Godfrey of Bouillon (?) Lord of Bouillon, Duke of Lower Lorraine,"King" of Jerusalem1,2

M, #68551, b. circa 1060, d. 18 July 1100
FatherEustache II «Aux Grenons» (?) Comte de Boulogne et de Lens1,5,6,3 b. bt 1015 - 1020, d. bt 1070 - 1082
MotherIda de Lorraine1,3,4 b. c 1040, d. 13 Aug 1113
Last Edited28 Jul 2020
     Godfrey of Bouillon (?) Lord of Bouillon, Duke of Lower Lorraine,"King" of Jerusalem was born circa 1060 at Baisy-Thy (near Brussels), Genappe, Belgium (now).1,2
Godfrey of Bouillon (?) Lord of Bouillon, Duke of Lower Lorraine,"King" of Jerusalem died on 18 July 1100 at Jerusalem, Palestine; Richardson says d. aft 1086.7,8,9,10,1
Godfrey of Bouillon (?) Lord of Bouillon, Duke of Lower Lorraine,"King" of Jerusalem was buried after 18 July 1100 at Jerusalem, Palestine.9


     ; Genealogy.EU (Boulogne page) identifies two sons of Eustac(h)e II named Godfrey:
o     1. Godfrey of Bouillon, Duke of Lower Lorraine, leader of the First Crusade, took the title Defender of the Holy Sepulchre (1099-1100), +Palestine 1100, bur Jerusalem
o     2. [illegitimate] Godfrey, lord of Carshalton, went on the First Crusade; m.before 1086 Beatrix de Mandeville
Godfrey of Carshalton is shown as the father of William. Boyer shows William to be the sone of Bodfrey of Bouillon.9,8

; per Racines et Histoire: "hérite du comté de Verdun de son oncle Godefroi «Struma», duc de Lotharingie (1076) qu’il doit disputer à Thierri, évêque de Verdun ; fait par l’Empereur markgraf van Antwerpen (Pâques 1076) puis duc de Basse Lotharingie (1087), un des principaux leaders de la 1ère Croisade (1096) pour laquelle il doit céder ses domaines de Rosay et Stenay sur la Meuse et gager son château de Bouillon à l’évêque de Liège; choisi comme «roi» de Jérusalem par un Grand Conseil (22/07/1099), en fait, à sa demande, prince ou (préfère t-il) «avoué du Saint-Sépulcre»."1

; leader of the 1st Crusade.8

; From Wikipedia: [quote]
Godfrey of Bouillon was born around 1060 in either Boulogne-sur-Mer in France or Baisy, a city in the region of Brabant (part of present-day Belgium). During Godfrey's lifetime this region was part of the Holy Roman Empire, a loose collection of principalities, or small royal states. Godfrey was the second son of Count Eustace II of Boulogne and Ida of Lower Lorraine. That he was the second son was very important to Godfrey's future. In the Middle Ages it was the first son who inherited the lands of the parents. As the second-born son, Godfrey had fewer opportunities. Were it not for a bit of family luck, he would have become just one more minor knight in service to a rich landed nobleman. It happened that Godfrey the Hunchback, his uncle on his mother's side, died childless, naming his nephew, Godfrey of Bouillon, as his heir and next in line to his duchy of Lower Lorraine. This duchy was an important one at the time, serving as a buffer between the kingdom of France and the German lands.

In fact, Lower Lorraine was so important to the German kingdom and the Holy Roman Empire that Henry IV, the German king and future emperor (ruled 1084-1105), decided in 1076 that he would place it in the hands of his own son and give Godfrey only Bouillon and the Mark of Antwerp, as a test of Godfrey's abilities and loyalty. Godfrey served Henry IV loyally, supporting him even when Pope Gregory VII was battling the German king over who should have more power in Europe, the church or the secular powers of the kings and princes (Investiture Controversy). Godfrey fought with Henry and his forces against the rival forces of Rudolf of Swabia and also took part in battles in Italy when Henry IV actually took Rome away from the pope.

At the same time, Godfrey was struggling to maintain control over the lands that Henry IV had not taken away from him. Matilda of Tuscany, the widow of his uncle, said that these lands should have come to her. Another enemy outside the family also tried to take away other bits of his land, and Godfrey's brothers, Eustace and Baldwin, both came to his aid. Following long struggles, and after proving that he was a loyal subject to Henry IV, Godfrey finally won back his duchy of Lower Lorraine in 1087, becoming Godfrey V, duke of Lower Lorraine. Still, Godfrey would never have had much power in the German kingdom or in Europe if it had not been for the coming of the Crusades.

[edit] First Crusade
Godfrey of Bouillon, from a fresco depicting the Nine Worthies, painted by Giacomo Jaquerio c. 1420
Godfrey of Bouillon, from a fresco depicting the Nine Worthies, painted by Giacomo Jaquerio c. 1420

In 1095 Urban II, the new Pope, called for a holy war against the Islamic forces that held Jerusalem and other religious locations in Palestine. Crusader fever caught on throughout Europe, partly because of the power of the Pope but also because there were many knights and second and third sons, such as Godfrey, who were looking for opportunities outside Europe. The Pope promised that all sins would be forgiven for anyone who served in the Crusades, but there was also talk of lands to be won there, of new duchies that could be carved out of Muslim lands.

Godfrey took out loans on most of his lands, or sold them, to the bishop of Liège and the bishop of Verdun. With this money he gathered thousands of knights to fight in the Holy Land. In this he was joined by his older brother, Eustace, and his younger brother, Baldwin, who had no lands in Europe. He was not the only major nobleman to gather such an army. Raymond of Saint-Gilles, also known as Raymond of Toulouse, created the largest army. At age fifty-five he was also the oldest and perhaps the best known of the Crusader nobles. Because of his age and fame, Raymond expected to be the leader of the entire First Crusade. Adhemar, the assistant to the Pope and bishop of Le Puy, traveled with him. There was also the fiery Bohemond, a Norman knight who had formed a small kingdom in southern Italy. He went into battle himself and fiercely combatting the enemy until they perished. For Bohemond this Crusade was simply another chance to add lands to his kingdom. There was also a fourth group under Robert of Flanders. No kings participated in this First Crusade.

Each of these armies traveled separately, some going southeast across Europe through Hungary and others sailing by water across the Adriatic Sea from southern Italy. Godfrey, along with his two brothers, started in August 1096 at the head of an army from Lorraine (some say 40,000 strong) along "Charlemagne's road," as Urban II seems to have called it (according to the chronicler Robert the Monk)—the road to Jerusalem. After some difficulties in Hungary, where he was unable to stop his men from pillaging fellow Christians, he arrived in Constantinople, capital of the Byzantine Empire, in November. The Pope had, in fact, called the Crusade in order the help the Byzantine emperor Alexius I fight the Islamic Turks who were invading his lands from Central Asia and Persia.

Godfrey and his troops were the second to arrive (after Hugh of Vermandois) in Constantinople. During the next several months the other Crusader armies arrived. Suddenly the Byzantine emperor had an army of about 4000 mounted knights and 25,000 infantry camped on his doorstep. But Godfrey and Alexius I had different goals. The Byzantine emperor wanted the help of the Crusader soldiers to recapture lands that the Seljuk Turks had taken. The Crusaders however had the main aim of taking the Holy Land in Palestine from the Muslims and setting up a Christian occupying force there. For them, Alexius I and his Turks were only a sideshow. Worse, the Byzantine emperor expected the Crusaders to take an oath of loyalty to him. Godfrey and the other knights agreed to a modified version of this oath, promising to help return some lands to Alexius I. By the spring of 1097 the Crusaders were ready to march into battle.

Their first major victory, with Byzantine soldiers at their side, was at the city of Nicaea, close to Constantinople, which the Seljuk Turks had taken some years earlier. Godfrey and his knights of Lorraine played a minor role in the siege of Nicaea, with Bohemond successfully commanding much of the action. Just as the Crusaders were about to storm the city, they suddenly noticed the Byzantine flag flying from atop the city walls. Alexius I had made a separate peace with the Turks and now claimed the city for the Byzantine Empire. These secret dealings were a sign of things to come in terms of relations between Crusaders and Byzantines.

