Liudolf I "the Great" (?) Margrave of East Saxony1,2,3

M, #4351, b. 806, d. 6 September 864
FatherBruno (?) Graf von Sachsen4,5 b. c 786, d. b 844
ReferenceGAV30
Last Edited25 Dec 2020
     Liudolf I "the Great" (?) Margrave of East Saxony was born in 806; Weis (AR7, line 141-16) says b. ca 816; Leo van de Pas says b. 806; Genealogy.EU (Liudolfer page) says b. 804; Find A Grave says b. 805.6,2,7,8 He married Oda (?) von Billung, Margravine of East Saxony, daughter of Billung I (?) Count von Thuringen and Aeda (?), circa 836.2,5,9,8
Liudolf I "the Great" (?) Margrave of East Saxony died on 6 September 864 at Germany (now); Genealogics says d. 866; Find A Grave says d. 12 Mar 864; Med Lands says d. 11 Mar 866.6,7,5,8
Liudolf I "the Great" (?) Margrave of East Saxony was buried after 6 September 864 at Stiftskirche Gandersheim, Bad Gandersheim, Landkreis Northeim, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     805, Germany
     DEATH     12 Mar 864 (aged 58–59), Germany
     Liudolf (c.?805 - 12 March 864 or 866) was a Saxon count, and Count of Eastphalia. Liudolf had extended possessions in eastern Saxony, and was a leader in the wars of King Louis the German against Normans and Slavs. The ruling Liudolfing House, also known as the Ottonian dynasty, is named after him; he is its oldest verified member. Unknown whether the coffin in the church actually does contain his remains.
     In 845/846, Liudolf and his wife founded a house of holy canonesses, duly established at their proprietary church in Brunshausen around 852, and moved in 881 to form Gandersheim Abbey. Liudolf's minor daughter Hathumoda became the first abbess. Other daughters followed in that role.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Brunhart III von Sachsen 796–843
      Oda von Merseburg von Sachsen
     Spouse
      Oda von Billung 806–913
     Children
      Otto I of Saxony unknown–912
      Waldrada d'Alsace
      Oda von Sachsen von Stade      BURIAL     Stiftskirche Gandersheim, Bad Gandersheim, Landkreis Northeim, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
     Created by: Frank K.
     Added: 29 Jun 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 132067250.7
     GAV-30.

; Per Genealogics:
     "one more daughter and two or three more sons
     "Liudolf was born about 805. His parentage cannot be established with certainty, though some sources give his father as a count Brun (Brunhart). About 836 he married Oda, daughter of a Frankish princeps named Billung and his wife Aeda. They had eleven or twelve children of whom Otto, Oda and possibly Liutgard would have progeny. By marrying a Frankish nobleman's daughter, Liudolf followed suggestions set forth by Charlemagne about ensuring the integrity of the Frankish empire in the aftermath of the Saxon Wars through marriage.
     "In 845/846, Liudolf and his wife travelled to Rome in order to ask Pope Sergius II for permission to found a house of secular canonesses, duly established at their proprietary church in Brunshausen around 852.
     "Liudolf was a 'comes' or count. This office, which resulted from appointment by an emperor or king, originally was to enforce royal authority and required administrative functions that could include military service. The office was not necessarily held for life, unless someone happened to die in office, and under Charlemagne it was not intended to be inherited.
     "He was described as 'dux Saconiae', and as duke of the Eastern Saxons (_dux orientalis Saxonum,_ probably since 850) and count of Westphalia. Liudolf had extended possessions in eastern Saxony, and was a leader (_dux_) in the wars of King Louis 'the German' against Normans and Slavs. The ruling Liudolfing House, also known as the Ottonian dynasty, is named after him; he is the earliest verified member. He was named _'Liudolfus comes'_ in _Annales Xantenes_ relating to his death, which occurred on 11 March 866. He was buried at the Brunshausen Abbey.
     "Liudolf's widow Oda moved in 881 to form Gandersheim Abbey. Their daughter Hathumod became its first abbess."3

; This is the same person as:
”Liudolf, Duke of Saxony” at Wikipedia, as
”Liudolf de Saxe” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Liudolf (Sachsen)” at Wikipedia (De.)10,11,12

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: I 3.
2. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 23.8


; Per Genealogy.EU (Liudolfing: “Liudolf, Mgve of East Saxony, *804, +866/874; m.Oda (*796), dau.of Billung /OR Warin, Bp of Hildesheim”.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "LIUDOLF, son of BRUNO & his wife --- (-11 Mar 866, bur Brunshausen). Brun was named as father of Liudolf in the early 13th century Gandersheimer Reimchronik[126], but no earlier source has so far been found which confirms the relationship. The Chronicon Hildesheimense records that Liudolf founded the abbey of Gandersheim in 852, first at Brunshausen[127]. Widukind records that "Liudulfus" transferred relics of Pope Innocent to Rome[128]. The Annales Alamannicorum record "Ludolfus dux Saxoniæ avus Heinrici" among those who swore allegiance in 864[129]. The Annales Xantenses record the death in 866 of "Liudolfus comes a septentrione"[130].
     "m ODA, daughter of BILLUNG princeps & his wife Aeda (-17 May 913). The Carmen de Primordiis Cœnobii Gandersheimensis names the wife of "Liudulfus" as "Oda…Francorum…de stirpe potentum, filia Billungi…atque Aedæ"[131]. "Oda comitissa, Pipini regis Italiæ ex filia neptis, Hliudolfi Ducis vidua" founded Kloster Calbe an der Milde, by charter dated 885[132]. "Arnolfus…rex" confirmed donations of his predecessor of land "in pago Nordthuringa dicto in comitatu Liudulfi in loco Uuanzleua" to Kloster Gandersheim naming "fideli costræ in sanctimoniali habitu constitutæ…Odæ" by an undated charter, placed in the compilation among charters dated [891/92], which names "filia eius Gerberga abbatissa"[133]. "Otto…rex" confirmed privileges to Kloster Gandersheim "avo illius Sigihardo comiti in pago Chiemihgovue in comitatu Sigihardi" to "comiti nostro Eberhart" by charter dated 4 May 947 in which he names "proavo nostro Liutulfo…et eius coniuge Oda…et avo nostro Ottone" recalling their involvement in the foundation of the monastery[134]."
Med Lands cites:
[126] Wolff, L. (ed.) (1969) Die Gandersheimer Reimchronik des Priesters Eberhard 2nd Ed. (Altdeutsche Textbibliothek, Tübingen), 9, lines 139-44, cited in Jackman (1997), p. 146 footnote 40.
[127] Chronicon Hildesheimense 4, MGH SS VII, p. 851.
[128] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ I.16, MGH SS III, p. 425.
[129] Annales Alamannicorum continuation Sangallensis prima 864, MGH SS I, p. 50, alternative text quoted in footnote 1.
[130] Annales Xantenses 866, MGH SS II, p. 231.
[131] Carmen de Primordiis Cœnobii Gandersheimensis, MGH SS IV, p. 306.
[132] Riedel Mark 1 [the full reference is not given], p. 25, quoted in Raumer, G. W. von (1836) Regesta Historiæ Brandenburgensis Tome I (Berlin) (“Regesta Historiæ Brandenburgensis”), p. 24.
[133] D Arn 107, p. 157.
[134] D O I 89, p. 171.5

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 63. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Liudolfer page (Liudolfing): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/liudolfer.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liudolf: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020478&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Liudolfdied866A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#Liudolfdied866B
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 141-16, p. 123. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 9 October 2019), memorial page for Liudolf Duke of von Sachsen (805–12 Mar 864), Find A Grave Memorial no. 132067250, citing Stiftskirche Gandersheim, Bad Gandersheim, Landkreis Northeim, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany ; Maintained by Frank K. (contributor 46941322), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/132067250/liudolf-duke_of-von_sachsen. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liudolf: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020478&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oda Billung: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020479&tree=LEO
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liudolf,_Duke_of_Saxony. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Liudolf de Saxe: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liudolf_de_Saxe. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  12. [S4759] Wikipedia - Die freie Enzyklopädie, online https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite, Liudolf (Sachsen): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liudolf_(Sachsen). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (DE).
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liutgard of Saxony: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020412&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Otto 'der Erlauchte': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020481&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#OttoErlauchtedied912
  16. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 141-17, p. 134.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Oda von Sachsen: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00280752&tree=LEO

Guillaume VIII-X "The Pious" de Poitou Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou1,2

M, #4352, b. 1099, d. 9 April 1137
FatherGuillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou1,3,4,2,5 b. 22 Oct 1071, d. 10 Feb 1127
MotherPhilippa Mathilde Maud (?) Comtesse de Toulouse suo jure1,6,2,5 b. c 1073, d. 28 Nov 1117
ReferenceGAV22 EDV23
Last Edited14 Jul 2020
     Guillaume VIII-X "The Pious" de Poitou Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou was born in 1099 at Toulouse, Departement de la Haute-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France.7,8,9,2,5 He married Eleanor/Aénor de Châtellerault Duchesse d'Aquitaine, daughter of Ayméric I (?) Vicomte de Châtellerault and Dangereuse 'La Maubergeonne' de L'Isle-Bouchard, in 1121 at France;
His 1st wife.1,10,11,2,5 Guillaume VIII-X "The Pious" de Poitou Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou married Emma (?) de Limoges, daughter of Adémar III 'le Barbu' (?) de Limoges, Vicomte de Segur and Marie (?) des Cars, before 1136;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.1,12,13,14,5
Guillaume VIII-X "The Pious" de Poitou Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou died on 9 April 1137 at Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain (now); on a pilgrimage to San Iago de Compostella in Galice.1,15,2,5
Guillaume VIII-X "The Pious" de Poitou Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou was buried after 9 April 1137 at Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1099, Toulouse, Departement de la Haute-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France
     DEATH     9 Apr 1137 (aged 37–38), Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain
     Nobility, only son of Guillaume IX and his second wife Philippa of Toulouse. He married Aenor of Chatellerault in 1121 who bore him three children. He succeeded his father in 1126.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Guillaume IX de Aquitaine 1071–1126
          Philippa of Toulouse 1073–1118
     Spouse
          Aenor de Châtellerault 1103–1130
     Siblings
          Agnes of Aquitaine 1105–1147
     Children
          Eleanor de Aquitaine 1122–1204
          Aelis Petronille de Aquitaine 1125–1151
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 26 Jun 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 92622584
     SPONSORED BY Debbie Chandler.16,5
     GAV-22 EDV-23 GKJ-24.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Guillaume was born in Toulouse in 1099, the son of Guillaume VII-IX de Poitou, duke of Aquitaine, and his second wife Philippa Mathilde de Toulouse, during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. His birth is recorded in the Chronicle of Saint-Maixent for the year 1099: _Wilhelmo comiti natus est filius, equivoce Guillelmus vocatus_ ('a son was born to Count Guillaume, named Guillaume like himself'). Later that same year, much to Philippa's anger, Guillaume VII-IX mortgaged Toulouse to her cousin Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade. Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers. Long after Guillaume's return he took up with Maubergeon/Dangerose de L'Isle-Bouchard, the wife of one of his vassals Ayméric I, vicomte de Châtellerault, and set Philippa aside.
     “In 1121 the younger Guillaume married Aénor de Châtellerault, daughter of his father's mistress Dangerose. Guillaume and Aénor had three children, of whom their two daughters, Eleonor the future duchess of Aquitaine, and Petronella/Alix would have progeny.
     “In 1126 Guillaume succeeded his father as Guillaume X, duke of Aquitiane and Guillaume VIII, comte de Poitou. Like his father before him, Guillaume was a patron of troubadours, music and literature. He was an educated man and strove to give his two daughters an excellent education, in a time when Europe's rulers were hardly literate. When Eleanor succeeded him as duchess, she would continue Guillaume's tradition and transform the Aquitanian court into Europe's centre of knowledge.
     “Aénor died in 1130, and in 1136 Guillaume married Emma de Limoges, widow of Bardon de Cognac and daughter of Ademar III 'le Barbu', comte de Limoges and Marie des Cars. They had no children. Guillaume was both a lover of the arts and a warrior. He became involved in conflicts with Normandy (which he raided in 1136, in alliance with Geoffrey 'le Bel' of Anjou who claimed it in his wife's name) and France.
     “Even inside his borders, Guillaume faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with the total destruction of his enemies. In international politics, Guillaume initially supported Antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, and opposed Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1143 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced Guillaume to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent.
     “In 1137 Guillaume joined the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, but died of suspected food poisoning during the trip. On his deathbed he expressed his wish to see King Louis VI of France as protector of his fifteen-year-old daughter Eleanor, and to find her a suitable husband. Louis VI naturally accepted this guardianship and married the heiress of Aquitaine to his own son Louis VII.”.2

; This is the same person as:
”William X, Duke of Aquitaine” at Wikipedia and as
”Guillaume X d'Aquitaine” at Wikipédia (FR.)17,18

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 28.
2. Histoire et Genealogie de la Maison de La Rochefoucauld La Ricamerie, 1975, Georges Martin, Reference: 211.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.2


; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME d'Aquitaine (1099-Santiago de Compostela 9 Apr 1137, bur Santiago de Compostela). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the birth in 1099 of "Willelmo comiti…filius æquivoce Guillelmus"[585]. William of Tyre names him and his father[586]. Robert of Torigny names "Guillermum…pater…Alienor reginæ Anglorum" as the son of "Guillermus comes Pictavensis et dux Aquitanorum" & his wife "filia [comitis Tolosani fratris Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii]"[587]. He succeeded his father in 1126 as GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou. “Willelmus...dux Aquitanorum” donated “ecclesiam S. Juliani de Stapio...ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Clida” to Notre-Dame de Saintes “et abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” by charter dated “XII Kal Sep”, signed by “eadem abbatissa Sibillla, et comitissa Tholosæ avia mea, et Agnete amita mea...Petro episcopo...”[588]. This charter does not specify the year but can be dated to [1126/27], given that Guillaume X Duke of Aquitaine (identified as the donor) succeeded his father in 1126 and that the successor of Pierre Bishop of Saintes (assuming that he can be identified as the subscriber “Petro episcopo”) is named in a document dated 1127[589]. “Guillelmus comes Pictaviensis et dux Aquitanorum” confirmed rights of “monachi Monasterii Novi Pictaviensis” granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 1129[590]. “Willelmus…dux Aquitanorum” donated property to “ecclesiæ B. Hilarii de Cella” (La Celle, outside Poitiers) by charter dated 3 Mar 1130, subscribed by “Willielmi ducis Aquitanorum, Aenordis comitissæ, Alienordis filiæ eorum, Wilelmi Aigres filii eorum”[591]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1136 that "Guillaume comte de Poitou et prince d'Aquitaine" died while on pilgrimage at "Saint-Jacques…la veille de Pâques" and was buried there[592]. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "28 Mar" of "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum"[593].
     "m firstly ELEONORE de Châtellerault, daughter of AMAURY [I] Vicomte de Châtellerault & his wife Amauberge "Dangerose"[594] --- (-after Mar 1130). “Willelmus…dux Aquitanorum” donated property to “ecclesiæ B. Hilarii de Cella” (La Celle, outside Poitiers) granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 3 Mar 1130, subscribed by “Willielmi ducis Aquitanorum, Aenordis comitissæ, Alienordis filiæ eorum, Wilelmi Aigres filii eorum”[595]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not so far been identified. It is indicated by the Chronicon Gaufredi Vosiensis which names [her niece] "Sibylla filia Radulfi de Faya, qui fuit frater Guillelmi Vicecomitis de Castelleyrac" when recording her marriage[596], read together with Ralph de Diceto who named Raoul [de Châtellerault] Seigneur de Faye as “avunculus” of [her daughter] Eléonore d’Aquitaine, wife of Henry II King of England[597].
     "m secondly (1136) as her second husband, EMMA de Limoges, widow of BARDON de Cognac, daughter of ADEMAR [III] "le Barbu" Comte de Limoges & his [second wife Marie des Cars]. The Chronicon Gaufredi Vosiensis names "aliam filiam [Ademari]…Ennoa (seu Emma)" stating that she married "Guillermus Dux, frater Raymundi Antiochiæ principis" after the death of her earlier husband "Bardoni de Coniaco", before being abducted by "Willelmus Sector-ferri, filius Wlgrini Comitis Engolismensis"[598]. She married thirdly (after 1137) as his first wife, Guillaume d'Angoulême, who succeeded his father in 1140 as Guillaume VI "Taillefer" Comte d'Angoulême."
Med Lands cites:
[585] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 419.
[586] WT XIV.IX, p. 618.
[587] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1159, p. 319.
[588] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, Instrumenta, col. 484.
[589] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, col. 1068.
[590] Champollion Figeac (1843) Documents historiques inédits tirés des collections manuscrites de la bibliothèque royal et des archives ou des bibliothèques des départements (Paris) Tome II, VI, p. 12.
[591] Champollion Figeac (1843), Tome II, VII, p. 13.
[592] Guizot, M. (ed.) (1825) Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis (Paris), p. 18.
[593] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 190.
[594] Who was the mistress of Guillaume IX Duke of Aquitaine.
[595] Champollion Figeac (1843), Tome II, VII, p. 13.
[596] Ex Chronico Gaufredi Vosiensis, 24, RHGF XII, p. 424.
[597] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 559.
[598] Ex Chronico Gaufredi Vosiensis, 41, RHGF XII, p. 425.5


; Per Med Lands:
     "ELEONORE (-after Mar 1130). “Willelmus…dux Aquitanorum” donated property to “ecclesiæ B. Hilarii de Cella” (La Celle, outside Poitiers) granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 3 Mar 1130, subscribed by “Willielmi ducis Aquitanorum, Aenordis comitissæ, Alienordis filiæ eorum, Wilelmi Aigres filii eorum”[675]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified. It is indicated by the Chronicon Gaufredi Vosiensis which names [her niece] "Sibylla filia Radulfi de Faya, qui fuit frater Guillelmi Vicecomitis de Castelleyrac" when recording her marriage[676], read together with Ralph de Diceto who named Raoul [de Châtellerault] Seigneur de Faye as “avunculus” of [her daughter] Eléonore d’Aquitaine, wife of Henry II King of England[677].
     "m (before 1122) as his first wife, GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou], son of GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou & his wife Philippa [Mathilde] de Toulouse (1099-Santiago de Compostela 9 Apr 1137, bur Santiago de Compostela)."
Med Lands cites:
[675] Champollion Figeac (1843) Tome II, VII, p. 13.
[676] Ex Chronico Gaufredi Vosiensis, 24, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 424.
[677] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 559.11


; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1): “I1. [2m.] Guillaume VIII (X) "the Saint", Duke of Aquitaine (1126-37), Ct of Poitou, *1099, +on a pilgrimage to San Iago de Composterba in Galice 9.4.1137; 1m: 1121 Eleonore de Châtellerault (+1130); 2m: before 1137 Emma de Limoges, dau.of Aymar III, Vicomte de Limoges and Umberge N; all kids were by 1m.”.19

; Per Genealogy.EU (Rochefoucauld): “D3. Aenor, *1103, +after III.1130; m.1121. Duke Guillaume VIII of Aquitaine (+9.4.1137)”.20
; Per Med Lands:
     "EMMA de Limoges . The Chronicon Gaufredi Vosiensis names "aliam filiam [Ademari]…Ennoa (seu Emma)" stating that she married "Guillermus Dux, frater Raymundi Antiochiæ principis" after the death of her earlier husband "Bardoni de Coniaco", before being abducted by "Willelmus Sector-ferri, filius Wlgrini Comitis Engolismensis"[782]. It is not certain that Emma was the daughter of Vicomte Adémar [III] by his second marriage. However, if Vicomte Adémar's first wife was a member of the family of the comtes d'Angoûleme (as speculated above), it is unlikely that she would have been Emma's mother, in view of Emma's third marriage. "Emma comitissa, uxor comitis Engolismensis, filia Ademari vicecomitis Lemovicensis" donated property "ripas stagni de Chalamans" to Notre-Dame de Dalon by undated charter[783]. The primary sources which confirm her first two marriages have not so far been identified.
     "m firstly BARDON de Cognac, son of HELIE [II] de Chambarot Seigneur de Cognac & his wife --- (-before 1136).
     "m secondly (1136) as his second wife, GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou], son of GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou & his wife Philippa [Mathilde] de Toulouse (1099-Santiago de Compostela 9 Apr 1137, bur Santiago de Compostela).
     "m thirdly (after 1137) as his first wife, GUILLAUME d'Angoulême, son of VULGRIN II Comte d'Angoulême & his first wife Pontia de La Marche (-Messina 7 Aug 1179, bur Messina). He succeeded his father in 1140 as GUILLAUME VI "Taillefer" Comte d'Angoulême."
Med Lands cites:
[782] Ex Chronico Gaufredi Vosiensis, 41, RHGF XII, p. 425.
[783] Dalon Notre-Dame 870, p. 210.14
He was Comte de Poitou between 1126 and 1137.9,18,17 He was Duke of Aquitaine between 1126 and 1137.1,17,18

Family 1

Eleanor/Aénor de Châtellerault Duchesse d'Aquitaine b. c 1103, d. a Mar 1129/30
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VIII-X: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020884&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VII-IX: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020882&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIXdied1127B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeXAquitainedied1137
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippa Mathilde de Toulouse: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020883&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VIII-X: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020884&tree=LEO
  8. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 72-12.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aénor de Châtellerault: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020885&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE%20NOBILITY.htm#AenorChatelleraultMGuillaumeXAquitaine
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Limoges: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00048754&tree=LEO
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d’ Angoulême, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LIMOUSIN.htm#EmmaLimogesM2GuillaumeVIIIPoitou
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.5.
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 14 July 2020), memorial page for Guillaume X of Aquitaine (1099–9 Apr 1137), Find a Grave Memorial no. 92622584, citing Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/92622584. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_X,_Duke_of_Aquitaine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Guillaume X d'Aquitaine: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_X_d%27Aquitaine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, de La Rochefoucauld: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/rochef/rochef1.html#AA1
  21. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  22. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings.
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  24. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.3. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Eleonoredied1204
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Petronella|Alix de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020906&tree=LEO
  27. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs d’Aquitaine & Comtes de Poitou, p. 12: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aquitaine-Poitou.pdf
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#AelisPetronilledied1153

Eleanor/Aénor de Châtellerault Duchesse d'Aquitaine1,2

F, #4353, b. circa 1103, d. after March 1129/30
FatherAyméric I (?) Vicomte de Châtellerault3,4,5,6,7 b. bt 1075 - 1076, d. b 7 Nov 1144
MotherDangereuse 'La Maubergeonne' de L'Isle-Bouchard3,6,7 b. c 1079, d. 1151
ReferenceGAV22 EDV23
Last Edited14 Jul 2020
     Eleanor/Aénor de Châtellerault Duchesse d'Aquitaine was born circa 1103 at Châtellerault, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France (now).8,6,9 She married Guillaume VIII-X "The Pious" de Poitou Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou, son of Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou and Philippa Mathilde Maud (?) Comtesse de Toulouse suo jure, in 1121 at France;
His 1st wife.1,6,7,10,11
Eleanor/Aénor de Châtellerault Duchesse d'Aquitaine died after March 1129/30 at Talmont-Saint-Hilaire, Departement de la Vendée, Pays de la Loire, France (now).12,8,6,7,9
Eleanor/Aénor de Châtellerault Duchesse d'Aquitaine was buried after March 1130 at Abbaye de Nieul-sur-l'Autise, Nieul-sur-l'Autise, Departement de la Vendée, Pays de la Loire, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1103, Chatellerault, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
     DEATH     Mar 1130 (aged 26–27), Talmont-Saint-Hilaire, Departement de la Vendée, Pays de la Loire, France
     Nobility, daughter of Aimery I de Chatellerault and Maubergeonne l'Isle Bouchard. She married Guillaume X and bore him three children.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Aymeric I de Châtellerault 1075–1151
     Spouse
          Guillaume X of Aquitaine 1099–1137
     Children
          Eleanor de Aquitaine 1122–1204
          Aelis Petronille de Aquitaine 1125–1151
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Nieul-sur-l'Autise, Nieul-sur-l'Autise, Departement de la Vendée, Pays de la Loire, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 29 Jun 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 92767318
     SPONSORED BY Debbie Chandler.9
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME d'Aquitaine (1099-Santiago de Compostela 9 Apr 1137, bur Santiago de Compostela). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the birth in 1099 of "Willelmo comiti…filius æquivoce Guillelmus"[585]. William of Tyre names him and his father[586]. Robert of Torigny names "Guillermum…pater…Alienor reginæ Anglorum" as the son of "Guillermus comes Pictavensis et dux Aquitanorum" & his wife "filia [comitis Tolosani fratris Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii]"[587]. He succeeded his father in 1126 as GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou. “Willelmus...dux Aquitanorum” donated “ecclesiam S. Juliani de Stapio...ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Clida” to Notre-Dame de Saintes “et abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” by charter dated “XII Kal Sep”, signed by “eadem abbatissa Sibillla, et comitissa Tholosæ avia mea, et Agnete amita mea...Petro episcopo...”[588]. This charter does not specify the year but can be dated to [1126/27], given that Guillaume X Duke of Aquitaine (identified as the donor) succeeded his father in 1126 and that the successor of Pierre Bishop of Saintes (assuming that he can be identified as the subscriber “Petro episcopo”) is named in a document dated 1127[589]. “Guillelmus comes Pictaviensis et dux Aquitanorum” confirmed rights of “monachi Monasterii Novi Pictaviensis” granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 1129[590]. “Willelmus…dux Aquitanorum” donated property to “ecclesiæ B. Hilarii de Cella” (La Celle, outside Poitiers) by charter dated 3 Mar 1130, subscribed by “Willielmi ducis Aquitanorum, Aenordis comitissæ, Alienordis filiæ eorum, Wilelmi Aigres filii eorum”[591]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1136 that "Guillaume comte de Poitou et prince d'Aquitaine" died while on pilgrimage at "Saint-Jacques…la veille de Pâques" and was buried there[592]. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "28 Mar" of "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum"[593].
     "m firstly ELEONORE de Châtellerault, daughter of AMAURY [I] Vicomte de Châtellerault & his wife Amauberge "Dangerose"[594] --- (-after Mar 1130). “Willelmus…dux Aquitanorum” donated property to “ecclesiæ B. Hilarii de Cella” (La Celle, outside Poitiers) granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 3 Mar 1130, subscribed by “Willielmi ducis Aquitanorum, Aenordis comitissæ, Alienordis filiæ eorum, Wilelmi Aigres filii eorum”[595]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not so far been identified. It is indicated by the Chronicon Gaufredi Vosiensis which names [her niece] "Sibylla filia Radulfi de Faya, qui fuit frater Guillelmi Vicecomitis de Castelleyrac" when recording her marriage[596], read together with Ralph de Diceto who named Raoul [de Châtellerault] Seigneur de Faye as “avunculus” of [her daughter] Eléonore d’Aquitaine, wife of Henry II King of England[597].
     "m secondly (1136) as her second husband, EMMA de Limoges, widow of BARDON de Cognac, daughter of ADEMAR [III] "le Barbu" Comte de Limoges & his [second wife Marie des Cars]. The Chronicon Gaufredi Vosiensis names "aliam filiam [Ademari]…Ennoa (seu Emma)" stating that she married "Guillermus Dux, frater Raymundi Antiochiæ principis" after the death of her earlier husband "Bardoni de Coniaco", before being abducted by "Willelmus Sector-ferri, filius Wlgrini Comitis Engolismensis"[598]. She married thirdly (after 1137) as his first wife, Guillaume d'Angoulême, who succeeded his father in 1140 as Guillaume VI "Taillefer" Comte d'Angoulême."
Med Lands cites:
[585] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 419.
[586] WT XIV.IX, p. 618.
[587] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1159, p. 319.
[588] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, Instrumenta, col. 484.
[589] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, col. 1068.
[590] Champollion Figeac (1843) Documents historiques inédits tirés des collections manuscrites de la bibliothèque royal et des archives ou des bibliothèques des départements (Paris) Tome II, VI, p. 12.
[591] Champollion Figeac (1843), Tome II, VII, p. 13.
[592] Guizot, M. (ed.) (1825) Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis (Paris), p. 18.
[593] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 190.
[594] Who was the mistress of Guillaume IX Duke of Aquitaine.
[595] Champollion Figeac (1843), Tome II, VII, p. 13.
[596] Ex Chronico Gaufredi Vosiensis, 24, RHGF XII, p. 424.
[597] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 559.
[598] Ex Chronico Gaufredi Vosiensis, 41, RHGF XII, p. 425.11
GAV-22 EDV-23 GKJ-24.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Histoire et Genealogie de la Maison de La Rochefoucauld, La Ricamerie, 1975, Martin, Georges. 211.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 28.6


; This is the same person as:
”Aénor de Châtellerault” at Wikipedia and as
”Aénor de Châtellerault” at Wikipédia (FR.)13,2

; Per Med Lands:
     "ELEONORE (-after Mar 1130). “Willelmus…dux Aquitanorum” donated property to “ecclesiæ B. Hilarii de Cella” (La Celle, outside Poitiers) granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 3 Mar 1130, subscribed by “Willielmi ducis Aquitanorum, Aenordis comitissæ, Alienordis filiæ eorum, Wilelmi Aigres filii eorum”[675]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified. It is indicated by the Chronicon Gaufredi Vosiensis which names [her niece] "Sibylla filia Radulfi de Faya, qui fuit frater Guillelmi Vicecomitis de Castelleyrac" when recording her marriage[676], read together with Ralph de Diceto who named Raoul [de Châtellerault] Seigneur de Faye as “avunculus” of [her daughter] Eléonore d’Aquitaine, wife of Henry II King of England[677].
     "m (before 1122) as his first wife, GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou], son of GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou & his wife Philippa [Mathilde] de Toulouse (1099-Santiago de Compostela 9 Apr 1137, bur Santiago de Compostela)."
Med Lands cites:
[675] Champollion Figeac (1843) Tome II, VII, p. 13.
[676] Ex Chronico Gaufredi Vosiensis, 24, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 424.
[677] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 559.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1): “I1. [2m.] Guillaume VIII (X) "the Saint", Duke of Aquitaine (1126-37), Ct of Poitou, *1099, +on a pilgrimage to San Iago de Composterba in Galice 9.4.1137; 1m: 1121 Eleonore de Châtellerault (+1130); 2m: before 1137 Emma de Limoges, dau.of Aymar III, Vicomte de Limoges and Umberge N; all kids were by 1m.”.14

; Per Genealogy.EU (Rochefoucauld): “D3. Aenor, *1103, +after III.1130; m.1121. Duke Guillaume VIII of Aquitaine (+9.4.1137)”.15

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  2. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Aénor de Châtellerault: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/A%C3%A9nor_de_Ch%C3%A2tellerault. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ayméric I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020886&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE%20NOBILITY.htm#AimeryIChatelleraultdiedbefore1144. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aénor de Châtellerault: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020885&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE%20NOBILITY.htm#AenorChatelleraultMGuillaumeXAquitaine
  8. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  9. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 14 July 2020), memorial page for Aenor de Châtellerault (1103–Mar 1130), Find a Grave Memorial no. 92767318, citing Abbaye de Nieul-sur-l'Autise, Nieul-sur-l'Autise, Departement de la Vendée, Pays de la Loire, France; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/92767318. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VIII-X: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020884&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeXAquitainedied1137
  12. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A%C3%A9nor_de_Ch%C3%A2tellerault. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, de La Rochefoucauld: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/rochef/rochef1.html#AA1
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  17. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.3. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Eleonoredied1204
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Petronella|Alix de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020906&tree=LEO
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs d’Aquitaine & Comtes de Poitou, p. 12: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aquitaine-Poitou.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#AelisPetronilledied1153

Ayméric I (?) Vicomte de Châtellerault1

M, #4354, b. between 1075 and 1076, d. before 7 November 1144
FatherBoson II (?) Vicomte de Châtellerault1,2,3,4 b. c 1036, d. 1092
MotherEleanore/Alienor de Thouars1,2 b. 1050, d. 1093
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited14 Jul 2020
     Ayméric I (?) Vicomte de Châtellerault was born between 1075 and 1076 at Chastellerault, Vienne, France.5,1 He married Dangereuse 'La Maubergeonne' de L'Isle-Bouchard, daughter of Barthélémy I de Beuil Seigneur de L'Isle-Bouchard and Geberge (?); her 1st husband.5,6,1,2
Ayméric I (?) Vicomte de Châtellerault was buried before 7 November 1144 at Abbaye Notre Dame de Noyers, Nouatre, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1075, France
     DEATH     7 Nov 1151 (aged 75–76), Noyers, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France
     Aimery I was the count of Châtellerault. He was married to Dangereuse de l'Isle Bouchard, a daughter of Barthelemy, Seigneur de l'Isle-Bouchard. He died as a monk at Notre-Dame de Noyers, currently located at Nouâtre.
     Aimery's daughter, Aenor de Châtellerault, was the wife of William X, Duke of Aquitaine and the mother of Eleanor of Aquitaine who was the wife of Henry II of England and the mother of Richard I of England and John, King of England. His son Hugues II of Châtellerault succeeded him as Viscount. Their other children included:
     Raoul (-[1190]) witnessed the charter dated May 27, 1152 under which "Alienora…ducissa Aquitanorum et Normannorum" donated property to Saint-Maixent. Seigneur de Faye-le-Vineuse. m (before 1144) Elisabeth de Faye, daughter and heiress of Aimery V de Loudun and his wife Mathilde (Rumpestachade) de Montsoreau.
     Amable, married Wulgrin II, Count of Angoulême
     Aois (fate unknown)
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Dangereuse de L'Isle Bouchard 1079–1151
     Children
          Aenor de Châtellerault 1103–1130
     BURIAL     Abbaye Notre Dame de Noyers, Nouatre, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France
     Maintained by: Kat
     Originally Created by: nbo
     Added: 21 Apr 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 88939402
     SPONSORED BY Blaine Barham.7
Ayméric I (?) Vicomte de Châtellerault died before 7 November 1144 at Abbaye Notre Dame de Noyers, Nouatre, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France; Richardson says d. c. 1144; Weis says d. 7 Nov 1151; Genealogics says d. both bef 7 Nov 1144 and on 7 Nov 1151.8,9,1
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:813.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef. 1700, Baltimore, 1995, Weis, Frederick Lewis; Sheppard, Walter. 157.
3. Histoire et Genealogie de la Maison de La Rochefoucauld, La Ricamerie, 1975, Martin, Georges. 211.1
GAV-23 EDV-24 GKJ-25.

