John Page

M, #5401
FatherJohn Page b. bt 1528 - 1536, d. 1623
MotherAudrey Redding b. c 1535, d. 1600
Last Edited29 May 2001

Etienne (Stephen) Henri de Blois comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Meaux, Provins et Sancerre1,2,3,4

M, #5402, b. between 1045 and 1046, d. circa 19 May 1102
FatherThibaut/Theobald III de Blois Comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Troyes, Meaux et Sancerre, et de Champagne2,3,4,5,6,7,8 b. c 1010, d. 30 Sep 1089
MotherGersende (?) de Maine9,2,4,10,6,7
ReferenceGAV25 EDV25
Last Edited24 Apr 2020
     Etienne (Stephen) Henri de Blois comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Meaux, Provins et Sancerre was born between 1045 and 1046 at Blois, France; Genealogics says b. ca 1045.1,2,3,4 He married Adela/Adèle (?) de Normandie, Countess of Blois and Chartres, daughter of William I "The Conqueror" (?) Duke of Normandy, King of England and Mathilde/Matilda/Maud van Vlaanderen Duchess of Normandy, Queen of England, circa 1080 at Breteuil, Eure, France; Genealogics says m. 1081 in Chartres; Henry Project says m. 1080; Genealogics.EU (Normandy) says m. 1080; Genealogics.EU (Blois) says m. 1081; Racines et Histoire (Normandie) says m. 1080/81; Weis [1992:121] says m. ca 1080; Med Lands says "Betrothed Breteuil, Chartres 1081."11,2,3,12,4,13,14,15,16,7
Etienne (Stephen) Henri de Blois comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Meaux, Provins et Sancerre died circa 19 May 1102 at Ramleh, Palestine; slain in battle of Ramleh.1,17,2,4,6,7
     ;      Per Genealogy.EU (Normandy): "Adela, *1062, +Marcigny-sur-Loire 3.3.1137; m.1080 Cte Etienne III de Blois (*1046 +V.1102)"
     Per Genealogy.EU (Blois): " [2m.] Cte Etienne de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Sancerre et de Meaux, *1046, +k.a.Ramleh V.1102, bur there; m.1081 Adela of England (*1062 +Marseilles 8.3.1135/37/38.)12,18"

; Per Racines et Histoire:
Normandie: "Adèle ° 1062 + 03/03/1137 (Marcignysur-Loire)
     ép. 1080/81 comte Etienne Henri de Blois ° 1046 +X 05/1102 (Ramlah) comte de Blois et Chartres"
Blois-Chartres: "2) Etienne-Henri de Blois ° 1046/47 +X 19/05/1102 (Ramlah, Palestine, peut-être décapité par les Turcs après capture) comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Meaux, Provins et Saint-Florentin, seigneur de Sancerre (1089), croisé (09/1096 avec Robert II, comte de Flandres, puis Robert «Courteheuse», duc de Normandie, s’enfuit honteusement lors du siège d’Antioche en 1098 ; croisé à nouveau printemps 1101, prend Ankara aux Turcs le 23/01/1101)
     ép. 1080 (Breteuil) & confirmé en 1081 (Chartres) ou entre 01 et 11/1083 ? Adèle d’Angleterre (alias de Normandie), Régente de Blois (1102-1107) ° 1062 ou 1067/68 ? (Normandie) + 08/03/1138 (Marcigny-sur-Loire, religieuse puis Prieure Clunisienne dès 1122) (fille de Guillaume II, duc de Normandie (William 1er, Roi d’Angleterre), et de Mathilde de Flandres.)15,19" GAV-25 EDV-25.

; Per Med Lands:
     "ETIENNE [Henri] de Blois, son of THIBAUT III Comte de Blois & his [first/second wife Gersende du Maine/Gundrada ---] (-murdered Ramla 19 May 1102). The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Stephanus et Hugo" as sons of "comes Tetbaudus", specifying that Etienne "factus est Blesensium Carnotensium atque Meldensium comes" on their father's death[176]. Orderic Vitalis names “Stephanus Blesensis palatinus comes...Tedbaldi filius...palatini consulis et nepos Bertæ Britnum comitissæ et Cenomannensium” when recording his marriage[177]. “Stephanus comes” donated property to the abbey of Pontlevoy, for the souls of “Theobaldi comitis patris mei et matris meæ Gundreæ…” by charter dated 1089[178]. As noted above, it is possible that “Gundreæ” in this charter is in fact a distorted transcription of “Gersendæ”, the name of Thibaut’s known first wife. This cannot be verified unless another primary source emerges which names the mother of Comte Etienne. He succeeded his father in 1089 as ETIENNE Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Sancerre et de Meaux. He joined the contingent of Robert II Count of Flanders on the First Crusade in Sep 1096, along with Robert "Curthose" Duke of Normandy. Albert of Aix records the arrival in Constantinople of "Robertus Normannorum comes, Stephanus Blesensis, Eustachius frater prædicti Ducis", dated to early 1097 from the context[179]. Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus Carpentarius, Willelmusque alter, quondam familiaris et domesticus imperatoris Constantinopolis, qui et sororem Boemundi principis Siciliæ uxorem duxerat", escaped "out of fear", believing that the crusading army was doomed after it was besieged by Kerbogha atabeg of Mosul, from Antioch to Alexandretta where they met "Stephanus Blesensis" (who had left the siege "causa infirmitatis") and who thereupon prepared to leave for Europe by sea[180]. "Henricus comes cognomina Stephanus necnon et Adela uxor eius cum filiis nostris" granted immunities to Chartres Notre-Dame by charter dated [Oct 1100/1101], signed by "Stephani comitis, Adele comitisse, Guillelmi, Stephani, Odonis, Teobaldi"[181]. Albert of Aix records that "Stephanus comes Blesensium, pœnitentia ductus" made plans to return to Jerusalem, dated to late 1100 from the context[182]. The group appointed Comte Raymond as their overall leader when they arrived at Constantinople[183]. After the combined armies left Constantinople in May 1101, they captured Ankara from the Seljuk Turks 23 Jun 1101 but were scattered after their defeat by the Turks at Mersivan[184]. Albert of Aix records "…Stephanus Blesensis…" among those who spent Easter in Jerusalem with Baudouin I King of Jerusalem, dated to 1102 from the context[185]. Robert of Torigny records that "Stephanus comes Blesensis" was killed "1102 XV Kal Aug apud Ramulam"[186]. Albert of Aix records that "Conradus, Arpinus, Stephanus Blesensis itemque Stephanus de Burgundia" were captured at Ramla after being burned in a tower, and that "Stephano itemque Stephano" were beheaded, dated to mid-1102 from the context[187]. Two of his letters to his wife Adela, written during the First Crusade, have survived and provide a unique first-hand account of events[188]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XIV Kal Jun" of "Stephanus palatinus comes"[189]. The necrology of Saint-Jean-en-Vallée records the death "XIV Kal Jun" of "Stephanus nomine Henricus comes palatinus"[190]. The necrology of Pontlevoy records the death "XIV Kal Jun" of "Henrici comitis"[191].
     "m (Betrothed Breteuil, Chartres 1081) ADELA of England, daughter of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre (Normandy [1066/67]-Marigney-sur-Loire 8 Mar 1138, bur Abbey of Holy Trinity, Caen). She is listed by Orderic Vitalis last among the daughters of King William in his description of their careers[192]. She is named third in his list of the daughters of King William I by Matthew Paris[193], but this appears unlikely in view of Adela's child-bearing until her husband's death in 1102. Her birth date is estimated bearing in mind that marriage frequently took place in early adolescence at the time, and also that Adela clearly continued to bear children right up to her husband's death. Orderic Vitalis records the betrothal “apud Bretolium” of “Stephanus Blesensis palatinus comes” and “Guillelmo rege...Adelam eius filiam” and their marriage “apud Carnotum”, dated to 1081[194]. Orderic Vitalis records that she encouraged her husband to join the First Crusade and did not hide her shame when he deserted from Antioch in 1098[195]. Regent of Blois 1102-1107, after the death of her husband. She became a nun at the Cluniac priory of Marigney-sur-Loire in [1122]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "VIII Id Mar" of "Adela comitissa"[196], and in another manuscript the death "VIII Id Mar" of "Adela nobilis Blesensium comitissa regis Anglorum Willelmi filia"[197].
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of Comte Etienne's mistress is not known.
     "Comte Etienne & his wife had [eleven] children.
     "Comte Etienne had [one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (1)]."
Med Lands cites:
[176] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 390.
[177] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XI, p. 393.
[178] Arbois de Jubainville (1859) Tome I, p. 504.
[179] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. XXI, p. 314.
[180] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber IV, Cap. XXXVII, p. 414.
[181] Chartres Notre-Dame, Tome I, XXIV, p. 104.
[182] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. VI, p. 563.
[183] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 20-1.
[184] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 21-23.
[185] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber IX, Cap. I, p. 591.
[186] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1102, p. 124.
[187] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber IX, Cap. V, p. 593.
[188] Epistolæ Stephani Comitis Carnotensis, RCH (Historiens Occidentaux) Tome III, pp. 885-90.
[189] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 13.
[190] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de Saint-Jean-en-Vallée, p. 231.
[191] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de Pontlevoy, p. 211.
[192] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 115.
[193] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1086, p. 21.
[194] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XI, p. 393.
[195] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 325.
[196] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 8.
[197] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire du xii siècle, p. 56.7


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 42.
2. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: page 193.6


; Per Genealogics:
     "Stephen (Etienne in French) was born about 1045, the son of Thibaut III, count of Blois, and Garsende de Maine. About 1081 Stephen married Adela of Normandy, the formidable daughter of William the Conqueror, and by her fathered seven children. When Stephen's father died in 1089 he became count of Blois and Chartres. In 1095 Adela became regent when her husband took part in the First Crusade. He had no enthusiasm for this duty, but Adela considered that he should go. There was never any nonsense in their household about who made the decisions---she did. Stephen de Blois went on crusade with Adela's brother Robert, duke of Normandy.
     "Having marched south through Italy, Stephen and his brother-in-law decided to spend the winter comfortably in southern Italy before continuing on their way. When at last these two leaders decided to embark their men at Brindisi, disaster struck them. It was a very medieval kind of disaster: the first ship to leave port capsized and sank with the loss of all hands together with many pack-animals, stores, and chests of money. Most of their men allowed themselves to be shipped, and after a rough and unpleasant crossing they reached Constantinople in May 1096. Stephen de Blois was impressed by the city, but reserved his greatest admiration for the Emperor Alexius. 'Your father, my beloved,' he wrote to Adela, 'made many gifts, but he was almost nothing compared with this man'. One cannot help but wonder how the formidable Adela reacted to this remark about her father, William the Conqueror; however, since her husband was the better part of two thousand miles away, perhaps for once he himself did not much mind how she reacted.
     "Godfrey of Bouillon had attacked the city of Nicaea and was joined, in early June 1096, by Stephen de Blois, Robert of Normandy and Raymond of Toulouse. They celebrated their assault by cutting off the heads of as many Turks as they could find and catapulting them over the city walls into the streets. Others were set up on spikes in front of the gates in full view of the depressed defenders. A Byzantine force took control of the city and deprived the Crusaders of another massacre by allowing the Turks to escape.
     "Stephen wrote to his wife in high spirits: 'In five weeks' time we shall be in Jerusalem, unless we are held up at Antioch'. After the joint Crusader force defeated another Turkish army, the retreating Turks laid waste to the country, burning the crops and destroying or befouling the wells. The weather was still painfully hot and it was not long before hunger and thirst began to take their toll. Stephen wrote to Adela to say that it was a great mistake to imagine that the sun always shone in Syria, for 'throughout this winter we have endured intense cold and incessant rain'.
     "Later Stephen marched his men to Alexandretta, as he saw no point in having them massacred by the Atabeg of Mosul. Afterwards he was to be rebuked bitterly for this 'cowardice' by the formidable Adela. He returned to France in 1099 but was forced by Adela to return to the East, there to redeem his tarnished reputation, which he did by being killed in the Battle of Ramleh on 19 May 1102."6

Reference: Weis [1992:121] line 137-23.20 Etienne (Stephen) Henri de Blois comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Meaux, Provins et Sancerre was also known as Stephen (Etienne) Count of Blois.17

; Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Étienne II Henri (Estienne Henri) (né en 10451 et mort le 19 mai 1102)2, fut comte de Blois, Châteaudun, Chartres, Meaux et seigneur de Sancerre, Saint-Florentin, Provins, Montereau, Vertus, Oulchy-le-Château, Château-Thierry, Châtillon-sur-Marne et Montfélix3.
Biographie
     "Il est le fils du comte Thibaud III de Blois et de Gersende du Maine, fille du comte Herbert Ier du Maine4. En 1080 à Chartres, il épouse Adèle d'Angleterre, fille de Guillaume le Conquérant.
     "En septembre 1096, avec le duc Robert Courteheuse, il rejoint l'armée de Robert II de Flandre pour participer à la première croisade4. Découragé par les rigueurs et les difficultés du siège d'Antioche, il déserte de la ville assiégée en 1098, afin d'éviter une mort inéluctable. Mais sa réputation sera ternie parce que des croisés survivent, et réussissent à prendre Jérusalem en 1099.
     "De retour à Blois, il est fraîchement accueilli par sa femme qui se dit offusquée, elle, Adèle d'Angleterre fille de Guillaume le Conquérant, d'être mariée à un lâche. Elle le persuade de penser à sa réputation et de retourner en Terre sainte.
     "Il rejoint la seconde vague de participants à la première croisade qui part au printemps 1101. Il rachète sa conduite précédente par une mort au combat à Ramla, le 19 mai 1102. Albert d'Aix rapporte qu'il aurait été capturé puis décapité.
     "Deux lettres d'Étienne-Henri adressées à Adèle lors de sa présence en Terre sainte nous sont parvenues, et donnent une description de première main sur les événements.
Famille et descendance
     "En 1080 à Breteuil, mariage confirmé à Notre-Dame de Chartres en 10812, il épouse Adèle d'Angleterre (v. 1067-1137), fille de Guillaume le Conquérant et Mathilde de Flandres. Ensemble ils ont pour descendance connue5 :
** Guillaume de Blois (avant 1092-v. 1150), seigneur de Sully, déshérité5 pour des problèmes mentaux. Il épouse cependant l'héritière de la seigneurie de Sully et a des descendants5.
** Thibaud IV le Grand (avant 1092-1152), comte de Blois, de Châteaudun, de Chartres et de Champagne?.
** Eudes, mort jeune5.
** Mathilde (morte en 1120), mariée en 1115 à Richard d'Avranches, 2e comte de Chester?. Ils meurent lors du naufrage de la Blanche-Nef en 1120.
** Étienne (v. 10926-1154), comte de Mortain, puis roi d'Angleterre en 1135.
** Henri (v. 10967-1171), abbé de Glastonbury puis évêque de Winchester.
** Éléonore, mariée vers 1120 à Raoul de Vermandois et répudiée en 1142.