Godfrey continued to play a minor role in the battles against the Muslims until the Crusaders finally reached Jerusalem in 1099. Before that time, he helped to relieve the vanguard at the Battle of Dorylaeum after it had been pinned down by the Seljuk Turks under Kilij Arslan I, with the help of the other crusader princes in the main force and went on to sack the Seljuk camp. In 1098 Godfrey took part in the capture of Antioch, which fell in June of that year after long and bitter fighting. During the siege some of the Crusaders felt that the battle was hopeless and left the Crusade to return to Europe. Alexius I, hearing of the desperate situation, thought that all was lost at Antioch and did not come to help the Crusaders as promised. When the Crusaders finally took the city, they decided that their oaths to Alexius I were no longer in effect. Bohemond, the first to enter the city gates, claimed the prize for himself. A Muslim force under Kerbogha, from the city of Mosul, arrived and battled the Crusaders, but the Christians finally defeated these Turkish Islamic troops.

After this victory the Crusaders were divided over their next course of action. The bishop of Le Puy had died at Antioch. Bohemond decided to remain behind in order to secure his new kingdom and Godfrey’s younger brother, Baldwin, also decided to stay in the north at the Crusader state he had established at Edessa. Most of the foot soldiers wanted to continue south to Jerusalem, but Raymond IV of Toulouse, by this time the most powerful of the princes, having taken others into his employ, such as Tancred, hesitated to continue the march. After months of waiting, the common people on the crusade forced Raymond to march on to Jerusalem, and Godfrey quickly joined him. As they traveled south into Palestine, the Crusaders faced a new enemy. No longer were the Seljuk Turks the rulers of these lands. Now the Christian army had to deal with armies of North African Muslims called Fatimids, who had adopted the name of the ruling family in Cairo, Egypt. The Fatimids had taken Jerusalem in August 1098. The Crusaders would be battling them for the final prize of the First Crusade in the siege of Jerusalem.

It was in Jerusalem that the legend of Godfrey of Bouillon was born. The army reached the city in June 1099 and built wooden ladders to climb over the walls. The major attack took place on July 14 and 15, 1099. Godfrey and some of his knights were the first to get over the walls and enter the city. Once inside, the Crusaders went wild, ultimately killing every Muslim man, woman, and child. Jews were also slaughtered. It was a shameful end to three years of fighting by the Crusaders, but they had finally done what they had set out to do in 1096—namely, to recapture the Holy Land and, in particular, the city of Jerusalem and its holy sites, such as the Holy Sepulchre, the tomb of Jesus Christ.

Once the city was captured, some form of government had to be set up. On July 22, a council was held in the Church of the Holy Seplechre. Raymond of Toulouse at first refused to become king, perhaps attempting to show his piety but probably hoping that the other nobles would insist upon his election anyway. Godfrey, who had become the more popular of the two after Raymond's actions at the siege of Antioch, did no damage to his own piety by accepting a position as secular leader, but with an unknown or ill-defined title. Raymond was incensed at this development and took his army out into the countryside.

[edit] Kingdom of Jerusalem
Coat of arms of the kingdom of Jerusalem
Coat of arms of the kingdom of Jerusalem

However, perhaps considering the controversy which had surrounded Tancred's seizure of Bethlehem, Godfrey refused to be crowned "king" in the city where Christ had died. The exact nature and meaning of his title is thus somewhat of a controversy. Although it is widely claimed that he took the title Advocatus Sancti Sepulchri, "advocate" or "defender" of the Holy Sepulchre, this title is only used in a letter which was not written by the Duke. Instead, Godfrey himself seems to have used the more ambiguous term Princeps, or simply retained his title of dux from back home in Lower Lorraine. Robert the Monk is the only one of the numerous chroniclers of the crusade to claim that Godfrey took the title "king".[1] During his short reign of a year Godfrey had to defend the new Kingdom of Jerusalem against Fatimids of Egypt, who were defeated at the Battle of Ascalon in August. He also faced opposition from Dagobert of Pisa, the Patriarch of Jerusalem, who had allied with Tancred. Although the Latins came close to capturing Ascalon, Godfrey's attempts to prevent Raymond of St Gilles from securing the city for himself meant that the town remained in Muslim hands, destined to be a thorn in the new kingdom's side for years to come.

In 1100 Godfrey was unable to directly expand his new territories through conquest. However, his impressive victory in 1099 and his subsequent campaigning in 1100 meant that he was able to force Acre, Ascalon, Arsuf, Jaffa, and Caesarea, to become tributaries. Meanwhile, the struggle with Dagobert continued; although the terms of the conflict are difficult to trace. Dagobert may well have visualised turning Jerusalem into a fiefdom of the pope, however his full intentions are not clear. Much of the evidence for this comes from William of Tyre, whose account of these events is troublesome - It is only William who tells us that Dagobert forced Godfrey to concede Jerusalem and Jaffa, while other writers such as Albert of Aachen and Ralph of Caen suggest that both Dagobert and his ally Tancred had sworn an oath to Godfrey to accept only one of his brothers or blood relations as his successor. Whatever Dagobert's schemes, they were destined to come to nought. Being at Haifa at the time of the Duke's death, he could do nothing to stop Godfrey's supporters from seizing Jerusalem and requesting that the Duke's brother Baldwin take up the reins of power. Dagobert was subsequently forced to crown Baldwin as the first Latin king of Jerusalem on December 25, 1100.

[edit] Death

"While he was besieging the city of Acre, Godfrey, the ruler of Jerusalem, was struck by an arrow, which killed him," reports the Arab chronicler Ibn al-Qalanisi. Christian chronicles make no mention of this; instead, Albert of Aix and Ekkehard of Aura report that Godfrey contracted an illness in Caesarea in June, 1100. It was later believed that the emir of Caesarea had poisoned him, but there seems to be no basis for this rumour; William of Tyre does not mention it. It is also said that he died after eating a poisoned apple. He died in Jerusalem after suffering from a prolonged illness.

[edit] Godfrey in history and legend

According to William of Tyre, the later 12th-century chronicler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, Godfrey was "tall of stature, not extremely so, but still taller than the average man. He was strong beyond compare, with solidly-built limbs and a stalwart chest. His features were pleasing, his beard and hair of medium blond."

Because he had been the first ruler in Jerusalem Godfrey was idealized in later stories. He was depicted as the leader of the crusades, the king of Jerusalem, and the legislator who laid down the assizes of Jerusalem, and he was included among the ideal knights known as the Nine Worthies. In reality he was only one of several leaders of the crusade, which also included Raymond IV of Toulouse, Bohemund of Taranto, Robert of Flanders, Stephen of Blois and Baldwin of Boulogne to name a few, along with papal legate Adhémar of Montiel, Bishop of Le Puy. Baldwin I of Jerusalem, Godfrey's younger brother, became the first titled king when he succeeded Godfrey in 1100. The assizes were the result of a gradual development.

Godfrey's role in the crusade was described by Albert of Aix, the anonymous author of the Gesta Francorum, and Raymond of Aguilers amongst others. In fictional literature, Godfrey was the hero of numerous French chansons de geste dealing with the crusade, the "Crusade cycle". This cycle connected his ancestors to the legend of the Knight of the Swan, most famous today as the storyline of Wagner's opera Lohengrin.

By William of Tyre's time later in the twelfth century, Godfrey was already a legend among the descendants of the original crusaders. Godfrey was believed to have possessed immense physical strength; it was said that in Cilicia he wrestled a bear and won, and that he once beheaded a camel with one blow of his sword.

Torquato Tasso made Godfrey the hero of his epic poem Gerusalemme Liberata.

In The Divine Comedy Dante sees the spirit of Godfrey in the Heaven of Mars with the other "warriors of the faith."

Godfrey is depicted in Handel's first opera "Rinaldo" (1711) as Goffredo.

Since the mid-19th century, an equestrian statue of Godfrey of Bouillon has stood in the center of the Royal Square in Brussels, Belgium. The statue was made by Eugène Simonis, and inaugurated on August 24, 1848.

Godfrey plays a key figure in the pseudohistorical theories put forth in the books The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail and The Da Vinci Code.

In 2005 he came in 17th place in the Walloon version of De Grootste Belg (the Greatest Belgian).