; This is the same person as:
"Aimery I, Viscount of Châtellerault" at Wikipedia and as
"Aymeric Ier de Châtellerault" at Wikipédia (Fr.)10,11

; Per Genealogics:
     "Ayméric was born about 1076, the son of Boson II, vicomte de Châtellerault, and Aliénor de Thouars. His wife was Dangerose de L'Isle-Bouchard, daughter of Barthélémy de L'Isle-Bouchard and Gerberge de Blaison. They had four children of whom Haois, Hugues II and Aénor would have progeny.
     "In 1115, after seven years of marriage, Dangerose was 'abducted' from her bedroom by Guillaume VII-IX 'le Jeune' de Poitou, duc d'Aquitaine, comte de Poitou. She was taken to a tower in his castle in Poitiers called Maubergeonne. As a result, Dangerose was nicknamed La Maubergeonne. Abductions like these were quite common among nobles during the Middle Ages. However, in this particular case she seems to have been a willing participant in the affair.
     "The duke of Aquitaine, the earliest known troubadour whose work survives, was quite popular with the women of his time and was known to have had many affaires. However, Dangerose would become his mistress for the rest of his life. There is no record of complaint by Ayméric. This is believed to be because he feared the wrath of his powerful and volatile overlord. It would be the duke's wife Philippa Mathilde de Toulouse who took action against the 'abduction' and affaire. Her actions would lead to both Guillaume and Dangerose being excommunicated by the Pope. Guillaume used his wealth and power eventually to reconcile with the pope and was accepted back into the Church.
     "In 1123 Ayméric and Dangerose's daughter Aénor married Guillaume IX's son and heir, who would become Guillaume VIII-X de Poitou, duc d'Aquitaine, duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitou. It is believed that this union came about at Dangerose's urging. The marriage led to the birth of Eleanor de Poitou, duchesse d'Aquitaine, who became the wife of Louis VII, king of France, and Henry II, king of England.
     "Ayméric died on 7 November 1151."1 Ayméric I (?) Vicomte de Châtellerault was also known as AumaryAlmeric I (?) Vicomte de Châtellerault.

; Per Med Lands:
     "AIMERY [I] (-Abbaye de Noyers 7 Nov before 1144, bur Abbaye de Noyers). "Bossonis vicecomitis, Aimerici filius eius, Adenordis vicecomitissæ" witnessed a charter dated [1082] under which "Erchembaldus Grenulla" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély[648]. "Boso vicecomes et uxor eius Adenors et filii eorum" donated property to St Cyprien by charter dated 1088 subscribed by "Bosonis vicecomitis et Aenoris uxoris eius et filiorum ipsorum Aimerici et Bosonis et sororis eorum Gisberge"[649]. "Willelmus Goscelinus monachus Sancti Cipriani" donated property to St Cyprien by charter dated [1088] subscribed by "Boso vicecomes, Ainors uxor, filii ipsorum Aimericus, Boso et Petrus"[650]. "Castri Araldus vicecomes…Boso…cum uxore Adenorde et filio Aimerico" donated property "allodium…in Brigisensi pago apud villam Culturas" to the abbey of Saint-Florent near Saumur by undated charter subscribed by "filii eius minoris Bosonis"[651]. “Boso proconsul Castri Araldi” donated “viam...Busseriæ” to Noyers, with the support of “uxor proconsulis et duo filii eius Aimericus et Boso et filia eius”, by charter dated to [1108][652]. Vicomte de Châtellerault. "Aimerico vicecomes de Castro Arraudi" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Boso fratre meo" by charter dated to [1108/1115/16][653]. “Aimericus proconsul Castri Araldi, Bartholomæus dominus Insulæ, Aimericus dominus Fagiæ, Paganus dominus Montis-Basonis, Hugo dominus Sanctæ Mauræ...” witnessed the charter dated to [1113] which records an agreement between the monks of Noyers and “Hugo Goscelini” concerning “terræ quam habebat Guitburgis mater Radulfi de Fontanellis”[654]. A charter dated to [1136] records that “Aimericus vice-comes Castri Araudi” died and was buried at Noyers after becoming a monk and that “filius eius Hugo vice-comes” confirmed privileges to the abbey[655].
     "m AMAUBERGE [Dangerose], daughter of ---. "Aimericus Castri Araudi vicecomes" donated property to Saint-Denis en Vaux on the advice of "matris mee Adenoris et uxoris mee Dangerose fratrumque meorum Bosonis et Petri" by charter dated 1109[656]. Europäische Stammtafeln suggests that she was the daughter of Barthélemy [I] Seigneur de l’Isle-Bouchard[657]. Barthélemy is recorded with a daughter with the unusual name Dangerose (see the section SEIGNEURS de l’ISLE-BOUCHARD) who, from a chronological point of view, appears to have been of the right age to have been the wife of Vicomte Aimery [I]. She left her husband to live with Guillaume IX Duke of Aquitaine, Guillaume VII Comte de Poitou, for which he was excommunicated. Ralph de Diceto’s Ymagines Historiarum record that “Willelmus comes Pictaviensium” left “uxori suæ” for “pellicem...Amalbergam”, specifying that the resulting dispute lasted seven years[658]. Orderic Vitalis recounts that "Hildegarde Ctss de Poitou" complained to the synod of Reims, held in Oct 1119 by Pope Calixtus II, that her husband had abandoned her for "Malberge wife of the vicomte de Châtellerault"[659]."
Med Lands cites:
[648] Saint-Jean d’Angély, Tome I, CCLVII, p. 314.
[649] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 283, p. 180.
[650] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 285, p. 182.
[651] Saint-Florent, Saumur LXXVIII, p. 108.
[652] Noyers, CCCLXIII, p. 394.
[653] Fontevraud 30, p. 23.
[654] Noyers, CCCXCIV, p. 427.
[655] Noyers, CDXCIV, p. 528.
[656] Saint-Denis en Vaux I, p. 346.
[657] ES XIV 83.
[658] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 567.
[659] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 259.2


; Per Genealogy.EU: "C1. Aymeric I Vcte de Châtellerault 1109/19; 1m: Maubergeron N; 2m: Dangerose N; all kids by 1m."12

; Per Racines et Histoire (L'Isle-Bouchard): "Amalaberge (Dangerosa, Maubergeonne) ° ~1075 + dès 07/11/1151
     ép. ~1100 Aimeri 1er Adhémar, vicomte de Châtellerault ° 1077 + 1144 (Noyers) (fils de Boson II et d’Aliénor de Thouars)
     ?) liaison avec Guillaume IX d’Aquitaine «Le Troubadour», comte de Poitiers ° 22/10/1071 + 10/02/1126.13 " He was Vicomte de Châtellerault between 1092 and 1144.

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ayméric I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020886&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE%20NOBILITY.htm#AimeryIChatelleraultdiedbefore1144. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boson II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00121006&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE%20NOBILITY.htm#BosonIChatelleraultdied1095B
  5. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maubergeon/Dangerose de L'Isle-Bouchard: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020887&tree=LEO
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 06 June 2020), memorial page for Aymeric I “Aimery” de Châtellerault (1075–7 Nov 1151), Find a Grave Memorial no. 88939402, citing Abbaye Notre Dame de Noyers, Nouatre, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France ; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/88939402/aymeric_i-de_ch_tellerault. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 183-3, p. 157. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S2048] Douglas Richardson, "Richardson email 23 Mar 2006: "Queen's Kinsfolk: Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine's kinsfolk"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 23 Mar2006. Hereinafter cited as "Richardson email 23 Mar2006."
  10. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Aymeric Ier de Châtellerault: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aymeric_Ier_de_Ch%C3%A2tellerault. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aimery_I,_Viscount_of_Ch%C3%A2tellerault. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, de La Rochefoucauld: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/rochef/rochef1.html
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de L’Isle-Bouchard, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/L-Isle-Bouchard.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330872&tree=LEO
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.5.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aénor de Châtellerault: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020885&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE%20NOBILITY.htm#AenorChatelleraultMGuillaumeXAquitaine

Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou1,2,3

M, #4355, b. 22 October 1071, d. 10 February 1127
FatherGuy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou4,5,2,6 b. c 1024, d. 25 Sep 1086
MotherHildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne4,2,7 b. c 1050, d. a 1120
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited20 Dec 2020
     Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou was born on 22 October 1071 at Perigueux, Departement de la Dordogne, Aquitaine, France (now).2,3,8 He married Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Aquitaine, daughter of Foulques IV "le Rechin" de Château-Landon Comte de Tours, d'Anjou et de Gatinais and Hildegarde de Beaugency, in 1089;
His 1st wife; her 1st husband.9,10,11,2,12,3,13,14 Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou and Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Aquitaine were divorced in 1090; Leo van de Pas says annulled 1093; Med Lands says divorced 1090.9,10,11,2,12,3,15,14 Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou married Philippa Mathilde Maud (?) Comtesse de Toulouse suo jure, daughter of Guillaume IV (?) Comte de Toulouse and Emma de Mortain, in 1094 at France;
His 2nd wife.11,2,16,17,15,18 Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou and Philippa Mathilde Maud (?) Comtesse de Toulouse suo jure were divorced in 1115.11,2,16,17,15,18
Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou died on 10 February 1127 at Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France (now), at age 55; Per Genealogics: "died at the siege of the castle of Blaye."2,3,8
Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou was buried after 10 February 1127 at Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     22 Oct 1071, Perigueux, Departement de la Dordogne, Aquitaine, France
     DEATH     10 Feb 1126 (aged 54), Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
     French nobility, also called the young or the Troubadour, Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony as Guillaume VII also Count of Poitou. He was the only son of Guillaume VIII and his third wife Hildegarde de Bourgogne. He succeeded his father in 1088 and married Ermengarde de Anjou in the following year. The marriage seems to have been not very happy. Her mood swings and unpredictable behavior, coupled with the failure to conceive a child led to the dissolution of the marriage. Around 1094 he married countess Philippa de Toulouse, heiress of Guillaume IV. With her he had two sons and five daughters. His reign was dominated by the conflict with the St-Gilles family for the power in Toulouse. After he had conquered Toulouse for the first time he sold his rights to Bertrand de St-Gilles to have enough money for a crusade. In March 1101 he started with Welf IV of Bavaria for the Holy Land. In September, after passing through Constantinople his army was defeated at Heraclea. He was able to flee and reached Antioch with only six men. After visiting Jerusalem he returned home in fall 1102. He kidnapped the willing Dangereuse de l'Isle-Bouchard, wife of Aimery de Chatellerault and installed her in his castle in Poitiers. She became his mistress and bore him five children including Raimund of Antioch. When Philippa returned from Toulouse to find she had been replaced she appealed to the church and accused her husband openly of adultery. Even after being excommunicated he refused to part from Dangereuse. Philippa retired to Fontevrault where she died a year later.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Guillaume VI de Poitou 1024–1086
          Hildegarde de Bourgogne 1050–1120
     Spouses
          Philippa of Toulouse 1073–1118
          Ermengarde de Anjou 1068–1146
     Children
          Guillaume X of Aquitaine 1099–1137
     BURIAL     Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 13 May 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 90062291
     SPONSORED BY Christian H. F. Riley.
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "William IX (Occitan: Guilhèm de Peitieus; Guilhem de Poitou French: Guillaume de Poitiers) (22 October 1071 – 10 February 1127), called the Troubador, was the Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony and Count of Poitou (as William VII) between 1086 and his death. He was also one of the leaders of the Crusade of 1101. Though his political and military achievements have a certain historical importance, he is best known as the earliest troubadour[1]—a vernacular lyric poet in the Occitan language—whose work survived.
Ducal career
     "William was the son of William VIII of Aquitaine by his third wife, Hildegarde of Burgundy. His birth was a cause of great celebration at the Aquitanian court, but the Church at first considered him illegitimate because of his father's earlier divorces and his parents' consanguinity. This obliged his father to make a pilgrimage to Rome soon after his birth to seek Papal approval of his third marriage and the young William's legitimacy.
Early career, 1088–1102
     "William inherited the duchy at the age of fifteen upon the death of his father. It has been generally believed that he was first married in 1088, at age sixteen, to Ermengarde, daughter of Fulk IV of Anjou. Biographers have described Ermengarde as beautiful and well-educated, though suffering from severe mood swings. However, Ruth Harvey's 1993 critical investigation shows the assumption of William's marriage to Ermengarde to be based largely on an error in a nineteenth-century secondary source and it is highly likely that Philippa of Toulouse was William's only wife.[2]
     "Further research[3] has found the claim that William was married to "Hermingerda", daughter of Fulk IV of Anjou is based on the very unreliable chronicle of William of Tyre, written between 1169 and 1187, more than 70 years after the events in question would have taken place. Tyre erroneously identifies Ermengarde's mother as Bertrade of Montfort, the sister of Amalricus de Montfort when her mother was in fact Audearde or Hildegarde of Beaugency. Tyre's chronicle lacks any contemporary corroboration, no primary text ever mentions a marriage between William and Ermengarde. It is therefore not only improbable that William married Ermengarde, it is likely that Ermengarde - at least as a wife of William - never existed.
     "In 1094, William married Philippa, the daughter and heiress of William IV of Toulouse.[4] By Philippa, William had two sons and five daughters, including his eventual successor, William X. His second son, Raymond,[5] eventually became the Prince of Antioch in the Holy Land, and his daughter Agnes married firstly Aimery V of Thouars and then Ramiro II of Aragon,[6] reestablishing dynastic ties with that ruling house.
     "William invited Pope Urban II to spend the Christmas of 1095 at his court. The pope urged him to "take the cross" (i.e. the First Crusade) and leave for the Holy Land, but William was perhaps more interested in exploiting the absence on Crusade of Raymond IV of Toulouse, his wife's uncle, to press her claim to Toulouse; on a more practical level, he also had no heir at that time. He and Philippa did capture Toulouse in 1098, an act for which they were threatened with excommunication. The Duchess was an admirer of Robert of Arbrissel, and persuaded William to grant him land in northern Poitou to establish a religious community dedicated to the Virgin Mary. This became Fontevraud Abbey, which would enjoy the patronage of their granddaughter Eleanor and would remain important until its dissolution during the French Revolution.
     "Likely motivated by many factors, religious as well as secular, William joined the Crusade of 1101, an expedition inspired by the success of the First Crusade in 1099. To finance it, he had to mortgage Toulouse back to Bertrand, the son of Raymond IV. William arrived in the Holy Land in 1101 and stayed there until the following year. His record as a military leader is not very impressive. He fought mostly skirmishes in Anatolia and was frequently defeated. His recklessness led to his being ambushed on several occasions, with great losses to his own forces. In September 1101, his entire army was destroyed by the Seljuk Turks led by Kilij Arslan I at Heraclea; William himself barely escaped, and, according to Orderic Vitalis, he reached Antioch with only six surviving companions. (See Army of William IX on the Crusade of 1101.)
Conflict with Church and wife, 1102–1118
     "William, like his father and many magnates of the time, had a rocky relationship with the Church. He was excommunicated twice, the first time in 1114 for an alleged infringement of the Church's tax privileges. His response to this was to demand absolution from Peter, Bishop of Poitiers. As the bishop was at the point of pronouncing the anathema, the duke threatened him with a sword, swearing to kill him if he did not pronounce absolution. Bishop Peter, surprised, pretended to comply, but when the duke, satisfied, released him, the bishop completed reading the anathema, before calmly presenting his neck and inviting the duke to strike. According to contemporaries, William hesitated a moment before sheathing his sword and replying, "I don't love you enough to send you to paradise."
     "William was excommunicated a second time for "abducting" the Viscountess Dangerose (Dangerosa), the wife of his vassal Aimery I de Rochefoucauld, Viscount of Châtellerault. The lady, however, appears to have been a willing party in the matter. He installed her in the Maubergeonne tower of his castle in Poitiers (leading to her nickname La Maubergeonne), and, as related by William of Malmesbury, even painted a picture of her on his shield.
     "Upon returning to Poitiers from Toulouse, Philippa was enraged to discover a rival woman living in her palace. She appealed to her friends at court and to the Church; however, no noble could assist her since William was their feudal overlord, and whilst the Papal legate Giraud (who was bald) complained to William and told him to return Dangerose to her husband, William's only response was, "Curls will grow on your pate before I part with the Viscountess." Humiliated, Philippa chose in 1116 to retire to the Abbey of Fontevrault. She did not survive there long, however: the abbey records state that she died on 28 November 1118.
Later career, 1118–1127
Relations between the Duke and his elder son William also became strained—although it is unlikely that he ever embarked upon a seven-year revolt in order to avenge his mother's mistreatment, as Ralph of Diceto claimed, only to be captured by his father. Other records flatly contradict such a thing. Ralph claimed that the revolt began in 1113; but at that time, the young William was only thirteen and his father's liaison with Dangerose had not yet begun. Father and son improved their relationship after the marriage of the younger William to Aenor of Châtellerault, Dangerose's daughter by her husband, Aimery I de Rochefoucauld, Viscount of Châtellerault, in 1121.
     "In October 1119, Orderic Vitalis reports that the Countess of Poitou, whom he refers to as "Hildegarde," suddenly appeared at the Council of Reims being held by Pope Calixtus II and demanded that the Pope excommunicate William (again), oust Dangerose from the ducal palace, and restore herself to her rightful place. The Pope postponed the case as William was not present to answer the charges. William was readmitted to the Church around 1120, after making concessions to it that may have included participating in the Reconquista efforts underway in Spain.
     "Between 1120 and 1123 William joined forces with the Kingdoms of Castile and León. Aquitanian troops fought side by side with Castilians in an effort to take Cordoba. During his sojourn in Spain, William was given a rock crystal vase by a Muslim ally that he later bequeathed to his granddaughter Eleanor. The vase probably originated in Sassanid Persia in the seventh century.
     "In 1122, William lost control of Toulouse, Philippa's dower land, to Alfonso Jordan, the son and heir of Raymond IV, who had taken Toulouse after the death of William IV. He did not trouble to reclaim it. He died on 10 February 1127, aged 56, after suffering a short illness. His nickname, "the Troubadour", was only applied in the nineteenth century. In contemporary documents the only nickname he occasionally bears is "the Younger" (Latin junior), to distinguish him from his father.[7]
Poetic career
     "William's greatest legacy to history was not as a warrior but as a troubadour—a lyric poet employing the Romance vernacular language called Provençal or Occitan.
     "He was the earliest troubadour whose work survives. Eleven of his songs survive (Merwin, 2002). The song traditionally numbered as the eighth (Farai chansoneta nueva) is of dubious attribution, since its style and language are significantly different (Pasero 1973, Bond 1982). Song 5 (Farai un vers, pos mi sonelh) has two significantly different versions in different manuscripts. The songs are attributed to him under his title as Count of Poitou (lo coms de Peitieus). The topics vary, treating sex, love, women, his own sexual and literary prowess, and feudal politics.
     "An anonymous 13th-century vida of William remembers him thus:
'The Count of Poitiers was one of the most courtly men in the world and one of the greatest deceivers of women. He was a fine knight at arms, liberal in his womanizing, and a fine composer and singer of songs. He traveled much through the world, seducing women.'

     "It is possible, however, that at least in part it is not based on facts, but on literal interpretation of his songs, written in first person; in Song 5, for example, he describes how he deceived two women.
     "In a striking departure from the typical attitude toward women in the period, William seems to have held at least one woman in particularly high esteem, composing several poems in homage to this woman, who he refers to as midons (master):[8]
Every joy must abase itself,
and every might obey
in the presence of Midons, for the sweetness of her welcome,
for her beautiful and gentle look;
and a man who wins to the joy of her love
will live a hundred years.
The joy of her can make the sick man well again,
her wrath can make a well man die,

     "His frankness, wit, and vivacity caused scandal and won admiration at the same time. He is among the first Romance vernacular poets of the Middle Ages, one of the founders of a tradition that would culminate in Dante, Petrarch, and François Villon. Ezra Pound mentions him in Canto VIII:
And Poictiers, you know, Guillaume Poictiers,
had brought the song up out of Spain
with the singers and viels ...

     "In Spirit of Romance Pound also calls William IX "the most 'modern' of the troubadours":
'For any of the later Provençals, i.e., the high-brows, we have to ... 'put ourselves into the Twelfth Century' etc. Guillaume, writing a century earlier, is just as much of our age as of his own.' —?Ezra Pound, cited in Bond 1982, p. lxxvi

     "William was a man who loved scandal and no doubt enjoyed shocking his audiences. In fact, William granted large donations to the church, perhaps to regain the pope's favour. He also added to the palace of the counts of Poitou (which had stood since the Merovingian era), later added to by his granddaughter Eleanor of Aquitaine and surviving in Poitiers as the Palace of Justice to this day.
     "One of William's poems, possibly written at the time of his first excommunication, since it implies his son was still a minor, is partly a musing on mortality: Pos de chantar m'es pres talenz (Since I have the desire to sing,/I'll write a verse for which I'll grieve). It concludes:
I have given up all I loved so much:
chivalry and pride;
and since it pleases God, I accept it all,
that He may keep me by Him.

I enjoin my friends, upon my death,
all to come and do me great honor,
since I have held joy and delight
far and near, and in my abode.

Thus I give up joy and delight,
and squirrel and grey and sable furs.


     "Orderic Vitalis refers to William composing songs (c. 1102) upon his return from the Crusade of 1101. These might be the first "Crusade songs": 'Then the Poitevin duke many times related, with rhythmic verses and witty measures, the miseries of his captivity, before kings, magnates, and Christian assemblies.[9]'
References
Notes
1. Joseph Anglade, Grammaire de l'ancien provençal ou ancienne langue d'oc, 1921, Part I, Chapter 1, p. 33: ... les poésies du premier troubadour, Guilhem de Poitiers ... ("the poems of the first troubadour, Guilhem de Poitiers").
2. Harvey, Ruth. "The wives of the 'first troubadour', Duke William IX of Aquitaine". Journal of Medieval History, Volume 19, Issue 4, 1993,pp. 307-325
3. Wolterbeek, Marc. "Inventing History, Inventing Her Story: The Case of William of Aquitaine's Marital Affairs." Medieval Association of the Pacific, University of California, Berkeley, March 1995, and International Medieval Congress, Leeds, England, July 1995.
4. John Gillingham, Richard I, (Yale University Press, 1999), 29.
5. Constance, Princess of Antioch (1130-1164), Alan V. Murray, Ancestry, Marriages and Family |journal=Anglo-Norman Studies XXXVIII: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2015, ed. Elisabeth Van Houts, (The Boydell Press, 2016), 86.
6. Sara McDougall, Royal Bastards: The Birth of Illegitimacy, 800-1230, (Oxford University Press, 2016), 199.
7. John E. Morby, "The Sobriquets of Medieval European Princes", Canadian Journal of History, 13:1 (1978), p. 12.
8. Bogin, Meg (1980). The Women Troubadours. W. W. Norton and Company. pp. 37–38.
9. Translation based on Marjorie Chibnall, in Bond, p. 240.
Bibliography
** Biographies des troubadours ed. J. Boutière, A.-H. Schutz (Paris: Nizet, 1964) pp. 7–8, 585-587.
** Bond, Gerald A., ed., transl. intro. The Poetry of William VII, Count of Poitier, IX Duke of Aquitaine, (Garland Publishing Co.:New York) 1982
** Duisit, Brice. Las Cansos del Coms de Peitieus (CD), Alpha 505, 2003
** Harvey, Ruth E. The wives of the 'first troubadour', Duke William IX of Aquitaine (Journal of Medieval History), 1993
** Meade, Marion. Eleanor of Aquitaine, 1991
** Merwin, W.S. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, 2002. pp xv-xvi. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. ISBN 0-375-41476-2.
** Owen, D.D.R. Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen and Legend
** Parsons, John Carmi. Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady, 2002
** Pasero, Nicolò, ed.: Guglielmo IX d'Aquitania, Poesie. 1973
** Verdon, J. La chronique de Saint Maixent, 1979.
** Waddell, Helen. The Wandering Scholars: the Life and Art of the Lyric Poets of the Latin Middle Ages, 1955
External links
** Complete works: http://www.trobar.org/troubadours/coms_de_peiteu/
** Works, translated by James H. Donalson: http://brindin.com/vcb3cove.htm
** Smythe, Barbara. Trobador Poets: Selections from the Poems of Eight Trobadors: http://www.yorku.ca/inpar/Medieval_Provencal.html
** Lyric allusions to the crusades and the Holy Land" (Not found 7 Dec 2019.)19" GAV-23 EDV-24 GKJ-25.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Guillaume VII-IX 'le Jeune' was born in 1071 as the son of Duke Guillaume VI-VIII of Aquitaine and Hildegarde de Bourgogne. Guillaume became duke of Aquitaine in 1086 when he was about 15. He was the first great troubadour in the Languedoc region. He also wrote songs in the Provençal dialect which were amoral, erotic and irreverent.
     "About 1089 he married Ermengarde d'Anjou, daughter of Foulques IV 'le Rechin', Comte d'Anjou and his first wife Hildegarde de Beaugency. However he divorced Ermengarde in 1090, and she married Alain IV Fergent, duc de Bretagne, and had progeny.
     "Before 1094 Guillaume married Philippa, the only child and heir of Count Guillaume IV of Toulouse and Emma de Mortain. They had a son Guillaume, who would succeed his father as Guillaume VIII-X, a daughter Agnès (Mathilde) de Poitou, who had progeny from both her marriages, and possibly up to four other daughters.
     "When he went on Crusade Guillaume was said to have had a painting of Philippa on his shield as 'it was his will to bear her in battle, as she had borne him in bed'. However, he fathered most of his children by Maubergeon/Dangerose, wife of Aymeric I, vicomte de Châtellerault. She had left her husband to become Guillaume's mistress. They had a son Raimund, prince of Antioch (born in 1114 or 1117, died 1149), as well as a son Henri de Poitiers and two daughters, Adelaide and Agnès.
     "Guillaume's rule was very disrupted by disputes with the house of St.Gilles over the inheritance of his wife Philippa. He twice took the city and county of Toulouse (in 1098 and 1113), where Philippa maintained a court in her own right as countess, and in 1099 gave birth there to their son Guillaume.
     "To fund a crusade to the Holy Land, Guillaume VII-IX in 1099 renounced his rights to the county of Toulouse in exchange for payment of a large sum to the nephew of his wife, Count Bertrand de St.Gilles, only to reclaim the county after the death of Bertrand on 21 April 1112 in the Holy Land. With support of the nobility and the citizens he was able to rule in Toulouse until 1123 (the year in which the citizens took over the town).
     "In March 1101 Guillaume set out on Crusade with Welf IV, duke of Bavaria (1036-1101). Their route led over Constantinople to Heraclea, where their army was annihilated by the Turks in September 1101; he himself managed to reach Antioch and Jerusalem with a few companions.
     "After his return in the autumn of 1102 he sided with Foulques IV 'Rechin', comte d'Anjou, the father of his first wife Ermengarde, in his disputes with his son Geoffrey Martel. However, after a reconciliation between them he lost some castles in the Saintogne, whose return he forced in 1107 by the imprisonment of Foulques' son Foulques V. In revenge Foulques 'Rechin' supported the men of Lusignan and Parthenay in their more than eight-years-long feud with the duke (from 1100), which was finished only by the capture of the castle of Parthenay.
     "About 1115 Guillaume was excommunicated by the papal legate Girard, presumably over his neglect of his wife Philippa, who left the court about then and took refuge at the Abbey of Fontevrault, where she died in 1117. After negotiations Guillaume's excommunication was withdrawn in 1118, but in atonement Guillaume left for Spain, where he supported Alfonso I 'el Batallador' of Aragón in the conquest of Calatayud. On 18 June 1120, with Alfonso he won a great victory over the Moors at Cutanda north of Daroca. Two years later, because Guillaume needed the help of Count Raimund Berengar III of Barcelona against Alphons Jourdain of Toulouse, he changed sides and forced Alfonso I, by challenging him to a duel, to abandon the siege of Leridas.
     "To finance his wars Guillaume did not shrink from devaluing the currency nor from infringements on church property. In 1121 he married his eldest son Guillaume to Aénor de Châtellerault, the legitimate daughter of his mistress Maubergeon/Dangerose. Their daughter Eleanor would be known to history as Eleanor of Aquitaine.
     "In 1126 the duke, who was well experienced in all the courtly and knightly arts, died at the siege of the castle of Blaye."13