     "Trois filles possibles dont la filiation n'est pas prouvée2 :
Agnès, épouse d'Hugues III, seigneur du Puiset.
Adélaïde (Adela ou Lithuise), mariée vers 1112 (et séparée en 1113) à Milon de Bray, vicomte de Troyes.
Alix épouse de Renard III, comte de Joigny.
     "Enfant illégitime possible :
Emma, épouse de Herbert de Winchester. Il semble toutefois qu'Emma n'ait rien à voir avec la Maison de Blois8. Elle serait plutôt la fille de Hunger fitz Odin, seigneur de Broad Windsor (Dorset)8. Elle est la mère de Guillaume FitzHerbert, archevêque d'York (1143-1147, 1153-1154).
Titres
     "Il apparaît pour la première fois comme comte de Champagne en 1077, puis en 1089. À la mort de son père, il conserve le patrimoine ancestral des comtés de Blois, de Chartres, de Meaux et de Provins, tandis que son demi-frère Eudes devient comte de Troyes.
Notes et références
1.21

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Stephen Henry (in French, Étienne Henri, in Medieval French, Estienne Henri; c.?1045 – 19 May 1102), Count of Blois and Count of Chartres, was the son of Theobald III, count of Blois, and Gersent of Le Mans.[1]
     "In 1089, upon the death of his father, he became the Count of Blois and Chartres, although Theobald had given him the administration of those holdings in 1074. He was the father of Stephen of England.
     "Count Stephen was one of the leaders of the First Crusade, leading one of the major armies of the Princes and often writing enthusiastic letters to his wife Adela of Normandy about the crusade's progress. Stephen was the head of the army council at the Crusaders' siege of Nicaea in 1097.[2] He returned home in 1098 during the lengthy siege of Antioch, fleeing the battlefield, without having fulfilled his crusading vow to forge a way to Jerusalem.[3] He was pressured by Adela into making a second pilgrimage, and joined the minor crusade of 1101 in the company of others who had also returned home prematurely. In 1102, Stephen was killed at the Second Battle of Ramla at the age of fifty-seven.[4]
Family
     "Stephen married Adela of Normandy,[5] a daughter of William the Conqueror around 1080 in Chartres. He fathered Adela's children:
1. William, Count of Sully[5]
2. Theobald II, Count of Blois[5]
3. Odo, who died young
4. Stephen, King of England[5]
5. Lucia-Mahaut, married Richard d'Avranches, 2nd Earl of Chester. Both drowned on 25 November 1120 in the White Ship disaster.
6. Agnes, married Hugh III of Le Puiset[6]
7. Eleanor (d. 1147) married Raoul I of Vermandois (d. 1152) and had issue; they were divorced in 1142.
8. Alix (c.1095 – 1145) married Renaud III of Joigni (d. 1134) and had issue
9. Adelaide, married Milo II of Montlhéry, Viscount of Troyes (divorced 1115)
10. Henry, Bishop of Winchester (c.1096-1171)[5]
11. Humbert, died young

     "A late 14th century source gives him an illegitimate daughter Emma, wife of Herbert of Winchester and mother of William of York, archbishop of York,[7] but recent research suggests a different parentage for her.[8]
References
1. Evergates 1999, p. 11.
2. Cartier, Étienne (1846) Recherches sur les monnaies au type chartrain frappées à Chartres, Blois, Vendoîns, Chateaudum, Nogent-le-Rotrou (Ferche), St. Aignan, Celles, Romorantin, Brosse, etc. Rollin, Paris, p. 7, OCLC 27374228, in French
3. Brundage 1960, p. 388.
4. Tyerman 2006, p. 87.
5. Evergates 2007, p. 248.
6. Evergates 2016, p. x.
7. Davis, King Stephen, p. 172
8. Burton "William of York (d. 1154)" "Oxford Dictionary of National Biography"
Sources
** Brundage, James A. (1960). "An Errant Crusader: Stephen of Blois". Traditio. 16: 380–395. doi:10.1017/S0362152900006139.
** Evergates, Theodore, ed. (1999). Aristocratic Women in Medieval France. University of Pennsylvania Press.
** Evergates, Theodore (2007). The Aristocracy in the County of Champagne, 1100-1300. University of Pennsylvania Press.
** Evergates, Theodore (2016). Henry the Liberal: Count of Champagne, 1127-1181. University of Pennsylvania Press.
** Tyerman, Christopher (2006). God's war: a new history of the Crusades. Harvard University Press."22 He was Count of Champagne, Brie, Blois and Chartres.23 He was Comte de Blois between 1089 and 1102.22 He was Leader of the First Crusade in 1096.24 He was Crusader in 1096.25 He was Per Database of Crusaders:
     "Country and Region of Origin     France, Centre (RE) Loir-et-Cher (D)
     Specific Title     Count of Blois and Chartres
     RoleCount (lay)
     Gender and Marital Statusa     Male
     Family     wife: Adela, daughter of William the Conqueror Brother-in-law: Robert II of Normandy (First Crusader) Father: Theobald III of Blois Grandson: Henry I of Champagne (Second Crusader)
Crusades
     1st Expedition     1st Crusade (1096-1099)?
     Contingent Leader     Stephen of Blois and Hugh of Vermandois?
     Probability of Participation     Certain
     Financial Arrangements     He gave a wood to the abbey of Marmoutier in compensation for former wrongs.
     Regent     Adela of England
     Followers     Fulcher of Chartres, Alexander (his chaplain), Grimoald of Maule, Hugh of Guernonatus, Joscelin of Courtenay, Ralph La Fontanelle
     Consequences of Expedition     Survived
     Actions     Stephen was said to have been a staunch supporter of the king of France before the First Crusade. On Stephen's journey east he met Pope Urban II, who gave his and Robert Curthose's army his blessing. Stephen travelled from Brindisi, through the Balkans to Constantinople, where he arrived on 14 May 1097. At Constantinople, Alexios even suggested that Stephen should send his son to be raised in the Byzantine court. At Nicaea, Stephen is believed to have estimated that Jerusalem was only five weeks march away. He deserted the crusade at Antioch on 2 June 1098 but later was forced to return to the east by his wife Adela.
     Sources     J. A. Brundage, 'An Errant Crusader: Stephen of Blois', Traditio, vol. 16 (1960), pp. 380-395. VE, pp. 50, 101. RFC, p. 118. AA, passim.
     2nd Expedition     Crusade of 1101
     Contingent Leader     Stephen of Blois and Stephen I of Burgundy?
     Probability of Participation     Certain
     Regent     Adela of England
     Consequences of Expedition     Died
     Actions     He survived the crusade and completed his pilgrimage to Jerusalem. He assisted King Baldwin I of Jerusalem in fighting the Egyptians at Ramla. He was captured and executed by the Egyptians.
     Sources     J. A. Brundage, 'An Errant Crusader: Stephen of Blois', Traditio, vol. 16 (1960), pp. 380-395. GF, passim. AA, passim. His deeds can be found in most First Crusade Chronicles." between 1096 and 1102.26

Family 2

Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 32, BLOIS 6. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012365&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020135&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012365&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EtienneIdied1102B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#ThibautIIIdied1089B
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 31, BLOIS 5.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Garsende de Maine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020139&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 137-23, p. 121. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00012366&tree=LEO
  14. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/willi001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Normandie, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Normandie.pdf
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Adeladied1138.
  17. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 504 (Chart 36). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Champagne-Blois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  20. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 137-23, p. 121: "...a leader of the First Crusade, 1096."
  21. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Étienne II de Blois: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tienne_II_de_Blois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen,_Count_of_Blois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  23. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 5.
  24. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 139-23, p. 122.
  25. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 139-23, p. 122: "a leader of the First Crusade."
  26. [S4754] A Database of Crusaders to the Holy Land | 1095 - 1149, online <https://www.dhi.ac.uk/crusaders/>, Stephen Henry married of Blois: https://www.dhi.ac.uk/crusaders/person/?id=679. Hereinafter cited as Crusaders to the Holy Land 1095-1149.
  27. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EleonoreBloisdiedafter1148
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00199412&tree=LEO
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046835&tree=LEO
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda|Maud de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036500&tree=LEO
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#MahautBloisdied1120
  33. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 137-25, p. 121.
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut IV-II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020141&tree=LEO
  35. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#ThibautIVdied1152B
  36. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  37. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Stephendied1154B.
  38. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lithuaise de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046841&tree=LEO
  39. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#LithuaiseBloisM1112MilonMontlheryTroyes
  40. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henri de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046839&tree=LEO
  41. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#AliceMRenaudIIIJoigny
  42. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00284741&tree=LEO

AdelaSprote (?) de Bretagne1

F, #5403, b. circa 911, d. circa 945
FatherHubert (?) Count of Senlis b. 852
ReferenceGAV28 EDV28
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     AdelaSprote (?) de Bretagne was born circa 911 at Bretagne, France.2,3,4 She married Guillaume I "Longsword" (?) Duke of Normandy, son of Rollo (Ganger Rolf, Rollon) "The Viking" (?) Duke of Normandy and Poopa (Poppa, Pope) (?) de Bayeux, Duchess of Normandy, before 933; Per Wikipedia: "He fathered his son, Richard, with Sprota.[c] who was a Breton captive and his concubine.[32]"
Wikipedia cites:
[32] The Normans in Europe, ed. & trans. Elisabeth van Houts (Manchester; New York: Manchester University Press, 2000), p. 47.5,6,7,8,9,10,1,11 AdelaSprote (?) de Bretagne married Esperleng (Asperling, L’ «Eperlan») (?) de Pîtres before 936;
Her 2nd husband.12,6,10,13,14,1
AdelaSprote (?) de Bretagne died circa 945.2
AdelaSprote (?) de Bretagne was buried circa 945 at Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     911
     DEATH     945 (aged 33–34)
     There is some doubt that Espriota Sproata's parents were indeed Herbert de Vermandois and Bertha de Morvais. They have come to the conclusion that Sprota was probably a commoner, William Longsword may have never married her, and that her parentage is most likely unknown. However we have elected to leave this memorial intact honoring her memory. Though her parentage is in question, it is generally considered that Herbert I was her father.
This leads to an interesting dilemma. If he was her father then she would have been born prior to 911 AD. He alledgedly died in Sep 907 AD.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Herbert I Count of Vermandois unknown–907
          Countess Bertha De Morvois Vermandois unknown–916
     Spouse
          William of Normandy 893–942
     Siblings
          Beatrice of Vermandois
          Herbert II Of Vermandois 884–943
     Children
          Richard I of Normandy 933–996
     Children
          Richard I of Normandy 933–996
     BURIAL     Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
     Created by: Gene Stephan
     Added: 7 Jul 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 132471168.15
     ; Per Weis: “William I, 'Longsword,' b. abt 891, prob. Rouen, abt 927 succ. to County of Normandy, abt 930 the bretons rebelled, he subdued them, taking Brittany, the channel Islands, the Contentin, and the Averanchin, killed in treacherous ambush 17 Dec. 942 by servants of Theobald of Blois and arnulf of Flanders. (Isenburg; Onslow, pp. 46-62). He m. (1) Sprota; m. (2) Luitgarde de Vermandois (136-19), n.i., dau. of Herbert II (50-18), Count of Vermandois and Troyes.”.16

; Per Racines et Histoire: "Guillaume 1er «Longue Epée» ° ~900/07 +x 17/12/942 (ass.) comte de Rouen, duc de Normandie (931) concubine 1) Sprota de Bretagne (origine viking ? ; ép. 2) Asperleng) ép. 2) ~940 Liég(e)ard(e) de Vermandois ° ~925 + un 27/05 (après 977/78) (veuve, elle ép. 2) 943/44 Thibaud «Le Tricheur» comte de Tours, Blois et Chartres.)9"

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME (Rouen [900/05]-murdered Pequigny 17 Dec 942, bur ---, transferred [1064] to Rouen Cathedral[47]). Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo captured “Baiocasensem urbem” [Bayeux] along with "nobilissimam puellam...Popam filiam...Berengarii illustris viri" whom he married “more Danico” and by whom he had “Willelmum...filiamque...Gerloc”[48]. However, the Planctus for William Longsword[49], composed shortly after the murder of Guillaume, states that he had a Christian mother of overseas origin. Orderic Vitalis names "Willelmum cognomento Longam-Spatam" as the son of “Rollo dux” by his wife “Berengarium comitem...Popam...filiam eius”[50]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin states that he was born in Rouen and, in a later passage, describes him as a "young man" one year before his father's death[51]. His birth date is estimated based on the estimated birth date of his own son. His father chose him as heir one year before his death[52]. Flodoard records that "filius Rollonis" did homage to ex-king Charles III "le Simple" at "castellum…Auga" in 927[53]. He succeeded his father in [928/33] as GUILLAUME I "Longuespee" Comte [de Normandie]. Flodoard names "Willelmus princeps Nortmannorum" in 933[54]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin records that he quelled a rebellion led by the Viking chief Riulf after the latter besieged Rouen[55]. In return for swearing allegiance to Raoul King of France, Guillaume appears to have been granted rights to further territory along the coast in 933, maybe the Cotentin and Avranchin. If this is correct, it would have created rivalry with the dukes of Brittany. Dudo of Saint-Quentin describes Comte Guillaume's invasion of Brittany shortly after his accession to quell a rebellion against him, and his defeat of the rebels at Bayeux[56]. Responding to raids by Comte Guillaume, Arnoul I Count of Flanders invaded Ponthieu and in 939 captured Montreuil from Herluin Comte de Ponthieu, although it was recaptured by Comte Guillaume's forces. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis comes” captured "castrum...Monasteriolum" from “comiti...Herluino”, who sought help from “Normanniæ dominum” who recaptured the castle for Herluin[57]. In 939, Guillaume joined the alliance against Louis IV King of France which was led by Otto I "der Große" King of Germany who raided Frankish territory. Comte Guillaume, however, met King Louis at Amiens, receiving a confirmation of the grant of his lands in Normandy. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis” tricked "duci Willelmo" into a meeting to settle the dispute concerning Montreuil “apud Pinchiniacum”, where Guillaume was killed by “Henricus necnon Balzo, Robertus quoque atque Ridulphus quatuor diaboli filii” on “XVI Kal Jan” 943[58]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Willelmus dux" was killed in 942 “fraude Arnulphi Flandrensis satrapæ”[59]. The Annalibus Rotomagensibus record that "Willermus dux Normannorum filius Rollonis" was killed "943 XVI Kal Jan"[60]. The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rollo et Willelmus filius eius" were buried "apud Rothomagum in ecclesia beatæ Mariæ"[61]. Orderic Vitalis implies that the transfer of his body to Rouen Cathedral took place after the "the ninth year" in office of Archbishop Maurilius, who had succeeded Mauger de Normandie[62], which would date the event to [1064].
     "Per Med Lands: [:TAB:]"GUILLAUME (Rouen [900/05]-murdered Pequigny 17 Dec 942, bur ---, transferred [1064] to Rouen Cathedral[47]). Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo captured “Baiocasensem urbem” [Bayeux] along with "nobilissimam puellam...Popam filiam...Berengarii illustris viri" whom he married “more Danico” and by whom he had “Willelmum...filiamque...Gerloc”[48]. However, the Planctus for William Longsword[49], composed shortly after the murder of Guillaume, states that he had a Christian mother of overseas origin. Orderic Vitalis names "Willelmum cognomento Longam-Spatam" as the son of “Rollo dux” by his wife “Berengarium comitem...Popam...filiam eius”[50]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin states that he was born in Rouen and, in a later passage, describes him as a "young man" one year before his father's death[51]. His birth date is estimated based on the estimated birth date of his own son. His father chose him as heir one year before his death[52]. Flodoard records that "filius Rollonis" did homage to ex-king Charles III "le Simple" at "castellum…Auga" in 927[53]. He succeeded his father in [928/33] as GUILLAUME I "Longuespee" Comte [de Normandie]. Flodoard names "Willelmus princeps Nortmannorum" in 933[54]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin records that he quelled a rebellion led by the Viking chief Riulf after the latter besieged Rouen[55]. In return for swearing allegiance to Raoul King of France, Guillaume appears to have been granted rights to further territory along the coast in 933, maybe the Cotentin and Avranchin. If this is correct, it would have created rivalry with the dukes of Brittany. Dudo of Saint-Quentin describes Comte Guillaume's invasion of Brittany shortly after his accession to quell a rebellion against him, and his defeat of the rebels at Bayeux[56]. Responding to raids by Comte Guillaume, Arnoul I Count of Flanders invaded Ponthieu and in 939 captured Montreuil from Herluin Comte de Ponthieu, although it was recaptured by Comte Guillaume's forces. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis comes” captured "castrum...Monasteriolum" from “comiti...Herluino”, who sought help from “Normanniæ dominum” who recaptured the castle for Herluin[57]. In 939, Guillaume joined the alliance against Louis IV King of France which was led by Otto I "der Große" King of Germany who raided Frankish territory. Comte Guillaume, however, met King Louis at Amiens, receiving a confirmation of the grant of his lands in Normandy. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis” tricked "duci Willelmo" into a meeting to settle the dispute concerning Montreuil “apud Pinchiniacum”, where Guillaume was killed by “Henricus necnon Balzo, Robertus quoque atque Ridulphus quatuor diaboli filii” on “XVI Kal Jan” 943[58]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Willelmus dux" was killed in 942 “fraude Arnulphi Flandrensis satrapæ”[59]. The Annalibus Rotomagensibus record that "Willermus dux Normannorum filius Rollonis" was killed "943 XVI Kal Jan"[60]. The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rollo et Willelmus filius eius" were buried "apud Rothomagum in ecclesia beatæ Mariæ"[61]. Orderic Vitalis implies that the transfer of his body to Rouen Cathedral took place after the "the ninth year" in office of Archbishop Maurilius, who had succeeded Mauger de Normandie[62], which would date the event to [1064]. [:TAB:]"[m] firstly SPROTA, daughter of ---. Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the rebel “Riulfus” was defeated at the battle of "Pratum-belli", a messenger arrived “a...Fiscannensis castri” and reported to Guillaume the birth of his son to “nobilissima puella Danico more sibi iuncta...Sprota”[63]. This passage suggests that Sprota was Count Guillaume's concubine rather than wife, particularly as no reference has been found to a dissolution of any marriage before she married Esperleng or before Guillaume married his second wife. She married Esperleng de Pîtres. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures”[64]. [:TAB:]"m secondly ([935]) as her first husband, LUITGARDIS de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[65]. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “Normannorum Dux” and "Herbertus...filiam suam", encouraged by “Hugone Magno”, after the marriage of Guillaume´s sister Gerloc [which would date the marriage to [935] if that report is accurate][66]. She married secondly Thibaut [I] Comte de Blois. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[67]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[68]." Med Lands cites: [LIND:][47] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91. [48] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber II, XII, p. 229. [49] The Planctus for William Longsword, Verse 2. [50] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 7. [51] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapters 15 and 16-17. [52] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 17. [53] Flodoardi Annales, 927, MGH SS III, p. 378. [54] Flodoardi Annales, 933, MGH SS III, p. 381. [55] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18. [56] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18. [57] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, X, p. 237. [58] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, XI, XII, p. 238. [59] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 9. [60] Annalibus Rotomagensibus 943, MGH SS XXVI, p. 498. [61] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 14. [62] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91. [63] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, II, p. 234. [64] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. [65] Rodulfus Glaber, Historiarum III.39, p. 165. [66] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234. [67] Chartres Saint-Père, Vol. I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.[:LIND] firstly SPROTA, daughter of ---. Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the rebel “Riulfus” was defeated at the battle of "Pratum-belli", a messenger arrived “a...Fiscannensis castri” and reported to Guillaume the birth of his son to “nobilissima puella Danico more sibi iuncta...Sprota”[63]. This passage suggests that Sprota was Count Guillaume's concubine rather than wife, particularly as no reference has been found to a dissolution of any marriage before she married Esperleng or before Guillaume married his second wife. She married Esperleng de Pîtres. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures”[64].
     "m secondly ([935]) as her first husband, LUITGARDIS de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[65]. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “Normannorum Dux” and "Herbertus...filiam suam", encouraged by “Hugone Magno”, after the marriage of Guillaume´s sister Gerloc [which would date the marriage to [935] if that report is accurate][66]. She married secondly Thibaut [I] Comte de Blois. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[67]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[68]."
Med Lands cites:
[47] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91.
[48] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber II, XII, p. 229.
[49] The Planctus for William Longsword, Verse 2.
[50] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 7.
[51] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapters 15 and 16-17.
[52] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 17.
[53] Flodoardi Annales, 927, MGH SS III, p. 378.
[54] Flodoardi Annales, 933, MGH SS III, p. 381.
[55] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18.
[56] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18.
[57] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, X, p. 237.
[58] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, XI, XII, p. 238.
[59] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 9.
[60] Annalibus Rotomagensibus 943, MGH SS XXVI, p. 498.
[61] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 14.
[62] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91.
[63] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, II, p. 234.
[64] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288.
[65] Rodulfus Glaber, Historiarum III.39, p. 165.
[66] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234.
[67] Chartres Saint-Père, Vol. I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.17