Godfrey also plays a key role in the book The Iron Lance by Stephen Lawhead

References

1. ^ Jonathan Riley-Smith, "The Title of Godfrey of Bouillon", Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research 52 (1979), 83-86, and Alan V. Murray, "The Title of Godfrey of Bouillon as Ruler of Jerusalem", Collegium Medievale 3 (1990), 163-78.

Sources

* This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
* William of Tyre
* Maalouf, Amin. The Crusades Through Arab Eyes, 1984.
* Andressohn, John C. The Ancestry and Life of Godfrey of Bouillon, 1947.
* Godfrey of Bouillon. New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia article. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
* Godfrey of Bouillon. Internet Medieval Sourcebook: The Crusaders at Constantinople: Collected Accounts. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
[end quote]1

; The First Crusade. Best recorded and most successful of the Crusades. Five popular, aimless mass migrations (1096) that emptied whole villages; two (perhaps 7000 under Peter the Hermit and perhaps 5000 under Walter the Penniless) reached Asia Minor and were annihilated. The Norman-French baronage flocked to the Cross and converged in three divisions on Constantinople: the Lorrainers under Godfrey of Bouillon and his brother Baldwin, via Hungary; the Provençals under Count Raymond of Toulouse and the papal legate, Adhemar of Puy, via Illyria; the Normans under Bohemund of Otranto (the most effective leader) via Durazzo by sea and land. Perhaps they were 30,000 in all.

The Muslim opposition: the Seljuks had merely garrisoned Syria and were not popular with the native population. Muslim unity in Asia Minor ended with the death of Malik Shah (1092), and Syria was divided politically, racially, and theologically (SunniGodfrey of Bouillon (?) Lord of Bouillon, Duke of Lower Lorraine,"King" of Jerusalem versus Shiite; the Fatimid capture of Jerusalem [1098] from the Sunnis).

Violent crusader assaults on Jewish communities led to terrible massacres in Speyer, Mainz, Cologne, and other Rhineland cities.

Nicaea (Iznik) [>], the Seljuk capital in Asia Minor, taken by the combined Greek and crusading force; defeat of the Muslim field army at Dorylaeum; excursion of Baldwin and Tancred, and rivalry in Cilicia; Bohemund established himself in the Antioch area. Siege and capture (by treachery) of Antioch (1097-98); countersiege of the Christians in Antioch by the emir of Mosul; election of Bohemund as leader. Baldwin's conquest of Edessa (1097); Christian divisions: rivalry of Norman and Provençal.

March to Jerusalem (Genoese convoy and food supply); siege, capture, and horrors of the sack. The death of the papal legate left the organization of the government of Jerusalem to feudal laymen. Godfrey of Bouillon, elected king, assumed the title of Defender of the Holy Sepulcher (for pious reasons). The main body of the Crusaders soon streamed back home. The Norman effort to dominate the government through their patriarch Dagobert led to his deposition by the anti-Norman party, and Jerusalem became a feudal kingdom. The government (as revealed by the Assizes of Jerusalem, the most complete feudal code extant) was narrowly feudal, with the king a feudal suzerain, not a sovereign, the tenants-in-chief dominant. Besides the feudal organization there were burgher and ecclesiastical organizations, with their own courts.

Continued divisions among the Muslims and the weakness of the Greeks favored the progress of the Latin states: the kingdom of Jerusalem, in close commercial alliance with the Italian towns (Genoa, Pisa, and, later, Venice), profited by the commerce through its ports and extended south to tap the Red Sea trade. The other states: the county of Edessa (established by Baldwin), the principality of Antioch (established by Bohemund), and the county of Tripoli (set up by Raymond of Toulouse) were fiefs of Jerusalem (divided into four great baronies and into lesser fiefs).

Muslim unification in Syria was completed by the Atabegs of Mosul and signalized by the capture of Edessa (1144). Mosul soon mastered Egypt; Saladin emerged supreme in Egypt (1171), quickly reduced Damascus and Aleppo, and brought Syria and Egypt under a single efficient rule.11 He was King of Jerusalem between 1099 and 1100 at Jerusalem, Palestine.7,12 He was Defender of the Holy Sepulcher between 1099 and 1100 at Jerusalem, Palestine.12

Citations

  1. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Godfrey of Bouillon: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godfrey_of_Bouillon. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  2. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boulogne.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#EustacheIIB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ida de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00305425&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eustace II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012361&tree=LEO
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison comtale de Boulogne, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Boulogne.pdf
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 158A-23, p. 128. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 38, BOULOGNE 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Boulogne page (Counts of Boulogne sur Mer): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/boulogne.html
  10. [S1896] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 22 June 2005: "Extended Pedigree of Counts of Boulogne-sur-Mer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/44eb7V2WEXc/m/5ixO37yx3noJ) to e-mail address, 22 June 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 22 June 2005."
  11. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 233. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  12. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 234.

Lady Margaret? de Menteith1,2,3

F, #68552
FatherAlexander Fitz Walter 6th Earl of Menteith1 d. c 1306
MotherMatilda/Maud (?) of Strathearn1,4
Last Edited26 Aug 2019
     Lady Margaret? de Menteith married Sir Alexander de Abernethy of that Ilk, son of Sir Hugh de Abernethy of that Ilk and Mary mac Dougall Queen of the Isle of Man; Per Ravilious: In December 2003, I had conjectured that the wife of Sir Alexander de Abernethy (d. ca. 1316) was an otherwise unidentified daughter of Alexander, Earl of Menteith (d. ca. 1306) [1]. This was based largely on the evidence of various 14th century dispensations.

In speaking with Andrew B. W. MacEwen this evening, he has advised me that he has found conclusive evidence that the lady in question was in fact a daughter of Earl Alexander of Menteith. He further stated that her identification as ' Lady Margaret de Abrenythy ', a lady of the court of Queen Isabella of England in 1311/1312 [2], is important, and most likely correct.

The evidence Andrew mentioned will be cited in a forthcoming article, and cannot be divulged at this time for that reason. However, he did extend permission to mention the existence of this evidence to the newsgroup so that this identification can be noted as correct.

A brief ahnentafel of the ancestry of Mary de Abernethy, one of the daughters and coheirs of Sir Alexander, will be provided in a followup post.

NOTES:

[1] J. Ravilious, , SGM, 5 December 2003:

[2] See J. Ravilious, , SGM, 24 August 2006.1
     ; per Ravilious: NN de Menteith.

daughter of Alexander, Earl of Menteith (conjectured by John
Ravilious, 5 Dec 2003[21], based in part on the dispensation for
her daughter Margaret's marriage to John Stewart (related in the 4th
degree - Papal Letters II:283[6])[21])

this identification stated by Andrew B. W. MacEwen as proved,
26 Nov 2006 [22], [23]]

most likely the same individual as ' lady Margaret de Abrenythy ',
lady of the court of Isabella of France, Queen of England, 1311/12[18].5

Family

Sir Alexander de Abernethy of that Ilk b. 1271, d. bt 1315 - 1317
Children

Citations

  1. [S2109] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 26 Nov 2006: "SP Addition: ___ de Menteith, wife of Sir Alexander de Abernethy"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Nov 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 26 Nov 2006."
  2. [S2135] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 31 Jan 2007: "Re: The Bonkil (or de Bonkil) family, ancestors of Stewart of Darnley"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 31 Jan 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 31 Jan 2007."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Margaret Menteith: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00496424&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud|Matilda of Strathearn: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177653&tree=LEO
  5. [S2110] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 26 Nov 2006: "Re: SP Addition: ___ de Menteith, wife of Sir Alexander de Abernethy"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Nov 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 26 Nov 2006."
  6. [S2790] John P. Ravilious, "The Earls of Menteith", The Scottish Genealogist LVII:3:130-139 (September 2010): p. 133. Hereinafter cited as "The Earls of Menteith."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary Abernethy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00116895&tree=LEO

Patrick de Abernethy1

M, #68553, d. before 1244
FatherLaurence de Abernethy Lord of Abernethy1,2,3 b. b 1178, d. c 1244
MotherDervorguilla (?) of Galloway1,2
Last Edited5 Nov 2020
     Patrick de Abernethy died before 1244; dvp.1
     ; per Ravilious: Patrick de Abernethy.
died bef 1244 in d.v.p.[30]

eldest son (d.v.p.)