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 28.20,21,22,13

; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1): “Guillaume VII (IX), Duke of Aquitaine (1086-1126), Ct of Poitou, *1071, +1126/27; 1m: 1089 (div 1090) Ermengarde d'Anjou (+1146); 2m: 1094 (div 1115) Philippa=Matilda of Toulouse (+28.11.1117)”.4

; Per Med lands:
     "GUILLAUME d’Aquitaine, son of GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Hildegarde de Bourgogne [Capet] (22 Oct 1071-10 Feb 1126). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the birth "1071 XI Kal Nov" of "Goffredo duci…Guillelmus filius"[558]. "Willelmi filius eius" subscribed the donation by "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" of property to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated [1073/87][559]. "Goffredus…dux Aquitanorum et Guillelmus filius eius" set entry conditions for monks at Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated 1078 or 1079[560]. He succeeded his father in 1086 as GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou. Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus comes et princeps Pictaviensium, de sanguine et origine Henrici tertii imperatoris Romanorum" crossed Hungary peacefully with "duce Bawariorum Welfone et…comitssa…Ida de marchia Osterrich", entered the territory of the Bulgars in which "duce Bulgarorum Guz" refused their passage into Adrianople (when "Rodulfus…de Scegonges ortus, cognatus ipsius Willelmi principis" was killed and "Hardewinus…de Sancto Medardo" captured), but that Guillaume captured "ducem Bulgarorum" who was forced to allow the pilgrims to continue, undated but in a passage adjacent to text which records events in 1101[561]. According to Albert of Aix, after the army was dispersed in Asia Minor by the Turks, Duke Guillaume fled to "Longinath juxta Tursolt civitatem", from where he was rescued and brought to Antioch by Tancred's forces[562]. "Aimericus de Ranconia vocatus filius Aimeri qui fuit male peremptus et filius Burgoniæ" donated "mariscum et verniatam quæ sunt sub molendino de Ternant" to the abbey of Ternant Ste-Marie by charter dated 1105, witnessed by "Willelmi ducis, Aldiardis comitissa"[563]. He was a troubadour and composer of lyric poetry. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the death "1126 IV Id Feb" of "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" and his burial "Pictavis civitate apud Novum Monasterium"[564]. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "10 Feb" of "Guillermus dux Aquitanorum"[565].
     "m firstly (1089, divorced 1090) as her first husband, ERMENGARDE d'Anjou, daughter of FOULQUES IV "le Rechin" Comte d'Anjou & his first wife Hildegarde de Baugency ([1068]-Jerusalem 1 Jun 1146). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of "Fulco" as "comitissam Redonensem" but does not name her[566]. "Fulco Andegavensis comes" donated property to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Gaufrido et Fulconello et filia mea Ermengarde" by charter dated 23 Jun 1096[567]. William of Tyre names her "Hermingerda", gives her father's name implying that she was born from his fifth marriage, and names her first husband "Pictaviensium comitis Willelmi", her divorce and her second husband "comes Brittaniæ"[568]. She married secondly ([1093]) as his second wife, Alain IV "Fergant" Duke of Brittany. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "comitissa Brittaniæ" was the daughter of Foulques and his first wife "filiam Lancelini de Baugenciaco", adding that she became a nun at "Jerusalem in ecclesia Sanctæ Annæ" after her husband died[569]. "Fulco Andecavorum comes nepos Goffridi Martelli…consulis" donated property to Angers with the consent of "Ermenjarde filia sua comitissa Brittaniæ" by charter dated 12 Apr 1109[570]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "Kal Jun" of "Ermengardis comitissa Britanniæ mater Conan ducis et soror Fulconis regis Hierosolymitani"[571]. The Annals of St Salvator Redon record that "Ermengardeque Alani conjugem, vere piam ac religiosam" was buried at the abbey of Redon[572].
     "m secondly (1094, divorced 1115) PHILIPPA [Mathilde] de Toulouse, daughter of GUILLAUME IV Comte de Toulouse & his second wife Emma de Mortain (-28 Nov 1117). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the marriage of "Guillelmus" and "Philippam…filiam Willelmi comitis Tolosani et neptem Raimundi de Sancto Egidio"[573]. Robert of Torigny refers to, but does not name, "filiam unam" of "comes Tolosanus frater Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii" & his wife, who married "Guillermus comes Pictavensis et dux Aquitanorum"[574]. "Guillelmus…Aquitainie similiter et Vasconie dux et comes" confirmed donations to Sainte-Croix, Bordeaux by "genitor noster Guillelmus qui et Gaufridus vocatus est" with the consent of "Mathildis uxor…" by charter dated 23 Mar 1096[575]. It is assumed that Mathilde and Philippa refer to the same person. "Willelmus comes et uxor mea Philippia, filia Willelmi comitis Tolosæ" donated property to Toulouse Saint-Sernin by charter dated Jul 1098[576]. She is also named in an undated donation by Bertrand Comte de Toulouse which names her father but not her husband[577]. “Philippæ comitissæ…Emmæ filia” reached agreement with “Bernardus-Atonis filius Ermengardis” by charter dated 1114[578]. Orderic Vitalis recounts that "Hildegarde Ctss de Poitou" complained to the synod of Reims, held in Oct 1119 by Pope Calixtus II, that her husband had abandoned her for "Malberge wife of the vicomte de Châtellerault"[579]. She became a nun. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "28 Nov" of "Philippa monacha, Pictavensis comitissa"[580].
     "Mistress (1): AMAUBERGE [Dangerose], wife of AIMERY [I] Vicomte de Châtellerault, daughter of ---. "Aimericus Castri Araudi vicecomes" donated property to Saint-Denis en Vaux on the advice of "matris mee Adenoris et uxoris mee Dangerose fratrumque meorum Bosonis et Petri" by charter dated 1109[581]. Europäische Stammtafeln suggests that she was the daughter of Barthélemy [I] Seigneur de l’Isle-Bouchard[582]. Barthélemy is recorded with a daughter with the unusual name Dangerose (see the document POITOU, section SEIGNEURS de l’ISLE-BOUCHARD) who, from a chronological point of view, appears to have been of the right age to have been the wife of Vicomte Aimery [I]. She left her husband to live with Duke Guillaume, for which he was excommunicated. Ralph de Diceto´s Ymagines Historiarum record that “Willelmus comes Pictaviensium” left “uxori suæ” for “pellicem...Amalbergam”, specifying that the resulting dispute lasted seven years[583]. Orderic Vitalis recounts that "Hildegarde Ctss de Poitou" complained to the synod of Reims, held in Oct 1119 by Pope Calixtus II, that her husband had abandoned her for "Malberge wife of the vicomte de Châtellerault"[584].
Med Lands cites:
[558] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 405.
[559] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 18, p. 22.
[560] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XCI, p. 97.
[561] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Caps. XXXIV and XXXV, p. 579.
[562] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. XL, p. 581.
[563] Besly (1647), Preuves, p. 392.
[564] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 427.
[565] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 189.
[566] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1095, MGH SS XXIII, p. 803.
[567] Angers 65, p. 127.
[568] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer") (“WT”) XIV.I, p. 606.
[569] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140.
[570] Angers 93, p. 171.
[571] Urseau, C. (ed.) L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers (Angers).
[572] Aurélien de Courson, M. (ed.) (1863) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Redon en Bretagne (Paris), ("Redon"), Monasterii S. Salvatoris Rotonensis Annales, VII Sepulturæ Insigniores, p. 451.
[573] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 411.
[574] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1159, p. 319.
[575] Bordeaux Sainte-Croix 3, p. 4.
[576] Douais, C. (ed.) (1867) Cartulaire de l'Abbaye de Saint-Sernin de Toulouse (844-1200) (Paris, Toulouse) ("Saint-Sernin"), 291, p. 206.
[577] Saint-Sernin, 435, p. 312.
[578] Histoire Générale de Languedoc (2nd Edn.) Tome IV, Preuves, XXVII, p. 362, and 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 451, col. 845.
[579] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 259.
[580] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 193.
[581] Documents concernant le Prieuré de Saint-Denis en Vaux, Archives historiques du Poitou Tome VII (Poitiers, 1878) ("Saint-Denis en Vaux") I, p. 346.
[582] ES XIV 83.
[583] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 567.
[584] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 259.15


; Per Med lands:
     "ERMENGARDE d'Anjou ([1068]-Jerusalem 1 Jun 1146, bur Redon). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of "Fulco" as "comitissam Redonensem" but does not name her[252]. "Fulco Andegavensis comes" donated property to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Gaufrido et Fulconello et filia mea Ermengarde" by charter dated 23 Jun 1096[253]. William of Tyre names her "Hermingerda", gives her father's name implying that she was born from his fifth marriage, and names her first husband "Pictaviensium comitis Willelmi", records her divorce and names her second husband "comes Brittaniæ"[254]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "comitissa Brittaniæ" was the daughter of Foulques and his first wife "filiam Lancelini de Baugenciaco", adding that she became a nun at "Jerusalem in ecclesia Sanctæ Annæ" after her husband died[255]. The Chronicon Briocensi records the marriage of "Alanus filius primogenitus [Hoelli]" and "Ermengardem filiam Comitis Andegavensis"[256]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Fergannus comes" married “filiam comitis Andegavorum” after the death of his first wife[257]. "Fulco Andecavorum comes nepos Goffridi Martelli…consulis" donated property to Angers with the consent of "Ermenjarde filia sua comitissa Brittaniæ" by charter dated 12 Apr 1109[258]. "Conanus…Britaniaæ dux cum sorore mea Hidevis et matre mea Ermeniart" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé by charter dated 1118, which names "pater meus Alanus et avus Hoel et attavus Alanus"[259]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "Kal Jun" of "Ermengardis comitissa Britanniæ mater Conan ducis et soror Fulconis regis Hierosolymitani"[260]. The Annals of St Salvator Redon record that "Ermengardeque Alani conjugem, vere piam ac religiosam" was buried at the abbey of Redon[261].
     "m firstly (1089, divorced 1090) GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou], son of GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Audearde [Hildegarde] de Bourgogne [Capet] ([22 Oct 1071]-10 Feb 1127).
     "m secondly ([1093]) as his second wife, ALAIN IV "Fergant" Duke of Brittany, son of HOËL de Cornouaïlle & his wife Havise de Bretagne (-13 Oct 1119)."
Med Lands cites:
[252] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1095, MGH SS XXIII, p. 803.
[253] Angers 65, p. 127.
[254] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 606.
[255] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140.
[256] Ex Chronico Briocensi, RHGF XII, p. 566.
[257] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XVII, p. 291.
[258] Angers 93, p. 171.
[259] Morbihan, 192, p. 155.
[260] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers.
[261] Redon, Monasterii S. Salvatoris Rotonensis Annales, VII Sepulturæ Insigniores, p. 451.14
He was Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne between 1086 and 1126.11,3 He was comte de Poitiers between 1088 and 1127.11,3,19

Family 1

Ermengarde (?) d'Anjou, Duchess of Aquitaine b. c 1068, d. 1 Jun 1146

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VII-IX: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020882&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VI-VIII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020880&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeVIIIAquitainedied1086B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020881&tree=LEO
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 07 December 2019), memorial page for Ermengarde de Anjou (1068–1 Jun 1146), Find A Grave Memorial no. 90367660, citing Abbaye Saint-Sauveur de Redon, Redon, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/90367660/ermengarde-de_anjou. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), De Dreux - Earls of Richmond, p. 162. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermengarde d'Anjou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020206&tree=LEO
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VII-IX 'le Jeune' de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020882&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#ErmengardeM1GuillaumeIXAquiM2AlainIVBret.
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIXdied1127B
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippa Mathilde de Toulouse: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020883&tree=LEO
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE.htm#Philippadied1117
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_IX,_Duke_of_Aquitaine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  21. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  22. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 72-11: "He was a crusader. He was the first troubador to become well-known; his poetry ran the gamut from ribaldry to pathos."
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VIII-X: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020884&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeXAquitainedied1137
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Iberia 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/iberia/iberia8.html
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès (Mathilde) de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020533&tree=LEO
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raimund de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020907&tree=LEO

Philippa Mathilde Maud (?) Comtesse de Toulouse suo jure1,2

F, #4356, b. circa 1073, d. 28 November 1117
FatherGuillaume IV (?) Comte de Toulouse1,3,4,5,6 b. c 1040, d. 1094
MotherEmma de Mortain1,4,5,7 b. c 1058, d. 1080
ReferenceGAV23 EDV23
Last Edited24 Sep 2020
     Philippa Mathilde Maud (?) Comtesse de Toulouse suo jure married Sancho I Ramirez (?) King of Aragon & Navarre, son of Ramiro I (?) King of Aragon and Gisberge/Hermesenda de Foix Cts de Bigorre; Note: Weis mentions this marriage, but neither Leo van de Pas nor Genealogy.EU (Toulouse 1 page) mention it.8 Philippa Mathilde Maud (?) Comtesse de Toulouse suo jure was born circa 1073 at Toulouse, Departement de la Haute-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France.9,4 She married Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou, son of Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou and Hildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne, in 1094 at France;
His 2nd wife.10,11,2,12,13,14 Philippa Mathilde Maud (?) Comtesse de Toulouse suo jure and Guillaume VII (IX) 'Le Troubadour' (?) Duc d'Aquitaine et de Gascogne, comte de Poitou were divorced in 1115.10,11,2,12,13,14
Philippa Mathilde Maud (?) Comtesse de Toulouse suo jure died on 28 November 1117 at Fontevraud-L'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France (now).2,15,12,14
Philippa Mathilde Maud (?) Comtesse de Toulouse suo jure was buried after 28 November 1117 at Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1073, Toulouse, Departement de la Haute-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France
     DEATH     28 Nov 1118 (aged 44–45), Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
     Wife of William IX Duke of Aquataine
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Guillaume IX de Aquitaine 1071–1126
     Children
          Guillaume X of Aquitaine 1099–1137
          Agnes of Aquitaine 1105–1147
     BURIAL     Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
     Created by: Brett Williams
     Added: 19 Feb 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 85222420
     SPONSORED BY Christian H. F. Riley.16
     ; Per Med lands:
     "GUILLAUME d’Aquitaine, son of GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Hildegarde de Bourgogne [Capet] (22 Oct 1071-10 Feb 1126). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the birth "1071 XI Kal Nov" of "Goffredo duci…Guillelmus filius"[558]. "Willelmi filius eius" subscribed the donation by "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" of property to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated [1073/87][559]. "Goffredus…dux Aquitanorum et Guillelmus filius eius" set entry conditions for monks at Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated 1078 or 1079[560]. He succeeded his father in 1086 as GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou. Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus comes et princeps Pictaviensium, de sanguine et origine Henrici tertii imperatoris Romanorum" crossed Hungary peacefully with "duce Bawariorum Welfone et…comitssa…Ida de marchia Osterrich", entered the territory of the Bulgars in which "duce Bulgarorum Guz" refused their passage into Adrianople (when "Rodulfus…de Scegonges ortus, cognatus ipsius Willelmi principis" was killed and "Hardewinus…de Sancto Medardo" captured), but that Guillaume captured "ducem Bulgarorum" who was forced to allow the pilgrims to continue, undated but in a passage adjacent to text which records events in 1101[561]. According to Albert of Aix, after the army was dispersed in Asia Minor by the Turks, Duke Guillaume fled to "Longinath juxta Tursolt civitatem", from where he was rescued and brought to Antioch by Tancred's forces[562]. "Aimericus de Ranconia vocatus filius Aimeri qui fuit male peremptus et filius Burgoniæ" donated "mariscum et verniatam quæ sunt sub molendino de Ternant" to the abbey of Ternant Ste-Marie by charter dated 1105, witnessed by "Willelmi ducis, Aldiardis comitissa"[563]. He was a troubadour and composer of lyric poetry. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the death "1126 IV Id Feb" of "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" and his burial "Pictavis civitate apud Novum Monasterium"[564]. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "10 Feb" of "Guillermus dux Aquitanorum"[565].
     "m firstly (1089, divorced 1090) as her first husband, ERMENGARDE d'Anjou, daughter of FOULQUES IV "le Rechin" Comte d'Anjou & his first wife Hildegarde de Baugency ([1068]-Jerusalem 1 Jun 1146). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of "Fulco" as "comitissam Redonensem" but does not name her[566]. "Fulco Andegavensis comes" donated property to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Gaufrido et Fulconello et filia mea Ermengarde" by charter dated 23 Jun 1096[567]. William of Tyre names her "Hermingerda", gives her father's name implying that she was born from his fifth marriage, and names her first husband "Pictaviensium comitis Willelmi", her divorce and her second husband "comes Brittaniæ"[568]. She married secondly ([1093]) as his second wife, Alain IV "Fergant" Duke of Brittany. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "comitissa Brittaniæ" was the daughter of Foulques and his first wife "filiam Lancelini de Baugenciaco", adding that she became a nun at "Jerusalem in ecclesia Sanctæ Annæ" after her husband died[569]. "Fulco Andecavorum comes nepos Goffridi Martelli…consulis" donated property to Angers with the consent of "Ermenjarde filia sua comitissa Brittaniæ" by charter dated 12 Apr 1109[570]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "Kal Jun" of "Ermengardis comitissa Britanniæ mater Conan ducis et soror Fulconis regis Hierosolymitani"[571]. The Annals of St Salvator Redon record that "Ermengardeque Alani conjugem, vere piam ac religiosam" was buried at the abbey of Redon[572].
     "m secondly (1094, divorced 1115) PHILIPPA [Mathilde] de Toulouse, daughter of GUILLAUME IV Comte de Toulouse & his second wife Emma de Mortain (-28 Nov 1117). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the marriage of "Guillelmus" and "Philippam…filiam Willelmi comitis Tolosani et neptem Raimundi de Sancto Egidio"[573]. Robert of Torigny refers to, but does not name, "filiam unam" of "comes Tolosanus frater Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii" & his wife, who married "Guillermus comes Pictavensis et dux Aquitanorum"[574]. "Guillelmus…Aquitainie similiter et Vasconie dux et comes" confirmed donations to Sainte-Croix, Bordeaux by "genitor noster Guillelmus qui et Gaufridus vocatus est" with the consent of "Mathildis uxor…" by charter dated 23 Mar 1096[575]. It is assumed that Mathilde and Philippa refer to the same person. "Willelmus comes et uxor mea Philippia, filia Willelmi comitis Tolosæ" donated property to Toulouse Saint-Sernin by charter dated Jul 1098[576]. She is also named in an undated donation by Bertrand Comte de Toulouse which names her father but not her husband[577]. “Philippæ comitissæ…Emmæ filia” reached agreement with “Bernardus-Atonis filius Ermengardis” by charter dated 1114[578]. Orderic Vitalis recounts that "Hildegarde Ctss de Poitou" complained to the synod of Reims, held in Oct 1119 by Pope Calixtus II, that her husband had abandoned her for "Malberge wife of the vicomte de Châtellerault"[579]. She became a nun. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "28 Nov" of "Philippa monacha, Pictavensis comitissa"[580].
     "Mistress (1): AMAUBERGE [Dangerose], wife of AIMERY [I] Vicomte de Châtellerault, daughter of ---. "Aimericus Castri Araudi vicecomes" donated property to Saint-Denis en Vaux on the advice of "matris mee Adenoris et uxoris mee Dangerose fratrumque meorum Bosonis et Petri" by charter dated 1109[581]. Europäische Stammtafeln suggests that she was the daughter of Barthélemy [I] Seigneur de l’Isle-Bouchard[582]. Barthélemy is recorded with a daughter with the unusual name Dangerose (see the document POITOU, section SEIGNEURS de l’ISLE-BOUCHARD) who, from a chronological point of view, appears to have been of the right age to have been the wife of Vicomte Aimery [I]. She left her husband to live with Duke Guillaume, for which he was excommunicated. Ralph de Diceto´s Ymagines Historiarum record that “Willelmus comes Pictaviensium” left “uxori suæ” for “pellicem...Amalbergam”, specifying that the resulting dispute lasted seven years[583]. Orderic Vitalis recounts that "Hildegarde Ctss de Poitou" complained to the synod of Reims, held in Oct 1119 by Pope Calixtus II, that her husband had abandoned her for "Malberge wife of the vicomte de Châtellerault"[584].
Med Lands cites:
[558] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 405.
[559] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 18, p. 22.
[560] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XCI, p. 97.
[561] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Caps. XXXIV and XXXV, p. 579.
[562] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. XL, p. 581.
[563] Besly (1647), Preuves, p. 392.
[564] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 427.
[565] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 189.
[566] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1095, MGH SS XXIII, p. 803.
[567] Angers 65, p. 127.
[568] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer") (“WT”) XIV.I, p. 606.
[569] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140.
[570] Angers 93, p. 171.
[571] Urseau, C. (ed.) L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers (Angers).
[572] Aurélien de Courson, M. (ed.) (1863) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Redon en Bretagne (Paris), ("Redon"), Monasterii S. Salvatoris Rotonensis Annales, VII Sepulturæ Insigniores, p. 451.
[573] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 411.
[574] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1159, p. 319.
[575] Bordeaux Sainte-Croix 3, p. 4.
[576] Douais, C. (ed.) (1867) Cartulaire de l'Abbaye de Saint-Sernin de Toulouse (844-1200) (Paris, Toulouse) ("Saint-Sernin"), 291, p. 206.
[577] Saint-Sernin, 435, p. 312.
[578] Histoire Générale de Languedoc (2nd Edn.) Tome IV, Preuves, XXVII, p. 362, and 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 451, col. 845.
[579] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 259.
[580] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 193.
[581] Documents concernant le Prieuré de Saint-Denis en Vaux, Archives historiques du Poitou Tome VII (Poitiers, 1878) ("Saint-Denis en Vaux") I, p. 346.
[582] ES XIV 83.
[583] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 567.
[584] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 259.13

; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1): “Guillaume VII (IX), Duke of Aquitaine (1086-1126), Ct of Poitou, *1071, +1126/27; 1m: 1089 (div 1090) Ermengarde d'Anjou (+1146); 2m: 1094 (div 1115) Philippa=Matilda of Toulouse (+28.11.1117)”.15

; Per Genealogics:
     "Philippa Mathilde was born about 1073, the daughter of Guillaume IV, comte de Toulouse, and Emma de Mortain. She was an only surviving child and so an heiress, by the laws of Toulouse. In 1088 Guillaume went on a pilgrimage to Palestine, leaving his brother Raimond VI of Saint-Gilles as regent.
     "Philippa's early life is something of a mystery. It is known that she did not marry Guillaume VII-IX 'le Jeune' de Poitou, duc d'Aquitaine, until 1094, after the death of her father and the succession of her uncle; the circumstances in which she lived prior to her father's death, the manner of her disinheritance, and the arrangement of her marriage, are thus unknown. What is certain is that, upon the death of her father, Philippa's claims were ignored, and his brother Raimond VI became comte de Toulouse. Philippa then married Guillaume VII-IX, duc d'Aquitaine, whom she considered worthy due to his numerous merits: a handsome man fully capable of flattering a woman, he was not only one of the most prominent dukes in Europe, able to give her the life she felt she deserved; his realm was also conveniently situated next to Toulouse, and so she believed she would easily be able to regain her homeland, - as indeed, the duke promised to do for her. Consequently the two swiftly married. Why she was allowed by her uncle to marry such a dangerous man, or indeed if Raimond had any choice in the matter, is unknown.
     "When Raimond set out on the First Crusade in the autumn of 1096, he left his son Bertrand to rule the county. However in the spring of 1098 Guillaume and Philippa marched into the city of Toulouse and took control without a single life being lost. In the next year she gave birth to her first child in the city. Guillaume 'le Toulousain'.
     "Philippa was stunned in 1100 when her husband mortgaged Toulouse to her cousin Bertrand in exchange for a vast sum of money, which the duke used to go on crusade himself. Philippa, removed from her home, was sent to his capital of Poitiers, from where she ruled Aquitaine on behalf of her husband while he was absent.
     "After Guillaume's return, he and Philippa for a time lived contentedly with each other, producing as further five daughters, and a son Raymond. Her first born Guillaume and a daughter Agnès would have progeny. She also ignored the duke's sexual boasting in song and talk, instead concentrating on religion (in particular the Abbey of Fontevrault, of which she was a keen sponsor), especially the teachings of the Fontevrault founder, Robert d'Arbrissel, who preached the superiority of women over men. Her obsession with a doctrine considered offensive by many men of that time, combined with Guillaume's growing dissatisfaction with her, and his teasing of her (claiming to be founding an abbey of prostitutes), led to discord in the marriage.
     "Toulouse had been won back by Guillaume for his wife in 1113, following the death of Bertrand in Syria in 1112. As Bertrand's heir had been his half-brother, the 9 year old Alfonse Jourdain, Guillaume had been unopposed. Thus by 1114 Philippa was spending most of her time ruling there. Accordingly she was less than pleased when, upon her return from Toulouse to Poitiers in 1114, she discovered her husband to have moved his mistress Dangerose de L'Isle-Bouchard into her palace. Philippa appealed to friends and the Church for assistance in ousting her husband's mistress, but to no avail.
     "About 1115 a humiliated Philippa, devastated by her husband's repayment of her service to him for so many years, left the court, taking refuge at the Abbey of Fontevrault. Some sources indicate they were divorced. For all Philippa's devotion to the abbey and its ideals, she found little peace there, both angry and resentful that her husband had cast her off in favour of a mistress. She died of unknown causes there on 28 November 1117.
     "Orderic Vitalis recounts that 'Hildegarde Comtesse de Poitou' complained to the synod of Reims, held in October 1119 by Pope Calixtus II, that her husband had abandoned her for 'Malberge wife of the vicomte de Châtellerault'. This is inconsistent with the date of death of Philippa, not to mention the difference of first name."4