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Sprota was the name of a Breton captive who William I, Duke of Normandy took as a wife in the Viking fashion (more danico)[1][2] and by her had a son, Richard I, Duke of Normandy. After the death of her husband William, she became the wife of Esperleng and mother of Rodulf of Ivry.[3][4][5]
Life
     "The first mention of her is by Flodoard of Reims and although he does not name her he identifies her under the year [943] as the mother of "William’s son [Richard] born of a Breton concubine".[6] Elisabeth van Houts wrote "on this reference rests the identification of Sprota, William Longsword’s wife 'according to the Danish custom', as of Breton origin",[7] and this could apply to someone of native Breton, Scandinavian, or Frankish ethnicity, the latter being the most likely based on her name spelling.[8] The first to provide her name was William of Jumièges.[9][10] The irregular nature (as per the Church) of her relationship with William served as the basis for her son by him being the subject of ridicule, the French King Louis "abused the boy with bitter insults", calling him "the son of a whore who had seduced another woman's husband."[11][12]
     "At the time of the birth of her first son Richard, she was living in her own household at Bayeux, under William's protection.[4] William, having just quashed a rebellion at Pré-de Bataille (c.936), at an unknown age received the news by a messenger that Sprota had just given birth to a son; delighted at the news William ordered his son to be baptized and given the personal name of Richard.[10] William's steward Boto became the boy's godfather.[13]
     "After the death of William Longsword and the captivity of her son Richard, she had been 'collected' from her dangerous situation by the 'immensely wealthy' Esperleng.[3] Robert of Torigni identified Sprota's second husband[b] as Esperleng, a wealthy landowner who operated mills at Pîtres.[4][14]
Family
     "By William I Longsword she was the mother of:
          "Richard I, Duke of Normandy[15]
     "By Esperling of Vaudreuil she was the mother of:
          " Rodulf, Count of Ivry[16]
          "several daughters who married Norman magnates
Genealogy (See attached image of genealogy chart including Sprota, from her Wikipedia article)
Notes
a. The date of the battle and as such Richard's birth is commonly given as c.936 but according to the Annals of Jumièges (ed. Laporte, p. 53) Richard was baptized in 938. See Van Houts, Gesta Normannorum Ducum, 1992, 1:78-9 n. 5.
b. Probably also in the Viking or Danish fashion of marriage. See: Searle, Predatory Kinship, 1988, 291 n. 2
References
1. Van Houts, Gesta Normannorum Ducum, 1994, 1:xxxviii
2. Reynolds, Marriage in the Western Church, 1992, 111
3. Philippe, La Normandie an xe siècle, 1845, 6
4. Crouch, The Normans, 2007, 26
5. Van Houts, The Normans in Europe, 2000, 4
6. Fanning and Bachrach, The Annals of Flodoard of Reims, 2011, p. 37
7. Van Houts, The Normans in Europe, 2000, 47 n. 77
8. Van Houts, The Normans in Europe, 2000, p. 182
9. Keats-Rohan, 'Poppa of Bayeux and Her Family', 1997, 192
10. Van Houts, Gesta Normannorum Ducum, 1992, 1:78-9
11. Van Houts, Gesta Normannorum Ducum, 1992, 1:102-3 n. 5
12. Albu, The Normans in their histories, 2001, 69.
13. Van Houts, Gesta Normannorum Ducum, 1992, 1:78-9 n. 3
14. Searle, Predatory Kinship, 1988, 108
15. Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln, 1984,
16. Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln, 1989, 694A
Sources
** Emily Albu, The Normans in their histories: propaganda, myth and subversion, (Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 2001).
** David Crouch, The Normans: The History of a Dynasty, (Hambledon Continuum, 2007).
** Steven Fanning and Bernard S. Bachrach, trans., The Annals of Flodoard of Reims, 916-966, (University of Toronto Press, 2011).
** Katherine S. B. Keats-Rohan, 'Poppa of Bayeux and Her Family', The American Genealogist, vol. 72 (July–October 1997), pp. 187-204.
** Delphine Lemaître Philippe, La Normandie an xe siècle, suivie des Recherches sur les droits des rois de France au patronage d'Illeville, (A. Perone, Rouen, 1845).
** Philip Lyndon Reynolds, Marriage in the Western Church, (Leiden; New York: E.J. Brill, 1994).
** Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II: Die Ausserdeutschen Staaten Die Regierenden Häuser der Übrigen Staaten Europas(Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984).
** Eleanor Searle, Predatory Kinship and the Creation of Norman Power, 840-1066 (University of California Press, Berkeley, 1988).
** Elizabeth M. C. Van Houts, trans., The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumièges, Orderic Vitalis, and Robert of Torigni, (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1992).
** Elizabeth M. C. Van Houts, trans., The Normans in Europe, (Manchester University Press, 2000)."14

Reference: Genealogics cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 310.10

; Per Med Lands:
     "[m] firstly SPROTA, daughter of ---. Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the rebel “Riulfus” was defeated at the battle of "Pratum-belli", a messenger arrived “a...Fiscannensis castri” and reported to Guillaume the birth of his son to “nobilissima puella Danico more sibi iuncta...Sprota”[63]. This passage suggests that Sprota was Count Guillaume's concubine rather than wife, particularly as no reference has been found to a dissolution of any marriage before she married Esperleng or before Guillaume married his second wife. She married Esperleng de Pîtres. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures”[64].
Med Lands cites:
[63] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, II, p. 234.
[64] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288.18


; This is the same person as ”Sprota” at The Henry Project.1 AdelaSprote (?) de Bretagne was also known as Sporta de Senlis.2 GAV-28 EDV-28 GKJ-28.

; per Racines et Histoire (Comtes de Bayeux, p. 2): "Sprota dite «de Senlis» probablement bretonne d’origine est devenue la concubine de Guillaume «Longue-Epée» à la suite d’une expédition de celui-ci en Bretagne (932); elle est la mère de Richard 1er ° 934 (Fécamp). Elle ép. 2) Asperleng, riche meunier des moulins de la Risle selon les chroniqueurs et possédant des biens au Vaudreuil et à Pîtres, d’où est issu Raoul, investi du comté d’Ivry et de biens à Bayeux par son demi-frère le duc. Osbern de Crépon, sénéchal du duc, est fils d’Herfast, frère de la duchesse Gonnor (épouse de Richard 1er) ; Herfast s’est fait moine à Saint-Père de Chartres (entre 1022 et 1026.)19"

Family 1

Guillaume I "Longsword" (?) Duke of Normandy b. bt 900 - 905, d. 17 Dec 942
Child

Citations

  1. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, "Sprota": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/sprot000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  2. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30654
  3. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  4. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bayeux-Ivry.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 2.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Normandiw, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Normandie.pdf
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sprota: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020059&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Guillaume "Longue Épée" of Normandy [William "Longsword"]: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/willi000.htm
  12. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 181, NORMANDY 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Asperlang: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00426912&tree=LEO
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprota. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 10 November 2019), memorial page for Espriota Sprota Adela de Bretagne (911–945), Find A Grave Memorial no. 132471168, citing Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France ; Maintained by Gene Stephan (contributor 48184541) , at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/132471168/espriota-sprota_adela_de-bretagne. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  16. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 121E-19, p. 121.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  17. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#GuillaumeIdied942. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#RobertIdied928
  19. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes & Vicomtes de Bayeux, & Seigneurs de Bréval & d’Ivry, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bayeux-Ivry.pdf

Hubert (?) Count of Senlis

M, #5404, b. 852
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     Hubert (?) Count of Senlis was born in 852.1 He was born circa 885.2
     GAV-29 EDV-29 GKJ-29. Hubert (?) Count of Senlis was also known as Hubert de Senlis.3

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  2. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30654
  3. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I11153

Ragnvald I "The Wise" Eysteinsson (?) 1st Earl of Orkney, Jarl of More

M, #5405, b. 830, d. between 890 and 894
FatherEystein Glumra Ivarsson (?) Jarl of the Upplands b. 810
MotherAseda Rognvaldsdottir b. 812
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited21 Jul 2020
     Ragnvald I "The Wise" Eysteinsson (?) 1st Earl of Orkney, Jarl of More married Ragnhild (Hiltrude) Hrolfsdotter (?), daughter of Hrolf Nefja.1,2,3 Ragnvald I "The Wise" Eysteinsson (?) 1st Earl of Orkney, Jarl of More married Ermina (?); his 1st wife.3 Ragnvald I "The Wise" Eysteinsson (?) 1st Earl of Orkney, Jarl of More was born in 820.4 He was born in 830 at Maer, Norway.5,6
Ragnvald I "The Wise" Eysteinsson (?) 1st Earl of Orkney, Jarl of More died between 890 and 894; burnt to death in his house.3,1
     He was Viking at Norway.4 GAV-29 EDV-29 GKJ-30.

He was 1st Earl of Orkney [Ashley, p. 440] RAGNALD (I) THE WISE earl of Orkney, c874-c5. The jarl or earl of More on the west coast of Norway, who fought alongside the future king Harald Finehair in establishing a united Norway. Harald married Ragnald's sister Swanhilda. During this civil war many Norwegians were driven out of Norway and settled in the Shetlands and Orkney, called the Nordreys by the Norse (as distinct from the Sudreys, or Hebrides and Man), which they used as a base to attack Norway and Norse ships. The traditional view is that around 874 Harald sent Ragnald to the Hebrides to bring these islands under his authority. During the expedition Ragnald's son, Ivar, was killed. As a consequence, once Ragnald had conquered the islands, Harald granted them back to him in recompense for his son. The more recent view is that Ragnald may have set out earlier on the expedition to conquer the Nordrey pirates himself and worked in league with OLAF THE WHITE, who was the Norse king of Dublin. According to this view Olaf granted Ragnald the Orkneys around the year 871 or earlier. However, Ragnald had no desire to remain in the isles so in 875 (or earlier) Ragnald gave the islands to his brother SIGURD, and returned to Norway where he continued to fight on behalf of the king. This created enemies and around the year 894 he was burned alive in his hall by two of Harald's sons by another wife. Ragnald had three children by his wife Ragnhild. In addition to Ivar, who died, there was Rolf, who became the first Duke of Normandy, and Thori, who succeeded him as Jarl of Möre. He also had several illegitimate sons two of whom, HALLAD and EINAR (I) became later Earls of Orkney. between 874 and 875.2

Family 1

Ermina (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121 E-17, p. 110. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 439 (Chart 27), 440. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  4. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  6. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 121 E-18, p. 110.
  8. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 439 (Chart 27), 441.
  9. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 439 (Chart 27), 441-442.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rollo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020055&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  11. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORWEGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#ThoreRagnvaldssonMAlofAarbodB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Ragnhild (Hiltrude) Hrolfsdotter (?)1

F, #5406, b. 848, d. between 849 and 916
FatherHrolf Nefja
ReferenceGAV29 EDV30
Last Edited21 Jul 2020
     Ragnhild (Hiltrude) Hrolfsdotter (?) married Ragnvald I "The Wise" Eysteinsson (?) 1st Earl of Orkney, Jarl of More, son of Eystein Glumra Ivarsson (?) Jarl of the Upplands and Aseda Rognvaldsdottir.2,3,1 Ragnhild (Hiltrude) Hrolfsdotter (?) was born in 822.4 She was born in 848 at Norway.5,6
Ragnhild (Hiltrude) Hrolfsdotter (?) died between 849 and 916; WFT Est.4
     GAV-29 EDV-30 GKJ-30.