' Patricio de Abbirnithin ' , witness (together with William fitz
Alan the Steward, Justiciar of Scotland, his father Laurence de
Abernethy, Patrick son of Earl Patrick (of Dunbar), David de
Lindsay, and others) to a charter on behalf of Balemerino priory,
dated at Selkirk, 10 Feb 1231/2 [Misc. Scot. Hist. Soc. VIII:8-9,
no. II[35]]

re: Laurence de Abernethy, Leslie wrote:
' He gave the Canons of the priory of St. Andrews ten shillings
yearly, payable out of Ballinbreich, with the consent of Sir Patrick
Abernethy, his son and heir, about 1230. Sir Patrick's son, Hugh de
Abernethy, possessed great influence previous to and during the reign
of Alexander III., about 1260.' [Leslie p. 37, Note A[3]]

his identification by Andrew B. W. MacEwen[30]

Patrick married NN.1 Patrick de Abernethy was also known as Padraic mac Labhruinn a Obarneithic Heir of Abernethy.2

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S2110] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 26 Nov 2006: "Re: SP Addition: ___ de Menteith, wife of Sir Alexander de Abernethy"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Nov 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 26 Nov 2006."
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Patrick de Abernethy, Padraic mac Labhruinn a Obarneithic, Heir of Abernethy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00561238&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Laurence de Abernethy, Lord of Abernethy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00404067&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Devorgilla de Abernethy, Derbforgaill inghen Padraic a Obarneithic: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00473262&tree=LEO

Laurence de Abernethy Lord of Abernethy1,2

M, #68554, b. before 1178, d. circa 1244
FatherOrm de Abernethy3,2
Last Edited23 Aug 2019
     Laurence de Abernethy Lord of Abernethy married Dervorguilla (?) of Galloway, daughter of Uchtred (?) Lord of Galloway and Gunnild (?) of Dunbar.1 Laurence de Abernethy Lord of Abernethy was born before 1178.2
Laurence de Abernethy Lord of Abernethy died circa 1244.1,2
     ; per Ravilious: Laurence de Abernethy. Laurence died ca 1244.[44]

lord of Abernethy

Genealogics #I00404067[2]

' Laurencius filius Orm de Abirnythyn', granted a charter (witnessed
by Archibald, abbot of Dunfermline, Earl Duncan of Fife, Earl Gilbert
of Strathearn, William Comyn and others) to the monks of Arbroath of
the advowson of the church of Abernethy, with appurtenances [confirmed by King William], 1198 or before * [Jamieson, p. 364[45],
from Regist. Aberbroth. I. Fol. 49, b. 50,
a. Macfarl. MS. I. p. 121, -123.]



'Laurencio de Abernithie' witness to charter of Malcolm, son of Earl
Duncan of Fife, to the nuns of North Berwick ante 1199 [Misc. Scot.
His. Soc. IV:308-9[46]]

'Laurencius de Abernethe', witness to agreement between Maelmure, earl
of Menteith and his brother and successor Maelmure Og, 6 Dec 1213
[Red Book of Menteith II:214, citing inspeximus of Henry III of
England dated 20 Sept 1261[7] ]


' laurentio de Abbirnithin' , witness (together with Walter fitz Alan
the Steward, Justiciar of Scotland, Patrick son of Earl Patrick
(of Dunbar), David de Lindsay, his son Patrick de Abernethy, and
others) to a charter on behalf of Balemerino priory, dated at
Selkirk, 10 Feb 1231/2 [Misc. Scot. Hist. Soc. VIII:8-9, no. II[35]]

' On 23 June 1233 King Alexander II confirmed to [Laurence de Abernethy] that land in the royal castle of Roxburgh quitclaimed
by the King's nephew William, son of the Earl (of Dunbar).'
[SP VII:398[1], cites Adv. Lib. MS. 35.4.16, p. 175]

'Laurentio de Abbirnithin', witness to confirmation by charter of
King Alexander II of an exchange of lands by Malcolm, thane of
Callendar (also witnessed by William fitz Alan the Steward,
Justiciar of Scotland, Walter Comyn, Henry de Stirling son of
the Earl, and others) at Scone, 30 June 1233 [Fraser I:122-3, No.
3[47]]

granted land to the monks of Balmerinach, on or after 11 Feb. 1233/4:
' "Laurentius de Abernethie, son of Orm", says Keith, "gave Corbie,
called also Birkhil, from a park of birks [birches] surrounding the
house, to this monastery [of Balmerinach;] and in his charter is
expressed the reason of his donation, viz. Because queen Emergarda
dying 3tio. Id. Februarij, anno 1233, and being buried in the church
of Balmerinach, ante magnum altare, had by her testament left him
200 merks sterling." ' [Jamieson p. 128[45], cites Catalogue, p. 259]

' Laurence de Abernethy' , witness [together with Patrick, earl of Dunbar, Malcolm, earl of Fife, Malisse, earl of Strathearn, Walter Cumin of Menteith, William, earl of Mar, Alexander, earl of Buchan, David de Hastings, earl of Athol, Robert de Bruce, Alan Durward, Henry de Balliol, Roger de Mowbray, Laurence de Abernethy, Richard Cumin, David de Lindsey, William de Lindsey, David de Graham, and others] to confirmation by Alexander II of
his treaty with England, 1244 [Anderson p. 355[44], cites Matthew
Paris, Chronica Majora, IV:381-5]

re: Laurence de Abernethy, Leslie wrote:
' He gave the Canons of the priory of St. Andrews ten shillings
yearly, payable out of Ballinbreich, with the consent of Sir
Patrick Abernethy, his son and heir, about 1230. Sir Patrick's
son, Hugh de Abernethy, possessed great influence previous to and
during the reign of Alexander III., about 1260.' [Leslie p. 37, Note A]

Laurence married Dervorguilla of Galloway.1

Reference: Genealogics cites:
     1. The Scots Peerage 1904-1914, nine volumes , Paul, Sir James Balfour.
     2. The Abernethy Family, 2009 , Ravilious, John.2

Family

Dervorguilla (?) of Galloway
Children

Citations

  1. [S2110] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 26 Nov 2006: "Re: SP Addition: ___ de Menteith, wife of Sir Alexander de Abernethy"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Nov 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 26 Nov 2006."
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Laurence de Abernethy, Lord of Abernethy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00404067&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2297] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 7 Oct 2008: "The Durham Liber Vitae: Laurence de Abernethy"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 7 Oct 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 7 Oct 2008."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Patrick de Abernethy, Padraic mac Labhruinn a Obarneithic, Heir of Abernethy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00561238&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugh de Abernethy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00561246&tree=LEO

Dervorguilla (?) of Galloway1

F, #68555
FatherUchtred (?) Lord of Galloway2,3 b. c 1120, d. 27 Sep 1174
MotherGunnild (?) of Dunbar2,4
Last Edited25 Oct 2020
     Dervorguilla (?) of Galloway married Laurence de Abernethy Lord of Abernethy, son of Orm de Abernethy.1
     Reference:
Genealogics cites:
1. The Scots Peerage 1904-1914, nine volumes , Paul, Sir James Balfour.
2. The Abernethy Family, 2009 , Ravilious, John.2

; per Ravilious: "her identification as daughter of Uhtred of Galloway by Andrew B. W. MacEwen[30]."1 Dervorguilla (?) of Galloway was also known as Derbforgaill inghen Uchtred a Gallobha.2

Family

Laurence de Abernethy Lord of Abernethy b. b 1178, d. c 1244
Children

Citations

  1. [S2110] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 26 Nov 2006: "Re: SP Addition: ___ de Menteith, wife of Sir Alexander de Abernethy"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 26 Nov 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 26 Nov 2006."
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dervorguilla of Galloway, Derbforgaill inghen Uchtred a Gallobha: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00116896&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Uchtred, Lord of Galloway: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106715&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gunnild of Dunbar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106716&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Patrick de Abernethy, Padraic mac Labhruinn a Obarneithic, Heir of Abernethy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00561238&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugh de Abernethy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00561246&tree=LEO

Sir Gedouin (?) de Dol1

M, #68556, d. circa 1235
FatherJean (?) de Dol, deigneur de Combourg1
Last Edited16 Feb 2019
     Sir Gedouin (?) de Dol married Eleanor de Vitré, daughter of Alain de Vitre Sire de Dinan and Clemence de Fougeres.1
Sir Gedouin (?) de Dol died circa 1235.1

Citations

  1. [S2111] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 1 Dec 2006: "Re: Complete Peerage Addition: Iseult de Dol, mother of Sir Elias d'Aubeney, Lord Daubeney"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 1 Dec 2006."

