillet 2000- octobre 2002) (n.p.: Prosopographica et Genealogica, 2002).

Family

DodeDeuteria (?) b. b 509
Child

Citations

  1. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferreolus_of_Rodez. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  2. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 08 October 2019), memorial page for Saint Dode (unknown–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 57757864, citing Saint Remi Basilica, Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/57757864/saint-dode. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  3. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 50-3.

Gigermerus I (?) of the Franks

M, #4948
FatherClodio (?) of the Franks d. 451
MotherBasina (?) de Thuringia
Last Edited6 Dec 2002
     

Citations

  1. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).

Clodio (?) of the Franks

M, #4949, d. 451
FatherPharamond (?) of the Franks b. 404, d. 430
MotherArgotta Cimbri
Last Edited6 Dec 2002
     Clodio (?) of the Franks was born at France.1 He married Basina (?) de Thuringia.1
Clodio (?) of the Franks died in 451 at France.1
     

Family

Basina (?) de Thuringia
Child

Citations

  1. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).