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Philippa (c. 1073 – 28 November 1118) was suo jure Countess of Toulouse, as well as the Duchess of Aquitaine by marriage to Duke William IX of Aquitaine.
Life
Early life and marriage
     "Philippa was born in approximately 1073 to Count William IV of Toulouse, and his wife Emma of Mortain. She was his only surviving child, and thus, by the laws of Toulouse, his heir. In 1088, William went on a pilgrimage to Palestine, leaving his brother Raymond of Saint-Gilles as regent. (Before he left, it is claimed, he also married his daughter to the King of Aragon in order to disinherit her; however, this marriage is apocryphal, as contemporary evidence shows that Sancho was still married to his previous wife at the time of his death in 1094.)[1]
     "Philippa's early life – if she was not married to Sancho Ramirez of Aragon – is something of a mystery. It is known that she did not marry William IX of Aquitaine until 1094,[2] after the death of her father and the succession of her uncle; the circumstances in which she lived prior to her father's death, the manner of her disinheritance, and the arrangement of her marriage, are thus unknown. Those historians that argue her to have been married to Sancho Ramirez argue that her removal from Toulouse prevented her from effectively claiming her inheritance, and that with the death of Sancho, she was free to remarry based on her own choice. What is certain is that, upon the death of Count William, Philippa's claims were ignored, and Raymond became count.
Political life
     "When Raymond IV of Toulouse set out on the First Crusade in the autumn of 1096, he left his son Bertrand to rule the County. However, in the spring of 1098, William and Philippa marched into the city of Toulouse, and took control without a single life being lost. In the next year, she gave birth to her first child in the city: William the Toulousain.
     "In 1099, her husband went on crusade and he left her as regent in Poitou.
     "She was an admirer of Robert of Arbrissel and persuaded her husband to grant him land in Poitou to establish a religious community dedicated to the Virgin Mary. In 1100 he founded Fontevraud Abbey there.
     "She was stunned in 1100 when her husband mortgaged Toulouse to her cousin Bertrand in exchange for a vast sum of money, which the Duke used to go on Crusade himself. Philippa, removed from her home, was sent to his capital of Poitiers, from where she ruled Aquitaine on behalf of her husband whilst he was absent.
     "After William's return, he and Philippa for a time lived contentedly with each other, producing a further five daughters, and a son, Raymond. She also ignored the Duke's sexual boasting in song and talk, instead concentrating on religion (in particular the Abbey of Fontevrault, of which she remained a keen sponsor), especially the teachings of its founder, who preached the superiority of women over men. Her obsession with a doctrine considered offensive by many men of that time, combined with William's growing dissatisfaction with her, and his teasing of her (claiming to be founding an abbey of prostitutes), led to discord in the marriage.
     "Toulouse had been won back by William for his wife in 1113, following the death of Bertrand in Syria in 1112: his heir being his half-brother, the 9 year old Alphonse-Jourdain, William had been unopposed. Thus, by 1114, Philippa was spending most of her time ruling there. Accordingly, she was less than pleased when, upon her return from Toulouse to Poitiers in 1114, she discovered her husband to have moved his mistress, Viscountess Dangereuse of Châtellerault, into her palace. Philippa appealed to friends and the church for assistance in ousting her husband's mistress, but to no avail – none could persuade the Duke to give up his mistress.
Later life
     "In 1116, a humiliated Philippa, devastated by her husband's repayment of her service to him for so many years, left the Court, taking refuge at the Abbey of Fontevrault. There she became a close friend of her husband's first wife, Ermengarde of Anjou, and the two spent much time reflecting upon the shortcomings of William. However, for all Philippa's devotion to the Abbey and its ideals, she found little peace there, both angry and resentful that her husband had cast her off in favour of a mistress. She died of unknown causes there on 28 November 1118, survived by her husband, his mistress, and Ermengarde, who would shortly attempt to avenge Philippa by attempting to have Dangereuse banished from Aquitaine.
Notes
1. Szabolcs de VAJAY, "Ramire II le Moine, roi d'Aragon et Agnes de Poitou dans l'histoire et la légende", in Mélanges offerts à René Crozet, 2 vol, Poitiers, 1966, vol 2, p 727-750; and Ruth E Harvey, "The wives of the first troubadour Duke William IX of Aquitaine", in Journal of Medieval History, vol 19, 1993, p 315. Harvey states that, contrary to prior assumptions, William IX was certainly Philippa of Toulouse's only husband. Vajay states that the marriage to an unnamed king of Aragon reported by a non-contemporary chronicler is imaginary even though it has appeared broadly in modern histories, and likewise he cites J de Salarrullana de Dios, Documentos correspondientes al reinado de Sancho Ramirez, Saragossa, 1907, vol I, nr 51, p 204-207 to document that Sancho's wife Felicie was clearly still married to him just months before his death, making the marriage to Philippa several years earlier, as reported in several modern popular biographies of her granddaughter, completely unsupportable.
2. Doran & Smith 2016, p. 153.
References
** Doran, John; Smith, Damian J., eds. (2016). Pope Innocent II (1130-43): The World vs the City. Routledge.
External links
** Medieval Lands Project on Philippa of Toulouse: https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE.htm#Philippadied1117.17 "

; Per Med lands: "PHILIPPA [Mathilde] de Toulouse (-28 Nov 1117). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the marriage of "Guillelmus" and "Philippam…filiam Willelmi comitis Tolosani et neptem Raimundi de Sancto Egidio"[419]. Robert of Torigny refers to, but does not name, "filiam unam" of "comes Tolosanus frater Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii" & his wife, who married "Guillermus comes Pictavensis et dux Aquitanorum"[420]. "Guillelmus…Aquitainie similiter et Vasconie dux et comes" confirmed donations to Sainte-Croix, Bordeaux by "genitor noster Guillelmus qui et Gaufridus vocatus est" with the consent of "Mathildis uxor…" by charter dated 23 Mar 1096[421]. It is assumed that Mathilde and Philippa refer to the same person. "Willelmus comes et uxor mea Philippia, filia Willelmi comitis Tolosæ" donated property to Toulouse Saint-Sernin by charter dated Jul 1098[422]. She is also named in an undated donation by Bertrand Comte de Toulouse which names her father but not her husband[423]. “Philippæ comitissæ…Emmæ filia” reached agreement with “Bernardus-Atonis filius Ermengardis” by charter dated 1114[424]. Orderic Vitalis recounts that "Hildegarde Ctss de Poitou" complained to the synod of Reims, held in Oct 1119 by Pope Calixtus II, that her husband had abandoned her for "Malberge wife of the vicomte de Châtellerault"[425]. This is inconsistent with the date of death of Philippa, shown above, not to mention the difference of first name. She became a nun. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "28 Nov" of "Philippa monacha, Pictavensis comitissa"[426]. m (1094, divorced 1115) as his second wife, GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou, son of GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Hildegarde de Bourgogne [Capet] ([22 Oct 1071]-10 Feb 1127)."
Med Lands cites:
[419] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 411.
[420] Robert de Torigny I, 1159, p. 319.
[421] Bordeaux Sainte-Croix 3, p. 4.
[422] Toulouse Saint-Sernin, 291, p. 206.
[423] Toulouse Saint-Sernin, 435, p. 312.
[424] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome IV, Preuves, XXVII, p. 362.
[425] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 259.
[426] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 193.14
GAV-23 EDV-23 GKJ-25.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 41.
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Edinburgh, 1977., Gerald Paget, Reference: 61.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.4
She was Countess of Toulouse in 1094.17 She was Countess of Toulouse between 1098 and 1101.17 She was Countess of Toulouse between 1112 and 1117.17

Family 1

Sancho I Ramirez (?) King of Aragon & Navarre b. bt 1042 - 1043, d. 4 Jun 1094

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html#PG4
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippa Mathilde de Toulouse: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020883&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106194&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippa Mathilde de Toulouse: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020883&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE.htm#GuillaumeIVdied1094. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Comte Guillaume de Toulouse, IV: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I40257&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Mortain: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00205379&tree=LEO
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 185-3, p. 159. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VII-IX: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020882&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIXdied1127B
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE.htm#Philippadied1117
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 07 December 2019), memorial page for Philippa of Toulouse (1073–28 Nov 1118), Find A Grave Memorial no. 85222420, citing Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France ; Maintained by Brett Williams (contributor 47234529), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/85222420/philippa-of_toulouse. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippa,_Countess_of_Toulouse. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VIII-X: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020884&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeXAquitainedied1137
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès (Mathilde) de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020533&tree=LEO
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#AgnesM2RamiroIIAragon
  23. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes_of_Aquitaine,_Queen_of_Aragon.

Guillaume IV (?) Comte de Toulouse1,2,3,4

M, #4357, b. circa 1040, d. 1094
FatherPons II Guillaume (?) comte de Toulouse, Albi & Dijon5,1,2,3,4 b. bt 995 - 997, d. c 1060
MotherAlmodis de La Marche1,6,2,3,4 b. c 1010, d. 10 Oct 1071
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited24 Sep 2020
     Guillaume IV (?) Comte de Toulouse was born circa 1040 at Languedoc, France (now); Genealogy.EU (Toulouse) says b. ca 1044; Weis and Genealogics say b. ca 1040.7,1,2,4 He married Mathilde (?) before 1067;
His 1st wife.1,7,2,3,4,8 Guillaume IV (?) Comte de Toulouse married Emma de Mortain, daughter of Robert de Mortain Count of Mortain, Earl of Cornwall and Maud de Montgomery Countess of Mortain, between 1071 and 1080;
His 2nd wife.9,1,2,7,3,4,10
Guillaume IV (?) Comte de Toulouse died in 1094 at near Huesca, Provincia de Huesca, Aragon, Spain; killed in battle; Stone (Chart 72-10) says d. 1093; Genealogy.EU (Toulouse 1) says d. 1093; Med Lands and Genealogics say d. 1094.11,1,2,7,3
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 763.


Geneagraphie cites:
     1. Lineage & Ancestry of HRH Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Gerald Paget, (Skilton, Edinburgh 1977 ), Vol I p 61 (Reliability: 0).
2. Royalty for Commoners, Roderick W. Stuart, (Genealogical Publishing Comp, Baltimore, 1993 ), p 117 (Reliability: 0).2,4 GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Guillaume IV was born about 1041, the son of Pons II Guillaume, comte de Toulouse and Almodis de La Marche. He was count of Toulouse, margrave of Provence, and from 1061 to 1094 duke of Narbonne. He succeeded his father on his death in 1061. His mother was kidnapped by and subsequently married to Ramon Berenguer I 'el Viejo', conde de Barcelona when Guillaume was a boy.
     “Guillaume was married to Emma de Mortain, daughter of Robert, comte de Mortain, earl of Cornwall and Mathilde de Montgommery. Emma was also a niece of Robert's half-brother William the Conqueror. Guillaume and Emma had a daughter Philippa Mathilde. He also had an illegitimate son Guillaume-Jordan with his half-sister Adelaide. Guillaume married again and produced two legitimate sons; neither, however, survived infancy, leaving his daughter Philippa Mathilde as his heiress. As Toulouse had no tradition of female inheritance, this raised a question with regard to the succession. In 1088, when Guillaume departed for the Holy Land, he left his brother Raimond to govern in his stead (and, it was later claimed, to succeed him). When Guillaume died in battle near Huesca (in Spain) in 1094, Raimond was in a perfect position to take power. After Philippa Mathilde married Guillaume VII-IX 'le Jeune' de Poitou, duc d'Aquitaine, they laid claim to Toulouse and fought, off and on, for years to try to reclaim it from Raimond and his children.
     “Through Philippa Mathilde's marriage, Guillaume was the great-grandfather of Eleanor of Aquitaine, and Eleanor's descendants would continue to lay nominal claim to Toulouse based on descent from Guillaume IV.”.2

; This is the same person as ”William IV, Count of Toulouse” at Wikipedia and as ”Guillaume IV de Toulouse” at Wikipédia (FR).12,13 Guillaume IV (?) Comte de Toulouse was also known as William IV Count of Toulouse and Perigord.

; Per Racines et Histoire (Toulouse): “2) Guillaume IV de Toulouse ° ~1044 +X 1094 (Huesca) comte de Toulouse (1060/61), comte de Périgord, Carcassonne, puis de Rodez (Rouergue), Albi, Dijon, Agde, Béziers, Uzès et duc de Narbonne (à la mort de sa cousine Berthe, comtesse de Rouergue 1063/64 ; cède ses droits à son frère)
     ép. 1) avant 1067 Matilda (Mantilis) > postérité
     ép. 2) ~1071 avant 1080 Emma (Emine) de Mortain (fille de Robert, comte de Mortain, et de Maud (Mathilde) de Montgomery)”.14

; Per Med Lands:
     "
GUILLAUME de Toulouse (-killed in battle Huesca 1094). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Guilelmum et Raymundum" as the two sons of "Guilelmi…Tolose comitis" & his wife "Alymodis multinuba"[399]. "Wilelmo…Raimundo…Ugoni" are named as sons of "Pontio" in the charter of "Vilelmo comite Tolosano" dated 9 Jun 1063[400]. He succeeded his father in 1060 as GUILLAUME IV Comte de Toulouse. "Willelmus Tolosanus comes" donated property to the abbey of Moissac, at the request of "quodam nobili viro Bernardo Gauzelini et…filiis eius Arnaldo abbate ac Gauzelino", by charter dated 1061[401]. On the death of his cousin Berthe Ctss de Rouergue in [1063/64], the counties of Agde, Béziers, Narbonne, Rouergue and Uzès reverted to Toulouse. "Rogerius comes Fuxensis et coniux mea Sicardis comitissa" donated property to Saint-Pons de Thomières by charter dated to [1074], subscribed by "domni G. comitis Tolosani et domni Raymundi fratris eius comitis Ruthenæ"[402]. "Willelmus Tolosanus civitatis comes" donated property to the abbey of Moissac by charter dated 14 Mar 1078[403]. "Guillelmus Tolosanensis, Albiensis, seu Caturcensis ac Lutevensis necne Carcassonæ...comes et dux" confirmed donations made by "Rogerius comes Fossensis" to Saint-Pons de Thomières, founded by “antiquo duce et comite Aquitanensium...Pontio”, by charter dated 15 May 1079, the signature clause of which states "...et in filium meum Pontium eis [which appears to refer back to “sanctum Pontium et aliorum martyrum”] commendavi"[404]. "Guillelmus Tolonanensium, Albensium seu Caturcensium, Lutevensium, Petragorensium, Carcassonensium, Aginnensium necne Astarachensium comes et dux…cum uxore mea…Emma" confirmed donations by "proavuo…meo Pontio Aquitanorum duce" to Saint-Pons de Thomières by charter dated 16 Jun 1080, signed by "Regimundus comes frater eius, Bertrandus comes nepos Willelmi et filius Raimundi, Guillelmi de Rehenti, Ademari vicecomitis…"[405]. The relationship "proavuo/proavo" in this charter is incorrect in light of the reconstruction shown in the present document. The rather ornate language of these two documents, and the lengthy titles accorded to the donor, suggest that they may be spurious in whole or part. "Guillelmus...Tolosanorum Carcassonensium et Albigensium comes et dux et...Emma uxor eius" donated property to Saint-Pons de Thomières, for the souls of “Pontii comitis patris mei---Guillelmi et matris meæ Adelmudis”, by charter dated 16 Jun 1080, signed by "Raymundus comes et frater Guillelmi comitis prædicti, Bertrandus comes nepos Guillelmi comitis prædicti et filius Raymundi comitis, Guillelmi de Rebenti, Ademari vicecomitis, Bernardi-Pontii de Granoiled, Bernardi-Raymundi de Tolosa, Aymerici de Roquefort..."[406].
     "m firstly (before 1067) MATHILDE, daughter of ---. "Willelmus comes et Adalmodis mater eius" donated property to the abbey of Moissac by charter dated 1067, signed by "Mantilis comitissa eius uxor"[407]. Catel records another donation dated 1067 by "Wilielmus comes et Ysarnus episcopus et comitissa Matels" to the Hôpital Saint-Raimond[408].
     "m secondly (before 1080) EMMA de Mortain, daughter of ROBERT Comte de Mortain & his first wife Mathilde de Montgomery (-after [1126/27]). Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis", specifying that one unnamed daughter (mentioned third) married "comes Tolosanus frater Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii"[409]. "Guillelmus Tolonanensium, Albensium seu Caturcensium, Lutevensium, Petragorensium, Carcassonensium, Aginnensium necne Astarachensium comes et dux…cum uxore mea…Emma" confirmed donations by "proavuo…meo Pontio Aquitanorum duce" to Saint-Pons de Thomières by charter dated 16 Jun 1080[410]. Her name is confirmed by the charter dated 1114 under which her daughter “Philippæ comitissæ…Emmæ filia” reached agreement with “Bernardus-Atonis filius Ermengardis”[411]. “Willelmus...dux Aquitanorum” donated “ecclesiam S. Juliani de Stapio...ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Clida” to Notre-Dame de Saintes “et abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” by charter dated “XII Kal Sep”, signed by “eadem abbatissa Sibillla, et comitissa Tholosæ avia mea, et Agnete amita mea...Petro episcopo...”[412]. This charter does not specify the year but can be dated to [1126/27], given that Guillaume X Duke of Aquitaine (identified as the donor) succeeded his father in 1126 and that the successor of Pierre Bishop of Saintes (assuming that he can be identified as the subscriber “Petro episcopo”) is named in a document dated 1127[413]."
Med Lands cites:
[399] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1100, MGH SS XXIII, p. 813.
[400] Cluny Tome IV, 3392, p. 495.
[401] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 260, col. 515.
[402] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 312.I, col. 607.
[403] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 332, col. 641.
[404] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 336.I, col. 648.
[405] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 336.II, col. 649.
[406] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 336.III, col. 652.
[407] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 277, col. 544.
[408] Catel (1623), p. 121.
[409] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1159, p. 319.
[410] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 336.II, col. 649.
[411] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome IV, Preuves, XXVII, p. 362.
[412] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, Instrumenta, col. 484.
[413] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, col. 1068.3


; Per Genealogy.EU (Toulouse 1): “G2. [2m.] Cte Guillaume IV de Toulouse (1061-88), Count de Perigord, de Carcassonne, de Rodez, d'Albi, de Dijon, Duke de Narbonne, *Languedoc ca 1044, +k.a.Huesca 1093; 1m: before 1067 Matilda N; 2m: ca 1071/before 1080 Emma, dau.of Cte Robert de Mortain and Matilda=Maud de Montgommery; all kids were by 1m”.15

; Per Weis: “Emma of Mortain, d. 1080; m. abt 1071, William IV, b. abt. 1040, d. 1093, Count of Toulouse and Pèregord [sic], son of Pons, Count de Toulouse, Albi, and Dijon. b. abt. 990, d. 1060, by Almode (185A-5), d. 1071, dau. of Bernard I, Count of La Marche and Pèrigord, d. 1047, by Amelia. Pons was son of William III, d. 1037, Count of Toulouse, by his 2nd wife, Emma of Provence, gt.-gr.dau. of Boso II, d. 965/7, Count of Avignon & Arles, and his wife, Constance of Provence (141A-19). (Moriarty, cit., 42, 44; Anselme II; 684-5; Don Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents...: Chart 72, "Descent from Theuderic," and note 8: ES III.4/763).”.7

; Per Med Lands:
     "EMMA de Mortain (-after [1126/27]). Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis", specifying that one unnamed daughter (mentioned third) married "comes Tolosanus frater Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii"[62]. Her name is confirmed by the charter dated 1114 under which her daughter “Philippæ comitissæ…Emmæ filia” reached agreement with “Bernardus-Atonis filius Ermengardis”[63]. “Willelmus...dux Aquitanorum” donated “ecclesiam S. Juliani de Stapio...ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Clida” to Notre-Dame de Saintes “et abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” by charter dated “XII Kal Sep”, signed by “eadem abbatissa Sibillla, et comitissa Tholosæ avia mea, et Agnete amita mea...Petro episcopo...”[64]. This charter does not specify the year but can be dated to [1126/27], given that Guillaume X Duke of Aquitaine (identified as the donor) succeeded his father in 1126 and that the successor of Pierre Bishop of Saintes (assuming that he can be identified as the subscriber “Petro episcopo”) is named in a document dated 1127[65].
     "m (before 1080) as his second wife, GUILLAUME IV Comte de Toulouse, son of PONS Comte de Toulouse & his second wife Almodis de la Marche (-killed in battle Huesca 1094)."
Med Lands cites:
[62] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1159, p. 319.
[63] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome IV, Preuves, XXVII, p. 362.
[64] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, Instrumenta, col. 484.
[65] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, col. 1068.16
He was Comte de Toulouse between 1061 and 1094.1,12

Family 1

Mathilde (?)
Child

Family 2

Emma de Mortain b. c 1058, d. 1080
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106194&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE.htm#GuillaumeIVdied1094. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Comte Guillaume de Toulouse, IV: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I40257&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Pons II Guillaume: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106197&tree=LEO
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almodis de La Marche: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106196&tree=LEO
  7. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 185-2, p. 175. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106195&tree=LEO
  9. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Burgh - Earl of Kent, pp. 88-89. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Mortain: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00205379&tree=LEO
  11. [S737] Compiler Don Charles Stone, Some Ancient and Medieval Descents (n.p.: Ancient and Medieval Descents Project
    2401 Pennsylvania Ave., #9B-2B
    Philadelphia, PA 19130-3034
    Tel: 215-232-6259
    e-mail address
    or e-mail address
    copyright 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, unknown publish date), Chart 72-10.
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_IV,_Count_of_Toulouse. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Guillaume IV de Toulouse: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_IV_de_Toulouse. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Toulouse, p. 8: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Toulouse.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/normabc.htm#EmmaMortainMGuillaumeIVToulouse
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Toulouse 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/toulouse/toul1.html#PG4
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume IV: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106194&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippa Mathilde de Toulouse: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020883&tree=LEO

Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou1,2

M, #4358, b. circa 1024, d. 25 September 1086
FatherGuillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou1,2,3,4 b. c 969, d. 31 Jan 1030
MotherAgnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy1,2,3,5 b. c 995, d. 10 Nov 1068
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited13 May 2020
     Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou was born circa 1024 at Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France (now); Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1 page) say b. ca 1025; Leo van de Pas says b. ca 1026; Wikipedia says b. ca 1025; Med Lands says b. 1023.6,1,2,7,8 He married Anna/Garsende (?) de Périgord, daughter of Boson III (?) comte de Perigord and Aina (?) de Montignac, in January 1044;
His 1st wife.1,2,9,3,8,10 Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou married Matilda (?) de la Marche between 1058 and 1059;
His 2nd wife.1,2,8 Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou married Hildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne, daughter of Robert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre and Ermengarde/Blanche (?) Countess of Anjou, Duchess of Burgundy, circa 1068;
His 3rd wife.6,1,11,2,12,13,8 Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou and Hildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne were divorced in 1076.13
Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou died on 25 September 1086 at Chateau de Chize, France (now); Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1 page) say d. 25 June 1086.6,1,2,9,7,8
Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou was buried after 25 September 1086 at Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf, Poitou, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1024
     DEATH     28 Sep 1086 (aged 61–62)
     Nobility. As Guillaume VI, Count of Poitou and as Guillaume VIII, Duke of Aquitaine. Born Guy de Poitiers, second son of Guillaume le Grand and Agnes de Macon, and twin brother of Pierre. When he succeeded his brother he changed his name to Guillaume. He was married thrice and was father of five children.
     Family Members
     Parents
          William Aquitaine 969–1030
          Agnes of Burgundy unknown–1068
     Spouse
          Hildegarde de Bourgogne 1050–1120
     Siblings
          Eudes de Poitou unknown–1039
          Guillaume IV de Poitou 1004–1038
          Guillaume V Pierre de Poitou 1023–1058
          Agnes Of Poitou 1024–1077
     Children
          Guillaume IX de Aquitaine 1071–1126
     BURIAL     Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 15 Jun 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 91952010
     SPONSORED BY Christian H. F. Riley.14
     GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-26.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "William VIII (c.?1025 – 25 September 1086), born Guy-Geoffrey (Gui-Geoffroi), was duke of Gascony (1052–1086), and then duke of Aquitaine and count of Poitiers (as William VI) between 1058 and 1086, succeeding his brother William VII (Pierre-Guillaume).
     "Guy-Geoffroy was the youngest son of William V of Aquitaine by his third wife Agnes of Burgundy. He was the brother-in-law of Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor who had married his sister, Agnes de Poitou.
     "He became Duke of Gascony in 1052 during his older brother William VII's rule. Gascony had come to Aquitanian rule through William V's marriage to Prisca (a.k.a. Brisce) of Gascony, the sister of Duke Sans VI Guilhem of Gascony.
     "William VIII was one of the leaders of the allied army called to help Ramiro I of Aragon in the Siege of Barbastro (1064). This expedition was the first campaign organized by the papacy, namely Pope Alexander II, against a Muslim occupied city in the Emirate of Zaragoza, and the precursor of the later Crusades movement. Aragon and its allies conquered the city, killed its inhabitants and collected an important booty.
     "However, Aragon lost the city again in the following years. During William VIII's rule, the alliance with the southern kingdoms of modern Spain was a political priority as shown by the marriage of all his daughters to Iberian kings.
     "He married three times and had at least five children. After he divorced his first two wives, the first due to infertility, he married a third time to a much younger woman who was also his cousin Robert I of Burgundy's daughter. This marriage produced a son, but William VIII had to visit Rome in the early 1070s to persuade the pope to recognize his children from his third marriage as legitimate.
Children
     "First wife: Garsende [fr] of Périgord, daughter of Count Aldabert II of Périgord (divorced November 1058), no children. She became a nun at Saintes.
     "Second wife: Matoeda (divorced May 1068)
1. Agnes (1052–1078), married Alfonso VI of Castile

     "Third wife: Hildegarde of Burgundy (daughter of duke Robert I of Burgundy)
1. Agnes (died 1097), married Peter I of Aragon
2. William IX of Aquitaine, his heir
3. Beatrice?[1] married firstly to Alfonso VI of Leon and Castile and secondly to Elias I, Count of Maine.

References
1. Chronicon Regum Legionensium
Sources
** Owen, D. D. R. Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen and Legend.
** Nouvelle Biographie Générale. Paris, 1859."7



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 28.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:76.15


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII), Duke of Aquitaine (1058-86), Ct of Poitou, *Poitiers ca 1025, +Chize 25.6.1086; 1m: ca 1044 (repudiated 1058) Anne de Perigord; 2m: 1058/59 (repudiated 1068) Matilda de la Marche; 3m: 1068/9 Hildegard de Bourgogne (+ after 1104.)16"



; Per GeneaLogics:
     "Guillaume VIII, christened Gui and called Guy-Geoffriou after his wife's uncle Geoffrey II Martel, comte d'Anjou, was born about 1026, the son of Guillaume III-V 'le Grand', duke of Aquitaine and comte de Poitou, and his third wife Agnès de Bourgogne. On the death of his brother Guillaume V-VII (Guillaume Aigret) in 1058 he became count of Poitou as Guillaume VI and duke of Aquitaine as Guillaume VIII.
     "As his brother did before him, he began by gaining control over his vassals. In 1060 he took Toulouse after its count had attacked Bordeaux. After an unsuccessful campaign in 1061 in which he was defeated in the battle of Chef-Boutonne by Geoffrey III 'the Bearded', comte d'Anjou, and Foulques IV 'Rechin', comte d'Anjou, the half-brothers of his wife Hildegarde de Bourgogne, he captured Saintes and took control of the Saintogne at the end of 1062. This enabled him to link easily its two capitals, Poitiers and Bordeaux (the road between them - the old Roman Way - passing through Saintes). He defeated the count of Armagnac in 1063, and thereby at least in theory restored his authority in Gascony. In that year he also commanded the Crusade to liberate the town of Barbastro; responding to the call of Pope Alexander II, Italian and French troops freed Barbastro from the Moslems (the pope had promised the participants of the expedition against Barbastro a collective indulgence of 30 years).
     "The third wife of Guillaume, Hildegarde de Bourgogne, the mother of his last four children, was his third cousin once removed. Pope Gregory VII at first required them to separate, but granted them an exemption. Guillaume then had an abbey built in Poitiers dedicated to St. John de Evangelist (the abbey of Montierneuf, also known as the church of St. John the Evangelist). He placed this abbey under the authority of the abbey of Cluny.
     "Guillaume died 25 September 1086 at the château de Chizé. He was buried in the abbey church he founded."15

Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou was also known as William VIII (?) Duke of Aquitaine.7

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUY d'Aquitaine, son of GUILLAUME V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME III Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Agnès de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comté] (1023-Chizé near Niort, Poitou 25 Sep 1086, bur Poitiers, église abbatiale de Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf). The Chronicle of Saint-Maixent names "Petrum cognomina Acerrimum et Gaufredum qui Wido vocatus est" as the twin sons of Duke Guillaume and his third wife Agnes[506]. "Wido" is named as son of Agnes (daughter of "Ermentrudis") in the Continuator of Flodoard[507]. He adopted the first name GEOFFROY, "Gausfredus filii mei" being named in the charter of his mother Agnes dated 1031[508]. Comte de Gascogne 1039. Comte de Bordeaux et d'Agen 1044. "Goffredus…comes atque Agnes…uxor" donated property to the monks of La Trinité, Vendôme by charter dated 6 Jan 1049 subscribed by "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Goffredi pueri fratris illius"[509]. He adopted the first name GUILLAUME when he succeeded his brother in 1058 as GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou. He extended his territories, confirming his authority in Gascony and pushing as far as Toulouse. He took part in the capture of Barbastro from the Moors in 1064, although the town was lost soon after[510]. "Goffredus…dux Aquitanorum et Guillelmus filius eius" set entry conditions for monks at Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated 1078 or 1079[511]. The Chronicon sancti Florentii Salmurensis records the death in Sep 1086 of "Guido Pictavorum comes"[512]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the death in 1086 of "Guido qui et Goffredus comes Pictavorum"[513].
     "m firstly (Jan 1044, repudiated 1058) as her second husband, AINA de Périgord, widow of EUDES de Bordeaux, daughter of [BOSON [III] Comte de Périgord & his wife Aina de Montignac] (-after 1058). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Audeberti comitis Petragoricæ filiam" as the wife of "Gaufredus", specifying that they later separated on the grounds of consanguinity[514]. This is impossible from a chronological point of view if it is assumed the charters dated 1122 naming "Ascelina comitissa" (see ANGOULEME) refer to the wife of Audebert [III] Comte de Périgord. It is therefore posited that Aina was the daughter of Boson [III] which, assuming the latter's birth in [990], is chronologically consistent with her first marriage before 1039. The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not so far been identified, although the charter dated 1043 under which "Ama comitissa Burdagelensis seu Petragorice patrie" donated property in the Dordogne to the monastery of Sainte-Marie-de-la-fin-des-terres suggests that it may be correct[515]. After her repudiation by her second husband, she became a nun at Notre Dame de Saintes where she died.
     "m secondly (after Nov 1058, repudiated after May 1068) MATHILDE, daughter of ---. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Mateodam" as the second wife of "Goffredus"[516]. Kerrebrouck[517] says that the family origin of Mathilde is unknown but that she may have belonged to the family of the Vicomtes de Thouars, although the basis for this speculation is not known. "Goffridi ducis Aquitanorum, Mathildæ comitissæ…" subscribed the charter dated May 1068 under which "Goscelinus beati Hilarii…thesaurarius" donated the monastery of Saint-Porchaire de Potiers to the abbey of Bourgueil[518].
     "m thirdly (Mar 1069, separated 1076) AUDEARDE [Hildegarde] de Bourgogne, daughter of ROBERT I "le Vieux" Duke of Burgundy & his second wife Ermengarde [Blanche] d'Anjou (-after 1120, bur Poitiers, [église abbatiale de Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf]). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the marriage of "Guido comes" and "Aldeardim filiam Roberti ducis Burgundiæ" after he repudiated his previous wife[519]. Her precise parentage is deduced from a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[520]. "Aimericus de Ranconia vocatus filius Aimeri qui fuit male peremptus et filius Burgoniæ" donated "mariscum et verniatam quæ sunt sub molendino de Ternant" to the abbey of Ternant Ste-Marie by charter dated 1105, witnessed by "Willelmi ducis, Aldiardis comitissa"[521].
Med Lands cites:
[506] Chronico Sancti Maxentii 1023, RHGF X, p. 232.
[507] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[508] Cluny Tome IV, 2855, p. 54.
[509] Angers 45, p. 93.
[510] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 91.
[511] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XCI, p. 97.
[512] Breve Chronicon sancti Florentii Salmurensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 189.
[513] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 408.
[514] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 395.
[515] Cartulaire de l'abbaye Sainte-Croix de Bordeaux, Archives historiques du département de la Gironde Tome XXVII (Bordeaux, 1892) ("Bordeaux Sainte-Croix") 80, p. 109.
[516] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 400.
[517] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 558, footnote 39.
[518] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, LXXXIV, p. 91.
[519] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 404.
[520] Halphen, L. & Poupardin, R. (eds.) (1913) Chroniques des Comtes d´Anjou et des Seigneurs d´Amboise (Paris), p. 247.
[521] Besly (1647), Preuves, p. 392.8
He was Count of Poitou.1 The marriage of Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou and Anna/Garsende (?) de Périgord was annulled in 1058; repudiated.1,2,3,10 Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou was Duc d'Aquitaine between 1058 and 1086.1 The marriage of Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou and Matilda (?) de la Marche was annulled in 1068; repudiated.1,2