Family

Ragnvald I "The Wise" Eysteinsson (?) 1st Earl of Orkney, Jarl of More b. 830, d. bt 890 - 894
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121 E-17, p. 110. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 439 (Chart 27), 440. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  4. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  6. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rollo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020055&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORWEGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#ThoreRagnvaldssonMAlofAarbodB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Hrolf Nefja

M, #5407
ReferenceGAV30 EDV31
Last Edited20 Feb 2003
     GAV-30 EDV-31 GKJ-31.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121 E-17, p. 110. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Eystein Glumra Ivarsson (?) Jarl of the Upplands1

M, #5408, b. 810
FatherIvar Vid Fame OplaendingeHalfdansson Jarl b. 790, d. bt 807 - 880
MotherGeva Eisteinsdatter (?) Trondheim2 b. bt 786 - 806, d. bt 807 - 880
ReferenceGAV30 EDV31
Last Edited22 Jul 2020
     Eystein Glumra Ivarsson (?) Jarl of the Upplands married Aseda Rognvaldsdottir, daughter of Rognvald Olafson King of Vestfold.3,4 Eystein Glumra Ivarsson (?) Jarl of the Upplands was born in 810 at Maer, Norway.3,4
     GAV-30 EDV-31 GKJ-31.

Eystein Glumra Ivarsson (?) Jarl of the Upplands was also known as Eystein (?) Jarl in Hademarken.6

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 439 (Chart 27). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S4751] Unknown compiler, online http://genealogie.quebec/, e-mail address (unknown location), downloaded 2018-2020, http://genealogie.quebec/info/index.php?no=38260
  3. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  4. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121 E-16, p. 110. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Norway 2 page - Yngling Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway2.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Svanhild: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00636734&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 439 (Chart 27), 440-441.
  9. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Daubeney formerly of South Petherton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  10. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I851

Aseda Rognvaldsdottir

F, #5409, b. 812
FatherRognvald Olafson King of Vestfold b. 790, d. 850
ReferenceGAV30 EDV31
Last Edited20 Feb 2003
     Aseda Rognvaldsdottir married Eystein Glumra Ivarsson (?) Jarl of the Upplands, son of Ivar Vid Fame OplaendingeHalfdansson Jarl and Geva Eisteinsdatter (?) Trondheim.1,2 Aseda Rognvaldsdottir was born in 812 at Maer, Norway.1,2
     GAV-30 EDV-31 GKJ-31.

Citations

  1. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 439 (Chart 27), 440-441. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  4. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Daubeney formerly of South Petherton Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  5. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I851

Bernard I (?) King of Italy/Lombards1,2,3

M, #5410, b. circa 797, d. 17 April 818
FatherPepin/Pippin I Karlmann (?) King of Italy1,3,2,4 b. Apr 773, d. 8 Jul 810
MotherChrothais (?)1,3
ReferenceGAV31 EDV31
Last Edited18 Jun 2020
     Bernard I (?) King of Italy/Lombards was born circa 797 at Lombardy, Italy.3,5,1,6 He married Cunigunde (?) di Lombardy, daughter of Herbert/Heribert (?) comte de Toulouse, between 813 and 814.3,1,2,4,7
Bernard I (?) King of Italy/Lombards died on 17 April 818 at Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy.6,1,3
Bernard I (?) King of Italy/Lombards was buried after 17 April 818 at Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio, Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     797, Bohain-en-Vermandois, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France
     DEATH     17 Apr 818 (aged 20–21), Aachen, Stadtkreis Aachen, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
     King of the Lombards of the Carolingian Dynasty (King of Italy) 810 to 818. Bernard was the illegitimate son of King Pepin of Italy, also known as Carloman. Bernard married a Cunigunde and had one son, Pepin, the Count of Vermandois. When his father died in 810, his grandfather, Charlemagne, allowed Bernard to inherit his father's kingdom despite the fact Bernard was illegitimate, as was his father. Bernard then became a trusted agent of both his grandfather and his uncle, Louis the Pious, King of Aquitaine and King of the Franks. Empress Ermengarde, the wife of Louis, wanted Bernard to be displaced in favor of her own sons, causing her husband to draw up the Ordinatio Imperii, a detail the future of the Frankish Empire where Bernard's position in Italy was confirmed but he would be a vassal to Lothair, Louis's eldest son. Bernard gathered many allies including Louis's own brothers in a plot to rebel against Lothair and Louis, who discovered the plot, taking Bernard by surprise in Chalon. He was then taken to Aix-la-Chapelle (Aachen, Germany) and condemned to death. Louis commuted the sentence to blinding, such a traumatic event that Bernard died two days later. Louis's half brothers Drago, Hugh and Theoderic were confined to monasteries, the remaining co-conspirators were treated severely, losing all properties, rights or their lives. Bernard's kingdom of Italy was absorbed into the Frankish Kingdom and given to Lothair. In the following years, Louis would confess to Bernard's murder in a public display of penance. It is believed that Bernard was beloved by his people and Louis's sentence upon Bernard created an upheaval in Italy. His penance was "a well-judged gesture to restore harmony and re-establish his authority."
     Family Members
     Parents
          Pepin Carolingian of Italy 773–810
          Berthe Ingeltrude de Toulouse of Gellone of Italy 777–810
     Spouse
          Cunigunda de Laon of Italy 795–834
     Siblings
          Adelaide di Lombardia
          Athalia de Carolingian 798–820
     Half Siblings
          Theodoric de Vermandois
     Children
          Pepin II de Carolingian de Vermandois 817–855
     BURIAL     Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio, Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy
     PLOT     Buried in the Basilica
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 2 Mar 2011
     Find a Grave Memorial 66394545.1,6,8
     ; Per Genealogics:
     “Bernhard was born in Vermandois, Normandy, about 797, the son of Pippin I, king of Italy; some sources indicate that he was illegitimate. When his father died in 810 from an illness contracted at a siege of Venice, his grandfather Charlemagne allowed Bernhard to inherit Italy, but the empire went to Pippin's younger brother Louis 'the Pious'. About 814 Bernhard married Kunigund of Laon. They had a son Pippin, who would have progeny.
     “Prior to 817 Bernhard was a trusted agent of his grandfather and then of his uncle Louis 'the Pious', emperor from 814. Bernhard's rights to Italy were respected, and he was used as an intermediary to manage events in his sphere of influence - for example, when in 815 Louis received reports that some Roman nobles had conspired to murder Pope Leo III, and that he had responded by butchering the ringleaders, Bernhard was sent to investigate the matter.
     “A change came in 817, when Louis 'the Pious' drew up an _Ordinatio Imperii_ detailing the future of the Frankish empire. Under this, the bulk of the Frankish territory went to Louis' eldest son Lothar I; Bernhard received no further territory, and although his kingship of Italy was confirmed, he would be a vassal of Lothar. This was, it was later alleged, the work of the empress Irmengard, who wished Bernhard to be displaced in favour of her own sons. Resenting Louis' actions, Bernhard began plotting with a group of magnates: Eggideo, Reginhard and Reginhar, the last the grandson of a Thuringian rebel against Charlemagne, Hardrad. Anselm, bishop of Milan, and Theodulf, bishop of Orléans, were also accused of being involved; there is no evidence either to support or contradict this in the case of Theodulf, while the case for Anselm is murkier.
     “Bernhard's main complaint was the notion of being a vassal of Lothar. In practical terms his actual position had not been altered at all by the terms of the decree, and he could safely have continued to rule under such a system. Nonetheless, reports came to Louis 'the Pious' that his nephew was planning to set up an independent regime in Italy.
     “Louis reacted swiftly to the plot, marching south to Châlons. Bernhard and his associates were taken by surprise; Bernhard travelled to Châlons in an attempt to negotiate terms, but he and the ringleaders were forced to surrender to Louis. He had them taken to Aix-la-Chapelle, where they were tried and condemned to death. Louis commuted their sentences to blinding, which would neutralise Bernhard as a threat without actually killing him; however, the process of blinding (carried out by means of pressing a red-hot stiletto to the eyeballs) proved so traumatic that Bernhard died in agony two days later, on 17 April 818. At the same time, Louis also had his half-brothers Drogo, Hugo and Dietrich tonsured and confined to monasteries, to prevent other Carolingian off-shoots challenging the main line. He also treated those guilty or suspected of conspiring with Bernhard harshly: Theodulf, bishop of Orléans, was imprisoned and died soon afterwards; the lay conspirators were blinded, the clerics deposed and imprisoned; all lost lands and honours.
     “Bernhard's kingdom of Italy was reabsorbed into the Frankish empire, and soon after bestowed upon Louis' eldest son Lothar. In 822 Louis made a display of public penance at Attigny, where he confessed before all the court to having sinfully slain his nephew; he also welcomed his half-brothers back into his favour (Drogo became an archbishop and bishop of Metz; and Hugo became abbot of St. Quentin de Monte near Péronne, and Louis' chancellor). These actions possibly stemmed from guilt over his part in Bernhard's death. It has been argued by some historians that his behaviour left him open to clerical domination, and reduced his prestige and respect among the Frankish nobility. Others, however, point out that Bernhard's plot had been a serious threat to the stability of the kingdom, and the reaction no less a threat; Louis' display of penance, then 'was a well-judged gesture to restore harmony and re-establish his authority.'”.2 GAV-31 EDV-31 GKJ-32.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference 74.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.2


; This is the same person as:
”Bernard of Italy” at Wikipedia, as
”Bernard d'Italie” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Bernardo d'Italia” at Wikipedia (It.)9,10,11 Bernard I (?) King of Italy/Lombards was also known as Bernhard (?) de Austrasia.12

; Per Med Lands:
     "BERNARD, illegitimate son of PEPIN I King of Italy & his mistress --- ([797]-Milan 17 Aug 818, bur Milan, San Ambrosio). Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names "Bernhardus filius Pippini ex concubina"[637]. Bernard is named only son of Pippin by Einhard[638]. Regino names "Bernhardus filius Pippin rex Italiæ" when recording his death in 818[639]. Settipani cites a litany of St Gallen which lists Bernard among Carolingians of illegitimate birth[640]. He was brought up at Kloster Fulda. His paternal grandfather sent him back to Italy in autumn 812, granting him the title "rex Langobardorum" in Apr 813. Einhard's Annales that "Walanem filium Bernhardi patruelis sui" was sent to Italy in 812 as guardian for "Bernhardum filium Pippin nepotem suum [Karoli imperatoris]"[641]. He was confirmed 11 Sep 813 at Aix-la-Chapelle as BERNARD I King of Italy, as vassal of the emperor, ruling under the regency of Adalhard abbé de Corbie[642]. Although he swore allegiance to his uncle Emperor Louis I "le Pieux" on the latter's accession in 814, the emperor passed the Ordinatio Imperii in Jul 817 which failed to mention Bernard's royal status, effectively depriving him of any role in government and of his royal title. Bernard rebelled unsuccessfully in Dec 817. He was tricked into returning to France to ask for the emperor's forgiveness at Chalon-sur-Saône, but was taken to Aix-la-Chapelle where he was sentenced to death. The Annales Xantenses record that "Bernhardus rex Langobardorum" was blinded in 818[643]. Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris records that "Bernhardus filius Pippini ex concubina" was blinded and died on the third day which followed this[644]. After his death, Italy was once more placed under the direct rule of the emperor[645].
     "m ([813]) CUNIGUNDIS, daughter of --- (-after 15 Jun 835). Settipani refers to an act of the monastery of San Alessandro, Parma dated 15 Jun 835 which names her[646]. The origin of Cunigundis is not known. Settipani suggests[647] that she was Cunigundis, daughter of Héribert, relative of St Guillaume Comte de Toulouse in order to explain the transmission of the name Héribert into the family of Bernard King of Italy. This is highly speculative. It would also mean that Héribert was older than suggested in the document CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY, as it is unlikely that Cunigundis was born later than 800 assuming that the birth date of her son is correctly estimated at [815]."
Med Lands cites:
[637] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 22, MGH SS II, p. 596.
[638] Einhard 19, p. 454.
[639] Reginonis Chronicon 818, MGH SS I, p. 567.
[640] Settipani, p. 211 footnote 142, which does not give the citation for the source.
[641] Einhardi Annales 812, MGH SS, p. 199.
[642] RFA 812 and 813, p. 95.
[643] Annales Xantenses 817, MGH SS II, p. 224.
[644] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 22 and 23, MGH SS II, p. 596.
[645] Settipani (1993), pp. 212-3.
[646] Settipani (1993), p. 213, citing Werner, K. F. 'Hludowicus Augustus: gouverner l'empire Chrétien - idées et réalités', Charlemagne's heir (1990), p. 32 footnote 103.
[647] Settipani (1993), p. 213. According to Rösch (1977), p. 74, the origin of Cunigundis is unknown.4,13


; Per Racines et Histoire: "1) Bernard 1er d’Italie ° ~797 + 17/04/818 (aveuglé 15/04, Milan) Roi d’Italie (810-818) et des Lombards, couronné 15/04/813
     ép. ~813 Cunégonde de Gellone ° ~795 + après 15/06/835 (fille d’Herbert + 843, fils de saint Guilhem, et de Cunégonde.)14"

; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1): "King Bernard I of Italy/Lombards (813-818), *ca 797, +St.Ambrosius, Milan 17.8.818, blinded; m.813 *[5411] Kunigunda (Cunegonde) N (*before 797, +after 15.6.835.)15" He was King of Italy; Leo van der Pas says King of Italy 813-817; Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says King of Italy/Lombards 813-818 between 810 and December 818.16,6,1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernhard I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020183&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-15, p. 51. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ITALY,%20Kings%20to%20962.htm#BernardIitalyB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 120. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernhard I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020183&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunigund: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020184&tree=LEO
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 17 June 2020), memorial page for Bernard de Carolingian (797–17 Apr 818), Find a Grave Memorial no. 66394545, citing Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio, Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/66394545. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_of_Italy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Bernard d'Italie: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_d%27Italie. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  11. [S4765] Wikipedia - L'enciclopedia libera, online https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_principale, Bernardo d'Italia: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernardo_d%27Italia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (IT).
  12. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I866
  13. [S4753] Christian Settipani, La Préhistoire des Capétiens, 481-987, première partie - Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (n.p.: Van Kerrebrouck, 1993), pp. 212-3. Hereinafter cited as Settipani [1993] La Préhistoire des Capétiens.
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  16. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 175. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020185&tree=LEO

Cunigunde (?) di Lombardy1,2

F, #5411, b. before 797, d. after 15 June 835
FatherHerbert/Heribert (?) comte de Toulouse3 d. a 843
ReferenceGAV31 EDV31
Last Edited18 Jun 2020
     Cunigunde (?) di Lombardy was born before 797.2 She married Bernard I (?) King of Italy/Lombards, son of Pepin/Pippin I Karlmann (?) King of Italy and Chrothais (?), between 813 and 814.4,2,5,6,7
Cunigunde (?) di Lombardy was buried after 15 June 835 at Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio, Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     795, Bohain-en-Vermandois, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France
     DEATH     Jun 834 (aged 38–39), Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Bernard de Carolingian 797–818
     Children
          Pepin II de Carolingian de Vermandois 817–855
     BURIAL     Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio, Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Created by: Memerizion
     Added: 6 Mar 2015
     Find a Grave Memorial 143397686.8
Cunigunde (?) di Lombardy died after 15 June 835.2,1,9
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1): "King Bernard I of Italy/Lombards (813-818), *ca 797, +St.Ambrosius, Milan 17.8.818, blinded; m.813 *[5411] Kunigunda (Cunegonde) N (*before 797, +after 15.6.835.)10"

; Per Racines et Histoire: "1) Bernard 1er d’Italie ° ~797 + 17/04/818 (aveuglé 15/04, Milan) Roi d’Italie (810-818) et des Lombards, couronné 15/04/813
     ép. ~813 Cunégonde de Gellone ° ~795 + après 15/06/835 (fille d’Herbert + 843, fils de saint Guilhem, et de Cunégonde.)11"