Jean (?) de Dol, deigneur de Combourg1

M, #68557
FatherHasculf de Soligny1
Last Edited10 Aug 2019

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S2111] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 1 Dec 2006: "Re: Complete Peerage Addition: Iseult de Dol, mother of Sir Elias d'Aubeney, Lord Daubeney"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 1 Dec 2006."

Eleanor de Vitré1

F, #68558
FatherAlain de Vitre Sire de Dinan1 d. 1197
MotherClemence de Fougeres1 d. 1252
Last Edited15 Aug 2019
     Eleanor de Vitré married Sir Gedouin (?) de Dol, son of Jean (?) de Dol, deigneur de Combourg.1

Citations

  1. [S2111] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 1 Dec 2006: "Re: Complete Peerage Addition: Iseult de Dol, mother of Sir Elias d'Aubeney, Lord Daubeney"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 1 Dec 2006."

Hasculf de Soligny1

M, #68559
Last Edited15 Aug 2019

Citations

  1. [S2111] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 1 Dec 2006: "Re: Complete Peerage Addition: Iseult de Dol, mother of Sir Elias d'Aubeney, Lord Daubeney"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 1 Dec 2006."

Aflonso (?)1

M, #68560
FatherFadrique Alfonso (?) sn de Haro, Grand Master of Order of St. Iago1 b. 1334, d. 29 May 1358
MotherPaloma (?)1
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     Aflonso (?) married Juana de Mendoza.1
     ; per Mommaerts-Browne: Fernando II/V of Aragon, (½ of 'the Gruesome Twosome'); son of

Juan II, king of Aragon, m. Juana; dt. of

Fadrique, (m. Mariana of Cordova); son of

Alfonso, (m. Juana de Mendoza); son of

Fadrique, (d. 1358), (brother of Enrique II of Castile), m. Paloma; dt. of

Gedaliah; son of

Shlomo Ha-Zeken, (d. 1299); son of

Yosef, (d. 1264); son of

Yahya ha-Nasi, (Don Yahya "El Negro", Lord of Aldeia dos Negros, Portugal),
(d. 1222); son of

Yaish, (d. 1196); son of

Hiyya al-Daudi, (d. 1154); son of

David; son of

Hizkaya; son of

David; son of

Zakkai; son of

Abraham; son of

Nathan; son of

David, (curiously a rabbi) - (WHY 'CURIOUSLY'? This line was LOADED with
rabbi'im); son of

Hazub, (Last Prince of the Davidic Dynasty mentioned in the medieval Jewish
chronicle, the _Seder Olam Zuta_, [the Smaller/Shorter Order, , of the World]); son of

Pinkhas, Prince (Phinehas or Pinchus); son of

Abbai, Prince; son of

Abdimi, Prince; son of

Nehemiah, Prince; son of

Magis, Prince, (Magis, id. with Misas); son of

Haninai, Prince; son of

Shemaiah, Prince; son of

Yakov, Prince; son of

Sutra II, Prince, (Mar-Zutra); son of

Guriya, Prince; son of

Saadia, (Sa'adyah), Prince of Judah; son of

Sutra [I], (Mar-Zutra), "Rav", Prince of Judah, son of the 30th Exilarch,
Mar-Zutra II. Sutra I was the son of his father's second wife, and given
his father's name. He was born the day of his father's execution. He was
carried to Palestine. As an adult he was accepted as Nasi or
Prince/Patriarch, and founded a new dynasty of the Palestinian Nesi'im ca.
550 CE, thus ending the interregnum period following the deposition of
Gamaliel VI in 425 CE.

Mar-Zutra II, the 30th Exilarch, reigned 512-520, in succession to Ahija(h)
I. He reigned first under the regency of Pa'idah, the brother of his first
wife, (508-512), who was deposed by his father Haninai, who then became
associated with his son in his reign. The execution of Mar-Zutra II was
followed by a vacancy in the office of Exilarch from 520-550 CE. Mar-Zutra
II's first son was Ahunai, (Huna Mar II), who was Exilarch from 550-560,
being restored after the interregnum. From his line was descended a new
dynasty of Exilarchs through Hofnai, Exilarch 560-581, whose sons were
Haninai, (Exilarch 581-589), and Bostani (I), who founded the new dynasty.



The portion from the _Seder Olam Zuta_ is as accurate as can be determined.
Al-Daudi means 'the Davidic', and would be entirely appropriate to such
ancestry. Was there, in fact, such a Jewish background for the Trastamaras?


-------------------------------
To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to GEN-MEDIEVAL-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message.1

Citations

  1. [S2113] Ford Mommaerts-Browne, "Mommaerts-Browne email 16 June 2007: "Any comments on this line? TAF?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 June 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Mommaerts-Browne email 16 June 2007."

Juana de Mendoza1

F, #68561
Last Edited16 Sep 2007

Citations

  1. [S2113] Ford Mommaerts-Browne, "Mommaerts-Browne email 16 June 2007: "Any comments on this line? TAF?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 June 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Mommaerts-Browne email 16 June 2007."

Paloma (?)1

F, #68562
FatherGedalia (?)1
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     Paloma (?) married Fadrique Alfonso (?) sn de Haro, Grand Master of Order of St. Iago, son of Alfonso XI 'el Justiciero' (?) King of Castile and León and Leonora/Eleanor de Guzmán sna de Medina Sidonia.1
     ; per Mommaerts-Browne: Fernando II/V of Aragon, (½ of 'the Gruesome Twosome'); son of

Juan II, king of Aragon, m. Juana; dt. of

Fadrique, (m. Mariana of Cordova); son of

Alfonso, (m. Juana de Mendoza); son of

Fadrique, (d. 1358), (brother of Enrique II of Castile), m. Paloma; dt. of

Gedaliah; son of

Shlomo Ha-Zeken, (d. 1299); son of

Yosef, (d. 1264); son of

Yahya ha-Nasi, (Don Yahya "El Negro", Lord of Aldeia dos Negros, Portugal),
(d. 1222); son of

Yaish, (d. 1196); son of

Hiyya al-Daudi, (d. 1154); son of

David; son of

Hizkaya; son of

David; son of

Zakkai; son of

Abraham; son of

Nathan; son of

David, (curiously a rabbi) - (WHY 'CURIOUSLY'? This line was LOADED with
rabbi'im); son of

Hazub, (Last Prince of the Davidic Dynasty mentioned in the medieval Jewish
chronicle, the _Seder Olam Zuta_, [the Smaller/Shorter Order, , of the World]); son of

Pinkhas, Prince (Phinehas or Pinchus); son of

Abbai, Prince; son of

Abdimi, Prince; son of

Nehemiah, Prince; son of

Magis, Prince, (Magis, id. with Misas); son of

Haninai, Prince; son of

Shemaiah, Prince; son of

Yakov, Prince; son of

Sutra II, Prince, (Mar-Zutra); son of

Guriya, Prince; son of

Saadia, (Sa'adyah), Prince of Judah; son of

Sutra [I], (Mar-Zutra), "Rav", Prince of Judah, son of the 30th Exilarch,
Mar-Zutra II. Sutra I was the son of his father's second wife, and given
his father's name. He was born the day of his father's execution. He was
carried to Palestine. As an adult he was accepted as Nasi or
Prince/Patriarch, and founded a new dynasty of the Palestinian Nesi'im ca.
550 CE, thus ending the interregnum period following the deposition of
Gamaliel VI in 425 CE.

Mar-Zutra II, the 30th Exilarch, reigned 512-520, in succession to Ahija(h)
I. He reigned first under the regency of Pa'idah, the brother of his first
wife, (508-512), who was deposed by his father Haninai, who then became
associated with his son in his reign. The execution of Mar-Zutra II was
followed by a vacancy in the office of Exilarch from 520-550 CE. Mar-Zutra
II's first son was Ahunai, (Huna Mar II), who was Exilarch from 550-560,
being restored after the interregnum. From his line was descended a new
dynasty of Exilarchs through Hofnai, Exilarch 560-581, whose sons were
Haninai, (Exilarch 581-589), and Bostani (I), who founded the new dynasty.