Family 1

Anna/Garsende (?) de Périgord d. a 1058

Family 3

Hildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne b. c 1050, d. a 1120
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page (The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VI-VIII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020880&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/La_Marche-Perigord.pdf, p.6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeVAquitainedied1030B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020876&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 110-23, p. 102. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_VIII,_Duke_of_Aquitaine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeVIIIAquitainedied1086B
  9. [S1677] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004 "Re: Clarification on William III/V and William VI/VIII, county Poitou, Dukes Acquitaine requested"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Sept 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004."
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anna de Périgord: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00329622&tree=LEO
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020881&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#AudeardeBourgognediedafter1120
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 03 December 2019), memorial page for Guillaume VI de Poitou (1024–28 Sep 1086), Find A Grave Memorial no. 91952010, citing Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/91952010/guillaume_vi-de_poitou. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VI-VIII de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020880&tree=LEO
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  17. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 45: Aragon and Castile: Early Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  18. [S1427] Richard Fletcher, The Quest for El Cid (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989/1990), p. 83. Hereinafter cited as Fletcher [1990] The Quest for El Cid.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020894&tree=LEO
  20. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VII-IX: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020882&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00329625&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020527&tree=LEO
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html

Hildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne1

F, #4359, b. circa 1050, d. after 1120
FatherRobert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre1,2,3,4,5 b. c 1011, d. 21 Mar 1076
MotherErmengarde/Blanche (?) Countess of Anjou, Duchess of Burgundy6,7,4,5 b. c 1018, d. 18 Mar 1076
ReferenceGAV24 EDV25
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Hildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne was born circa 1050.1,8,4 She married Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou, son of Guillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou and Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy, circa 1068;
His 3rd wife.9,10,1,11,4,12,13 Hildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne and Guy-Guillaume VI (VIII) (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou were divorced in 1076.12
Hildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne was buried after 1120 at Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf, Poitou, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1050
     DEATH     1120 (aged 69–70)
     Nobility, youngest child of Robert I 'Le Vieux' de Bourgogne and Ermengarde de Anjou.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Robert de Bourgogne 1011–1076
          Ermengarde de Anjou 1018–1076
     Spouse
          Guillaume VI de Poitou 1024–1086
     Siblings
          Constance Of Burgundy 1046–1093
     Half Siblings
          Fulk of Anjou 1043–1109
     Children
          Guillaume IX de Aquitaine 1071–1126
     BURIAL     Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 15 Jun 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 91952236
     SPONSORED BY Christian H. F. Riley.14
Hildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne died after 1120.9,1,4,12
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "Hildegarde of Burgundy (c.?1056–1104) was a French noble,[1] Duchess consort of Gascony and Aquitaine by marriage to William VIII, Duke of Aquitaine. She was the only daughter of Robert I, Duke of Burgundy with his second wife, Ermengarde of Anjou.[2] She was, and by marriage, Duchess of Gascony and Aquitaine. She married William VIII, Duke of Aquitaine; she was his third wife.[3] William and Hildegarde had these children together:
** William IX, Duke of Aquitaine
** Agnes of Aquitaine, Queen of Aragon and Navarre
** Beatrice?[4] married firstly to Alfonso VI of Leon and Castile and secondly to Elias I, Count of Maine.

     "William’s birth was a cause of great celebration at the Aquitanian court, but the Church at first considered him illegitimate because of his parents’ consanguinity. This obliged his father to make a pilgrimage to Rome soon after his birth to seek papal approval of his marriage to Hildegarde.
References
1. "Hildegarde of Burgundy". Encyclopedia of Things. 12 March 2012. Retrieved 2 May 2012.
2. Halphen, L. & Poupardin, R. (eds.) 1913. Chroniques des Comtes d´Anjou et des Seigneurs d´Amboise, p. 247.
3. Genealogical database by Herbert Stoyan
4. Chronicon Regum Legionensium."15



Reference: Genealogics cites: Encyclopedie Genealogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde, Paris, VIII 1963,IX 1964,XII 1966, Sirjean, Docteur Gaston. 8.4 GAV-24 EDV-25 GKJ-26. Hildegarde (Aldegarde) (?) de Bourgogne was also known as Audearde (?) de Bourgogne.12

; Per Med Lands: " AUDEARDE [Hildegarde] de Bourgogne (-after 1120, bur Poitiers, [église abbatiale de Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf]). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the marriage of "Guido comes" and "Aldeardim filiam Roberti ducis Burgundiæ" after he repudiated his previous wife[223]. Her precise parentage is deduced from a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[224]. m (Mar 1069, separated 1076) as his third wife, GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou, son of GUILLAUME V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME III Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Agnès de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comté] (1023-Chizé near Niort, Poitou 25 Sep 1086, bur Poitiers, église abbatiale de Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf)."
Med Lands cites:
[223] Chronicon Sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, p. 404.
[224] Halphen & Poupardin (1913), p. 247.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020160&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#RobertIDucdied1076B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020881&tree=LEO
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ermengarde d'Anjou: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/ermen001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S2115] Bruce Hallowell, "Hallowell email 19 Dec 2006: "Re: More Kinsfolk: Hugues de Thouars, kinsman of Alice, Countess of Eu"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 19 Dec 2006, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html. Hereinafter cited as "Hallowell email 19 Dec 2006."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermengarde d'Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020216&tree=LEO
  8. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 110-23, p. 102. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page (The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VI-VIII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020880&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#AudeardeBourgognediedafter1120
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeVIIIAquitainedied1086B
  14. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 03 December 2019), memorial page for Hildegarde de Bourgogne (1050–1120), Find A Grave Memorial no. 91952236, citing Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/91952236/hildegarde-de_bourgogne. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hildegarde_of_Burgundy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VII-IX: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020882&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00329625&tree=LEO
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020527&tree=LEO
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html

Robert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre1,2,3,4

M, #4360, b. circa 1011, d. 21 March 1076
FatherRobert II "The Pious/le Pieux" (?) King of France1,3,5,6,7,8 b. 27 Mar 972, d. 20 Jul 1031
MotherConstance (?) d'Arles, Queen of France1,3,9,6,7,10 b. c 986, d. 25 Jul 1032
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Robert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre was born circa 1011 at France; Med Lands says b. 1011/12.3,11,1,4,6,7 He married Ella/Hélie/Hedwig (?) de Sémur-en-Brionnais, daughter of Dalmace/Dalmas I de Sémur Sire de Sémur, baron de Sémur and Aremburge (?) de Bourgogne, in 1033; his 1st wife; Louda & Maclagan (Table 61) says m. 1038.1,3,2,6,7,12,13 Robert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre and Ella/Hélie/Hedwig (?) de Sémur-en-Brionnais were divorced in 1048; Louda & Maclagan (Table 61) says repudiated 1055; Med Lands says repudiateed 1048.1,3,14,6,7,13 Robert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre married Ermengarde/Blanche (?) Countess of Anjou, Duchess of Burgundy, daughter of Foulques III "The Black", (?) Comte d'Anjou and Hildegarde (?) de Sundgau (Metz), Countess of Anjou, between 1048 and 1049 at France;
Her 2nd marriage; Genealogy.EU (Anjou 1 and Capet 4/9 pages) say m. ca 1048; Med lands says m. 1049.1,15,3,2,4,16,17,6,7,18
Robert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre died on 21 March 1076 at Fleury-Sur-Ouche, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France; Med Lands says d. 8 or 18 Mar 1078; The Henry Project says d. a8 March 1076.19,1,20,3,4,6,7,18
Robert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre was buried after 21 March 1076 at Abbaye de Saint-Seine, Saint-Seine-l'Abbaye, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France,

; from Find A Grave:
     
     BIRTH     1011
     DEATH     21 Mar 1076 (aged 64–65), Fleurey-sur-Ouche, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France
French Nobility. He was born as the third son of Robert II and his third wife Constance d'Arles. He was considered to be his mothers favorite son who therefore supported him in his rebellion against his father and later his brother. In 1032 he received the duchy of Burgundy from Henri and was named first Peer of France. For this special status among the other vassals he renounced his claims for the throne but remained inimical against his brother. Contemporaries describe him as brutal and violent. He spent his life in feuds with his own vassals and plundered churches and monasteries without inhibition. Around 1033 he married Helie de Semur, daughter of Dalmace I Seigneur Semur-en-Brionnais. They had five children but Robert repudiated her in 1046. She became a nun and died after 1055. In 1048 he married secondly to Ermengarde de Anjou, widow of Geoffrey de Chateau-Landon, who bore him a daughter. He was murdered with his second wife at the church of Fleury-sur-Ouche. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Parents
          Robert II 972–1031
          Constance d'Arles unknown–1032
     Spouse
          Ermengarde de Anjou 1018–1076
     Siblings
          Advisa Capet 1003–1063
          Hugues de France 1007–1025
          Henri I 1008–1060
          Adela Capet 1009–1079
          Constance Capet De Dammartin 1014–1052
     Children
          Constance Of Burgundy 1046–1093
          Hildegarde de Bourgogne 1050–1120
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Saint-Seine, Saint-Seine-l'Abbaye, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 5 Sep 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 96597423.21,7
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 24.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:20.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.6


; Per Genealogics:
     "Robert was born about 1011, a son of Robert II 'le Pieux', king of France and Constance de Provence, and brother of Henri I. In 1025, with the death of his eldest brother Hugues, he and Henri rebelled against their father and defeated him, forcing him back to Paris. In 1031, after the death of his father the king, Robert participated in a rebellion against his brother in which he was supported by his mother, Queen Constance. Peace was only achieved when Robert was given Burgundy in 1032.
     "About 1033 Robert married Hélie de Sémur-en-Brionnais, and they had five children, of whom two, Henri and Constance, would have progeny. In 1046 he repudiated Hélie and assassinated her brother Joceran, as well as murdering her father Damas I, sire de Sémur, with his own hands. By Ermengarde d'Anjou, daughter of Foulques III 'Nerra', comte d'Anjou, Robert had a daughter Hildegarde who would have progeny.
     "Throughout his reign, he was little more than a robber baron who had no control over his own vassals, whose estates he often plundered, especially those of the Church. He seized the income of the diocese of Autun and the wine of the canons of Dijon. He burgled the abbey of St. Germain at Auxerre. In 1055 the bishop of Langres, Hardouin, refused to dedicate the church of Sennecy so as not 'to be exposed to the violence of the duke'.
     "Robert died on 21 March 1076. His first son Hugues had died in battle in his mid-20s, and his second son Henri also predeceased him. Robert was succeeded by Henri's eldest son, his grandson Hugues I."6

; According to The Henry Project: "Robert I, d. 18 March 1076 [the same day as his wife, see above], duke of Burgundy, son of Robert II, king of France.
The Saint-Aubin genealogies show that Ermengarde's daughter Hildegarde was "de altero patre" and "filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis" [Poupardin (1900), 206], and chart the consanguinity between Ermengarde and Robert's brother king Henri (I) of France. Having been married earlier to Hélie de Semur, whom he set aside, duke R[obert] of the Burgundians was mentioned (along with a count Thibaut) in a letter from abbot Jean I of Fécamp to pope Leo IX as having entered into a consanguineous marriage, and this is presumably a reference to his marriage with Ermengarde ["... Fabula autem haec subsannationis veritur de Tedbaldo comite et Burgundiorum infrunito duce R., qui, transgressores pontificaium decretorum, fas nefasque confundunt, qui abdicatis legitimi thori connubiis, volutantur in inhonestis et consanguinitate foedatis thalamis. ..." PL 143: 797-800]."18

; This is the same person as:
”Robert I, Duke of Burgundy” at Wikipedia and as
”Robert Ier de Bourgogne” at Wikipédia (FR).22,23 GAV-25 EDV-26 GKJ-27.24

; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT de France, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles ([1011/12]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 8 or 18 Mar 1076, bur Abbaye de Saint-Seine, Côte d’Or). The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and his wife Constance[142]. Rodulfus Glauber names "Heinricus rex…germanium suum Rotbertum" when recording the latter's installation as duke of Burgundy by his brother[143]. His mother supported him as candidate to be consecrated associate king in 1027, in place of his older brother Henri who was supported by their father. His father named him heir to the duchy of Burgundy in 1030. He was installed as ROBERT I Duke of Burgundy in 1032 by his brother King Henri I. Comte d'Auxerre in 1040, when he conquered the county after Hugues Bishop of Auxerre died in 1039. He lost it after the 1060 council of Autun which ended his war with Nevers[144]. “Robertus Burgundie dux” renounced rights “in villa...Gilliacus...” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 22 Sep 1040, subscribed by “...Elie conjugis eius...”[145]. “Robertus dux Burgundiorum cum uxore mea Helia” donated “terram...Villare Bichet...in pago Belnensi” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, with the consent of “filiorum nostrorum Hugonis et Henrici”, by charter dated to [1043/44][146]. “Robertus dux et duo filii mei Hugo et Henricus” renounced rights to revenue from land “in Gilliaco” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 2 Feb 1053[147]. The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "VIII Id Mar" of "Robertus…dux Burgundie"[148]. The necrology of Molesme records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Robertus dux Burgundie et Ermengardis uxor eius"[149]. There is some mystery surrounding his death: a narrative by Pierre de Saint-Julien deacon of Chalon records that “Robertus dux” died “nuper dedecorose” in the church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, without providing further details[150].
     "m firstly ([1033], repudiated [1048/50]) HELIE de Semur, daughter of DALMAS [I] Seigneur de Semur-en-Brionnais & his wife Aramburge --- ([1016]-Semur-en-Brionnais, Saône-et-Loire 22 Apr after 1055). "Robertus dux Burgundionum" confirmed the possessions of Cluny by charter dated [1040] subscribed by "Ilie uxoris eius"[151]. The date of the marriage is deduced from the charter, dated to [1034], which is subscribed by "Roberti ducis et uxoris sue", under which "Gibuinus" confirmed a donation to Saint-Etienne de Dijon[152]. “Robertus Burgundie dux” renounced rights “in villa...Gilliacus...” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 22 Sep 1040, subscribed by “...Elie conjugis eius...”[153]. "Robertus…dux et rector inferioris Burgundiæ" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1 Mar 1043 which names "Helie uxoris mee…"[154]. “Robertus dux Burgundiorum cum uxore mea Helia” donated “terram...Villare Bichet...in pago Belnensi” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, with the consent of “filiorum nostrorum Hugonis et Henrici”, by charter dated to [1043/44][155]. Her parentage is confirmed by the Vita S Hugonis, which records that "Dux Burgundie, gener eius" killed the father of St Hugues (abbot of Cluny) by his own hand[156]. The "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius", but do not make the link with Duke Robert[157]. "Robertus dux et uxor sua Hylia" donated money to the church of Saint-Etienne de Dijon by undated charter[158]. She was repudiated, presumably on grounds of consanguinity, before [1050] when Jean Abbot of Fécamp wrote to Pope Leo IX recording that "Tedbaldo comite et Burgundionum…duce R" had "abdicatis legitimi thori connumbiis" and had "in inhonestis et consanguinitate fœdatis thalamis"[159]. She became a nun as PETRONILLE after her repudiation[160]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 22 Apr of "Helya uxor Rotberti ducis"[161].
     "m secondly ([1049]) as her second husband, ERMENGARDE d'Anjou, widow of GEOFFROY II "Ferréol" Seigneur de Château-Landon, Comte de Gâtinais, daughter of FOULQUES III "Nerra/the Black" Comte d’Anjou & his second wife Hildegarde de Metz ([1015/20]-[church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076]). The Historiæ Andegavensis names "Goffridi de Castro Landono et Ermengardis filia Fulconis Comitis Andegavensis" as parents of "Fulco comes Andegavensis"[162]. Considering that she gave birth to at least one child by her second marriage, it is unlikely that Ermengarde was born earlier than [1015]. She must therefore have been considerably younger than her brother. Her first marriage is dated very approximately to [1035]. Her second marriage is deduced from a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[163]. Her second marriage is dated from the letter written before [1050] by Jean Abbot of Fécamp to Pope Leo IX recording that "Tedbaldo comite et Burgundionum…duce R" had "abdicatis legitimi thori connumbiis" and had "in inhonestis et consanguinitate fœdatis thalamis"[164]. The necrology of Molesme records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Robertus dux Burgundie et Ermengardis uxor eius"[165]. This suggests that Ermengarde died on the same day as her husband, possibly at the same place and in the same circumstances, although it is not infrequent for medieval necrologies to record couples on the same day maybe in commemoration of a joint donation to the religious institution in question. No other source which elucidates the circumstances of Ermengarde’s death has been identified.
Med Lands cites:
[142] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.
[143] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.9, MGH SS VII, p. 64.
[144] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554.
[145] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LV, p. 87.
[146] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LVII, p. 87.
[147] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LIX, p. 95.
[148] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.
[149] Petit, Vol. I, p. 386.
[150] Du Chesne (1625), Vergy, Preuves, p. 79.
[151] Cluny, Tome IV, 2949, p. 149.
[152] Petit, Vol. I, 21, p. 362.
[153] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LV, p. 87.
[154] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 324, p. 104.
[155] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LVII, p. 87.
[156] Hildeberti Vita S Hugonis chap. 2, par. 9, quoted in Petit, Vol. I, p. 167 footnote 2. The relevant passage has not been found in Vita, auctore Hildeberto Cenomanensi Episcopo, Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 159, cols. 859-894.
[157] Marcigny-sur-Loire, 2, p. 1.
[158] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I], 91, p. 108.
[159] Bouchard (1987), p. 257, citing Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 143, cols. 799-800.
[160] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554.
[161] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 13.
[162] Historiæ Andegavensis, RHGF X, p. 203.
[163] Halphen & Poupardin (1913), p. 247.
[164] Bouchard (1987), p. 257, citing Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 143, cols. 799-800.
[165] Petit, Vol. V, p. 386.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 9): “Robert I "le Vieux", Duc de Bourgogne (1032-76), Cte d'Auxerre (1040-60), *1011, +Fleury-sur-Ouche 21.3.1076, bur Sémur; 1m: ca 1033 (repudiated 1046) Helie, dau.of Damas de Sémur by Aramburge de Bourgogne; 2m: ca 1048 Ermengarde=Blanche d'Anjou (*ca 1018 +18.3.1076)”.25

; Per Med Lands:
     "HELIE ([1016]-Semur-en-Brionnais, Saône-et-Loire 22 Apr after 1055). "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius"[188]. Her parentage is confirmed by the Vita S Hugonis, which records that "Dux Burgundie, gener eius" killed the father of St Hugues (abbot of Cluny) by his own hand[189]. The date of the marriage is deduced from the charter, dated to [1034], which is subscribed by "Roberti ducis et uxoris sue", under which "Gibuinus" confirmed a donation to Saint-Etienne de Dijon[190]. "Robertus dux Burgundionum" confirmed the possessions of Cluny by charter dated [1040] subscribed by "Ilie uxoris eius"[191]. “Robertus Burgundie dux” renounced rights “in villa...Gilliacus...” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 22 Sep 1040, subscribed by “...Elie conjugis eius...”[192]. "Robertus…dux et rector inferioris Burgundiæ" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1 Mar 1043 which names "Helie uxoris mee…"[193]. “Robertus dux Burgundiorum cum uxore mea Helia” donated “terram...Villare Bichet...in pago Belnensi” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, with the consent of “filiorum nostrorum Hugonis et Henrici”, by charter dated to [1043/44][194]. "Robertus dux et uxor sua Hylia" donated money to the church of Saint-Etienne de Dijon by undated charter[195]. She was repudiated, presumably on grounds of consanguinity, before [1050] when Jean Abbot of Fécamp wrote to Pope Leo IX recording that "Tedbaldo comite et Burgundionum…duce R" had "abdicatis legitimi thori connumbiis" and had "in inhonestis et consanguinitate fœdatis thalamis"[196]. She became a nun as PETRONILLE after her repudiation[197]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 22 Apr of "Helya uxor Rotberti ducis"[198].
     "m ([1033], repudiated [1048]) as his first wife, ROBERT I Duke of Burgundy, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles ([1007]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076, bur Saint-Seine-l’Abbaye, Côte d’Or)."
Med Lands cites:
[188] Marcigny-sur-Loire 2, p. 1.
[189] Petit, Vol. I, p. 167 footnote 2, quoting Hildeberti Vita S Hugonis chap. 2, par. 9. The relevant passage has not been found in Vita, auctore Hildeberto Cenomanensi Episcopo, Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 159, cols. 859-894.
[190] Petit 21, p. 362.
[191] Cluny, Tome IV, 2949, p. 149.
[192] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LV, p. 87.
[193] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 324, p. 104.
[194] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LVII, p. 87.
[195] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I], 91, p. 108.
[196] Bouchard (1987), p. 257, citing Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 143, cols. 799-800.
[197] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554.
[198] Histoire d’Auxerre (1850), Tome IV, p. 13.13

; Per Genealogy.EU (Anjou): "Ermengarde dit Blanche, *ca 1018, +murdered at Fleury-sur-Ouche 18.3.1076; 1m: ca 1035 Geoffroy Ferreol de Château-Landon, Cte de Gâtinais (+1043/46); 2m: ca 1048 Duke Robert I of Burgundy (*1011 +1076.)15"
; Per Med Lands:
     "ERMENGARDE d'Anjou ([1015/20]-[church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076]). The Historiæ Andegavensis names "Goffridi de Castro Landono et Ermengardis filia Fulconis Comitis Andegavensis" as parents of "Fulco comes Andegavensis"[196]. Considering that she gave birth to at least one child by her second marriage, it is unlikely that Ermengarde was born earlier than [1015]. She must therefore have been considerably younger than her brother. Her first marriage is dated very approximately to [1035]. Her second marriage is deduced from a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[197]. Her second marriage is dated from the letter written before [1050] by Jean Abbot of Fécamp to Pope Leo IX recording that "Tedbaldo comite et Burgundionum…duce R" had "abdicatis legitimi thori connumbiis" and had "in inhonestis et consanguinitate fœdatis thalamis"[198]. The necrology of Molesme records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Robertus dux Burgundie et Ermengardis uxor eius"[199]. This entry suggests that Ermengarde died on the same day as her husband, possibly at the same place and in the same circumstances, although it is not infrequent for medieval necrologies to record couples on the same day maybe in commemoration of a joint donation to the religious institution in question. No other source which elucidates the circumstances of Ermengarde’s death has been identified.
     "m firstly ([1035]) GEOFFROY II "Ferréol" Seigneur de Château-Landon, Comte de Gâtinais, son of HUGUES du Perche Comte de Gâtinais & his wife Beatrix de Mâcon (-30 Apr [1043/47]).
     "m secondly (1049) as his second wife, ROBERT I "le Vieux" Duke of Burgundy, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles ([1007]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076, bur Abbaye de Saint-Seine, Côte d’Or)."
Med Lands cites:
[195] Anjou Charité, VIII, p. 10.
[196] Historiæ Andegavensis, RHGF X, p. 203.
[197] Halphen & Poupardin (1913), p. 247.
[198] Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 143, cols. 799-800, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 257.
[199] Petit, Vol. V, p. 386.17
He was Duc de Bourgogne between 1032 and 1076.3,22,7 He was Cte d'Auxerre between 1040 and 1060.3,7

Family 1

Ella/Hélie/Hedwig (?) de Sémur-en-Brionnais b. 1016, d. 22 Apr 1109
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert II 'le Pieux': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007643&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020160&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#RobertIDucdied1076B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Robert II le Pieux (the Pious): https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/rober102.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#RobertIIdied1031B
  10. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Constance of Arles: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/const000.htm
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 110-22, p. 102. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Sémur-en-Brionnais: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026652&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgdautun.htm#HelieSemurdiedafter1055
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Sémur-en-Brionnais: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026652&tree=LEO
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermengarde d'Anjou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020216&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#ErmengardeM1GeoffroyIIGatinaisM2RobertIA.
  18. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Ermengarde d'Anjou: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/ermen001.htm
  19. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  20. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  21. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 03 December 2019), memorial page for Robert de Bourgogne, I (1011–21 Mar 1076), Find A Grave Memorial no. 96597423, citing Abbaye de Saint-Seine, Saint-Seine-l'Abbaye, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/96597423/robert-de_bourgogne. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I,_Duke_of_Burgundy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  23. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Robert Ier de Bourgogne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Ier_de_Bourgogne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  24. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#Robertdied1113
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026655&tree=LEO
  28. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020881&tree=LEO

Ella/Hélie/Hedwig (?) de Sémur-en-Brionnais1,2,3

F, #4361, b. 1016, d. 22 April 1109
FatherDalmace/Dalmas I de Sémur Sire de Sémur, baron de Sémur2,4,3,5 b. c 985, d. 1048
MotherAremburge (?) de Bourgogne2,6,5 b. c 999
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited16 Jul 2020
     Ella/Hélie/Hedwig (?) de Sémur-en-Brionnais was born in 1016 at Semur-en-Brionnais, Departement de Saône-et-Loire, Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, France.2,3,5 She married Robert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre, son of Robert II "The Pious/le Pieux" (?) King of France and Constance (?) d'Arles, Queen of France, in 1033; his 1st wife; Louda & Maclagan (Table 61) says m. 1038.1,2,7,8,9,3,5 Ella/Hélie/Hedwig (?) de Sémur-en-Brionnais and Robert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre were divorced in 1048; Louda & Maclagan (Table 61) says repudiated 1055; Med Lands says repudiateed 1048.1,2,10,8,9,5
Ella/Hélie/Hedwig (?) de Sémur-en-Brionnais died on 22 April 1109 at Semur-en-Brionnais, Departement de Saône-et-Loire, Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, France (now); Genealogy.EU (Capet 4 page) says d. 22 Apr 1055 or 22 Apr 1109.2,1,11,3,5
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "ROBERT de France, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles ([1011/12]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 8 or 18 Mar 1076, bur Abbaye de Saint-Seine, Côte d’Or). The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and his wife Constance[142]. Rodulfus Glauber names "Heinricus rex…germanium suum Rotbertum" when recording the latter's installation as duke of Burgundy by his brother[143]. His mother supported him as candidate to be consecrated associate king in 1027, in place of his older brother Henri who was supported by their father. His father named him heir to the duchy of Burgundy in 1030. He was installed as ROBERT I Duke of Burgundy in 1032 by his brother King Henri I. Comte d'Auxerre in 1040, when he conquered the county after Hugues Bishop of Auxerre died in 1039. He lost it after the 1060 council of Autun which ended his war with Nevers[144]. “Robertus Burgundie dux” renounced rights “in villa...Gilliacus...” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 22 Sep 1040, subscribed by “...Elie conjugis eius...”[145]. “Robertus dux Burgundiorum cum uxore mea Helia” donated “terram...Villare Bichet...in pago Belnensi” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, with the consent of “filiorum nostrorum Hugonis et Henrici”, by charter dated to [1043/44][146]. “Robertus dux et duo filii mei Hugo et Henricus” renounced rights to revenue from land “in Gilliaco” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 2 Feb 1053[147]. The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "VIII Id Mar" of "Robertus…dux Burgundie"[148]. The necrology of Molesme records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Robertus dux Burgundie et Ermengardis uxor eius"[149]. There is some mystery surrounding his death: a narrative by Pierre de Saint-Julien deacon of Chalon records that “Robertus dux” died “nuper dedecorose” in the church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, without providing further details[150].
     "m firstly ([1033], repudiated [1048/50]) HELIE de Semur, daughter of DALMAS [I] Seigneur de Semur-en-Brionnais & his wife Aramburge --- ([1016]-Semur-en-Brionnais, Saône-et-Loire 22 Apr after 1055). "Robertus dux Burgundionum" confirmed the possessions of Cluny by charter dated [1040] subscribed by "Ilie uxoris eius"[151]. The date of the marriage is deduced from the charter, dated to [1034], which is subscribed by "Roberti ducis et uxoris sue", under which "Gibuinus" confirmed a donation to Saint-Etienne de Dijon[152]. “Robertus Burgundie dux” renounced rights “in villa...Gilliacus...” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 22 Sep 1040, subscribed by “...Elie conjugis eius...”[153]. "Robertus…dux et rector inferioris Burgundiæ" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1 Mar 1043 which names "Helie uxoris mee…"[154]. “Robertus dux Burgundiorum cum uxore mea Helia” donated “terram...Villare Bichet...in pago Belnensi” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, with the consent of “filiorum nostrorum Hugonis et Henrici”, by charter dated to [1043/44][155]. Her parentage is confirmed by the Vita S Hugonis, which records that "Dux Burgundie, gener eius" killed the father of St Hugues (abbot of Cluny) by his own hand[156]. The "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius", but do not make the link with Duke Robert[157]. "Robertus dux et uxor sua Hylia" donated money to the church of Saint-Etienne de Dijon by undated charter[158]. She was repudiated, presumably on grounds of consanguinity, before [1050] when Jean Abbot of Fécamp wrote to Pope Leo IX recording that "Tedbaldo comite et Burgundionum…duce R" had "abdicatis legitimi thori connumbiis" and had "in inhonestis et consanguinitate fœdatis thalamis"[159]. She became a nun as PETRONILLE after her repudiation[160]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 22 Apr of "Helya uxor Rotberti ducis"[161].
     "m secondly ([1049]) as her second husband, ERMENGARDE d'Anjou, widow of GEOFFROY II "Ferréol" Seigneur de Château-Landon, Comte de Gâtinais, daughter of FOULQUES III "Nerra/the Black" Comte d’Anjou & his second wife Hildegarde de Metz ([1015/20]-[church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076]). The Historiæ Andegavensis names "Goffridi de Castro Landono et Ermengardis filia Fulconis Comitis Andegavensis" as parents of "Fulco comes Andegavensis"[162]. Considering that she gave birth to at least one child by her second marriage, it is unlikely that Ermengarde was born earlier than [1015]. She must therefore have been considerably younger than her brother. Her first marriage is dated very approximately to [1035]. Her second marriage is deduced from a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[163]. Her second marriage is dated from the letter written before [1050] by Jean Abbot of Fécamp to Pope Leo IX recording that "Tedbaldo comite et Burgundionum…duce R" had "abdicatis legitimi thori connumbiis" and had "in inhonestis et consanguinitate fœdatis thalamis"[164]. The necrology of Molesme records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Robertus dux Burgundie et Ermengardis uxor eius"[165]. This suggests that Ermengarde died on the same day as her husband, possibly at the same place and in the same circumstances, although it is not infrequent for medieval necrologies to record couples on the same day maybe in commemoration of a joint donation to the religious institution in question. No other source which elucidates the circumstances of Ermengarde’s death has been identified.
Med Lands cites:
[142] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.
[143] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.9, MGH SS VII, p. 64.
[144] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554.
[145] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LV, p. 87.
[146] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LVII, p. 87.
[147] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LIX, p. 95.
[148] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.
[149] Petit, Vol. I, p. 386.
[150] Du Chesne (1625), Vergy, Preuves, p. 79.
[151] Cluny, Tome IV, 2949, p. 149.
[152] Petit, Vol. I, 21, p. 362.
[153] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LV, p. 87.
[154] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 324, p. 104.
[155] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LVII, p. 87.
[156] Hildeberti Vita S Hugonis chap. 2, par. 9, quoted in Petit, Vol. I, p. 167 footnote 2. The relevant passage has not been found in Vita, auctore Hildeberto Cenomanensi Episcopo, Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 159, cols. 859-894.
[157] Marcigny-sur-Loire, 2, p. 1.
[158] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I], 91, p. 108.
[159] Bouchard (1987), p. 257, citing Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 143, cols. 799-800.
[160] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554.
[161] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 13.
[162] Historiæ Andegavensis, RHGF X, p. 203.
[163] Halphen & Poupardin (1913), p. 247.
[164] Bouchard (1987), p. 257, citing Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 143, cols. 799-800.
[165] Petit, Vol. V, p. 386.9


; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 9): “Robert I "le Vieux", Duc de Bourgogne (1032-76), Cte d'Auxerre (1040-60), *1011, +Fleury-sur-Ouche 21.3.1076, bur Sémur; 1m: ca 1033 (repudiated 1046) Helie, dau.of Damas de Sémur by Aramburge de Bourgogne; 2m: ca 1048 Ermengarde=Blanche d'Anjou (*ca 1018 +18.3.1076)”.12

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 200.
2. Encyclopedie Genealogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde Paris, VIII 1963,IX 1964,XII 1966., Docteur Gaston Sirjean, Reference: 7.3


; This is the same person as ”Hélie de Semur-en-Brionnais” at Wikipédia (FR).13

; Per Genealogics: "her mother possibly Aremburge de Bourgogne but not certain”.3 GAV-26 EDV-26 GKJ-27.14

; Per Med Lands:
     "HELIE ([1016]-Semur-en-Brionnais, Saône-et-Loire 22 Apr after 1055). "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius"[188]. Her parentage is confirmed by the Vita S Hugonis, which records that "Dux Burgundie, gener eius" killed the father of St Hugues (abbot of Cluny) by his own hand[189]. The date of the marriage is deduced from the charter, dated to [1034], which is subscribed by "Roberti ducis et uxoris sue", under which "Gibuinus" confirmed a donation to Saint-Etienne de Dijon[190]. "Robertus dux Burgundionum" confirmed the possessions of Cluny by charter dated [1040] subscribed by "Ilie uxoris eius"[191]. “Robertus Burgundie dux” renounced rights “in villa...Gilliacus...” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 22 Sep 1040, subscribed by “...Elie conjugis eius...”[192]. "Robertus…dux et rector inferioris Burgundiæ" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1 Mar 1043 which names "Helie uxoris mee…"[193]. “Robertus dux Burgundiorum cum uxore mea Helia” donated “terram...Villare Bichet...in pago Belnensi” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, with the consent of “filiorum nostrorum Hugonis et Henrici”, by charter dated to [1043/44][194]. "Robertus dux et uxor sua Hylia" donated money to the church of Saint-Etienne de Dijon by undated charter[195]. She was repudiated, presumably on grounds of consanguinity, before [1050] when Jean Abbot of Fécamp wrote to Pope Leo IX recording that "Tedbaldo comite et Burgundionum…duce R" had "abdicatis legitimi thori connumbiis" and had "in inhonestis et consanguinitate fœdatis thalamis"[196]. She became a nun as PETRONILLE after her repudiation[197]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 22 Apr of "Helya uxor Rotberti ducis"[198].
     "m ([1033], repudiated [1048]) as his first wife, ROBERT I Duke of Burgundy, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles ([1007]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076, bur Saint-Seine-l’Abbaye, Côte d’Or)."
Med Lands cites:
[188] Marcigny-sur-Loire 2, p. 1.
[189] Petit, Vol. I, p. 167 footnote 2, quoting Hildeberti Vita S Hugonis chap. 2, par. 9. The relevant passage has not been found in Vita, auctore Hildeberto Cenomanensi Episcopo, Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 159, cols. 859-894.
[190] Petit 21, p. 362.
[191] Cluny, Tome IV, 2949, p. 149.
[192] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LV, p. 87.
[193] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 324, p. 104.
[194] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LVII, p. 87.
[195] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I], 91, p. 108.
[196] Bouchard (1987), p. 257, citing Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 143, cols. 799-800.
[197] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554.
[198] Histoire d’Auxerre (1850), Tome IV, p. 13.5

Family

Robert I "le Vieux" (?) Duc de Bourgogne, Cte d'Auxerre b. c 1011, d. 21 Mar 1076
Children

Citations

  1. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Capet 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet4.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Sémur-en-Brionnais: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026652&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Damas I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026656&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgdautun.htm#HelieSemurdiedafter1055. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/burgdautun.htm#GeoffroyIISemurdied10701080
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020160&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#RobertIDucdied1076B
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hélie de Sémur-en-Brionnais: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026652&tree=LEO
  11. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 9: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet9.html
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Hélie de Semur-en-Brionnais: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A9lie_de_Semur-en-Brionnais. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#Robertdied1113
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026655&tree=LEO
  17. [S2184] Leo van de Pas, "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007: "Descendants Alfonso VI - improved and extended"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/lVvrEhMS2pk/m/lxJSTqSvbG0J) to e-mail address, 23 Sept 2007. Hereinafter cited as "van de Pas email 23 Sept 2007."

Guillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou1,2

M, #4362, b. circa 969, d. 31 January 1030
FatherGuillaume II (IV) 'Fier à bras' (?) Comte de Poitiers, Duc d'Aquitaine2,3,4,5,6,7,8 b. 935, d. 3 Feb 993
MotherEmma de Blois Comtesse de Poitiers2,3,4,6,9,8,10 b. c 950, d. a 27 Dec 1003
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited22 Sep 2020
     Guillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou was born circa 969 at Poitou, France.1,2 He married Adalmode de Limoges, daughter of Géraud (?) vicomte de Limoges and Rothilde (?) de Brosse, circa 997;
His 1st wife; her 2nd husband.
NB: There is some disagreement as to which "Almodis" Guillauime married:
     Genealogics says she was Almodis de Gévaudan, dau. of Etienne I de Brioude.
     Med Lands and Racines et Histoire say he m. Adalmode (Almodis) de Limoges, dau. of Geraud, Vcte de Limoges.
I have chosed to follow the Med Lands/Racines et Histoire proposals.1,2,11,12,4,13,14 Guillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou married Sancha/Prisca (?) de Gascogne, daughter of Guillaume I Sancho (?) Duc de Gascogne and Urraca Garcés (?) de Navarre, before 10 March 1011;
His 2nd wife.1,2,12,4 Guillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou married Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy, daughter of Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy and Ermentrude/Irmgard de Roucy Countess of Rheims, between 1018 and 1019;
His 3rd wife. Genealogics says m. ca 1018; Med Lands says m. 1019; Wikipédia (Fr.) says m. 1016.1,15,2,12,16,4,17,18
Guillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou died on 31 January 1030.2,1
Guillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou was buried after 31 January 1030 at Maillezais Cathedral, Maillezais, Departement de la Vendée, Pays de la Loire, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     969, France
     DEATH     31 Jan 1030 (aged 60–61), Maillezais, Departement de la Vendée, Pays de la Loire, France
     Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou
     William was the son and successor of William IV, Duke of Aquitaine and Emmaline of Blois, born in 969. (She has an unknown burial I will not to.) Grandson of William III, Duke of Aquitaine his wife, Adele, Theobald I of Blois and Lutgarde of Vermandois. William was the husband of Adalemode of Limoges, the widow of Adalbert I of La Marche. They had one son:
* William VI, his successor

     Secondly, he was the husband of Sancha of Gascony, the daughter of Duke William II Sanchez of Gascony and his wife, the sister of Sancho VI William. They had two sons and one daughter:
* Odo, a duke
* Adalais, wife of Count Guiraut Trancaleon of Armagnac
* Theobald, died young

     Sancha died by 1018.
     Thirdly, he married Agnes of Burgundy, the daughter of Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy. They had two sons and a daughter:
* Peter William, Duke William VII
* Guy Geoffrey, Duke William VIII
* Agnes, wife of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor

     William became Duke of Aquitaine in 990, his father died in 994, and his mother remained regent of Aquitaine until 1004. She was known to be quite formidable and ruled with strength. William was well educated and a book collector, as well as a friend of Bishop Fulbert of Chartres, a prominent teacher. William made the court of Aquitaine the largest learning center in Southern France.
     William was no an expert in the field, and was defeated by Boso of La Marche despite assistance from his suzerain, Robert II of France. William was also defeated by the Vikings in 1006 who attacked his coast annually, and lost the Loudunais and Mirebalais to Fulk Nerra, count of Anjou, as well as Confolens, Ruffec, and Chabanais in order to compensate William II of Angoulême.
     He was successful through his patronization of the Peace and Truce of God movements initiated by Pope and Church to bring some peace to his highly feudal territories. He founded Maillezais Abbey in 1010 and Bourgueil Abbey, rebuilt the cathedral and many other religious structures in Poitiers after a fire. He traveled widely in Europe, annually visiting Rome or Spain as a pilgrim.
     William was approached by the Italians to help rule Italy when their own Henry II died, and six of William's letters involving the proposals survived the decades. William died peacefully as was his realm, on the first or second of January at Maillezais, where he is buried.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Guillaume II de Poitou
          Emma de Blois
     Spouse
          Agnes of Burgundy unknown–1068
     Children
          Eudes de Poitou unknown–1039
          Guillaume IV de Poitou 1004–1038
          Guillaume V Pierre de Poitou 1023–1058
          Agnes Of Poitou 1024–1077
          Guillaume VI de Poitou 1024–1086
     BURIAL     Maillezais Cathedral, Maillezais, Departement de la Vendée, Pays de la Loire, France
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
     Added: 12 Nov 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 61508998
     SPONSORED BY Christian H. F. Riley.19
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME de Poitou, son of GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou] & his wife Emma de Blois ([969]-Maillezais 31 Jan 1030, bur Maillezais, Abbaye de Saint-Pierre). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Willelmum" as son of "Willelmum" (son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ") and his wife "filiam Tetbaldi Campenensis…Emmam"[405]. "Vuillelmus dux Aquitanorum" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély for the soul of "…filios meo Vuilelmo…" by charter dated [971][406]. "Willelmus Aquitanorum comes et dux et uxor mea Hemma et filius noster equivocus Willelmus" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated Dec 992[407]. His mother retained custody of Guillaume during her separation from his father, but returned him to Poitiers in May 988[408]. "Guilelmus Aquitaniencum dux" founded a hospital near Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jan 989, subscribed by "Emma comitissa, Guillelmi filium eius, Guilelmi comitis Engolismæ…"[409]. He succeeded his father in 993 as GUILLAUME V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME III Comte de Poitou. He summoned a council at Poitiers in 1000 which decided that future disputes should be settled by justice not recourse to arms[410]. Duke Guillaume enjoyed close relations with Emperor Heinrich II, with whom he exchanged gifts[411]. Rebels in Italy, opposed to the election of Konrad II King of Germany in 1024, offered the throne of Italy to Duke Guillaume, who refused the offer[412]. Duke Guillaume maintained an active correspondence with leading churchmen, men of science and political leaders and established a library for which he commissioned the transcription of manuscripts[413]. He abdicated in favour of his eldest son in 1029 and became a monk at the Abbey of Maillezais[414].
     "m firstly ([997]) as her second husband, ADALMODE de Limoges, widow of AUDEBERT I Comte de La Marche et du Périgord, daughter of GERAUD Vicomte de Limoges & his wife Rothilde de Brosse (-after 1005). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Aldebertus frater [Helias Petragoricensi comite]" married "sorore Widonis vicecomitis"[415]. Ademar records the second marriage of "Adalmode coniuge…Aldeberti" to Duke William[416]. The Chronicle of Petrus Malleacensis records that Adalmodis was wife of Boson Comte du Périgord and daughter of "Candida", for whom Duke Guillaume promised to expand "fluvium Rhodanum Regni" in return for marrying her daughter[417], but this is not consistent with the other sources. According to the Chronicle of Maillezais, Adalmode was the daughter of Adelaide d'Anjou (presumably by her first husband Etienne de Brioude/Gévaudan), and also widow of Boson Comte du Périgord (brother of Comte Audebert I, whom he survived by several years). Thierry Stasser has shown that this is incorrect[418]. After her first husband was killed, Adalmode sought refuge in the château de Rochemeaux but was forced to surrender by Poitevin forces[419].
     "m secondly (1011 before 10 Mar) SANCHA [Brisca] de Gascogne, daughter of GUILLAUME SANCHE Duke of Gascony & his wife Urraca de Navarra (-before 1018). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Briscam" as sister of "dux Santii", when recording her marriage to "Willelmi ducis" after the death of the latter's first wife[420]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maixent names "sororem Sancii Ducis Gasconiæ, nomine Briscam" as second wife of Duke Guillaume, in a later paragraph recording the death of "Sancia conjuge Guillermi ducis"[421]. "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Willelmi filii eius, Odoni filii eius, Prisca comitisse" subscribed the charter dated to [1012/18] under which "Ugo Liziniacensis domnus" donated property to St Cyprien, Poitiers[422]. An agreement between the abbots of Jumièges and Bougeuil concerning an exchange of land in Poitou, by charter dated [13 Apr/4 Apr] 1012, is subscribed by "Richardus…filius Ricardi principi magni…Vuillelmus Pictavorum comes et uxor Prisca…"[423].
     "m thirdly (1019) as her first husband, AGNES de Mâcon, daughter of OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comté] & his first wife Ermentrude de Roucy ([990/95]-Saintes 10 Nov 1068, bur Poitiers, Priory of Saint-Nicolas). Agnes is named as daughter of "Ermentrudis" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that she was mother of "Wido"[424]. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus…Pictauensis" married one of the daughters of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" & his wife[425]. "Agnes comitissa filia Ottonis cognomento Willelmi comitis Matiscensis, uxor…Wilelmi ducis Aquitanorum" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1020][426]. She married secondly (1 Jan 1032, repudiated [1049/52]) Geoffroy "Martel" d'Anjou (-9 Nov 1067), who later succeeded as Geoffroy II Comte d'Anjou. The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records that "Gaufredus Martellus Andegavensis comes" married "Agnetem comitissam Pictavensem" incestuously in 1032[427]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1032 Kal Jan" of "Gaufridus comes, Agnetem comitissam incesto", indirectly indicating her origin in a later passage which records the marriage "1043 XII Nov" of "Hainricus imperator [et] filiam Agnetis comitissæ"[428]. Her origin is clarified by the Chronicæ Sancti Albini which records the marriage "1043 XII Kal Nov…apud Vesbrianim" of "Henricus imperator…filiam Willelmi comitis Pictavorum et Agnetis"[429]. Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou & his wife founded the abbey of La Trinité de Vendôme by charter dated 31 May 1040, signed by "Goffridi comitis Andegavorum, Agnetis conjugis suæ…"[430]. A powerful personality, she succeeded in defeating her stepson Duke Eudes and installed her own son as Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou. Regent of Aquitaine for her son 1039-1044. She arranged her daughter's marriage with Emperor Heinrich III in 1043 and lived at the imperial court after this time. "Goffredus…comes atque Agnes…uxor" donated property to the monks of La Trinité, Vendôme by charter dated 6 Jan 1049 subscribed by "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Goffredi pueri fratris illius"[431]. "Gaufredus Andegavorum comes…uxor mea Agnes" made a donation to the priory of Saint-Nicholas de Poitiers by undated charter which also names "eius [Agnetis] filii comites…Pictavenses"[432]. A charter dated to [1060/67] recites a prior donation to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by "Hildegardis comitissa", who retained a life interest in the property which, after the death of the donor, was sold in turn to "Agneti comitissa" (recording her divorce from "comitum Gaufridum"), "comitem Gaufridum…Gaufridi nepotem" and finally "fratre eius Fulconi" who restituted it to the abbey[433]. After her separation from her second husband, in 1047 she founded the abbey of Notre-Dame de Saintes, where she became a nun in 1068[434]. "Agnes" founded the abbey of Saint-Nicolas at Poitou with the consent of "ambobus filiis Guillelmi et Gauffrido" by charter dated [1050][435]. "Aquitanorum…dux Gaufridus" confirms in his charter dated [1058/68] that "mea mater Agnes…frater meus Guillelmus" were both buried in the priory of Saint-Nicolas de Poitiers[436]. The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Agnes comitissa"[437].
     "Duke Guillaume V & his first wife had [two children].
     "Duke Guillaume V & his second wife had two children.
     "Duke Guillaume V & his third wife had four children."
Med Lands cites:
[405] Adémar de Chabannes III, 30, p. 150.
[406] Saint-Jean d'Angély CXCII, p. 231.
[407] Saint-Maixent Vol. I, LXI, p. 77.
[408] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 165.
[409] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XLVII, p. 54.
[410] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 1, p. 85.
[411] Richard (1903) Tome II, p. 77.
[412] Richard (1903) Tome II, p. 57.
[413] Richard (1903) Tome II, p. 91.
[414] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Berthe, reine d'Aragon', p. 398.
[415] Adémar de Chabannes III, 25, p. 148.
[416] Adémar de Chabannes III, 34, p. 156.
[417] Petrus Malleacensis Monachi Relatione VI, RHGF X, p. 182.
[418] Stasser, T. 'Adélaïde d'Anjou. Sa famille, ses mariages, sa descendance', Le Moyen Age, 103, 1 (1997), pp. 9-52, cited in Settipani (2004), p. 176.
[419] Richard (1903) Tome II, p. 11-12.
[420] Adémar de Chabannes III, 39, p. 162.
[421] Chronico Sancti Maxentii 1010 and 1013, RHGF X, p. 232.
[422] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 49, p. 49.
[423] Vernier, J. J. (ed.) (1916) Chartes de l'abbaye de Jumièges, Tome I c 825-1169 (Rouen, Paris) 7, p. 16.
[424] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[425] France, J., Bulst, N. and Reynolds, P. (eds. and trans.) (1989) Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum Libri Quinque, Rodulfus Glaber Opera (Oxford) Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 107.
[426] Cluny Tome III, 2742, p. 765.
[427] Chronico Sancti Michaelis in periculo maris, RHGF X, p. 176.
[428] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, pp. 23 and 24.
[429] Chronica sancti Sergii Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, pp. 135-6.
[430] Société des Archives Historiques du Maine (1905) Cartulaire de Château-du-Loir, Archives historiques du Maine Tome VI (Le Mans) (“Château-du-Loir”) 13, p. 5.
[431] Urseau, C. (ed.) (1908) Cartulaire noir de la cathédrale d'Angers (Paris, Angers) (“Angers”) 45, p. 93.
[432] Société des Archives Historiques du Poitou (1872) Cartulaire du prieuré de Saint-Nicolas de Poitiers, Archives historiques du Poitou Tome I (Poitiers) ("Poitiers Saint-Nicolas") 27, p. 32.
[433] Broussillon, B. de (ed.) (1903) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Aubin d'Angers (Paris) (“Angers Saint-Aubin”) 72, p. 89.
[434] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Contribution à l'histoire de l'attitude des royaumes pirénéens dans la querelle des investitures: de l'origine de Berthe, reine d'Aragon et de Navarre', Estudios Genealógicos, Heráldicos y Nobiliarios, en honor de Vicente de Cadenas y Vicent (Hidalguía, Madrid, 1978), Vol. 2, pp. 375-402, 398.
[435] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas 1, p. 5.
[436] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas 5, p. 12.
[437] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, p. 203.4


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Guillaume III (V) "le Grand", Duke of Aquitaine (995-1030), Ct of Poitou, *ca 969, +Maillezais 31.1.1030; 1m: ca 997 Almodis de Gevaudun (+after 1005); 2m: 1011 Sancha de Gascogne (+ca 1018); 3m: 1019 Agnes de Bourgogne (*ca 995 +9.11.1068.)1"

He was Comte de Poitou.3 GAV-25 EDV-26 GKJ-27.

; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou): "F1. Guillaume III (V) "le Grand", Duke of Aquitaine (995-1030), Ct of Poitou, *ca 969, +Maillezais 31.1.1030; 1m: ca 997 Almodis de Gevaudun (+after 1005); 2m: 1011 Sancha de Gascogne (+ca 1018); 3m: 1019 Agnes de Bourgogne (*ca 995 +9.11.1068.)20"

; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea): "Agnes de Bourgogne, *ca 995, +Poitou 10.11.1068; 1m: 1019 Guillaume III de Poitou, Duc d'Aquitaine (*ca 969 +31.1.1030); 2m: 1032 (div 1049/52) Cte Geoffroy II Martel d'Anjou."15

; Per Med Lands:
     "AGNES de Mâcon ([990/95]-Saintes 10 Nov 1068, bur Poitiers, Priory of Saint-Nicolas). Agnes is named as daughter of "Ermentrudis" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that she was mother of "Wido"[105]. Her birth date range is estimated on the basis of the estimated birth date range of her mother. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus…Pictauensis" married one of the daughters of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" & his wife[106]. "Agnes comitissa filia Ottonis cognomento Willelmi comitis Matiscensis, uxor…Wilelmi ducis Aquitanorum" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1020][107]. The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records that "Gaufredus Martellus Andegavensis comes" married "Agnetem comitissam Pictavensem" incestuously in 1032[108]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1032 Kal Jan" of "Gaufridus comes, Agnetem comitissam incesto", indirectly indicating her origin in a later passage which records the marriage "1043 XII Nov" of "Hainricus imperator [et] filiam Agnetis comitissæ"[109]. Her origin is clarified by the Chronicæ Sancti Albini which records the marriage "1043 XII Kal Nov…apud Vesbrianim" of "Henricus imperator…filiam Willelmi comitis Pictavorum et Agnetis"[110]. Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou & his wife founded the abbey of La Trinité de Vendôme by charter dated 31 May 1040, signed by "Goffridi comitis Andegavorum, Agnetis conjugis suæ…"[111]. A powerful personality, she succeeded in defeating her stepson Duke Eudes and installed her own son as Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou. Regent of Aquitaine for her son 1039-1044. She arranged her daughter's marriage with Emperor Heinrich III in 1043 and lived at the imperial court after this time. "Goffredus…comes atque Agnes…uxor" donated property to the monks of La Trinité, Vendôme by charter dated 6 Jan 1049 subscribed by "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Goffredi pueri fratris illius"[112]. "Gaufredus Andegavorum comes…uxor mea Agnes" made a donation to the priory of Saint-Nicholas de Poitiers by undated charter which also names "eius [Agnetis] filii comites…Pictavenses"[113]. A charter dated to [1060/67] recites a prior donation to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by "Hildegardis comitissa", who retained a life interest in the property which, after the death of the donor, was sold in turn to "Agneti comitissa" (recording her divorce from "comitum Gaufridum"), "comitem Gaufridum…Gaufridi nepotem" and finally "fratre eius Fulconi" who restored it to the abbey[114]. After her separation from her second husband, in 1047 she founded the abbey of Notre-Dame de Saintes, where she became a nun in 1068[115]. "Agnes" founded the abbey of Saint-Nicolas at Poitou with the consent of "ambobus filiis Guillelmi et Gauffrido" by charter dated [1050][116]. "Aquitanorum…dux Gaufridus" confirms in his charter dated [1058/68] that "mea mater Agnes…frater meus Guillelmus" were both buried in the priory of Saint-Nicolas de Poitiers[117]. The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Agnes comitissa"[118].
     "m firstly (1019) as his third wife, GUILLAUME III "le Grand" Comte de Poitou, GUILLAUME V Duke of Aquitaine, son of GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou] & his wife Emma de Blois ([969]-Abbaye de Maillezais 31 Jan 1030).
     "m secondly (1 Jan 1032, divorced [1049/52]) as his first wife, GEOFFROY d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES III "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Hildegarde [de Metz] (14 Oct [1006/07]-14 Nov 1060). He succeeded his father in 1040 as GEOFFROY II "Martel" Comte d'Anjou."
Med Lands cites:
[105] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[106] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 107.
[107] Cluny, Tome III, 2742, p. 765.
[108] Chronico Sancti Michaelis in periculo maris, RHGF, Tome X, p. 176.
[109] Marchegay & Mabille (1869), Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, pp. 23 and 24.
[110] Marchegay & Mabille (1869), Chronica sancti Sergii Andegavensis, pp. 135-6.
[111] Château-du-Loir, 13, p. 5.
[112] Angers Cathedral, 45, p. 93.
[113] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas, 27, p. 32.
[114] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 72, p. 89.
[115] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Berthe, reine d'Aragon et de Navarre' (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 375-402, 398.
[116] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas 1, p. 5.
[117] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas 5, p. 12.
[118] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, p. 203.18
He was Duke of Aquitaine between 995 and 1030.3

Family 1

Adalmode de Limoges d. bt 1007 - 1011

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume III-V 'Le Grand': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020504&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeVAquitainedied1030B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume II-IV 'Fier a bras': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020502&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIIPoitoudied995
  7. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Duc Guillaume II (IV) d' Aquitaine, "Fierebras": https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I13868&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs d’Aquitaine & Comtes de Poitou, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aquitaine-Poitou.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020503&tree=LEO
  10. [S4743] Geneagraphie, online http://geneagraphie.com/, Emma de Champagne: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I15079&tree=1
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almodis de Gevaudan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196680&tree=LEO
  12. [S1677] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004 "Re: Clarification on William III/V and William VI/VIII, county Poitou, Dukes Acquitaine requested"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Sept 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004."
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LIMOUSIN.htm#AiscelineLimogesMAldebertILaMarche
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maisons de la Marche & de Périgord &Talleyrand-Périgord, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/La_Marche-Perigord.pdf
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#Ag
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020876&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#AgnesBourgognedied1068
  19. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 22 March 2020), memorial page for William Aquitaine, V (969–31 Jan 1030), Find A Grave Memorial no. 61508998, citing Maillezais Cathedral, Maillezais, Departement de la Vendée, Pays de la Loire, France ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/61508998/william-aquitaine. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Poitou: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196678&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00196679&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume V-VII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020903&tree=LEO
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page (The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VI-VIII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020880&tree=LEO
  26. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/La_Marche-Perigord.pdf, p.6.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020893&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Agnesdied1077
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béatrice de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174768&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#BeatrixMRaymondImelgueil

Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy1,2,3

F, #4363, b. circa 995, d. 10 November 1068
FatherOtto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy2,4,5,6,7,8,9 b. c 958, d. b 21 Sep 1026
MotherErmentrude/Irmgard de Roucy Countess of Rheims2,5,6,10,11,8 b. c 950, d. bt 5 Mar 1003 - 1004
ReferenceGAV25 EDV26
Last Edited24 Jul 2020
     Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy was born circa 995 at Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France (now).1,2,12,5,13 She married Guillaume III (V) "le Grand" (?) Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou, son of Guillaume II (IV) 'Fier à bras' (?) Comte de Poitiers, Duc d'Aquitaine and Emma de Blois Comtesse de Poitiers, between 1018 and 1019;
His 3rd wife. Genealogics says m. ca 1018; Med Lands says m. 1019; Wikipédia (Fr.) says m. 1016.1,2,14,4,12,15,5,6 Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy married Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours, son of Foulques III "The Black", (?) Comte d'Anjou and Hildegarde (?) de Sundgau (Metz), Countess of Anjou, on 15 January 1032;
His 1st wife.16,2,4,12,17,5,6 Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy and Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours were divorced between 1049 and 1050; Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1 page) says div between 1049 and 1052; Genealogics says div. 1050; Med Lands says div. 1049/52.2,12,5,6
Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy died on 10 November 1068 at Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France (now); died as a nun.2,4,12,5,13
Agnès (?) de Bourgogne, Princess of Lombardy was buried after 10 November 1068 at Saint Nicolas de Poitiers, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France
     DEATH     10 Nov 1068, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
     Daughter of Othon Guillaume de Bourgogne and Ermetrude de Roucy. Granddaughter of Renaud de Roucy. Born about 995.
     Agnes became the third wife of William III of Poitiou in 1019, making her the Duchess of Aquitane until his death is 1058 of illness. They had two sons who would be influential but not inherit William's titles. One granddaughter would marry Emperor Henry III.
     Secondly, Agnes then married Geoffrey II, Count of Anjou, making her now the Countess of Anjou. She supported Geoffrey when he invaded Poitou against William's heir's, who died in the process, leaving Agnes's sons from her first marriage in control of Poitiou. After marrying her daughter to Henry in Germany, Agnes returned to Poitou and founded the Abbey of Our Lady and Sacred in 1047, as well as the abbey of Saint Nicolas de Poitiers where she retired to, and was buried.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Otto Guillaume de Bourgogne unknown–1026
     Spouse
          William Aquitaine 969–1030
     Siblings
          Renaud I de Bourgogne unknown–1057
          Mathilde de Bourgogne Nevers unknown–1005
     Children
          Guillaume V Pierre de Poitou 1023–1058
          Agnes Of Poitou 1024–1077
          Guillaume VI de Poitou 1024–1086
     BURIAL     Saint Nicolas de Poitiers, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
     Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Added: 2 Apr 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 87891070
     SPONSORED BY Christian H. F. Riley.13
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou): "F1. Guillaume III (V) "le Grand", Duke of Aquitaine (995-1030), Ct of Poitou, *ca 969, +Maillezais 31.1.1030; 1m: ca 997 Almodis de Gevaudun (+after 1005); 2m: 1011 Sancha de Gascogne (+ca 1018); 3m: 1019 Agnes de Bourgogne (*ca 995 +9.11.1068.)18"

Reference: Genealogics cites: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 27.5

; Per Stewart email [2004]: "William the Great was married by March 1019 to Agnes of Burgundy, daughter of Count Otto-William - her origin is not in doubt, as in an undated charter of Cluny she is helpfully described as "Agnes comitissa, filia Ottonis cognomento Willelmi, comitis Matiscensis, uxor etiam ejusdem nominis Willelmi, ducis Aquitanorum". Agnes was later wife of Geoffroy II Martel, count of Anjou, and she died (veiled as a nun) on 9 November 1068."4

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Agnes of Burgundy (or Agnes de Macon; died 10 November 1068) was Duchess of Aquitaine by marriage to Duke William V and Countess of Anjou by marriage to Count Geoffrey II. She served as regent of the Duchy of Aquitaine during the minority of her son from 1039 until 1044. She was a daughter of Otto-William, Count of Burgundy[1] and Ermentrude de Roucy and a member of the House of Ivrea.
First marriage: Duchess of Aquitaine
     "In 1019, she married Duke William V of Aquitaine[1] by whom she had three children: William VII, Duke of Aquitaine, William VIII, Duke of Aquitaine and Agnes, Holy Roman Empress.[2] William died on 31 January 1030, leaving his widow and their three young children, plus the three surviving children from his first two marriages. While married to William, Agnes gave many gifts to the abbey of Cluny.[1]
Second marriage: Countess of Anjou
     "After her husband's death, Agnes lost her influence at the court of Poitiers since her sons were not heirs. In order for her to regain her position and ensure a future for her children, Agnes had to remarry. Thus she married Geoffrey II, Count of Anjou in 1032,[3] which was an attractive offer because his father was the powerful Fulk III, Count of Anjou.
     "In 1033, Geoffrey's troops invaded Poitou with the support of Agnes. William VI, Duke of Aquitaine, the new Count of Poitou, was captured in March. He was released only in 1036 against a large ransom and he died in 1038 without children. The county then returned to his brother, Agnes' stepson Odo, who was already Duke of Gascony. He went to war against Agnes, her husband and sons. Odo was killed at the battle at Mauzé.
Regency
     "The succeeding Count of Poitou was Agnes's son, Peter, who took the name of William VII Aigret. Being too young, his mother governed territories in his place from 1039 to 1044 and indeed it even seems the government itself, without her husband. When she transmitted the power to William, she married and took the opportunity to give his second son, Geoffrey Guy the duchy of Gascony, by marrying an heiress. Agnes then joined Geoffrey in Anjou and although she may not have actively participated in the government, certainly had some influence on him.
     "Agnes and Geoffrey stayed in Germany at the imperial court, so her daughter Agnes could marry Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor. They then bonded with the imperial couple, during a trip to Italy where they participated in the council of Sutri, filing and inducting two popes Pope Clement II, who was quick to crown the emperor and empress. After a pilgrimage to Monte Garaño, the couple went back to Poitou in 1047 where they founded Sainte-Marie-des-Dames.[4] Between 1047 and 1049, Agnes founded the abbey of Saint Nicolas de Poitou.
Separation from Geoffrey
     "Between 1049 and 1052, Agnes and Geoffrey separated. The reasons are varied: the most logical is the absence of children, however the council of Reims in 1049 condemned certain marriages as incestuous and judged them to part; in addition, Geoffrey went to war against the King of France who appreciated the little freedom from war that would take his vassal to Germany (it seems that Geoffrey had to swear allegiance to the emperor and to no longer depend on the King of France) and it is very possible that the King imposed on his vanquished vassal that he should divorce his wife. Indeed, Agnes also influenced her husband, but she came from Burgundy and had retained strong links with her homeland, so it may be that it was Agnes who wanted the divorce.
Later life
     "Still, Agnes returned to the court of Poitiers and her son William over whom she had much influence. A war soon broke out between Anjou and Poitou, which saw a victory for Geoffrey in 1053. This would have probably never happened if Agnes had not divorced Geoffrey. In 1058 William left for another war against his former stepfather Count of Anjou, probably because Geoffrey gave the dowry of Agnes to his new wife, Adelaide. William was on the verge of winning when he died of an illness in 1058.
     "He was succeeded by his brother, Geoffrey Guy, who took the dynastic name of William VIII. The young count had remained close to Geoffrey because he was the only father figure he knew and he reconciled with Anjou. But only during Geoffrey's lifetime, in fact, after Geoffrey's death, William did not hesitate to attack his heirs and assume control of Saintonge from 1062. Agnes, despite her retirement, was still very active and did not hesitate to travel throughout Poitou to participate in donations or simply see her son at the court of Poitiers. In 1062, Agnes with her daughter, Empress Agnes, petitioned Pope Alexander II to place St. Nicholaus of Poitou under apostolic protection.[5] Agnes died on 10 November 1068. She is buried at St. Nicolas de Poitiers.
See also
** County of Burgundy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_of_Burgundy
** Dukes of Burgundy family tree: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_of_Burgundy
References
1. Bouchard 1987, p. 142.
2. Bachrach 1993, p. 268.
3. Abel 2012, p. 854.
4. Johnson 1991, p. 195-196.
5. Bouchard 1987, p. 143.
Sources
** Abel, Mickey (2012). "Emma of Blois as Arbiter of Peace and the Politics of Patronage". In Martin, Therese (ed.) Reassessing the Roles of Women as 'Makers' of Medieval Art and Architecture. Brill. p. 823-864.
** Bachrach, Bernard S. (1993). Fulk Nerra, the Neo-Roman Consul 987-1040. University of California Press.
** Bouchard, Constance Brittain (1987). Sword, Miter, and Cloister: Nobility and the Church in Burgundy, 980-1198. Cornell University Press.
** Johnson, Penelope D. (1991). Equal in Monastic Profession: Religious Women in Medieval France. University of Chicago Press."


Per Wikipédia (Fr.):
     "Agnès de Bourgogne ou Agnès de Mâcon1, (vers 990/995 - † 1068) (Dynastie des Unrochides), fille d'Otte-Guillaume, comte de Mâcon et comte palatin de Bourgogne (Dynastie des Unrochides) et d'Ermentrude de Roucy, fille de Renaud de Roucy. Son père, Otte-Guillaume, est le fils d'Aubert Ier d'Italie.
Biographie
     "Vers 10162, elle épouse le duc Guillaume V d'Aquitaine3 avec lequel elle a trois enfants :
** Pierre dit Guillaume VII d'Aquitaine (1023-1058).
** Guy-Geoffroi dit Guillaume VIII d'Aquitaine (1023-1086), frère jumeau de Pierre.
** Agnès d'Aquitaine (1025-1077) dite Ala, qui épouse en 1041, Henri III dit le Noir, empereur germanique.
     "Le 31 janvier 1030, son époux Guillaume le Grand meurt en la laissant veuve avec ses trois jeunes enfants et deux fils aînés issus de ses deux précédents mariage. Le seul moyen pour elle de retrouver sa position et d’assurer un avenir à ses enfants, est d'épouser un comte. C’est ainsi qu'elle s'unit à Geoffroi II d'Anjou dit Martel dont le père n'est autre que Foulque III Nerra, le puissant comte d'Anjou. Le mariage est célébré le 1er janvier 10323.
     "Comme ses propres fils, Pierre et Guy-Geoffroi, ne sont pas les héritiers du Poitou, son second époux voit là une raison pour essayer de s'en emparer. Dès 1033, les troupes de Geoffroi Martel envahissent le Poitou avec le soutien de certains seigneurs qui se rallient à la comtesse Agnès. Son beau-fils, Guillaume VI d'Aquitaine, qui a succédé à son père Guillaume V, est fait prisonnier à la bataille de Montcoué (Montcouer) en septembre 1033. Celui-ci ne sera libéré qu'à la fin 1036 contre une forte rançon et il meurt en 1038 sans enfants. Le comté revient alors à son frère Eudes de Poitiers, déjà duc de Gascogne. Ce dernier, remontant de ses territoires pour combattre les troupes de Geoffroi et d'Agnès, fait demi tour après une première défaite et se heurte à la défense du château de Mauzé où il meurt pendant le siège.
     "Le Poitou revient alors au fils aîné d'Agnès, Pierre, qui prend le nom de Guillaume VII Aigret. Étant trop jeune, c'est sa mère qui gouverne les territoires à sa place de 1039 à 1044 ; d'ailleurs, il semble même qu'elle gouverne seule, sans même son époux. Quand elle transmet le pouvoir à Guillaume, elle le marie et en profite pour doter son second fils Guy-Geoffroi du duché de Gascogne, par le mariage avec une héritière. Agnès rejoint alors Geoffroi en Anjou et si elle ne participe pas activement au gouvernement, a certainement une certaine influence sur lui.
     "Dès noël 1045, Agnès et Geoffroi sont en Allemagne à la cour impériale puisqu'en 1043, sa fille Ala a épousé l'empereur Henri III du Saint-Empire. Ils enchaînent alors avec, le couple impérial, un voyage en Italie où ils participent au concile de Sutri qui dépose deux papes et intronise Clément II qui s'empresse de couronner l'empereur et l'impératrice. Agnès est à la première place pour la consécration de sa fille. Après un pèlerinage à Monte Garano, le couple est de retour dans le Poitou dès 1047 quand ils fondent l'abbaye de Notre Dame à Saintes. Entre 1047 et 1049, Agnès fonde seule l'abbaye de Saint Nicolas de Poitiers.
     "Entre 1049 et 1052, le couple se sépare. Les raisons sont diverses : la plus logique est l'absence d'enfants, cependant il ne faut pas oublier que le concile de Reims de 1049 condamne certains mariages jugés comme incestueux et le leur en fait partie ; en outre, Geoffroi entre en guerre contre le roi de France qui apprécie très peu les libertés que se prend son vassal envers l'Allemagne (il semblerait que Geoffroi ait eu le projet de prêter serment à l'empereur pour ne plus dépendre du roi de France) et il est très possible que le roi ait imposé à son vassal vaincu de divorcer d'avec sa femme. En effet, Agnès outre l’influence qu’elle a sur son époux, est originaire de Bourgogne et a gardé de forts liens avec sa terre d’origine ; il semble donc que ce soit la comtesse qui ait poussé à ce rapprochement avec l’empereur.
     "Toujours est-il qu'Agnès revient à la cour de Poitiers auprès de son fils Guillaume sur lequel elle semble avoir beaucoup d'influence. Une guerre éclate rapidement entre l'Anjou et le Poitou, qui voit la victoire de Geoffroi Martel en 1053. Si le pouvoir politique d’Agnès a ensuite diminué, il n’en va pas de même pour son influence qu’elle dépense sans compter au profit de ses fondations. En 1058 Guillaume repart en guerre contre le comte d'Anjou, vraisemblablement puisque son ex beau-père a donné le douaire d’Agnès à sa dernière épouse, Adélaïde. Le comte de Poitou est sur le point de gagner quand il meurt de maladie en 1058.
     "Lui succède son frère, Guy-Geoffroi, qui prend le nom dynastique de Guillaume VIII. Le jeune comte est resté proche de Geoffroi Martel, qui est la seule figure paternelle qu’il ait connue, et il fait un rapprochement avec l'Anjou. Mais seulement du vivant de Geoffroi, en effet, après sa mort il n'hésite pas à attaquer ses héritiers et reprend le contrôle de la Saintonge dès 1062. Agnès, malgré sa retraite, est toujours très active et n’hésite pas à voyager dans tout le Poitou pour participer à des donations ou simplement voir son fils à la cour de Poitiers ; et ce jusqu'à sa mort le 10 novembre 10683. Elle est enterrée dans sa fondation de Saint Nicolas de Poitiers.
Sources
** Célestin Port, Dictionnaire historique, géographique et biographique de Maine-et-Loire et de l'ancienne province d'Anjou : A-C, t. 1, Angers, H. Siraudeau et Cie, 1965, 2e éd. (notice BnF no FRBNF33141105, lire en ligne [archive])
** Michel Dillange, Les comtes de Poitou, ducs d'Aquitaine : 778-1204, Mougon, Geste éd., coll. « Histoire », 1995, 303 p., ill., couv. ill. en coul; 24 cm (ISBN 2-910919-09-9, ISSN 1269-9454, notice BnF no FRBNF35804152).
** Olivier Guillot, Le comte d’Anjou et son entourage au xie siècle, Paris, Editions Picard, 1972.
** Penelope D. Johnson, « Agnes of Burgundy : an eleventh-century woman as monastic patron », Journal of Medieval History,? juin 1989 (DOI 10.1016/0304-4181(89)90011-0).
** Alfred Richard, Histoire des comtes de Poitou, vol. 1, Paris, 1903.
** Isabelle Soulard-Berger, « Agnès de Bourgogne, duchesse d’Aquitaine puis comtesse d’Anjou. Œuvre politique et action religieuse (1019-v. 1068) », Bulletin de la Société des Antiquaires de l’Ouest, vol. VI,? 1er trimestre 1992, p. 45-56 [lire en ligne [archive]].
** Isabelle Soulard, « Agnès de Bourgogne ou la tentation du pouvoir », dans Isabelle Soulard, Les femmes du Poitou au Moyen Âge, éditions La Crèche, 1998, p. 140-150.
Notes et références
1. Généalogie d'Agnès de Mâcon sur le site Medieval Lands [archive]
2. Georges Pon et Yves Chauvin, La fondation de l'abbaye de Maillezais : récit du moine Pierre, Centre vendéen de recherches historiques, 2001 (ISBN 2911253094 et 9782911253096, OCLC 406932722, lire en ligne [archive]), p. 215
3. Port 1965, p. 5
Articles connexes
** Comté de Bourgogne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comt%C3%A9_de_Bourgogne
** Histoire de la Bourgogne - Histoire de la Franche-Comté: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histoire_de_la_Bourgogne
** Liste des comtes de Bourgogne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_comtes_palatins_de_Bourgogne."19 GAV-25.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Agnes was the daughter of Eudes Guillaume, count of Burgundy, and Ermentrud de Roucy. About 1018 she became the third wife of Guillaume III-V, duke of Aquitaine, one of the most powerful lords in France. They had four children who would have progeny: Pierre-Guillaume and Guy-Geoffriou who would both be dukes of Aquitaine, Agnès and Béatrice. After twelve years of marriage Guillaume died, leaving his widow and their young children, plus the three surviving children from his first two marriages.
     "After her husband's death, Agnes lost her influence at the court of Poitiers since her sons were not heirs. In order for her to regain her position and ensure the future of her children, Agnes had to remarry. So she married Geoffrey II Martel, comte d'Anjou, which was an attractive offer because his father was the powerful Foulques III 'Nerra', comte d'Anjou.
     "In 1033, Geoffrey's troops invaded Poitou with the support of Agnes. Guillaume IV-VI 'le Gros', duke of Aquitaine, the new count of Poitou, was captured in March. He was released only in 1036 against a large ransom and he died in 1038 without children. The county then passed to his half-brother, Agnes' stepson Eudes de Poitou, who was already duke of Gascony. He went to war against Agnes, her husband and sons, but he was killed at the battle of Mauzé.
     "The succeeding count of Poitou was Agnes' son Pierre-Guillaume, who took the name of Guillaume V-VII Aigret. As he was too young, his mother governed in his place from 1039 to 1044. When she passed power to Guillaume, she arranged his marriage to Ermesinde de Longwy and took the opportunity to give her second son Guy-Geoffriou the duchy of Gascony. Agnes then joined Geoffrey in Anjou, and although she many not have actively participated in the government, she certainly influenced him.
     "From 1043 to Christmas 1045 Agnes and Geoffrey stayed in Germany at the imperial court, so that her daughter Agnes could marry Emperor Heinrich III. They then accompanied the imperial court to Italy where they participated in the council of Sutri, which deposed two popes and chose Pope Clement II, who was quick to crown the emperor and empress. After a pilgrimage to Monte Garaño, in 1047, the couple returned to Poitou, where they founded the abbey of Nortre Dame at Saintes. Between 1047 and 1049 Agnes founded the abbey of Saint-Nicolas at Poitiers.
     "Between 1049 and 1052 Agnes and Geoffrey separated after 18 years of marriage. The reasons are varied: the most logical is the absence of children, but a factor may also have been that the council of Reims in 1049 condemned certain marriage as incestuous and ruled that they had to separate; as well Geoffrey went to war against the king of France who little appreciated his vassal's tilt towards Germany, and it is quite possible that the king imposed on his vanquished vassal that he had to divorce his wife.
     "Agnes returned to the court of Poitiers and her son Guillaume V-VII, over whom she had considerable influence. A war soon broke out between Anjou and Poitou which resulted in victory for Geoffrey II Martel in 1053. This would have probably never happened if Agnes had not divorced Geoffrey. In 1058 Guillaume V-VII left for another war against his former stepfather Geoffrey II, probably because Geoffrey had Agnes' dowry given to his new wife Adelheid. Guillaume was on the verge of winning when he died of an illness in 1058.
     "He was succeeded by his younger brother Guy-Geoffriou, who took the dynastic name of Guillaume VI-VIII. The young count had remained close to Geoffrey because he was the only father figure he had known, and he reconciled with Anjou. However, after Geoffrey's death Guillaume did not hesitate to attack his heirs and assume control of Saintonge from 1062. Agnes, despite her retirement, was still very active and travelled throughout Poitou to participate in donations or simply to see her son at the court of Poitiers.
     "Agnes died on 10 November 1068. She was buried at Saint-Nicolas in Poitiers."5

; Per Med Lands:
     "AGNES de Mâcon ([990/95]-Saintes 10 Nov 1068, bur Poitiers, Priory of Saint-Nicolas). Agnes is named as daughter of "Ermentrudis" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that she was mother of "Wido"[105]. Her birth date range is estimated on the basis of the estimated birth date range of her mother. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus…Pictauensis" married one of the daughters of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" & his wife[106]. "Agnes comitissa filia Ottonis cognomento Willelmi comitis Matiscensis, uxor…Wilelmi ducis Aquitanorum" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1020][107]. The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records that "Gaufredus Martellus Andegavensis comes" married "Agnetem comitissam Pictavensem" incestuously in 1032[108]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1032 Kal Jan" of "Gaufridus comes, Agnetem comitissam incesto", indirectly indicating her origin in a later passage which records the marriage "1043 XII Nov" of "Hainricus imperator [et] filiam Agnetis comitissæ"[109]. Her origin is clarified by the Chronicæ Sancti Albini which records the marriage "1043 XII Kal Nov…apud Vesbrianim" of "Henricus imperator…filiam Willelmi comitis Pictavorum et Agnetis"[110]. Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou & his wife founded the abbey of La Trinité de Vendôme by charter dated 31 May 1040, signed by "Goffridi comitis Andegavorum, Agnetis conjugis suæ…"[111]. A powerful personality, she succeeded in defeating her stepson Duke Eudes and installed her own son as Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou. Regent of Aquitaine for her son 1039-1044. She arranged her daughter's marriage with Emperor Heinrich III in 1043 and lived at the imperial court after this time. "Goffredus…comes atque Agnes…uxor" donated property to the monks of La Trinité, Vendôme by charter dated 6 Jan 1049 subscribed by "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Goffredi pueri fratris illius"[112]. "Gaufredus Andegavorum comes…uxor mea Agnes" made a donation to the priory of Saint-Nicholas de Poitiers by undated charter which also names "eius [Agnetis] filii comites…Pictavenses"[113]. A charter dated to [1060/67] recites a prior donation to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by "Hildegardis comitissa", who retained a life interest in the property which, after the death of the donor, was sold in turn to "Agneti comitissa" (recording her divorce from "comitum Gaufridum"), "comitem Gaufridum…Gaufridi nepotem" and finally "fratre eius Fulconi" who restored it to the abbey[114]. After her separation from her second husband, in 1047 she founded the abbey of Notre-Dame de Saintes, where she became a nun in 1068[115]. "Agnes" founded the abbey of Saint-Nicolas at Poitou with the consent of "ambobus filiis Guillelmi et Gauffrido" by charter dated [1050][116]. "Aquitanorum…dux Gaufridus" confirms in his charter dated [1058/68] that "mea mater Agnes…frater meus Guillelmus" were both buried in the priory of Saint-Nicolas de Poitiers[117]. The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Agnes comitissa"[118].
     "m firstly (1019) as his third wife, GUILLAUME III "le Grand" Comte de Poitou, GUILLAUME V Duke of Aquitaine, son of GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou] & his wife Emma de Blois ([969]-Abbaye de Maillezais 31 Jan 1030).
     "m secondly (1 Jan 1032, divorced [1049/52]) as his first wife, GEOFFROY d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES III "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Hildegarde [de Metz] (14 Oct [1006/07]-14 Nov 1060). He succeeded his father in 1040 as GEOFFROY II "Martel" Comte d'Anjou."
Med Lands cites:
[105] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[106] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 107.
[107] Cluny, Tome III, 2742, p. 765.
[108] Chronico Sancti Michaelis in periculo maris, RHGF, Tome X, p. 176.
[109] Marchegay & Mabille (1869), Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, pp. 23 and 24.
[110] Marchegay & Mabille (1869), Chronica sancti Sergii Andegavensis, pp. 135-6.
[111] Château-du-Loir, 13, p. 5.
[112] Angers Cathedral, 45, p. 93.
[113] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas, 27, p. 32.
[114] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 72, p. 89.
[115] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Berthe, reine d'Aragon et de Navarre' (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 375-402, 398.
[116] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas 1, p. 5.
[117] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas 5, p. 12.
[118] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, p. 203.6


; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea): "Agnes de Bourgogne, *ca 995, +Poitou 10.11.1068; 1m: 1019 Guillaume III de Poitou, Duc d'Aquitaine (*ca 969 +31.1.1030); 2m: 1032 (div 1049/52) Cte Geoffroy II Martel d'Anjou."2 She was Duchess consort of Aquitaine between 1019 and 1030.19 She was Countess consort of Anjou between 1040 and 1050.19

Family 2

Geoffroy II Martel (?) Comte d'Anjou et de Tours b. 14 Oct 1006, d. 14 Nov 1067

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#Ag
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020876&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1677] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004 "Re: Clarification on William III/V and William VI/VIII, county Poitou, Dukes Acquitaine requested"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Sept 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020876&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#AgnesBourgognedied1068. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes Guillaume: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036188&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#OthonIMacondied1026
  9. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Otto alias Guillaume, or Otte-Guillaume: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/otwil000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrud/Irmgard de Roucy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020659&tree=LEO
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/ermen101.htm
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  13. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 May 2020), memorial page for Agnes of Burgundy (unknown–10 Nov 1068), Find a Grave Memorial no. 87891070, citing Saint Nicolas de Poitiers, Poitiers, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/87891070/agnes_of-burgundy. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume III-V 'Le Grand': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020504&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeVAquitainedied1030B
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey II Martel: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020214&tree=LEO
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Poitou: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes_of_Burgundy,_Duchess_of_Aquitaine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume V-VII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020903&tree=LEO
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page (The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume VI-VIII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020880&tree=LEO
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/La_Marche-Perigord.pdf, p.6.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020893&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Agnesdied1077
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béatrice de Poitou: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00174768&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#BeatrixMRaymondImelgueil

Guillaume II (IV) 'Fier à bras' (?) Comte de Poitiers, Duc d'Aquitaine1,2,3,4,5,6,7

M, #4364, b. 935, d. 3 February 993
FatherGuillaume I/III "Tête-d'Étoupe" (?) Duc d'AquitaineComte de Poitou, Auvergne et Limoges8,9,10,11,3,5,7 b. c 900, d. 3 Apr 963
MotherGerloc/Adèle (?) of Normandy, Comtesse de Poitiers, Duchesse d'Aquitaine8,9,11,12,13,3,5,7 b. c 917, d. a 14 Oct 962
ReferenceGAV26 EDV27
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Guillaume II (IV) 'Fier à bras' (?) Comte de Poitiers, Duc d'Aquitaine was born in 935; Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1 page) says b. 937; Genealogics says b. 935; Med Lands and Geneagraphie say b. 937; Racines et Histoire (Aquitaine and Blois-chartres) says b. 937.14,9,3,5,7,15 He married Emma de Blois Comtesse de Poitiers, daughter of Thibault I/II "Le Tricheur" (?) comte de Blois, etc. and Luitgarde/Ledgarde (?) Cts de Vermandois, Duchess of Normandy, circa 968.2,8,9,3,5,7,16,17,15,18
Guillaume II (IV) 'Fier à bras' (?) Comte de Poitiers, Duc d'Aquitaine died on 3 February 993 at Saint-Maixent-L'Ecole, France (now); Genealogy.EU (Blois 1 and Poitou 1 pages) says d. 3 Feb 995/6; Med Lands says end 995/early 996; Geneagraphie says d. 3 Feb 995; Racines et Histoire (Aquitaine) says d. entre fin 995 et 03/02/996; Racines et Histoire (Blois-Chartres) says d. 03/02/ ou après 05 /995.2,14,3,9,5,7,15
Guillaume II (IV) 'Fier à bras' (?) Comte de Poitiers, Duc d'Aquitaine was buried after 3 February 993 at Abbatiale Saint-Maixent, Saint-Maixent-l'Ecole, Departement des Deux-Sèvres, Poitou-Charentes, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     unknown
     Born around 937 as the eldest son of Guillaume I and his wife Adelaide de Normandie. He died as a monk in late 995 or early 996.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Guillaume I de Poitou
     Spouse
          Emma de Blois
     Children
          William Aquitaine 969–1030
     BURIAL     Abbatiale Saint-Maixent, Saint-Maixent-l'Ecole, Departement des Deux-Sèvres, Poitou-Charentes, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 2 Jun 2016
     Find a Grave Memorial 163748752
     SPONSORED BY Christian H. F. Riley.19
     ; Per Genealogics:
     “Guillaume II-IV, called 'Fier-à-bras' ('Iron Arm'), was born about 935, the son of Guillaume I-III, duc d'Aquitaine, comte de Poitou and Gerloc (Adele) of Normandy. He was duke of Aquitaine and count of Poitou from 963 to his retirement in 990.
     “Guillaume's father retired to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son. Guillaume's early reign was characterised by many wars. He fought frequently against the counts of Anjou, the first time against Geoffrey I 'Greymantle', comte d'Anjou, who had taken Loudun.
     “In 968 Guillaume married Emma de Blois, daughter of Thibaut I 'the Deceiver', comte de Blois et Chartres and Liutgarde de Vermandois. Their marriage was stormy, in part because of Guillaume's indulgence in the pursuit of women and, as a hunting aficionado, wild animals. She banished his paramours and they separated twice for long periods.
     “In 988 Guillaume went to war with the newly-elected king of France, Hugues Capet, whom he refused to recognise. Capet had been granted Aquitaine by King Lothar I before the latter had been reconciled to Guillaume's father. Capet renewed his claim on the great duchy and invaded it that year. A royal army was defeated on the plain of the Loire Valley. Guillaume sheltered the young Louis, the son of Charles, duc de Lorraine, the last legitimate Carolingian heir. He opened the palace of Poitiers to him and treated him as royalty, regarding him as the true heir to the French throne.
     “Like his father, Guillaume finally retired to an abbey, in his case the abbey of Saint-Maixent-L'Ecole, long associated with his family. He died there on 3 February 993. From his retirement his wife Emma ruled Aquitaine in the name of their son Guillaume until 1004. Their second son Ebalus died sometime after 997.”.3 GAV-26 EDV-27 GKJ-28.

; This is the same person as ”William IV, Duke of Aquitaine” at Wikipedia and as ”Guillaume IV d'Aquitaine” at Wikipédia (FR).20,6

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 28.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.