; Per Med Lands:
     "BERNARD, illegitimate son of PEPIN I King of Italy & his mistress --- ([797]-Milan 17 Aug 818, bur Milan, San Ambrosio). Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names "Bernhardus filius Pippini ex concubina"[637]. Bernard is named only son of Pippin by Einhard[638]. Regino names "Bernhardus filius Pippin rex Italiæ" when recording his death in 818[639]. Settipani cites a litany of St Gallen which lists Bernard among Carolingians of illegitimate birth[640]. He was brought up at Kloster Fulda. His paternal grandfather sent him back to Italy in autumn 812, granting him the title "rex Langobardorum" in Apr 813. Einhard's Annales that "Walanem filium Bernhardi patruelis sui" was sent to Italy in 812 as guardian for "Bernhardum filium Pippin nepotem suum [Karoli imperatoris]"[641]. He was confirmed 11 Sep 813 at Aix-la-Chapelle as BERNARD I King of Italy, as vassal of the emperor, ruling under the regency of Adalhard abbé de Corbie[642]. Although he swore allegiance to his uncle Emperor Louis I "le Pieux" on the latter's accession in 814, the emperor passed the Ordinatio Imperii in Jul 817 which failed to mention Bernard's royal status, effectively depriving him of any role in government and of his royal title. Bernard rebelled unsuccessfully in Dec 817. He was tricked into returning to France to ask for the emperor's forgiveness at Chalon-sur-Saône, but was taken to Aix-la-Chapelle where he was sentenced to death. The Annales Xantenses record that "Bernhardus rex Langobardorum" was blinded in 818[643]. Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris records that "Bernhardus filius Pippini ex concubina" was blinded and died on the third day which followed this[644]. After his death, Italy was once more placed under the direct rule of the emperor[645].
     "m ([813]) CUNIGUNDIS, daughter of --- (-after 15 Jun 835). Settipani refers to an act of the monastery of San Alessandro, Parma dated 15 Jun 835 which names her[646]. The origin of Cunigundis is not known. Settipani suggests[647] that she was Cunigundis, daughter of Héribert, relative of St Guillaume Comte de Toulouse in order to explain the transmission of the name Héribert into the family of Bernard King of Italy. This is highly speculative. It would also mean that Héribert was older than suggested in the document CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY, as it is unlikely that Cunigundis was born later than 800 assuming that the birth date of her son is correctly estimated at [815]."
Med Lands cites:
[637] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 22, MGH SS II, p. 596.
[638] Einhard 19, p. 454.
[639] Reginonis Chronicon 818, MGH SS I, p. 567.
[640] Settipani, p. 211 footnote 142, which does not give the citation for the source.
[641] Einhardi Annales 812, MGH SS, p. 199.
[642] RFA 812 and 813, p. 95.
[643] Annales Xantenses 817, MGH SS II, p. 224.
[644] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 22 and 23, MGH SS II, p. 596.
[645] Settipani (1993), pp. 212-3.
[646] Settipani (1993), p. 213, citing Werner, K. F. 'Hludowicus Augustus: gouverner l'empire Chrétien - idées et réalités', Charlemagne's heir (1990), p. 32 footnote 103.
[647] Settipani (1993), p. 213. According to Rösch (1977), p. 74, the origin of Cunigundis is unknown.6,12


; NB: The identity of the ancestors of Cunégonde, wife of Bernard I, is generally given as unknown (c.f., Genealogics, Med Lands. However, Christian Settipani [1993, 2004] has hypothesized based on onomastics that she was perhaps the dau. of Heribert, comte de Toulouse and grandau. of Guillaume de Gellone and his wife Cunégonde.
Conclusion: I have chosed to show Cunégonde's father as Heribert for now. GA Vaut.7,6,13,14,15

Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference 74.7 GAV-31 EDV-31 GKJ-32.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunigund: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020184&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  3. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Héribert (fils de Guillaume de Gellone): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A9ribert_(fils_de_Guillaume_de_Gellone). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-15, p. 51. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernhard I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020183&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ITALY,%20Kings%20to%20962.htm#BernardIitalyB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kunigund: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020184&tree=LEO
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 17 June 2020), memorial page for Cunigunda de Laon of Italy (795–Jun 834), Find a Grave Memorial no. 143397686, citing Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio, Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/143397686. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 50-15, p. 51: "about 835."
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  12. [S4753] Christian Settipani, La Préhistoire des Capétiens, 481-987, première partie - Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (n.p.: Van Kerrebrouck, 1993), pp. 212-3. Hereinafter cited as Settipani [1993] La Préhistoire des Capétiens.
  13. [S4753] Christian Settipani, Settipani [1993] La Préhistoire des Capétiens, pp. 213-4.
  14. [S4752] Christian Settipani, "La Noblesse du Midi carolingien: Etudes sur quelques grandes familles d'Aquitaine et du Languedoc du IXe au XIe siècles, Toulousain, Périgord, Limousin, Poitou, Auvergne", Prosopographica et Genealogica 5 (2004): p. 388. Hereinafter cited as "La Noblesse du Midi Carolingien."
  15. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 17 June 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernhard I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020183&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020185&tree=LEO

Rognvald Olafson King of Vestfold1

M, #5412, b. 790, d. 850
FatherOlaf II Gudrodson (?)1 d. 840
ReferenceGAV31 EDV31
Last Edited30 Aug 2020
     Rognvald Olafson King of Vestfold was born in 790 at Jutland, Denmark (now).2,3
Rognvald Olafson King of Vestfold died in 850.2,3
     GAV-31 EDV-31 GKJ-32.

; Per Med Lands: "ROGNVALD . The Ynglinga Saga names Rognvald "Mountain-high" as the son of Olaf whom he succeeded as king of Vestfold[34]."
Med Lands cites:
[34] Snorre, Ynglinga Saga, 55.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORWAY.htm#_Toc360005216. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  2. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  3. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).

Pepin/Pippin I Karlmann (?) King of Italy1,2

M, #5413, b. April 773, d. 8 July 810
FatherCharlemagne (?) King of the Franks and Emperor of the West1,2,3 b. 2 Apr 747, d. 28 Jan 814
MotherHildegardis (?) of Swabia, Countess of Vinzgau, Queen of the Franks1,2,4,5,6 b. bt 2 May 757 - 30 Apr 761, d. 30 Apr 783
ReferenceGAV32 EDV32
Last Edited14 Sep 2020
     Pepin/Pippin I Karlmann (?) King of Italy was born in April 773 at Aachen (Aix La Chapelle), Stadtkreis Aachen, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany (now); Leo van der Pas says b. 777.7,1,2 He was baptized on 12 April 781 at Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy.8 He married Chrothais (?) circa 795;
Stone (2000) Chart 31, Note 1: "Settipani and Van Kerrebrouck (1993) are the primary authority for the line given above. Their information differs from most modern accounts in two ways. First, they supply the name of the mother of King Bernard as Chrothais (pp. 211, 170), identifying her (as others have) as a close relative of the half-brothers Alard (or Adalard) and Wala, sons of Duke Bernard and successive Abbots of Corbie. (Moriarty (1955) proposed that the mother of King Bernard was a daughter of Duke Bernard, but Settipani and Van Kerrebrouck (pp. 3 55-8) list no daughter named Chrothais.) And, second, they supply (p. 222) Liedgardis as the possible name of the wife of Herbert I, Count of Vermandois, whereas Moriarty (1985, p. 6) gives the name as Bertha, daughter of Guerri I, Count of Morvois, citing Chaume's Les Origines du Duché de Bourgogne but pointing out that no wife is given by Brandenburg, Winkhaus or Isenburg."
Sources:
** Moriarty, George Andrews. 1955. "Genealogical Research in Europe: The Wife should be Mother) of Bernard of Italy." New England Historical and Genealogical Register 109: 1 75-178.
** ------------, 1985. The Plantagenet Ancestry of King Edward III and Queen Philippa. Salt Lake City: Mormon Pioneer Genealogical Society. The original manuscript is in Boston at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, with copies at Salt Lake City and Philadelphia (at the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania).
** Settipani, Christian, and Patrick Van Kerrebrouck. 1993. La préhistoire des Capetiens [481 -987 Premiere partie: Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens. Villeneuve d'Ascq (France): P. Van Kerrebrouck.9,1

Pepin/Pippin I Karlmann (?) King of Italy died on 8 July 810 at Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy, at age 37.10,1,2
Pepin/Pippin I Karlmann (?) King of Italy was buried after 8 July 810 at Verona, Italy (now).2


     Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference 67.1 GAV-32 EDV-32 GKJ-33.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Pepin or Pippin (or Pepin Carloman, Pepinno, April 773 – 8 July 810), born Carloman, was the son of Charlemagne and King of the Lombards (781–810) under the authority of his father.
     "Pepin was the second son of Charlemagne by his then-wife Hildegard.[1] He was born Carloman, but was rechristened with the royal name Pepin (also the name of his older half-brother Pepin the Hunchback, and his grandfather Pepin the Short) when he was a young child. He was made "king of Italy"[2] after his father's conquest of the Lombards, in 781, and crowned by Pope Hadrian I with the Iron Crown of Lombardy.
     "He was active as ruler of Lombardy and worked to expand the Frankish empire. In 791, he marched a Lombard army into the Drava valley and ravaged Pannonia, while his father marched along the Danube into Avar territory. Charlemagne left the campaigning to deal with a Saxon revolt in 792. Pepin and Duke Eric of Friuli continued, however, to assault the Avars' ring-shaped strongholds. The great Ring of the Avars, their capital fortress, was taken twice. The booty was sent to Charlemagne in Aachen and redistributed to all his followers and even to foreign rulers, including King Offa of Mercia. A celebratory poem, De Pippini regis Victoria Avarica, was composed after Pepin forced the Avar khagan to submit in 796.[3] This poem was composed at Verona, Pepin's capital after 799 and the centre of Carolingian Renaissance literature in Italy. The Versus de Verona (c. 800), an urban encomium of the city, likewise praises king Pepin.[4] The "Codex Gothanus" History of the Lombards hails Pepin's campaign against Benevento and his liberation of Corsica "from the oppression of the Moors."[5]
     "His activities included a long, but unsuccessful siege of Venice in 810. The siege lasted six months and Pepin's army was ravaged by the diseases of the local swamps and was forced to withdraw. A few months later Pepin died, on 8 July 810.[6]
Family
     "He had one or more mistresses, whose names are not known for certain, and whose ancestry is not given from any reliable source although one has been conjectured to have been called Bertha, and she is believed to be the daughter of William of Gellone, count of Toulouse. Pepin had one son and five daughters (they were: Adelaide, married Lambert I of Nantes; Atala; Gundrada; Bertha; and Tetrada), all of whom but the eldest were born between 800 and Pepin's death. All except Adelaide and Tetrada died before their grandfather's death in 814. Tetrada married Adelaide's stepson, Lambert II of Nantes. Pepin's son was Bernard. Pepin was expected to inherit a third of his father's empire, but he predeceased him. The Lombard crown passed on to his illegitimate son Bernard, but the empire went to Pepin's younger brother, Louis the Pious.
Notes
1. Kingship and Royal Government, Janet L. Nelson, The New Cambridge Medieval History, Vol. 2, ed. Rosamond McKitterick, (Cambridge University Press, 1991), 400.
2. However exaggerated the title "king of Italy" may seem, it was the one used by his subjects: ..."[Charlemagne] transferred all the kingdom of Italy to his great and glorious son lord Pippin, the great king"... (Historia Langobardorum codicis Gothani, in Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Scriptores rerum Langobardicarum et Italicarum saec. VI-IX, p.11.)
3. Peter Godman (1985), Latin Poetry of the Carolingian Renaissance (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press), 186–191.
4. Godman, 180–187.
5. Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Scriptores rerum Langobardicarum et Italicarum saec. VI-IX, p. 11.
6. Royal Frankish Annals."11

; Per Genealogy.EU: "King Pepin I of Italy/Lombards (781-810), King of Lombardy -cr Roma 15.4.781, *IV.773, +8.7.810, bur Milan; m.795 Bertha, dau.of Ct Guillaume of Toulouse; ? 2m: Chrothais (*780) dau.of Bernhard son of Charles Martel."2



; Per Racines et Histoire: "3) Pépin 1er d’Italie ° 04/773 + 08/07/810 (Milan) Roi des Lombards, couronné 15/07/781 (Rome)
     ép. 1) 795 Berthe de Toulouse (fille de Guillaume, comte de Toulouse)
     ép. 2) Chrotaïs ° 780 (fille de Bernard, fils de Charles Martel.)12"

He was King of Italy between 781 and 810.10,2 He was King of Lombardy on 15 April 781.10

Family

Chrothais (?)
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pippin I (Karlmann): http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020039&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charlemagne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000001&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegardis: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020006&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#CharlemagneB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Hildegarde: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/hilde001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  7. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 120. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-14, p. 51: "...by Pope Adrian I". Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 31, Note 1.
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 50-14, p. 51.
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pepin_of_Italy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 50-15, p. 51.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bernhard I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020183&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ITALY,%20Kings%20to%20962.htm#BernardIitalyB.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adalhaid: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020182&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gundrada/Gundradis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331025&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berthaid/Berta/Bothaidis: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331026&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Atula/Adele/Athalia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331024&tree=LEO

Olaf II Gudrodson (?)1

M, #5414, d. 840
FatherGudrod "The Magnificent" Halfdanson (?) King of Westfold2 b. c 780, d. bt 810 - 827
MotherAlfhilda/Alfhilde (?)3
ReferenceGAV32 EDV33
Last Edited30 Aug 2020
     Olaf II Gudrodson (?) was born circa 786 at Vestfold, Norway.4
Olaf II Gudrodson (?) died in 840 at Geirstad, Norway (now).4,5
     GAV-32 EDV-33 GKJ-33.

; Per Med Lands:
     "[OLAF (-Geirstad ----, bur Geirstad). The Ynglinga Saga names "Olaf afterwards called Geirstad-Alf" as the son of Gudröd "the Hunter" and his wife Alfhild[32]. The Ynglinga Saga records that Olaf succeeded his father in Vestfold when he was about 20 years old and divided the kingdom with his younger half-brother, but died "of a disease in his foot" and was buried at Geirstad which was his main residence[33]. m ---. The name of Olaf's wife is not known. King Olaf & his wife had one child:]
(a) [ROGNVALD ."

Med Lands cites:
[32] Snorre, Ynglinga Saga, 53.
[33] Snorre, Ynglinga Saga, 54.2

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 209, Chart 10. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORWAY.htm#_Toc360005216. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S4784] Wikipedia - Det frie oppslagsverket, online https://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hovudside, Gudrød Veidekonge: https://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gudr%C3%B8d_Veidekonge. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (NO).
  4. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30762
  5. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  6. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30761

Gudrod "The Magnificent" Halfdanson (?) King of Westfold1,2

M, #5415, b. circa 780, d. between 810 and 827
FatherHalfdan Mildi (?) King of Vestfold2,3,4 b. c 750, d. 802
MotherLif/Liv (?)2,4,3
ReferenceGAV33 EDV34
Last Edited30 Aug 2020
     Gudrod "The Magnificent" Halfdanson (?) King of Westfold married Asa Haraldsdottir (?), daughter of Harald "Red-Beard" (?) King of Agdir;
His 2nd wife.5,2 Gudrod "The Magnificent" Halfdanson (?) King of Westfold married Alfhilda/Alfhilde (?), daughter of Alfarin (?) King at Alfheim; [:CR]His 1st wife.5 Gudrod "The Magnificent" Halfdanson (?) King of Westfold was born circa 780 at Holtum, Vestfold, Norway.6,7
Gudrod "The Magnificent" Halfdanson (?) King of Westfold died between 810 and 827; Murdered.5
     ; This is the same person as ”Gudrød the Hunter” at Wikipedia and as ”Gudrød Veidekonge” at Wikipedia (NO).