The portion from the _Seder Olam Zuta_ is as accurate as can be determined.
Al-Daudi means 'the Davidic', and would be entirely appropriate to such
ancestry. Was there, in fact, such a Jewish background for the Trastamaras?


-------------------------------
To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to GEN-MEDIEVAL-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message.1

Citations

  1. [S2113] Ford Mommaerts-Browne, "Mommaerts-Browne email 16 June 2007: "Any comments on this line? TAF?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 June 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Mommaerts-Browne email 16 June 2007."

Gedalia (?)1

M, #68563
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     ; per Mommaerts-Browne: Fernando II/V of Aragon, (½ of 'the Gruesome Twosome'); son of

Juan II, king of Aragon, m. Juana; dt. of

Fadrique, (m. Mariana of Cordova); son of

Alfonso, (m. Juana de Mendoza); son of

Fadrique, (d. 1358), (brother of Enrique II of Castile), m. Paloma; dt. of

Gedaliah; son of

Shlomo Ha-Zeken, (d. 1299); son of

Yosef, (d. 1264); son of

Yahya ha-Nasi, (Don Yahya "El Negro", Lord of Aldeia dos Negros, Portugal),
(d. 1222); son of

Yaish, (d. 1196); son of

Hiyya al-Daudi, (d. 1154); son of

David; son of

Hizkaya; son of

David; son of

Zakkai; son of

Abraham; son of

Nathan; son of

David, (curiously a rabbi) - (WHY 'CURIOUSLY'? This line was LOADED with
rabbi'im); son of

Hazub, (Last Prince of the Davidic Dynasty mentioned in the medieval Jewish
chronicle, the _Seder Olam Zuta_, [the Smaller/Shorter Order, , of the World]); son of

Pinkhas, Prince (Phinehas or Pinchus); son of

Abbai, Prince; son of

Abdimi, Prince; son of

Nehemiah, Prince; son of

Magis, Prince, (Magis, id. with Misas); son of

Haninai, Prince; son of

Shemaiah, Prince; son of

Yakov, Prince; son of

Sutra II, Prince, (Mar-Zutra); son of

Guriya, Prince; son of

Saadia, (Sa'adyah), Prince of Judah; son of

Sutra [I], (Mar-Zutra), "Rav", Prince of Judah, son of the 30th Exilarch,
Mar-Zutra II. Sutra I was the son of his father's second wife, and given
his father's name. He was born the day of his father's execution. He was
carried to Palestine. As an adult he was accepted as Nasi or
Prince/Patriarch, and founded a new dynasty of the Palestinian Nesi'im ca.
550 CE, thus ending the interregnum period following the deposition of
Gamaliel VI in 425 CE.

Mar-Zutra II, the 30th Exilarch, reigned 512-520, in succession to Ahija(h)
I. He reigned first under the regency of Pa'idah, the brother of his first
wife, (508-512), who was deposed by his father Haninai, who then became
associated with his son in his reign. The execution of Mar-Zutra II was
followed by a vacancy in the office of Exilarch from 520-550 CE. Mar-Zutra
II's first son was Ahunai, (Huna Mar II), who was Exilarch from 550-560,
being restored after the interregnum. From his line was descended a new
dynasty of Exilarchs through Hofnai, Exilarch 560-581, whose sons were
Haninai, (Exilarch 581-589), and Bostani (I), who founded the new dynasty.



The portion from the _Seder Olam Zuta_ is as accurate as can be determined.
Al-Daudi means 'the Davidic', and would be entirely appropriate to such
ancestry. Was there, in fact, such a Jewish background for the Trastamaras?


-------------------------------
To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to GEN-MEDIEVAL-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S2113] Ford Mommaerts-Browne, "Mommaerts-Browne email 16 June 2007: "Any comments on this line? TAF?"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 June 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Mommaerts-Browne email 16 June 2007."

Sir Nicholas de Longford Knt., of Longford, Derbyshire1,2,3

M, #68564, b. circa 1334, d. 23 May 1373
FatherSir Nicholas de Longford Knt., of Longford, Derbyshire1,4,3 b. b 1296, d. bt 28 Feb 1356 - 1357
MotherAlice le Boteler1,4,3 d. 1376
ReferenceGAV19
Last Edited19 Aug 2019
     Sir Nicholas de Longford Knt., of Longford, Derbyshire was born circa 1334.1 He married Alice Deincourt, daughter of Sir Roger Deincourt Knt., of Knapthorpe and Maud/Matilda Bugge, on 3 April 1347; her 1st husband; Richardson says m. abt 29 Sept. 1346 (date of marriage contract.)5,2,3
Sir Nicholas de Longford Knt., of Longford, Derbyshire died on 23 May 1373.1,3
     Reference: van de Pas cites: A Study of a Medieval Knightly Family: The Longfords of Derbyshire, Part 1, Bevan, Rosie, Reference.1 GAV-19.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Nicholas de Longford, of Longford: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00414038&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Pierrepont: p. 582. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Longford 9: p. 460.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Longford 8: p. 460.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice Deincourt: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00414039&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Nicholas de Longford, of Longford: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00414033&tree=LEO
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Pierrepont 13: p. 583.

Elizabeth Parker1,2,3

F, #68565, d. 1545
FatherThomas Parker Esq., of Poslingford, Suffolk3
Last Edited11 Nov 2008
     Elizabeth Parker married Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth, son of Thomas Cavendish of Cavendish Overhall and Alice Smith of Podbrook Hall, on 3 November 1542; his 2nd wife.2,3
Elizabeth Parker died in 1545.3

Family

Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth b. c 1505, d. 25 Oct 1557

Citations

  1. Van de Pas calls her "Elizabeth Conyngsby."
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir William Cavendish, of Chatsworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008551&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Hardwick 17: p. 379. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

Margaret Bostock1,2

F, #68566, d. 16 June 1540
FatherEdward Bostock Esq., of Whatcross, Cheshire2
Last Edited11 Nov 2008
     Margaret Bostock married Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth, son of Thomas Cavendish of Cavendish Overhall and Alice Smith of Podbrook Hall, in 1532; his 1st wife.1,3,2
Margaret Bostock died on 16 June 1540.2
Margaret Bostock was buried after 16 June 1540 at St. Botolph's, Aldersgate, London, City of London, Greater London, England.2


     ; van de Pas cites: The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: vol XI page 713.1

Family

Sir William Cavendish Knt., KB, of Chatsworth b. c 1505, d. 25 Oct 1557
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Bostock: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008552&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Hardwick 17: p. 379. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir William Cavendish, of Chatsworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008551&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anne Cavendish: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00241070&tree=LEO
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p. 69.

Anne Lumley1

F, #68567
FatherThomas Lumley1,2 b. c 1462, d. 1505
MotherMargaret Plantagenet1,3 b. c 1462
Last Edited13 Jul 2020
     Anne Lumley married Robert Ogle 4th Lord Ogle, son of Ralph Ogle 3rd Lord Ogle and Margaret Gascoigne Baroness Ogle, before 28 December 1515.1,4
     ; van de Pas cites: 1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: O 29130
2. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 338
3. Cahiers de Saint Louis , Dupont, Jacques and Saillot, Jacques, Reference: 98
4. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: X 34.1

Family

Robert Ogle 4th Lord Ogle
Child

Lady Alan de Heton Knt.1,2

M, #68568
FatherSir Thomas de Heton3
MotherAgnes (?)4
Last Edited27 Nov 2008
     Lady Alan de Heton Knt. married Constance Lilburn, daughter of Sir John Lilburn and Constance (?).5,1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alan de Heton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387207&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Heron 11: p. 397. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Thomas Heton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387213&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387214&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance Lilburn: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387208&tree=LEO

Constance Lilburn1

F, #68569
FatherSir John Lilburn2
MotherConstance (?)2
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     Constance Lilburn married Lady Alan de Heton Knt., son of Sir Thomas de Heton and Agnes (?).1,3

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constance Lilburn: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387208&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Lilburn: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387215&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alan de Heton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387207&tree=LEO

Sir John Lilburn1

M, #68570
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     Sir John Lilburn married Constance (?)1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Lilburn: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387215&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Constance (?)1