See attached pedigree chart for Gudrod (from Wikipedia article.)3,4 GAV-33 EDV-34 GKJ-34.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:105.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.7


; Per Genealogics:
     “Gudröd, known as 'the Hunter', was a semi-legendary king in south-east Norway during the early Viking Age. He is mentioned in the skaldic poem _Ynglingatal._ Snorri Sturluson elaborates on Gudröd's story in _Heimskringla,_ written about 1230; however, this is not considered to be a historical account by modern historians. The following account is taken from _Heimskringla._
     “Gudröd was the son of Halfdan 'the Mild' of the House of Yngling and Liv Dagsdotter of Vestmar. He married Alfhild, a daughter of Alfarin, king of Alfheim (Bohuslän), the name of the area between Glomma and Göta älv, and he inherited half the province of Vingulmark. They had a son Olaf Gudrödsson.
     “After Alfhild died, Gudröd sent his warriors to Agder and its king, Harald, to propose a marriage with his daughter Åsa. However, Harald Granraude declined, so Gudröd decided to take his daughter by force.
     “They arrived at night. When Harald realised that he was being attacked, he assembled his men and fought well, but died together with his son Gyrd. Gudröd carried away Åsa and forcibly married her. She gave him a son named Halfdan who would be called Halfdan 'the Black'.
     “In the autumn, when Halfdan was a year old, Gudröd was having a feast in Stiflesund. He was very drunk and in the evening, as he was walking on the gangway to leave the ship, an assassin killed him with a spear. Gudröd's men instantly killed the assassin, who turned out to be Åsa's page-boy. Åsa admitted that the page-boy had acted on her behalf.”.7 He was King of Vermaland, Vestfold, and Vingulmark.5 Gudrod "The Magnificent" Halfdanson (?) King of Westfold was also known as Gudrod "Jagtkinge" Halfdansson.6

; Per Weis: “GUDRÖD, "the Magnificent," also called "the Hunting-King," s. Halfdan "Wife-Leg" and Asa (MOriarty( )Sturleson says gt.-gr.s. Halfdan "White-leg"), King of Vermanland, Vestfold, and Vingulmark, murdered 810-827 at instigation of 2nd wife Asa in revenge for forcibly abducting her and killing, abt. 800, her father and brother; m. (1) Alfhilde, dau. Alfrim, ruler of Vingulmark; m. (2) Asa, dau. Harald "Red Beard," King of Agdir, believed bur. in Oseberge ship, richest Scandinavian archeological find. (Moriarty, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 170; Snorri Sturleson, Heimsktingla, tr Hollander, pp. 45-49 (Saga of the Ynglings, vspd 44-49); Sir Iain Moncreiffe, Royal Highness: Ancestry of the Royal Child, p. 109).”.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "[GUDRÖD Halfdansson (-Stiflesund ----). The Historia Norwegie names "Guthrodum Regem Venatorem" as son of "Halfdan Auri Prodigus Cibique Tenacissimus", recording that he was betrayed by his wife who bribed one of his squires to murder him[25]. The Ynglinga Saga names Gudröd "the Hunter" as son of Halfdan "the Mild"[26]. According to tradition his family came from Uppsala, establishing their rule over the district west of the Oslo fjord, also known as the Vik, with the title King of Vestfold. The Ynglinga Saga records that Gudröd "the Hunter" was killed when his younger son was one year old, by one of his wife's servants[27]. m firstly ALFHILDA, daughter of ALFARIN King at Alfheim & his wife ---. The Ynglinga Saga names "Alfhild, a daughter of King Alfarin of Alfheim" as the wife of Gudröd "the Hunter"[28]. Part of Vingulmark was her dowry[29]. m secondly ASA, daughter of HARALD King at Agder & his wife ---. The Ynglinga Saga records that Gudröd "the Hunter" proposed marriage to Asa, daughter of Harald "Redbeard" king at Agder, after the death of his first wife, but was refused. The Saga records that Gudröd proceeded to invade Agder, kill Harald and his son Gyrd, and abduct and marry Asa[30]. The Historia Norwegie records that Asa bribed one of his squires to murder her husband[31]. After her husband was killed, she set off westwards to Agder with her one year old son.
     "King Gudröd & his first wife had one child:]
i) [OLAF (-Geirstad ----, bur Geirstad)."

Med Lands cites:
[25] Historia Norwegie X, pp. 78 and 80.
[26] Snorre, Ynglinga Saga, 53.
[27] Snorre, Ynglinga Saga, 53.
[28] Snorre, Ynglinga Saga, 53.
[29] Dunham, S. A. (1840) History of Denmark, Sweden and Norway (London), Vol. I, p. 162.
[30] Snorre, Ynglinga Saga, 53.
[31] Historia Norwegie X, p. 80.2

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Norway 2 page - Yngling Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway2.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORWAY.htm#_Toc360005216. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gudr%C3%B8d_the_Hunter. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S4784] Wikipedia - Det frie oppslagsverket, online https://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hovudside, Gudrød Veidekonge: https://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gudr%C3%B8d_Veidekonge. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (NO).
  5. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 243A-15, p. 219. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  6. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I30763
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gudröd Halfdansson: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120966&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Norway 2 page - Yngling Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway2.html
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Halfdan 'Svarte': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120967&tree=LEO

Berenger (?) Comte de Bayeux1,2

M, #5416
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited18 Apr 2020
     GAV-29. GAV-29 EDV-29 GKJ-30. Berenger (?) Comte de Bayeux was also known as Berenger (?) Cte de Bayeaux et de Senlis.2

; NB: There is uncertainty about the father of the Poppa who m. Rollo.
See entries on Genealogics, Med Lands, Wikipedia (Fr.) and Wikipedai for discussions of this.3,4,5,6

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKISH%20NOBILITY.htm#Berengardied892. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Poppa de Bayeux: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poppa_de_Bayeux. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poppa_of_Bayeux. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Poppa|Papie of Bayeux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020056&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

John (3) Wrothe MP, of Enfield, Middlesex1,2

M, #5417
FatherJohn (2) Wrothe MP, of Enfield, co Middlesex, and Puck Shipton, co Wiltshire1,2 d. 1376
ReferenceGAV20 GKJ19
Last Edited4 Sep 2019
     John (3) Wrothe MP, of Enfield, Middlesex married Beatrix St. Maur, daughter of Nicholas de Saint Maur (Seymour) Lord St. Maur and Elena/Ellen La Zouche.1 John (3) Wrothe MP, of Enfield, Middlesex married Matilda Durrant, daughter of Thomas Durant of Enfield, before 1353; His 2nd wife.3,4,5,6,2
John (3) Wrothe MP, of Enfield, Middlesex died in 1375;
History of Parliament sayd d. v. p.3,5,1
     GAV-20 GKJ-19.

;
Per Andrews-Reading [2007]
     "> What happened to the contention that John Wroth's mother was Beatrice de St Maur, and that he was that one named heir in the IPM of Thomas Seymour, at that time aged 19 ? Will
     "Good question. The problem is there's no evidence that it is correct. So many of the published Wroth pedigrees are little better than rubbish - including that in the Somerset Visitations, which makes this identification. None of the material on the Wroths indicates an inheritance from the Seymours. I should add that I haven't seen the original 1358 IPM for Thomas (PRO C 135/140/4), only the extract in the Thoroton Society's run of abbreviated Notts IPMs (which calls his heir "Joan Worthy"!)7" He was M.P.3

; per Andrews-Reading: [quote]Yes, you are correct. There were five successive generations in the Wroth family, all named "John Wroth". The third of these was John Wroth MP (d 1375). His second wife is known to have been Matilda/Maud Durrant. It has been claimed that his first wife was Beatrice St Maur, but there is no goo evidence to show that this was so, and reason to believe that it was not.[end quote]8

; per Mardicar: [quote] John WROTHE
Birth:of Enfield, Middlesex
Death:1375, d.v.p.

Fishmonger
Justice of the Peace co. Middlesex
Shire knight

Sources5,16

Spouse:Beatrix ST. MAUR

Sources5

Children:John (-1396) [end quote]

Mardicar cites:
Sources

1. Foss, Edward., JUDGES OF ENGLAND 1066-1870., London: John Murray, 1870., p 768.
2. Weaver, Frederic William, VISITATIONS OF THE COUNTY OF SOMERSET., Exeter: Printed for the editor by William Pollard, 1885., p 91.
3. ARCHAEOLOGIA CANTIANA., London: John E. Taylor, 1858-1960., v 12 p 310, 314.
4. ARCHAEOLOGIA CANTIANA., London: John E. Taylor, 1858-1960., v 12 p 314.
5. Weaver, Frederic William, VISITATIONS OF THE COUNTY OF SOMERSET., Exeter: Printed for the editor by William Pollard, 1885., p 92.
6. ARCHAEOLOGIA CANTIANA., London: John E. Taylor, 1858-1960., v 12 p 310-2, 314.
7. VICTORIA COUNTY HISTORIES OF ENGLAND., Folkestone: Reprinted by Dawsons of Pall Mall; Published for the University of London Institute of Historical Reseacrch, 1971., pt 32 (Somerset) v 6 p 285.
8. PUBLICATIONS OF THE HARLEIAN SOCIETY., London, various editors and dates., v 3 p 40.
9. ARCHAEOLOGIA CANTIANA., London: John E. Taylor, 1858-1960., v 12 p 312, 314.
10. Watney, Vernon James, WALLOP FAMILY., Oxford: John Johnson, 1928., #1055.
11. Banks, T.C., DORMANT AND EXTINCT BARONAGE OF ENGLAND., London: T. Bensley, 1807., v 1 p 400.
12. ARCHAEOLOGIA CANTIANA., London: John E. Taylor, 1858-1960., v 12 p 312.
13. "PUBLIC RECORD OFFICE CATALOG (PROCAT)," ;, C/219/330/15.
14. Roskell, J.S., Linda Clark and Carole Rawliffe, HOUSE OF COMMONS 1386-1421., Published for the History of Parliament Trust; Stroud: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1992., v 4 p 908.
15. Beaven, Alfred, ALDERMEN OF THE CITY OF LONDON TEMP. HENRY III -- 1908., London: E. Fisher & company, limited, 1908-13., v 1 p 388.
16. Roskell, J.S., Linda Clark and Carole Rawliffe, HOUSE OF COMMONS 1386-1421., Published for the History of Parliament Trust; Stroud: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1992., v 4 p 908.
17. Thrupp, Sylvia L., MERCHANT CLASS OF MEDIEVAL LONDON., Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1948, p 375 .
18. Deputy Keeper of the Records, CALENDAR OF CLOSE ROLLS PRESERVED IN THE PUBLIC RECORD OFFICE., Nendeln, Liechtenstein : Kraus Reprint, 1970 (Originally published: London : H.M.S.O.), Edw III v 9 p 445-6, v 12 p 493 (1368), v 13 p 546 (1373).
19. Deputy Keeper of Records, CALENDAR OF THE PATENT ROLLS PRESERVED IN THE PUBLIC RECORD OFFICE., Nendeln/Liechtenstein: Kraus reprint; Kraus-Thomson Organization Limited, 1971, Edw III v 9 p 267 (1352); 1359.
20. CALENDAR OF INQUISITIONS POST MORTUM., Published by authority of His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department., v 12 p 242.
21. "PUBLIC RECORD OFFICE CATALOG (PROCAT)," ;, E 40/1633.
22. CALENDAR OF INQUISITIONS POST MORTUM., Published by authority of His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department., v 12 p 493.
23. Roskell, J.S., Linda Clark and Carole Rawliffe, HOUSE OF COMMONS 1386-1421., Published for the History of Parliament Trust; Stroud: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1992., v 4 p 908-9.
24. Deputy Keeper of the Records, CALENDAR OF CLOSE ROLLS PRESERVED IN THE PUBLIC RECORD OFFICE., Nendeln, Liechtenstein : Kraus Reprint, 1970 (Originally published: London : H.M.S.O.), Ric II v 1 p 185, v 4 p 462, v 5 p 384.
25. CALENDAR OF INQUISITIONS POST MORTUM., Published by authority of His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department., IPM of Thomas Buckland v 15 #96 p 38.
26. ARCHAEOLOGIA CANTIANA., London: John E. Taylor, 1858-1960., v 12 p 313 .
27. Watney, Vernon James, WALLOP FAMILY., Oxford: John Johnson, 1928., #964.
28. Faris, David, PLANTAGENET ANCESTRY OF SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY COLONISTS. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1999, 2nd edition., p 76-7. Some entries may be from 1st edition so pages will be off.
29. VICTORIA COUNTY HISTORIES OF ENGLAND., Folkestone: Reprinted by Dawsons of Pall Mall; Published for the University of London Institute of Historical Reseacrch, 1971., pt 2 (Berkshire) v 4 p 526; pt 14 (Hampshire) v 4 p 628; pt 39 (Wiltshire) v 10 p 15, v 11 p 32.
30. Deputy Keeper of the Records, CALENDAR OF CLOSE ROLLS PRESERVED IN THE PUBLIC RECORD OFFICE., Nendeln, Liechtenstein : Kraus Reprint, 1970 (Originally published: London : H.M.S.O.), 1379 Ric II v 1 p 185.
31. VICTORIA COUNTY HISTORIES OF ENGLAND., Folkestone: Reprinted by Dawsons of Pall Mall; Published for the University of London Institute of Historical Reseacrch, 1971., pt 2 (Berkshire) v 4 p 526; pt 14 (Hampshire) v 4 p 628; pt 39 (Wiltshire) v 11 p 32.
32. Roskell, J.S., Linda Clark and Carole Rawliffe, HOUSE OF COMMONS 1386-1421., Published for the History of Parliament Trust; Stroud: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1992., v 4 p 628, 908.
33. Faris, David, PLANTAGENET ANCESTRY OF SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY COLONISTS. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1999, 2nd edition., p 76. Some entries may be from 1st edition so pages will be off.
34. VICTORIA COUNTY HISTORIES OF ENGLAND., Folkestone: Reprinted by Dawsons of Pall Mall; Published for the University of London Institute of Historical Reseacrch, 1971., pt 2 (Berkshire) v 4 p 526; pt 14 (Hampshire) v 4 p 628; pt 39 (Wiltshire) v 10 p 15.
35. Gordon, John Steele, "ANCESTRY OF JOHN STEELE GORDON.," http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jsggenealogy/Jsgordon/d237.htm#P485, 17 Jun 00.
36. Cokayne, George Edward, COMPLETE PEERAGE OF ENGLAND., London: St. Catherine Press, 1910-59., v 12 pt 1 p 746.
37. Roskell, J.S., Linda Clark and Carole Rawliffe, HOUSE OF COMMONS 1386-1421., Published for the History of Parliament Trust; Stroud: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1992., v 4 p 628-30, 908.
38. VICTORIA COUNTY HISTORIES OF ENGLAND., Folkestone: Reprinted by Dawsons of Pall Mall; Published for the University of London Institute of Historical Reseacrch, 1971., pt 14 (Hampshire) v 4 p 628.
39. Cokayne, George Edward, COMPLETE PEERAGE OF ENGLAND., London: St. Catherine Press, 1910-59., v 12 pt 1 p 746; v. 12 pt 2 p 96 note g.
40. Burke, Sir Bernard., GENEALOGICAL HISTORY OF DORMANT, ABEYANT, FORFEITED, AND EXTINCT PEERAGES OF GREAT BRITAIN., London: Harrison, 1866., (1883) p 533.
41. ARCHAEOLOGIA CANTIANA., London: John E. Taylor, 1858-1960., v 12 p 313.1 John (3) Wrothe MP, of Enfield, Middlesex was also known as John (3) Wroth MP, of Enfield, Middlesex.3 He was Fishmonger; Justice of the Peace co. Middlesex; Shire knight.1

Family 2

Matilda Durrant b. 1338
Child

Citations

  1. [S2011] Mardi Car, "Mardi Car email 5 Dec 2005 : "Re: The early Wroths of Enfield, Middlesex"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 5 Dec 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mardi Car email 5 Dec 2005."
  2. [S2167] Michael Andrews-Reading, "Andrews-Reading email 21 Aug 2007: "Some snippets on the early Wroths of London"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Aug 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Andrews-Reading email 21 Aug 2007."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Wroth: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00528034&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maud Durant: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00706533&tree=LEO
  5. [S4718] The History of Parliament, online <http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/>, https://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/wroth-william-1408. Hereinafter cited as History of Parliament Website.
  6. [S2227] Michael Andrews-Reading, "Andrews-Reading email 15 May 2006: "Re: Wroth of London: originally de Wrotham? "," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 15 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Andrews-Reading email 15 May 2006."
  7. [S2168] Michael Andrews-Reading, "Andrews-Reading email 21 Aug 2007: "Re: Some snippets on the early Wroths of London"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Aug 2007. Hereinafter cited as "Andrews-Reading email 21 Aug 2007."
  8. [S2228] Michael Andrews-Reading, "Andrews-Reading email 3 Feb 2008: "Re: Wroth Family"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 3 Feb 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Andrews-Reading email 3 Feb 2008."