F, #68571
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     Constance (?) married Sir John Lilburn.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir John Lilburn: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387215&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Robert Ogle1

M, #68572
FatherSir Robert Ogle2
MotherJoan Hepple3
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     Robert Ogle married Elena Bertram, daughter of Sir Robert Bertram and Margaret Felton.4,1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert Ogle: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387205&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Ogle: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387209&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan Hepple: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387210&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elena Bertram: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387206&tree=LEO

Elena Bertram1

F, #68573
FatherSir Robert Bertram2
MotherMargaret Felton3
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     Elena Bertram married Robert Ogle, son of Sir Robert Ogle and Joan Hepple.1,4

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elena Bertram: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387206&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Bertram: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387211&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Felton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387212&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert Ogle: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387205&tree=LEO

Sir Robert Bertram1

M, #68574
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     Sir Robert Bertram married Margaret Felton.2,1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Bertram: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387211&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Felton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387212&tree=LEO

Margaret Felton1

F, #68575
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     Margaret Felton married Sir Robert Bertram.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret Felton: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387212&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Bertram: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387211&tree=LEO

Sir Robert Ogle1

M, #68576
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     Sir Robert Ogle married Joan Hepple.2,1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Ogle: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387209&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan Hepple: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387210&tree=LEO

Joan Hepple1

F, #68577
Last Edited16 Sep 2007
     Joan Hepple married Sir Robert Ogle.1,2

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan Hepple: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387210&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Ogle: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00387209&tree=LEO

Joane (Anne) Ogle1,2

F, #68578
FatherSir Robert Ogle Knt., of Ogle, Northumberland1,3,4,2 b. bt 1369 - 1373, d. 12 Aug 1436
MotherMaud de Grey1,2 d. a 1454
Last Edited10 Jan 2009
     Joane (Anne) Ogle married Robert Manners Esq., of Etal, Northumberland, son of Sir John Manners Knt., of Etal, Northumberland and Anne Middleton.5,1,2
     ; van der Pas cites: 1. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 413
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: Q 98647.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joane (Anne) Ogle: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00052475&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Manners 12: p. 489. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert Ogle: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00111092&tree=LEO
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Heron 11: p. 397.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Manners: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00052474&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Manners: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00052476&tree=LEO
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Bladen: p. 110.

Robert Manners Esq., of Etal, Northumberland1,2

M, #68579, b. circa 1408, d. 1461
FatherSir John Manners Knt., of Etal, Northumberland2 d. 6 Sep 1438
MotherAnne Middleton2
Last Edited10 Jan 2009
     Robert Manners Esq., of Etal, Northumberland married Joane (Anne) Ogle, daughter of Sir Robert Ogle Knt., of Ogle, Northumberland and Maud de Grey.1,3,2 Robert Manners Esq., of Etal, Northumberland was born circa 1408; Richardson says "aged 30 in 1438."1,2
Robert Manners Esq., of Etal, Northumberland died in 1461; Richardson says d. shortly after 13 Nov. 1461.1,2
     ; van den Pas cites: 1. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938, Reference: Page 2148
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: Q 98647
3. Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-century Colonists 1996, Baltimore, 1st Edition, Faris, David, Reference: 206.1 He was Knight of the Shire for Northumberland at Northumberland, England.2

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Manners: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00052474&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Manners 12: p. 489. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joane (Anne) Ogle: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00052475&tree=LEO
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Bladen: p. 110.

Sir Robert de Aspale Knt., of Aspall1,2,3

M, #68580, b. circa 1274
FatherRichard de Aspal2 b. b 1237, d. b Apr 1306
ReferenceGKJ19
Last Edited12 Dec 2012
     Sir Robert de Aspale Knt., of Aspall married Alice de Cressingham, daughter of Sir Hugh de Cressingham Knt.4,1,2,3 Sir Robert de Aspale Knt., of Aspall was born circa 1274; "aged 38" according to his
uncle's IPM, 1312.2
     GKJ-19.

; Ancestral to Queen Elizabeth II are the Aspal family of Stonham Aspal, Suffolk.

Few printed pedigrees of the family have appeared, while those that have (such as that in volume II of Copinger's Suffolk) are highly inaccurate. The family details contained in the ODNB entry for Geoffrey de Aspale are also incorrect.

A first draft of the family's pedigree follows; in presenting it I would like to record my thanks to Rosie Bevan for her kind assistance, as ever - needless to add, all errors remain my own.

1. - de Aspal, said in ODNB to be a Suffolk landowner who married into the Bukerel family of London , but this appears to relate to his son John; left issue:

2a. Geoffrey de Aspale, educated at Oxford; had a dispensation for pluralism from Pope Innocent IV [died 1254]; philosophical writer (ODNB); presented by the King to the living of Tong, Kent, 1264 (Cal. Patent Rolls, 4 September 1264); as "Master Geoffrey de Aspale, clerk of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hereford", this presentation confirmed, 1265 (Cal. Patent Rolls, 3 December 1265); King's clerk by 1276 (Cal. Patent Rolls, 8 November 1276); granted the archdeaconry of Dublin, 1278 (Cal. Patent Rolls, 28 September 1278); Bogo de Clare nominated "Geoffrey de Haspale and Roger his brother" to be his attorneys, 1278 (Cal. Patent Rolls, 11 June 1278); keeper of the wardrobe to Queen Eleanor by 1278 (ODNB); "letters for Bogo de Clare nominating Geoffrey de Aspale and John his brother his attorneys for two years" (Cal. Patent Rolls, 22 September 1279); had real estate at Cowlinge, Suffolk, 1280 (Cal. Patent Rolls, 12 March 1280) where he was Rector (Suffolk Record Office, Iveagh MS HD1538/Vol 13/p 43/5); Master of St Leonard's Hospital, York; gave the manor of Halliford, Middlesex to Westminster Abbey, circa 1286 (ODNB); a "notorious pluralist" (VCH Sussex, vol 6 part 1, sub Findon); died in Gascony, 11 June 1287 (ODNB); alias Haspal or Haspale, inquisition post mortem in Surrey, Suffolk, Lincolnshire and Kent, 15 Edward I (PRO C 133/48/2):

"Writ, 8 July 15 Edward I: inquest for Surrey, Friday after the Translation of St Thomas the Martyr, 15 Edward I: various lands held for life of the heirs of Simon de Pudyndene; Suffolk: the manor of North Glenham, held for life of the priory of Tefford; Cowlinge: a messuage, 80 acres of arable, 2 ½ acres of meadow, 2 ½ acres of pasture, the advowson of the church, the advowson of the chapel of St Margaret, jointly held by the said Master Geoffrey and John his brother, by purchase of Sir Robert de Pugeys, rendering 1d yearly for all services; and 80 acres of arable, 60s rent, a windmill and 2 customers, jointly held by the said Geoffrey and John his brother by purchase of John de Cowelleston, Rector of the church, doing to him 12d yearly; Richard de Aspale his brother, aged 50 and more, is his next heir; Denham: the manor held by farm for five years, of which three will have elapsed at the feast of St Michael, 15 Edward I; Lincoln: inquest held Tuesday after the Beheading of St John the Baptist, 15 Edward I: the manor of Scalleby, including 2s rent of two gardens for fish in Ancholm, and rents of sokemen in Great and Little Cotes, near Grimsby, and in Sualwe, held of John Paynel by a mesne by service of half a knight's fee, and rendering 2s warnoth to Sir Roger de Mowbray; heir as above. Kent: inquest held Saturday after the Nativity of St Mary the Virgin, 15 Edward I: Nessyndene: the manor, including a water-mill bought of Gilbert Elys, outside the wall of Rochester, of the fee of Sir Robert Pugeys, lord of Magna Delthe, a windmill outside Eastgate of the same fee, held of Geoffrey Costentyn, and another windmill situate upon the fee of Nicholas de Weldeham; the messuage and all the lands etc which are in demesne and of free fee are held of Sir Roger Loveday, doing 1d only each year; Richard, brother of the said Geoffrey, is next heir of these lands; the other lands etc are subject to gavelkind, and are held of divers lords, paying 15s 10d yearly; these are partible between all the brothers of the said Geoffrey, according to the custom of Kent. He died in parts across the sea on the day of St Barnabas, as the jury believe." (Cal. IPMs, vol II, #635)