Adele/Aélis (?) du Maine1,2

F, #5418, b. 868, d. between 907 and 931
ReferenceGAV29 EDV30
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Adele/Aélis (?) du Maine was born in 868 at Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France (now).1 She married Robert I (?) Count of Paris, Duke of France, King of the West Franks, son of Robert I "le Fort" (?) Cte de Paris, de Angers et de Tours and Aelis/Adelaide (?) de Tours, before 894;
His 1st wife.3,4,1,5,6
Adele/Aélis (?) du Maine died between 907 and 931 at Pays de la Loire, France (now);
Genealogy.EU says d. bef 931; Find A Grave says d. 894.
From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     868, Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France
     DEATH     894 (aged 25–26), Pays de la Loire, France
     Family Members
     Parents
      Girard du Maine 847 – unknown
      Wandelgarde de Porthois du Maine 850 – unknown
     Spouse
      Robert Robertin 866–923
     Children
      Adele de Capet
     BURIAL     Unknown
     Created by: Memerizion
     Added: 30 May 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 147172864.3,1,2
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT, son of ROBERT "le Fort" Comte [de Tours], Marquis en Neustrie & his [second] wife --- ([860]-killed in battle near Soissons 15 Jun 923). "Rodbertum fratrem Odonis regis" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[65]. He was installed as lay abbot of Marmoutier on the death of Hugues l’Abbé in 886[66]. He succeeded his brother in 888 as Marquis en Neustrie, and probably also as Comte de Paris, d'Orléans et de Tours. After his brother King Eudes captured Poitou in 893, he installed Robert as Comte de Poitou but the latter was expelled by Adémar, son of Comte Emenon[67]. Abbot of Saint-Martin de Tours: "Robert abbé de Saint-Martin" confirmed possessions of Saint-Martin de Tours by charter dated 30 Aug 894[68]. Eudes King of France granted the abbey of Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers to the bishop of Poitiers, at the request of "marchiones…Hrobertus…atque Ademarus", by charter dated to [894][69]. After the death of his brother in 898, Robert supported Charles III King of France who seems to have confirmed Robert's position in Neustrie. “Rotbertus...beati Martini abba...et comes” restored “cellulæ...Sancti Clementis”, previously donated by “predecessor noster domnus Odo germanus noster...tunc abbas deinde Francorum rex”, to Saint-Martin by charter dated 13 Sep 900, subscribed by “...Attonis vicecomitis, Guarnegaudi vicecomitis, Fulconis vicecomitis, Rainaldi vicecomitis...”[70]. He rebelled against the king in 922, triggered by the confiscation of the monastery of Chelles by King Charles from Rothilde (who was the mother-in-law of Robert's son Hugues) in favour of his favourite Haganon. He was elected ROBERT I King of France 22 Jun 922, consecrated at Reims by Gauthier Archbishop of Sens. Flodoard records in 922 that "Franci" elected “Rotbertum seniorem” who was invested “Remis apud Sanctum Remigium ab episcopis et primatibus regni”[71]. King Robert was killed fighting ex-King Charles, although his forces won the battle: Flodoard records in 923 that "Karolus cum suis Lothariensibus" crossed “Mosam...ad Atiniacum...et...super Axonam” where he lost the battle near Soissons in which “Rotbertus...rex” was killed[72]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVII Kal Jul" of "Rotbertus rex"[73]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Magloire records the death "XVII Kal Jul" of "Robertus rex"[74]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records that "Rotbertus rex" was killed in battle 15 Jun[75].
     "m firstly ---. The name of Robert's first wife is not known. However, as King Robert's known wife Béatrix de Vermandois could not have been the mother of his daughter Adela (married to the brother of Béatrix) it is assumed that this earlier marriage is correct. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[76], Robert's first wife was named AELIS. This may be based on the 21 May 907 donation of Rebais abbey to the church of Paris which refers to "comitis Rotberti et Adele comitisse"[77]. However, as shown below, this is more likely to refer to Robert and his daughter than to his wife.
     "m secondly ([897]) BEATRIX de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [I] Comte de Vermandois & his wife --- ([880/83]-after 26 Mar 931). The Historia Francorum Senonensis records that "sororem Herberti" was the wife of "Robertus princeps" who rebelled against Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks[78]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodbertus dux” married “sororem Herberti” by whom he had “Hugonem Magnum”[79]. "Hugo rector Abbatiæ sancti Martini" names "genitoris nostri Rotberti quondam regis ac genitricis nostræ domnæ Beatricis" in his charter dated 26 Mar 931[80]. The marriage date is estimated by Werner on the assumption that the marriage accompanied the political reconciliation between Beatrix's father and Robert's uncle[81]. If the 907 donation mentioned above in fact refers to Robert's first wife, his marriage to Beatrix would of course have taken place after that date."
Med lands cites:
[65] Saint-Bertin 2.69, 893, p. 136.
[66] Settipani (1993), p. 405.
[67] Richard, A. (1903) Histoire des Comtes de Poitou (republished Princi Negue, 2003) Tome I 72.
[68] Tours Saint-Martin XCVIII, p. 117.
[69] ´Documents pour l´histoire de l´église de Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers´, Mémoires de la société des antiquaires de l´ouest, année 1847 (Poitiers, 1848) ("Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers"), XII, p. 16.
[70] Mabille ‘Les invasions normandes...’, Bibliothèque de l´Ecole des Chartes, Tome XXX (1869), Pièces Justificatives, IX, p. 442.
[71] Flodoard 922, MGH SS III, p. 370.
[72] Flodoard 923, MGH SS III, p. 371.
[73] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 14.
[74] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Magloire, p. 390.
[75] L'abbé Lebeuf (1855) Mémoires concernant l'histoire civile et ecclésiastique d'Auxerre et de son ancient diocese (Auxerre) (“Histoire d´Auxerre”), Tome IV, p. 15.
[76] ES II 10.
[77] Diplôme de Charles III, no 57, Lauer, quoted in Settipani (1993), p. 407.
[78] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366.
[79] Willelmi Gemmetensis monachi Historiæ Normannorum, Du Chesne, A. (1619) Historiæ Normannorum Scriptores Antiqui (Paris) (“Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619)”), Liber II, XXI, p. 233.
[80] RHGF IX, p. 719.
[81] Werner, K. F. (1967) 'Die Nachkommen Karls des Großen bis um Jahr 1000 (1.-8. Generation)', Karl der Große, IV, p. 458, cited in Settipani (1993), p. 407.7


Reference: Genealogics cites: Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser. 1961.
See also Weis [1992:51] Line 50-18.6,8

; NB: While Find a Grave Memorials linke Adele/Aelis as the daughter of Girard du Maine and hiw wife, Wanderlgarde de Porthois, I have not been able to find any other source with such a link. Therefore, I now show no parents for Adele/Aelis. GA Vaut.9,10,11,12

; From The Henry Project:
     "Who was countess Adèle?
     "On 21 May 907, a countess Adèle appears in an act of the French king Charles the Simple, named along with a count Robert who is almost certainly the future king Robert I ["... venerandi comitis Rotberti, et Adelæ comitissæ ..." RHF 9: 505; also in Rec. actes Charles III le Simple, #57 (not seen by me)]. As argued by Constance Bouchard, the most natural interpretation of this evidence would make Adèle a wife of Robert [Bouchard (1988), 16, n. 27], but it has been argued that Adèle was actually the daughter of Robert I who married Heribert II of Vermandois [Werner (1967), 458, n. 4; Settipani (1993), 407-8].
     "The evidence regarding Adèle is closely tied to the chronology of Béatrix (see her page), wife of Robert I and mother of Hugues le Grand. The usual interpretation is that the act of 26 March 931 indicates that Béatrix was still alive on that date, since the word quondam is applied only to Robert in that record. If we accept that scenario, and identify the Adèle of 907 as a wife of Robert, this would place Adèle as the first wife and Béatrix as the second wife [e.g., Chaume (1925), 393 (conjectured as a "probable" daughter of count Aleran II), 537; Bouchard (1988), 16, n. 27]. However, as argued by Karl Ferdinand Werner and Christian Settipani, there is a chronological problem here. If Béatrix were not married to Robert until after 21 May 907, then her son Hugues le Grand could have been born in 908 at the earliest, which goes against everything that is known about the chronology of Hugues le Grand. Hugues appears as his father's heir on 31 March 914 ["S. Roberti gloriosi abbatis. S. domni Hugonis filii sui abbatis et comitis cui post ipsum iam sui honores dati erant." Werner (1958), 287], and he was actively participating in events from 922 on [Flodoard, Annales, s.a. 922ff, 7ff]. On this basis, Werner and Settipani argue that countess Adèle was not a wife of Robert I, but his daughter who married Heribert II of Vermandois, and whose name is otherwise unknown.
     "All of this depends on the assumption that Béatrix was still alive in 931. However, as was pointed out recently by Peter Stewart in the soc.genealogy.medieval newsgroup, if Béatrix were still alive in 931, then she would have been married to Robert during the time that he was king of France (922-3), and she should therefore in that case appear as regina in the 931 act, and not merely as domna. This appearance as domna instead of regina would seem to outweigh the fact that she does not appear as quondam, and it therefore seems likely that Béatrix was no longer living in 931. In this case there would be no obstacle to placing her death before 907, and making Adèle a later rather than an earlier wife. Since the identification of Werner and Settipani depends heavily on ruling out Adèle as a wife of Robert, we can accept as probable Stewart's thesis that Robert was married first to Béatrix and then to Adèle."
The Henry Project cites:
** Bouchard (1988)a = Constance Brittain Bouchard, "Patterns of women's names in royal lineages, ninth-eleventh centuries", Medieval Prosopography 9, 1 (1988): 1-32.
** Flodoard, Annales = Ph. Lauer, ed., Les Annales de Flodoard (Paris, 1905).
** RHF = Recueil des historiens des Gaules et de la France.
** Settipani (1993) = Christian Settipani, La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987 (Première partie - Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens) (Villeneuve d'Ascq, 1993).
** Werner (1958) = Karl Ferdinand Werner, "Untersuchungen zur Frühzeit des französischen Fürstentums (9.-10. Jahrhundert)", parts I-III, Die Welt als Geschichte 18 (1958): 256-289.
** Werner (1967) = Karl Ferdinand Werner, "Die Nachkommen Karls des Großen bis um das Jahr 1000 (1.-8. Generation)", Karl der Große 4 (1967): 403-483.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "m firstly ---. The name of Robert's first wife is not known. However, as King Robert's known wife Béatrix de Vermandois could not have been the mother of his daughter Adela (married to the brother of Béatrix) it is assumed that this earlier marriage is correct. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[76], Robert's first wife was named AELIS. This may be based on the 21 May 907 donation of Rebais abbey to the church of Paris which refers to "comitis Rotberti et Adele comitisse"[77]. However, as shown below, this is more likely to refer to Robert and his daughter than to his wife.
Med lands cites:
[76] ES II 10.
[77] Diplôme de Charles III, no 57, Lauer, quoted in Settipani (1993), p. 407.7
GAV-29 EDV-30 GKJ-30. She was living on 21 May 907; Acording to The Henry Project: “Adèle appears with Robert on 21 May 907”.2

Citations

  1. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2019), memorial page for Aélis du Maine (868–894), Find A Grave Memorial no. 147172864, ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664) Unknown, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/147172864/a_lis-du_maine. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  2. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Robert I: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/rober101.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet2.html
  4. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020109&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aelis: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020110&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#RobertIdied923B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 50-18, p. 51: first wife of Robert I. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 28 June 2020), memorial page for Aélis du Maine (868–894), Find a Grave Memorial no. 147172864,; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664) Unknown, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/147172864
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2019), memorial page for Girard du Maine (847–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 147237650, citing Cathedrale St-Julien du Mans, Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/147237650/girard-du_maine
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2019), memorial page for Wandelgarde de Porthois du Maine (850–unknown), Find A Grave Memorial no. 147237766, citing Cathedrale St-Julien du Mans, Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France ; Maintained by Memerizion (contributor 48072664), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/147237766/wandelgarde-du_maine
  12. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 28 June 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adela/Liegarde/Hildebrante of Neustria: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020190&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#AdelaMHeribertIIVermandois

Ivar Vid Fame OplaendingeHalfdansson Jarl

M, #5419, b. 790, d. between 807 and 880
FatherHalfdan "The Old" (?) b. bt 774 - 779, d. 800
ReferenceGAV31 EDV32
Last Edited20 Feb 2003
     Ivar Vid Fame OplaendingeHalfdansson Jarl married Geva Eisteinsdatter (?) Trondheim, daughter of Eystein Trondheim and unknown (?).1,2 Ivar Vid Fame OplaendingeHalfdansson Jarl was born in 790 at Norway.3,4
Ivar Vid Fame OplaendingeHalfdansson Jarl died between 807 and 880; date is WFT estimate.3
     GAV-31 EDV-32 GKJ-32.

Family

Geva Eisteinsdatter (?) Trondheim b. bt 786 - 806, d. bt 807 - 880
Child

Citations

  1. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  3. [S647] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121 E-15, p. 110. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Geva Eisteinsdatter (?) Trondheim1

F, #5420, b. between 786 and 806, d. between 807 and 880
FatherEystein Trondheim b. bt 740 - 777, d. bt 786 - 830
Motherunknown (?) b. bt 748 - 780, d. bt 786 - 842
ReferenceGAV31 EDV32
Last Edited11 Mar 2020
     Geva Eisteinsdatter (?) Trondheim married Ivar Vid Fame OplaendingeHalfdansson Jarl, son of Halfdan "The Old" (?).2,3 Geva Eisteinsdatter (?) Trondheim was born between 786 and 806 at Norway; date is WFT estimate.4
Geva Eisteinsdatter (?) Trondheim died between 807 and 880 at Norway; date is WFT estimate.4
     GAV-31 EDV-32 GKJ-32.

Citations

  1. [S4751] Unknown compiler, online http://genealogie.quebec/, e-mail address (unknown location), downloaded 2018-2020, http://genealogie.quebec/info/index.php?no=38260
  2. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  3. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  4. [S647] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).

Geoffroy I (?) Comte de Gâtinais1

M, #5421
ReferenceGAV31
Last Edited13 Oct 2019
     GAV-31.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffroy I, Comte de Gâtinais: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020233&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.