2b. Richard de Aspal, born before 1237; heir to his brother Geoffrey, 1287; dead by April 1306; married Alice, received a quitclaim from Thomas de Caldbeck of Cowlinge, in respect of a messuage at Cowlinge, formerly held by Sir Robert Pugeys, dated 15 April 1306 (Suffolk Record Office, Iveagh MS HD 1538/Vol 13/p 43/4). Issue:

3. Sir Robert de Aspal, born circa 1274 ("aged 38" according to his uncle's IPM, 1312); held rent and land at Cowlinge, 1305-1306 (Suffolk Record Office, Iveagh MS HD1538/Vol 13/p 43/1-3), wherein he is called "Robert, son of Richard de Aspal"; nephew and heir of Roger de Aspal, of Kent and Suffolk: "order to the Escheator beyond Trent to deliver to Robert de Aspale, kinsman and heir of Roger de Aspale, tenant in chief, the lands late of the said Roger his uncle, he having done homage" (Calendar of Fine Rolls, 10 June 1312); "release by Ralph the Prior and the convent of the Holy Trinity by Alegate for £40 to Sir Robert de Aspale, knight, heir of Sir Roger de Aspale, lately deceased, of all their right in the houses in St Clement's Street, London, by Candlewick Street, which Sir Roger bequeathed to them by his will", dated Saturday the morrow of St Margaret, 7 Edward II [17 November 1313] (PRO E 40/1850); an executor of Alice, Countess of Norfolk; knight of the shire for Suffolk, 1327 (Knights of Edward I); a Justice in Eyre, Hampshire, 4 Edward III [1330-1] (PRO E 32/163); steward of Queen Isabel, 1334 (PRO SC 8/11/542); dead by 1349; married Alice Cressingham, daughter of Hugh de Cressingham [died 1297] (Complete Peerage, sub Tibetot; ODNB); "Sir Robert de Aspale and Dame Alice his wife" named in a feoffment of 27 May 1322 (Suffolk Record Office, HD1538/305/2); "Alice who was the wife of Robert de Aspale, knight, and Thomas their son v Humphrey, son and heir of John de Boys of Cowlinge", 22 Edward III [1348-9] (Suffolk Feet of Fines). Issue:

4a. Sir John de Aspall, granted his father Sir Robert de Aspale the manor of Slamundeshaye in Black- and in White-Nottele, Essex, for life, 2 Edward III [1328-9] (Charters and Rolls in the Bodleian Library); held Stonham Aspal, 1347 (PRO C 241/123/88); dead by 20 April 1357 (PRO C 241/137/1); married Elizabeth (Copinger, Suffolk, vol ii).

4b. Thomas de Aspall, held Basing, 1336-1345 (PRO C 241/108/214 & 121/261); Sheriff of Hampshire, 19 Edward III [1345-6] (PRO E 358/2); married circa 1336 Mirabel Wake, widow of Hugh, 2nd Lord St John of Basing. Issue:

5. Sir John de Aspall, of Lackford, living 1366; married Katherine Pecche (Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology & Natural History, 1848, p 2); issue:

6. Mirabel de Aspall, daughter and sole heir; married William Gedding, and left issue - see previous posts on SGM

4c. Elizabeth de Aspall, died circa 1390; married firstly Sir John Wauton, of Wimbish (ODNB); married secondly John, 2nd Lord Tibetot, born 1313; proved his age, 8 Edward III [1334-5]; served in Scotland and in Flanders; Governor of Berwick-on-Tweed, 20 Edward III [1346-7] (Dugdale's Baronage, vol II, p 39); died 1367 (ODNB); issue:

5. Sir Payn Tibetot, JP, MP, born circa 1351; son of his father's second marriage; received the manors of Harston and Burwell, Cambs, under his father's settlement of circa 1365, and Lovetotes manor in Bramford, Suffolk, from his mother; knighted by 1387; inherited property from his mother, 1390; entered the service of the Earl of Arundel; an executor under the Earl's will of 1393; MP for Cambs, 1399 and 1404; JP for Cambs from 1399; Sheriff of Cambs and Hunts, 1401-2 and 1404-5; attended the great council, 1401; knight of the King's chamber under Henry IV; purchased the reversion of the manor of Everseden, 1409; died circa 1413 (History of Parliament 1386-1412, vol IV, pp 628-30); married Agnes Wroth, daughter of John Wroth, MP, of Enfield; died 1396 (VCH Hants, vol IV, p 628). Left issue, including Queen Elizabeth II.

2c. Sir John de Aspal, acquired 10s annual rent in Cowlinge from Robert de Swyvelshoe (Suffolk Record Office, Iveagh MS HD1538/Vol 13/ fo 42/5); granted together with his brother Roger the manor and advowson of Stonham Antigone by Sir William de Nerford (Suffolk Record Office, Iveagh MS HD1538/365/1, said to be dated between 1246 and 1270 but elsewhere dated to 1278); in 1270 he and his wife granted her ancestral property at St Mary Colechurch, London, to Roger de Aspal, clerk, who afterwards disposed of it to Roger Beyuin [died 1277] (Historical Gazeteer of London Before the Great Fire: St Mary Colechurch); living circa 1290 (Copinger's Suffolk, vol ii, sub Aspal); married by 1259 Alice Bukerel, daughter and heir of Thomas Bukerel (Historical Gazeteer of London Before the Great Fire: St Mary Colechurch); a minor in the ward of John Reinger of London, 24 June 1244 (London Eyre of 1244, #245); living, 1270. Issue:

3b. John de Aspal, possibly born after 1270, when William Bukerel registered a claim to the patrimony of Alice Bukerel, should she die without issue; named as "John, son of Sir John de Aspale" in a deed concerning land at Cowlinge, dated 15 September 1308 (Suffolk Record Office, Iveagh MS HD1538/188/2); probably the one of this name, "of Cowlinge", who witnessed a deed of Robert de Aspal, 28 July 1318 (Suffolk Record Office, Iveagh MS HD1538/Vol 13/p 43/6

2d. Roger de Aspal, granted property in London by his brother, 1270; living circa 1290 (Copinger, op. cit.); held lands at Stonham Aspal, 1295 (Suffolk Record Office, Iveagh MS HD1538/365/2); one of this name parson of Stonham Antigone and Henneye, 1295 (Cal. Patent Rolls, 24 Edward I, m 22d); writ of diem clausit extremum for one of this name with lands in Kent, 18 April 1295, but there is no surviving IPM and this is likely to have been issued in error (Cal. IPMs vol III, #300); held two knight's fees at Stonham and Pebenesse and ¼ fee at Micklefield under Roger, Earl of Norfolk, 1306 (Cal. IPMs, vol IV, #434); Lord of Stonham Aspal; died 1312 (Copinger, op. cit.); left a will, bequeathing property in London; IPM, Suffolk and Kent, 5 Edward II (PRO C 134/26/13):

"Writ dated 25 April 5 Edward II, Suffolk inquest, 18 May 5 Edward II: Stonham Antegan: a messuage, 100 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow, 6 acres of wood and £4 rent of assize, held of the Countess of Norfolk, marshal of England, as dower, by service of one knight's fee; Mikeleffeld: a messuage, 20 acres of land, an acre of pasture and an acre of wood, held of the said Countess of a moiety of a quarter of a knight's fee. Robert de Aspale aged 30 and more is his next heir. Kent: inquest 12 May 5 Edward II: Nessendene: the manor, held of the King in chief by service of half a knight's fee; a windmill in the said manor, held of the Bishop of Rochester by service of 20d; a wood and 12 acres of pasture, held of Richard de Grey by service of 5 shillings, and 7 acres of meadow held of Geoffrey de Say by service unknown; heir as above, aged 38." (Cal. IPMs, vol V, #348)

Arms: azure, three chevrons or

MA-R.2

; van de Pas cites: The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XII/2 96.1

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Robert Aspall, of Aspall: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00413663&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2174] Michael Andrews-Reading, "Andrews-Reading email 31 Aug 2007: "Aspal of Stonham Aspal, Suffolk"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 31 Aug 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Andrews-Reading email 31 Aug 2007."
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Paulet 8: p. 569-70. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice de Cressingham: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00413664&tree=LEO