Juhel (Judicaël) Bérenger (?) Comte de Rennes1,2

M, #5422, b. before 931, d. between 972 and 979
FatherPaskwitan II (?) de Rennes d. a 903; per the Henry Project: "possible father", citing Poupardin (1900), 206. [Poupardin (1900) = René Poupardin, "Généalogies angevines du XIe siècle", Mélanges d'Archéologie et d'Histoire (Paris, Rome) 20 (1900):199-208.]2,3
ReferenceGAV28 EDV29
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Juhel (Judicaël) Bérenger (?) Comte de Rennes married Gerberge (?)4,5,1,6 Juhel (Judicaël) Bérenger (?) Comte de Rennes was born before 931.7
Juhel (Judicaël) Bérenger (?) Comte de Rennes died between 972 and 979; Henry Project says: "probably deceased by 979"; Med Lands says d. ca 970.1,6,8
     ; This is the same person as ”Juhel [alias] Bérenger II” at The Henry Project.2

; NB: The father of Judicaël/Juhael de Rennes, father of Conan I "le Tort" Duke of Brittany is unclear. One group of sources (Group 1) put his as the son of Pakwitan II (grandson of Erispoe). Other sources (Group 2) make him the son of a Berenger II of Neustria, son-in-law of Gurvand (m. an unnamed dau of Gurvand).
Group 1
     The Henry Project calls him "Juhel [alias] Bérenger" and says his possible father was Pascweten (fl. 895-903), son of Alain le Grand.
     Genealogics says that he is the sone of "Paseweten", son of Alain le Grand.
     Wikipedia (Fr.) says "Judicaël est un petit-fils d'Erispoë mais le nom de son père n'est pas précisé explicitement dans les sources contemporaines où il est désigné comme « Judicheïl ex filia Herispoii regis natus » " (citing Chronique de Réginon de Prüm: AD 874)
Group 2
     Med Lands says that he is the son of "Berenger", of unknown parentage.
     Wikipedia reports regarding Berengar: "Various reconstructions make him father, grandfather, or great-grandfather of Judicael Berengar, later Count of Rennes"
The Henry Project page has a long discussion of all of the possibilities proposed and essentially argues that the Group 1 lineage is the most likely. I have chosen to follow Group 1 with the attribution of Pasceweten (var. sp.) as his father. GA Vaut.8,9,10,6,11,12

; The Henry Project Bibliography:
** Bachrach (1985) = B. Bachrach, "Geoffrey Greymantle, count of the Angevins, 960-987: a study in French politics, Studies in Medieval and Renaissance History 17 (n.s. 7):3-65.
** Bachrach (1993) = B. Bachrach, Fulk Nerra, the Neo-Roman Consul, 987-1040 (University of California Press, 1993).
** Le Baud = Pierre le Baud, Chronicques & Ystoires des Bretons (Charles de la Lande de Calan, ed.), 4 vols. (Société des Bibliophiles Bretons, 1910). This edition contains le Baud's first redaction (ca. 1480) in its entirety, with extracts from the second redaction (ca. 1500) which differ significantly from the first.
** de la Borderie (1864, 1890) = Arthur de la Borderie, "Examen chronologique des chartes du cartulaire de Redon antérieur du XIe siècle", Bibliothèque de l'École des Chartes 25 (1964): 259-282, 393-434 [reprinted in Annales de Bretagne 5 (1889-90): 535-630]. Page numbers given are from the latter work.
** de la Borderie (1891) = Arthur de la Borderie, Miracles de S. Magloire et fondation du monastère de Lehon (Rennes, 1891).
** Byrne (1976) = Francis John Byrne (and Theodor Schieffer, German version), "Die keltischen Völker (5.-11. Jahrhundert)", in Theodor Schieder, ed., Handbuch der europäischen Geschichte 1 (Stuttgart, 1976): 448-491 (Bretagne, 482-491).
** Cart. Landevenec = Arthur de la Borderie, ed., Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Landevenec (Rennes, 1888).
** Cart. S.-Georges de Rennes = Paul de la Bigne Villeneuve, Cartulaire de l'Abbaye de Saint Georges de Rennes, Bulletin et Mémoires de la Société Archéologique du département d'Ille-et-Villaine 9 (1875):127-312, 10 (1876), 1-327.
** Cart. Angers = C. Urseau, Cartulaire Noir de la Cathédrale d'Angers (Paris & Angers, 1908).
** Cart. Morbihan = Louis Rozenzweig, Cartulaire General du Morbihan (Vannes, 1895).
** Cart. Redon = M. Aurélien de Courson, Cartulaire de l'Abaaye de Redon (Collection de documents inédites sur l'histoire de France, Paris, 1863).
** Cart. S.-Père de Chartres = M Guérard, Cartulaire de l'Abbaye de Saint-Père de Chartres, 2 vols. (Paris, 1840).
** Chr. Nantes = René Merlet, ed., La Chronique de Nantes (Paris, 1895). [Pages numbers alone are citations to the text, page numbers with footnotes indicate comments by Merlet.]
** Dudo = Eric Christiansen, ed. & trans., Dudo of St. Quentin, History of the Normans (The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1998). Citation is by book and chapter of Dudo's work, with the page number in parentheses.
** Flodoard's Annals = See MGH SS 3, 363-408 (Latin), and van Houts (2000), 42-51 (English translation of excerpts relating to the Normans).
** Gall. Christ. = Gallia Christiana.
** Guillotel (1979) = Hubert Guillotel, "Le premier sie\cle du pouvoir ducal breton", in Actes du 103e Congre's National des Socie'te's Savantes, Nancy-Metz, 1978, Section de philologie et d'histoire jusqu'a' 1610 (Paris, 1979).
** Guillotel (1980) = Hubert Guillotel, article on "Berengar, Gf. v. Rennes", in Lexicon des Mittelalters.
** Guillotel (1982) = Hubert Guillotel, article on "Bretagne" (Hochmittelalter), in Lexicon des Mittelalters.
** Guillotel (1984) = André Chédeville & Hubert Guillotel, La Bretagne des saints et des rois Ve-Xe siècle (Rennes, 1984). (All pages cited on this webpage are from the part of the book by Guillotel.)
** Guillotel (2000) = Hubert Guillotel, "Une autre marche de Neustrie", in Keats-Rohan & Settipani, eds., Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval (Oxford, 2000).
** Halphen (1906) = Louis Halphen, Le comté d'Anjou au XIe siècle (1906).
** Keats-Rohan (1997) = K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, "'Un vassal sans histoire'?: Count Hugh II (c.940/955-992) and the origins of Angevin overlordship in Maine", in K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, ed., Family Trees and the Roots of Politics (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1997): 189-210.
** Latrie (1889) = L. de Mas Latrie, Trésor de Chronologie d'Histoire et de Geographie (Paris, 1889).
** Lobineau (1707) = Gui Alexis Lobineau, Histoire de Bretagne, 2 vols., (Paris, 1707).
** Lot (1907) = Ferdinand Lot, Mélanges d'histoire bretonne (VIe-XIe) siècle) (Paris, 1907).
** Merlet (1895) = René Merlet, "Les origines du monastère de Saint-Magloire de Paris", Bibliothèque de l'École des Chartes 56 (1895):237-273.
** Merlet (1925) = René Merlet, "La Famille des Bérenger comtes de Rennes et ducs de Bretagne", in Mélanges d'histoire du Moyen Age offerts à M. Ferdinand Lot par ses amis et ses élèves (Paris, 1925), 549-561.
** Moriarty = George Andrews Moriarty, The Plantagenet Ancestry, MS (available on film number 441438 at the Family History Library). These notes of the author were not intended for publication, but are often cited as if they were.
** Morice (1742) = Hyacinthe Morice, Memoires pour servir de preuves à l'histoire ecclésiastique et civile de Bretagne, 3 vols, (Paris, 1742).
** Morice (1750) = Dom Hyacinthe Morice, Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de Bretagne, 3 vols, (Paris, 1750).
** Poupardin (1900) = René Poupardin, "Généalogies angevines du XIe siècle", Mélanges d'Archéologie et d'Histoire (Paris, Rome) 20 (1900):199-208.
** RHF = Recueil des historiens des Gaules et de la France.
** Saint-Phalle (2000) = Edouard de Saint-Phalle, "Les comtes de Gâtinais aux Xe et XIe siècles", in Keats-Rohan & Settipani, eds., Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval (Oxford, 2000).
** Settipani (1997) = Christian Settipani, "Les comtes d'Anjou et leur alliances aux Xe et XIe siècles", in K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, ed., Family Trees and the Roots of Politics (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1997): 211-267.
** Settipani (2000) = Christian Settipani, "Les vicomtes de Châteaudun et leur alliés", in Keats-Rohan & Settipani, eds., Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval (Oxford, 2000).
** van Houts (2000) = Elisabeth van Houts, ed. & trans., The Normans in Europe (Manchester & New York, 2000) [gives English translations of many of the primary sources relevant to early Norman history]
** Vita Gildae = "Gidae Vita et Translatio", in Lot (1907), 433-473. For extracts from the relevant part of the same work (as "Vita S. Gildæ Abbatis Ruyensis"), see RHF 10:377-8.
** Winkhaus (1950) = Eberhard Winkhaus, Ahnen zu Karl dem Grossen und Widukind (Ennepetal-Altenvoerde (Westfalen), 1950).13,8 Juhel (Judicaël) Bérenger (?) Comte de Rennes was also known as Judicael/Juhael Comte de Rennes.6 GAV-28 EDV-29 GKJ-29.

; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDICAËL [Juhael] (-[970]). Comte de Rennes. "Alanus dux Britonum" donated property to Landevenec by undated charter, dated to [940/50], witnessed by "Alan dux, Iudhæel comes…Houuel comes…Iestin vicecomes, Diles vicecomes…"[519]. "Judhael comite" confirmed a donation to Landevenec by "vir…stemate regalium ortus…Moysen" by undated charter dated to the mid-10th century[520].
     "m GERBERGE, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Comte Judicaël & his wife had [three] children:
     "a) CONAN de Rennes (-killed in battle Conquereil 27 Jun 992).
     "b) [MEEN (-1020).
     "c) [ENOGUEN]"

Med Lands cites:
[519] Landevenec (Borderie), 25, p. 156.
[520] Landevenec (Borderie), 40, p. 164.6
He was Count of Rennes between 944 and 979.13

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html#C1
  2. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Juhel [alias] Bérenger: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/juhel000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Pascweten: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/pascw000.htm
  4. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  5. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#BerangerMDaughterGurvandBretagne. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Juhel [alias] Bérenger: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/juhel000.htm
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judicael Berengar: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139571&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  10. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judica%C3%ABl_de_Rennes. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berengar_II_of_Neustria. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 29 March 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/juhel000.htm
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#EnoguenFougeresMTriscanVitre
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Conon I 'le Tort': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020196&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#ConanIdied992
  17. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Conan I: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/conan000.htm

Gerberge (?)

F, #5423
ReferenceGAV28 EDV29
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Gerberge (?) married Juhel (Judicaël) Bérenger (?) Comte de Rennes, son of Paskwitan II (?) de Rennes.1,2,3,4
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDICAËL [Juhael] (-[970]). Comte de Rennes. "Alanus dux Britonum" donated property to Landevenec by undated charter, dated to [940/50], witnessed by "Alan dux, Iudhæel comes…Houuel comes…Iestin vicecomes, Diles vicecomes…"[519]. "Judhael comite" confirmed a donation to Landevenec by "vir…stemate regalium ortus…Moysen" by undated charter dated to the mid-10th century[520].
     "m GERBERGE, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Comte Judicaël & his wife had [three] children:
     "a) CONAN de Rennes (-killed in battle Conquereil 27 Jun 992).
     "b) [MEEN (-1020).
     "c) [ENOGUEN]"

Med Lands cites:
[519] Landevenec (Borderie), 25, p. 156.
[520] Landevenec (Borderie), 40, p. 164.4


; According to the Henry Project: "Supposed wife (probably falsely attributed) [of Conan I]: Gerberge, sister of a certain countess Hildegarde.
This Hildegarde was evidently wife of a viscount of Châteaudun, and Gerberge was married first, to a certain Bérenger, and second, to Gilduin de Saumur [Lobineau (1707) 1:91, citing a charter in the 25th year of king Lothair]. Hildegarde and Gerberge are mentioned in several modern studies [e.g., Keats-Rohan (1997), Saint-Phalle (2000), Settipani (1997), Settipani (2000)], none of which attempt to identify Gerberge's first husband with Juhel Bérenger. In the absence of any clear evidence identifying her first husband with Juhel Bérenger of Rennes, the supposed link should be set aside as improbable.“.5 Gerberge (?) was also known as Geberge (?)4 GAV-28 EDV-29 GKJ-29.

Citations

  1. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html#C1
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#BerangerMDaughterGurvandBretagne. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Juhel [alias] Bérenger: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/juhel000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/brittnpr.htm#EnoguenFougeresMTriscanVitre
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#ConanIdied992

Ivar Rognvaldsson (?)

M, #5424, b. 868, d. circa 874
FatherRagnvald I "The Wise" Eysteinsson (?) 1st Earl of Orkney, Jarl of More b. 830, d. bt 890 - 894
MotherRagnhild (Hiltrude) Hrolfsdotter (?) b. 848, d. bt 849 - 916
Last Edited19 Aug 2004
     Ivar Rognvaldsson (?) was born in 868 at Maer, Norway.1,2
Ivar Rognvaldsson (?) died circa 874.3

Citations

  1. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 439 (Chart 27), 440. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Odin (?)1

M, #5425, b. 215
FatherFrithuwald (?) b. 190, d. bt 222 - 281
MotherBeltsa (?) b. 194, d. bt 222 - 288
ReferenceGAV53 EDV54
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     Odin (?) was born in 215 at Asgard, Asia.2,3
     GAV-53 EDV-54 GKJ-53.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 209, Chart 10. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  3. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).

Elesa (?)1

M, #5426, b. 439
FatherEsla (?)1 b. 411, d. bt 443 - 502
ReferenceGAV45 EDV46
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     Elesa (?) was born in 439 at Saxony, North Germany.2,3
     GAV-45 EDV-46 GKJ-45.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 209, Chart 10. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  3. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).

Esla (?)1

M, #5427, b. 411, d. between 443 and 502
FatherGewis (?)1 b. 383, d. bt 415 - 474
ReferenceGAV46 EDV46
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     Esla (?) was born in 411 at Saxony, North Germany.2,3 He married an unknown person between 430 and 462; WFT Est.2,3
Esla (?) died between 443 and 502; WFT Est.2,3
     GAV-46 EDV-46 GKJ-46.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 209, Chart 10. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  3. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).

Gewis (?)1

M, #5428, b. 383, d. between 415 and 474
FatherWig (?)1 b. 355, d. bt 387 - 446
ReferenceGAV47 EDV48
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     Gewis (?) was born in 383 at Saxony, North Germany.2,3 He married an unknown person between 402 and 434; WFT Est.2,3
Gewis (?) died between 415 and 474; WFT Est.2,3
     GAV-47 EDV-48 GKJ-47.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 209, Chart 10. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  3. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).

Wig (?)1

M, #5429, b. 355, d. between 387 and 446
FatherFreawine (?)1 b. 327, d. bt 359 - 418
ReferenceGAV48 EDV49
Last Edited20 Feb 2003
     Wig (?) was born in 355 at Saxony, North Germany.2,3
Wig (?) died between 387 and 446; date is WFT estimate.2,3
     GAV-48 EDV-49 GKJ-48.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 209, Chart 10. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  3. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).

Freawine (?)1

M, #5430, b. 327, d. between 359 and 418
FatherFrithogar (?)1 b. 299, d. bt 331 - 390
ReferenceGAV49 EDV50
Last Edited19 Feb 2003
     Freawine (?) was born in 327 at Saxony, North Germany.2,3 He married an unknown person between 346 and 378; WFT Est.2,3
Freawine (?) died between 359 and 418; WFT Est.2,3
     GAV-49 EDV-50 GKJ-49.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 209, Chart 10. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S630] Unknown author, Broderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #1822, Date of Import: 27 Jul 1997 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  3. [S628] Inc. Br²derbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. 19, Ed. 1, Family 0671 (n.p.: Release date: March 13, 1998, unknown publish date).