Geneagraphie cites:
1. Web.genealogie, Le site de la généalogie historique, (http://web.genealogie.free.fr/), Dynastie d'Aquitaine (Reliability: 3).
2. Die Nachkommen Karls des Großen, Brandenburg, Erich, (Verlag Degener und Co, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1995 Bibliothek Klassischer Werke der Genealogie, Herausgegeben von Manfred), IX 100 (Reliability: 3).
3. Généalogie de Carné, Alain de Carné, Forez, Loire, France.3
He was Comte de Poitou.8

; Per Racines et Histoire (Aquitaine): “Guillaume II (de Poitou et d’Auvergne, IV d’Aquitaine) «Fierbrace» («Fier-à-Bras») de Poitou ° 937 + entre fin 995 et 03/02/996 (Saint-Maixent) duc d’Aquitaine (963-993, abdique en 01/993 en faveur de son fils et se retire comme moine à Saint-Cyprien de Poitiers), comte de Poitou, Abbé laïc de Saint-Hilaire (D’abord sous l’emprise de son médecin italien Madelme, adultère notoire puis bigot (988) ; sa femme le quitte 2 fois (entre 976 et 988) et s’exile avec son fils aîné)
     ép. 968 (Tours) Emma de Blois (alias de Tours) ° ~950/53 + après 01/08/1004 (~1006 ou 1028 ?) (fille de Thibauld 1er «Le Tricheur» comte de Blois, et de Luitgarde/Liégearde de Vermandois) (hérite de sa mère en son nom propre un domaine près de Vernon qu’elle donne à l’Abbaye de Bourgueil ; son douaire en 968 fut établi à Chinon ; confirme la donation de son fils de Brétignolle à l’Abbaye de Bourgueil 27/12/1003)
nombreuses liaisons dont ? de Thouars”


Per Racines et Histoire (Blois-Chartres): “Emma de Blois ° ~953/54 + après 27/12/1003 peut-être après 01/08/1004 ? (Chinon est son douaire (968) ; elle hérite aussi de fiefs maternels près de Vernon qu’elle donne à l’Abbaye de Bourgueil ; citée dans des chartes de son mari 971, 12/992, 990/1004 ; confirme la donation de Brétignolle à Bourgueil par son fils 27/12/1003) fuit le Poitou (et son mari volage) entre 976 et 988
     ép. 968 comte Guillaume de Poitiers dit «Fierà-Bras» (II de Poitou ; IV d’Aquitaine) ° ~937 (ou 949 ?) + 03/02/ ou après 05 /995 (Saint-Maixent) (fils de Guillaume III «Tête d’Etoupe», duc d’Aquitaine (1er du Poitou),
et d’Adela «Gerloc» de Normandie) ”.15,9

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME de Poitou ([937]-Saint-Maixent [end 995/early 996], bur Abbaye de Saint-Maixent[373]). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Willelmum" as son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ" when recording that he succeeded his father[374]. "Ebulus…Lemovicensium sedis episcopus" donated property including "alodum…meum Baidon" to Saint-Maixent "pro remedio animæ…fratris mei Guillelmi, sive pro consolatione nepotism mei equivoci Guillelmi Aquitanorum ducis" by charter dated Jan [965/66][375]. He succeeded his father in 963 as GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras/Fera Brachia" Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou, lay abbot of Saint-Hilaire-de-Poitiers. "Guilelmus…Aquitanensium dux et cœnobii…Hylarii abbas" donated property to "clericus…Rodgarius" by charter dated Mar 967[376]. "Wilelmus…Aquitaniensium dux et cœnobii…Hylarii abbas" donated property to "Mainardo", at the request of "patruus noster domnus Ebolus, sancte Lemovicensis sedis episcopus atque…beati Hylarii archiclavus", by charter dated Jan 969, subscribed by "Adraldo vicecomes, Arbertus vicecomes, Kadeloni vicecomes…"[377]. At first a powerful duke, he led a dissolute life after the departure of his wife, became increasingly ill and fell under the influence of Madelme, an Italian doctor, whom he rewarded with a vast estate near Fontenay[378]. Duke Guillaume became increasingly religious following the return of his wife in 988, and under her influence the couple made donations to numerous religious establishments. "Guilelmus Aquitaniencum dux" founded a hospital near Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jan 989, subscribed by "Emma comitissa, Guillelmi filium eius, Guilelmi comitis Engolismæ…"[379]. It appears that a reaction to these religious excesses set in, and the duke's wife left him once more together with their older son in 991[380]. Duke Guillaume abdicated in Jan 993 in favour of his son, and retired to the Abbey of Saint-Cyprien de Poitiers, later transferring to the Abbey of Saint-Maixent where he became a monk on his deathbed[381].
     "m ([968]) EMMA de Blois, daughter of THIBAUT I "le Tricheur" Comte de Blois & his wife Luitgard de Vermandois ([953]-1 Aug, 1004 or after). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records the marriage of "Willelmum" (son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ") and "filiam Tetbaldi Campenensis…Emmam"[382]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "filiam Tetbaudi Campanensis…Emmam sive Emelinam" as the wife of "Willelmu duce…Caput Stupæ…filium eius Willelmum"[383]. She inherited property near Vernon in eastern Normandy from her mother which she gave to the Abbey of Bourgueil in Aquitaine[384]. Her dowry in 968 was Chinon. "Vuillelmus dux Aquitanorum" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély for the soul of "…uxore mea Emma…" by charter dated [971][385]. She fled Poitou between 976 and 988 because of the adulterous behaviour of her husband[386]. "Ledgardis" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis ecclesiam", for the souls of "senioris mei…comitis Tedbaldi…patris mei Heirberti, Trecassini comitis", with the consent of "archipresule…Hugone et…comite Odone, filiis meis", by charter dated 5 Feb 978, signed by "…Emma comitissa Pictavæ urbis…"[387]. "Guilelmus Aquitaniencum dux" founded a hospital near Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jan 989, subscribed by "Emma comitissa, Guillelmi filium eius, Guilelmi comitis Engolismæ…"[388]. "Willelmus Aquitanorum comes et dux et uxor mea Hemma et filius noster equivocus Willelmus" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated Dec 992[389]. "Emme matris eius" subscribed the donation by "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" of property to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated [990/1004][390]. She confirmed her son's 27 Dec 1003 donation of Bretignolle to the Abbey of Bourgueil, but according to Richard she was still alive when her first grandson was born in 1004[391]. A necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "Kal Aug" of "Emma comitissa, Burgulii"[392].
     "Mistress (1): --- de Thouars, daughter of ---. Richard recounts that Comte Guillaume IV had adulterous relations with "une jeune femme de la famille vicomtale" when visiting the vicomte de Thouars, which triggered his marital separation from his wife Emma de Blois[393]. The primary source which confirms this has not yet been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[373] Ademari Historiarum III.34, MGH SS IV, p. 131.
[374] Adémar de Chabannes III, 30, p. 150.
[375] Saint-Maixent Vol. I, XXXIII, p. 48.
[376] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XXXII, p. 36.
[377] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XXXVI, p. 40.
[378] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 160-1.
[379] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XLVII, p. 54.
[380] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 169-76.
[381] Ademari Historiarum III.34, MGH SS IV, p. 131.
[382] Adémar de Chabannes III, 30, p. 150.
[383] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 380.
[384] Houts, E. van (ed. and trans.) (2000) The Normans in Europe (Manchester University Press), p. 183.
[385] Saint-Jean d'Angély CXCII, p. 231.
[386] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Contribution à l'histoire de l'attitude des royaumes pirénéens dans la querelle des investitures: de l'origine de Berthe, reine d'Aragon et de Navarre', Estudios Genealógicos, Heráldicos y Nobiliarios, en honor de Vicente de Cadenas y Vicent (Hidalguía, Madrid, 1978), Vol. 2, p. 399.
[387] Guérard, M. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Père de Chartres (Paris) ("Chartres Saint-Père") Tome I, Liber Tertius, Cap. VIII, p. 63.
[388] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XLVII, p. 54.
[389] Saint-Maixent Vol. I, LXI, p. 77.
[390] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 17, p. 22.
[391] Richard (1903) Tome II, p. 41.
[392] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, Calendrier nécrologique du xiii siècle, p. 206.
[393] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 113, referring to "Appendice III" which does not appear to exist in the book.5


; Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1): “E1. Guillaume II (IV) "Iron Arm", Duke of Aquitaine (963-995), Ct of Poitou, *937, +St.Maixent 3.2.993/995; m.968 Emma de Blois (*950 +after 1003)Per ”


Per Genealogy.EU (Blois 1): “A4. Emma de Blois, *ca 954, +after 27.12.1003; m.ca 968 Cte Guillaume II de Poitou (*ca 949 +3.2.995/6)”.21,22 He was Comte de Poitiers between 963 and 995.6 He was Duc d'Aquitaine between 963 and 995.14,6

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume II-IV 'Fier a bras': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020502&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIIPoitoudied995. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Guillaume IV d'Aquitaine: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_IV_d%27Aquitaine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  7. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Duc Guillaume II (IV) d' Aquitaine, "Fierebras": https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I13868&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I-III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020102&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIPoitoudied963
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerloc-Adele of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020070&tree=LEO
  13. [S4743] Geneagraphie, online http://geneagraphie.com/, Gerloc-Adele de Normandie: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I14384&tree=1
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs d’Aquitaine & Comtes de Poitou, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aquitaine-Poitou.pdf
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020503&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EmmaBloisdiedafter1003
  18. [S4743] Geneagraphie, online http://geneagraphie.com/, Emma de Champagne: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I15079&tree=1
  19. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 22 September 2020), memorial page for Guillaume II “Fierabras” de Poitou (unknown–unknown), Find a Grave Memorial no. 163748752, citing Abbatiale Saint-Maixent, Saint-Maixent-l'Ecole, Departement des Deux-Sèvres, Poitou-Charentes, France; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/163748752/guillaume_ii-de_poitou. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_IV,_Duke_of_Aquitaine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G2
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Champagne-Blois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#EB
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs d’Aquitaine & Comtes de Poitou, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aquitaine-Poitou.pdf
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ebalus de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020505&tree=LEO
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume III-V 'Le Grand': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020504&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeVAquitainedied1030B

Emma de Blois Comtesse de Poitiers1,2,3,4,5,6

F, #4365, b. circa 950, d. after 27 December 1003
FatherThibault I/II "Le Tricheur" (?) comte de Blois, etc.7,1,8,4,9,2,5,6,10 b. bt 910 - 913, d. 16 Jan 975
MotherLuitgarde/Ledgarde (?) Cts de Vermandois, Duchess of Normandy11,1,8,4,2,5,6,10 b. bt 915 - 920, d. a 9 Feb 978
ReferenceGAV26 EDV27
Last Edited16 Dec 2020
     Emma de Blois Comtesse de Poitiers was born circa 950; Genealogy.EU (Blois 1 page) says b. ca 954; Genealogics says b. 950; Med Lands says b. 953; Racines et Histoire (Aquitaine) says b. 950/953; Racines et Histoire (blois-Chartres) says b. 953/54; Geneagraphie says b. 954.1,2,5,12,13,6 She married Guillaume II (IV) 'Fier à bras' (?) Comte de Poitiers, Duc d'Aquitaine, son of Guillaume I/III "Tête-d'Étoupe" (?) Duc d'AquitaineComte de Poitou, Auvergne et Limoges and Gerloc/Adèle (?) of Normandy, Comtesse de Poitiers, Duchesse d'Aquitaine, circa 968.1,3,13,14,15,16,2,5,12,6
Emma de Blois Comtesse de Poitiers was buried after 27 December 1003 at Abbaye Saint-Pierre de Bourgueil-en-Vallée, Bourgueil, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     unknown
     Countess of Poitou and Duchess of Aquitaine by marriage, dame de Coudres and Longueville in her own right. She was born in 953 as the fourth child of Thibaut I de Blois and Luitgard de Vermandois. She was married to Guillaume II de Poitier in 968. The marriage was overshadowed by his numerous affairs. She finally left him and found refuge with her brother Eudes in Chinon. They temporarily reconciled in 988 and made several religious donations. She again left him in 989 and took their son with her. In the following year she founded the abbey in Bourgueil together with her son. It is unclear when she died. According to some sources she was alive when her first grandson was born in 1004. Bio by: Lutetia
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Guillaume II de Poitou
     Children
          William Aquitaine 969–1030
     BURIAL     Abbaye Saint-Pierre de Bourgueil-en-Vallée, Bourgueil, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 2 Jun 2016
     Find a Grave Memorial 163746922.17
Emma de Blois Comtesse de Poitiers died after 27 December 1003; Genealogics says d. after 27 Dec 1003; Med Lands says d. 1 Aug 1004 or later; Racines et Histoire (Aquitaine) says d. 01/08/1004 (~1006 ou 1028 ?); Racines et Histoire (blois-Chartres) says d. after 27/12/1003
peut-être après 01/08/1004?; Geneagraphie says d. 27 Dec 1003.1,2,5,13,12,6
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME de Poitou ([937]-Saint-Maixent [end 995/early 996], bur Abbaye de Saint-Maixent[373]). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Willelmum" as son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ" when recording that he succeeded his father[374]. "Ebulus…Lemovicensium sedis episcopus" donated property including "alodum…meum Baidon" to Saint-Maixent "pro remedio animæ…fratris mei Guillelmi, sive pro consolatione nepotism mei equivoci Guillelmi Aquitanorum ducis" by charter dated Jan [965/66][375]. He succeeded his father in 963 as GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras/Fera Brachia" Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou, lay abbot of Saint-Hilaire-de-Poitiers. "Guilelmus…Aquitanensium dux et cœnobii…Hylarii abbas" donated property to "clericus…Rodgarius" by charter dated Mar 967[376]. "Wilelmus…Aquitaniensium dux et cœnobii…Hylarii abbas" donated property to "Mainardo", at the request of "patruus noster domnus Ebolus, sancte Lemovicensis sedis episcopus atque…beati Hylarii archiclavus", by charter dated Jan 969, subscribed by "Adraldo vicecomes, Arbertus vicecomes, Kadeloni vicecomes…"[377]. At first a powerful duke, he led a dissolute life after the departure of his wife, became increasingly ill and fell under the influence of Madelme, an Italian doctor, whom he rewarded with a vast estate near Fontenay[378]. Duke Guillaume became increasingly religious following the return of his wife in 988, and under her influence the couple made donations to numerous religious establishments. "Guilelmus Aquitaniencum dux" founded a hospital near Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jan 989, subscribed by "Emma comitissa, Guillelmi filium eius, Guilelmi comitis Engolismæ…"[379]. It appears that a reaction to these religious excesses set in, and the duke's wife left him once more together with their older son in 991[380]. Duke Guillaume abdicated in Jan 993 in favour of his son, and retired to the Abbey of Saint-Cyprien de Poitiers, later transferring to the Abbey of Saint-Maixent where he became a monk on his deathbed[381].
     "m ([968]) EMMA de Blois, daughter of THIBAUT I "le Tricheur" Comte de Blois & his wife Luitgard de Vermandois ([953]-1 Aug, 1004 or after). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records the marriage of "Willelmum" (son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ") and "filiam Tetbaldi Campenensis…Emmam"[382]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "filiam Tetbaudi Campanensis…Emmam sive Emelinam" as the wife of "Willelmu duce…Caput Stupæ…filium eius Willelmum"[383]. She inherited property near Vernon in eastern Normandy from her mother which she gave to the Abbey of Bourgueil in Aquitaine[384]. Her dowry in 968 was Chinon. "Vuillelmus dux Aquitanorum" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély for the soul of "…uxore mea Emma…" by charter dated [971][385]. She fled Poitou between 976 and 988 because of the adulterous behaviour of her husband[386]. "Ledgardis" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis ecclesiam", for the souls of "senioris mei…comitis Tedbaldi…patris mei Heirberti, Trecassini comitis", with the consent of "archipresule…Hugone et…comite Odone, filiis meis", by charter dated 5 Feb 978, signed by "…Emma comitissa Pictavæ urbis…"[387]. "Guilelmus Aquitaniencum dux" founded a hospital near Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jan 989, subscribed by "Emma comitissa, Guillelmi filium eius, Guilelmi comitis Engolismæ…"[388]. "Willelmus Aquitanorum comes et dux et uxor mea Hemma et filius noster equivocus Willelmus" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated Dec 992[389]. "Emme matris eius" subscribed the donation by "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" of property to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated [990/1004][390]. She confirmed her son's 27 Dec 1003 donation of Bretignolle to the Abbey of Bourgueil, but according to Richard she was still alive when her first grandson was born in 1004[391]. A necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "Kal Aug" of "Emma comitissa, Burgulii"[392].
     "Mistress (1): --- de Thouars, daughter of ---. Richard recounts that Comte Guillaume IV had adulterous relations with "une jeune femme de la famille vicomtale" when visiting the vicomte de Thouars, which triggered his marital separation from his wife Emma de Blois[393]. The primary source which confirms this has not yet been identified."
Med Lands cites:
[373] Ademari Historiarum III.34, MGH SS IV, p. 131.
[374] Adémar de Chabannes III, 30, p. 150.
[375] Saint-Maixent Vol. I, XXXIII, p. 48.
[376] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XXXII, p. 36.
[377] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XXXVI, p. 40.
[378] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 160-1.
[379] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XLVII, p. 54.
[380] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 169-76.
[381] Ademari Historiarum III.34, MGH SS IV, p. 131.
[382] Adémar de Chabannes III, 30, p. 150.
[383] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 380.
[384] Houts, E. van (ed. and trans.) (2000) The Normans in Europe (Manchester University Press), p. 183.
[385] Saint-Jean d'Angély CXCII, p. 231.
[386] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Contribution à l'histoire de l'attitude des royaumes pirénéens dans la querelle des investitures: de l'origine de Berthe, reine d'Aragon et de Navarre', Estudios Genealógicos, Heráldicos y Nobiliarios, en honor de Vicente de Cadenas y Vicent (Hidalguía, Madrid, 1978), Vol. 2, p. 399.
[387] Guérard, M. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Père de Chartres (Paris) ("Chartres Saint-Père") Tome I, Liber Tertius, Cap. VIII, p. 63.
[388] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XLVII, p. 54.
[389] Saint-Maixent Vol. I, LXI, p. 77.
[390] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 17, p. 22.
[391] Richard (1903) Tome II, p. 41.
[392] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, Calendrier nécrologique du xiii siècle, p. 206.
[393] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 113, referring to "Appendice III" which does not appear to exist in the book.15


; Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1): “E1. Guillaume II (IV) "Iron Arm", Duke of Aquitaine (963-995), Ct of Poitou, *937, +St.Maixent 3.2.993/995; m.968 Emma de Blois (*950 +after 1003)Per ”


Per Genealogy.EU (Blois 1): “A4. Emma de Blois, *ca 954, +after 27.12.1003; m.ca 968 Cte Guillaume II de Poitou (*ca 949 +3.2.995/6)”.18,19

; Per Racines et Histoire (Aquitaine): “Guillaume II (de Poitou et d’Auvergne, IV d’Aquitaine) «Fierbrace» («Fier-à-Bras») de Poitou ° 937 + entre fin 995 et 03/02/996 (Saint-Maixent) duc d’Aquitaine (963-993, abdique en 01/993 en faveur de son fils et se retire comme moine à Saint-Cyprien de Poitiers), comte de Poitou, Abbé laïc de Saint-Hilaire (D’abord sous l’emprise de son médecin italien Madelme, adultère notoire puis bigot (988) ; sa femme le quitte 2 fois (entre 976 et 988) et s’exile avec son fils aîné)
     ép. 968 (Tours) Emma de Blois (alias de Tours) ° ~950/53 + après 01/08/1004 (~1006 ou 1028 ?) (fille de Thibauld 1er «Le Tricheur» comte de Blois, et de Luitgarde/Liégearde de Vermandois) (hérite de sa mère en son nom propre un domaine près de Vernon qu’elle donne à l’Abbaye de Bourgueil ; son douaire en 968 fut établi à Chinon ; confirme la donation de son fils de Brétignolle à l’Abbaye de Bourgueil 27/12/1003)
nombreuses liaisons dont ? de Thouars”


Per Racines et Histoire (Blois-Chartres): “Emma de Blois ° ~953/54 + après 27/12/1003 peut-être après 01/08/1004 ? (Chinon est son douaire (968) ; elle hérite aussi de fiefs maternels près de Vernon qu’elle donne à l’Abbaye de Bourgueil ; citée dans des chartes de son mari 971, 12/992, 990/1004 ; confirme la donation de Brétignolle à Bourgueil par son fils 27/12/1003) fuit le Poitou (et son mari volage) entre 976 et 988
     ép. 968 comte Guillaume de Poitiers dit «Fierà-Bras» (II de Poitou ; IV d’Aquitaine) ° ~937 (ou 949 ?) + 03/02/ ou après 05 /995 (Saint-Maixent) (fils de Guillaume III «Tête d’Etoupe», duc d’Aquitaine (1er du Poitou),
et d’Adela «Gerloc» de Normandie) ”.12,13

; Per Med Lands:
     "EMMA de Blois ([953]-1 Aug, 1004 or later). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records the marriage of "Willelmum" (son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ") and "filiam Tetbaldi Campenensis…Emmam"[98]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "filiam Tetbaudi Campanensis…Emmam sive Emelinam" as the wife of "Willelmu duce…Caput Stupæ…filium eius Willelmum"[99]. She inherited property near Vernon in eastern Normandy from her mother which she gave to the abbey of Bourgueil in Aquitaine[100]. Her dowry in 968 was Chinon. "Vuillelmus dux Aquitanorum" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély for the soul of "…uxore mea Emma…" by charter dated [971][101]. She fled Poitou between 976 and 988 because of the adulterous behaviour of her husband[102]. "Ledgardis" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis ecclesiam", for the souls of "senioris mei…comitis Tedbaldi…patris mei Heirberti, Trecassini comitis", with the consent of "archipresule…Hugone et…comite Odone, filiis meis", by charter dated 5 Feb 978, signed by "…Emma comitissa Pictavæ urbis…"[103]. "Willelmus Aquitanorum comes et dux et uxor mea Hemma et filius noster equivocus Willelmus" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated Dec 992[104]. "Emme matris eius" subscribed the donation by "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" of property to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated [990/1004][105]. She confirmed her son's 27 Dec 1003 donation of Bretignolle to the Abbey of Bourgueil, but according to Richard she was still alive when her first grandson was born in 1004[106]. A necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "Kal Aug" of "Emma comitissa, Burgulii"[107].
     "m ([968]) GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou], son of GUILLAUME III “Tête d'Etoupes” Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME I Comte de Poitou] & his wife Adela [Gerloc] [de Normandie] ([937]-Saint-Maixent 995 after May, bur Abbaye de Saint-Maixent)."
Med Lands cites:
[98] Adémar de Chabannes III, 30, p. 150.
[99] Chronicon Sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, p. 380.
[100] Houts (2000), p. 183.
[101] Saint-Jean d’Angély, CXCII, p. 231.
[102] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Berthe, reine d'Aragon' (1978), Vol. 2, p. 399.
[103] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Tertius, Cap. VIII, p. 63.
[104] Saint-Maixent, Vol. I, LXI, p. 77.
[105] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien, 17, p. 22.
[106] Richard (1903), Tome II 41.
[107] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, Calendrier nécrologique du xiii siècle, p. 206.5


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 28, 42.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 76.



Geneagraphie cites:
1. Web.genealogie, Le site de la généalogie historique, (http://web.genealogie.free.fr/), Dynastie d'Aquitaine (Reliability: 3).
2. Die Nachkommen Karls des Großen, Brandenburg, Erich, (Verlag Degener und Co, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1995 Bibliothek Klassischer Werke der Genealogie, Herausgegeben von Manfred), VIII.12b (Reliability: 3).2,6


; This is the same person as ”Emma of Blois” at Wikipedia and as ”Emma de Blois” at Wikipédia (FR).20,21 GAV-26 EDV-27 GKJ-28.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020503&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EmmaBloisdiedafter1003. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Emma de Champagne: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I15079&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut I 'the Deceiver': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020499&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020503&tree=LEO
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_I,_Count_of_Blois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#ThibautIdied975
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liutgarde/Ledgard de Vermandois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020498&tree=LEO
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs d’Aquitaine & Comtes de Poitou, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aquitaine-Poitou.pdf
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume II-IV 'Fier a bras': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020502&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIIPoitoudied995
  16. [S4743] Geneagraphie, online http://geneagraphie.com/, Duc Guillaume II (IV) d' Aquitaine, "Fierebras": https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I13868&tree=1
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 22 September 2020), memorial page for Emma de Blois (unknown–unknown), Find a Grave Memorial no. 163746922, citing Abbaye Saint-Pierre de Bourgueil-en-Vallée, Bourgueil, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/163746922/emma-de_blois. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G2
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Champagne-Blois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#EB
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_of_Blois
  21. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Emma de Blois: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_de_Blois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  22. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs d’Aquitaine & Comtes de Poitou, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aquitaine-Poitou.pdf
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ebalus de Poitou: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020505&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume III-V 'Le Grand': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020504&tree=LEO
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeVAquitainedied1030B

Thibault I/II "Le Tricheur" (?) comte de Blois, etc.1,2,3,4,5

M, #4366, b. between 910 and 913, d. 16 January 975
FatherThibaud (Thibaut, Tetbald) dit «L’Ancien» (?) vicomte de Tours, comte de Blois1,3,6,4,7,8 d. c 942
MotherRichilde (?) de Bourges1,9,4,8 b. 892, d. 946
ReferenceGAV31 EDV29
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Thibault I/II "Le Tricheur" (?) comte de Blois, etc. was born between 910 and 913; Boyer [2001:31] says b. 910; Genealogy.EU says b. 910; Racines et Histoire says b. 910; Genealogics and Wikipedia says b. ca 913.10,1,3,4,2 He married Luitgarde/Ledgarde (?) Cts de Vermandois, Duchess of Normandy, daughter of Heribert II (?) Cte de Vermandois et de Troyes and Adela/Hildebrante/Liegarde (?) of Neustria, Princess of France, between 943 and 944;
Her 2nd husband. Med Lands says m. 943/444.11,1,12,2,3,4,13,14
Thibault I/II "Le Tricheur" (?) comte de Blois, etc. died on 16 January 975.10,1,2,3,4
Thibault I/II "Le Tricheur" (?) comte de Blois, etc. was buried after 16 January 975 at Abbaye de Marmoutier, Tours, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown
     DEATH     16 Jan
     Nobility. Born around 910 as the son of Thibaut I 'the old' Vicomte de Tours. He married Luitgardis de Vermandois around 944 who bore him five children. He died on a January 16th between 975 and 977.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Thibaut of Blois
     Spouse
          Luitgardis de Vermandois 914 – unknown
     Siblings
          Gerlotte (Gillette) De Blois Briquebec 914–937
     Children
          Hugues de Blois unknown–986
          Eudes I de Blois unknown–996
          Emma of Blois unknown–1003
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Marmoutier, Tours, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 16 Mar 2014
     Find A Grave Memorial 126438039.15
     He was first count of Blois, Chartres, and Châteaudun as well as count of Tours.4

Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 150.16

; Per Genealogics:
     "Thibaut was born about 913, the son of Thibaut, vicomte de Tours, comte de Blois, and Richilde de Bourges. He was the first count of Blois, Chartres and Châteaudun from 960, and count of Tours from 945.
     "About 943 Thibaut married Liutgarde de Vermandois, widow of Guillaume I 'Longsword', duke of Normandy, and daughter of Heribert II, comte de Meaux, Soissons et Vermandois, and Adela of Neustria. Their children Emma and Eudes would have progeny.
     "Thibaut was initially a vassal of Hugues 'the Great', duke of The Franks. Around 945 he captured King Louis IV to the benefit of Hugues. In return for his freedom, the king granted him the city of Laon. He took the title of Count in Tours, and seized Chartres and Châteaudun. In 958 he met Foulques II 'the Good', comte d'Anjou, in Verron and the two described themselves as 'governor and administrator (of the) kingdom (of Neustria)' and _comites Dei gratia_ ('counts by the grace of God').
     "Thibaut governed the duchy of Brittany during the minority of its Duke Drogo. Thus Thibaut extended his influence all the way to Rennes.
     "In 960 he began opposing Richard I 'the Fearless', duke of Normandy, his wife's step-son, and entered into a long war with the Normans. In 961 he attacked Évreux. The Normans responded by attacking Dunois. In 962 he launched an assault on Rouen which failed. The Normans burned Chartres in response. He took control of the fortresses of Saint-Aignan in the Loir-et-Cher, Vierzon, and Anguillon in Berry.
     "Thibaut reinforced Chartres and Châteaudun. Around 960 he built Saumur. By the time of his death in 978, he had built a vast power on the Loire, dominating central France. His daughter Emma, by her marriage to Guillaume II-IV 'Fier à bras', duc d'Aquitaine, comte de Poitou, brought him the county of Provins, nucleus of the later county of Champagne."2

; Per Racines et Histoire:
     "Thibaud 1er «Le Tricheur» ° 910 + 16/01/975 comte de Blois, de Rennes (959/60), vicomte puis comte de Tours (942), comte de Chartres et de Châteaudun (960), seigneur de Chinon, Saumur et Beaugency, Régent de Bretagne pour son neveu Dreu (Drogo) à la mort d’Alain II (952), vassal du Roi Lothaire (963), excommunié par l’Archevêque de Reims Odalric (964) pour la prise de Coucy, X contre Richard 1er de Normandie, battu (955) après la prise d’Evreux ép. ~942/45 Luitgardis (Ledgarde, Liégard(e)) de Vermandois ° avant 925 (~915/920) + après 09/02/977/78 (peut-être un 14/11 ou un 27/05 ou peu après ?) dame d’Illiers-L’Evêque (27) (fille d’Hér(i)bert II, comte de Vermandois, et d’Adela de Francie ; veuve de Guillaume 1er «Longuespée» de Normandie, ép. ~940 + ass. 17/12/942 à Picquigny sur ordre du comte de Flandres) (souscrit charte en 950 de Ragnfred, Evêque de Chartres, en faveur de Saint-Père de Chartres)."17

; This is the same person as ”Theobald I, Count of Blois” at Wikipedia and as ”Thibaud Ier de Blois” at Wikipédia (FR).4,18 Thibault I/II "Le Tricheur" (?) comte de Blois, etc. was also known as Theobald I "Le Tricheur" (?) Count of Blois.4 GAV-31 EDV-29 GKJ-29.

; Per Weis: “Theobald I, 'The Devious," Count of Chartres and Blois, d. 16 Jan 975; m. 942/5 as 2nd husb. Luitgarde de Vermandois (136-19), d. 978, wid. of William I (121E-19) of Normandy, d. 942, and dau. of Hert II de Vermandois (50-18)/ (Gens. 16-19: G.A. Moriary; "The Robertins" in NEHGRH 99:130-131, 101; 112 chart, corrrected by Moriarty, The Plantagent Ancestry, p. 36; ES II/46, III/48; Seversmith 2,488-9; West Winter, VII.6).”.19

; Per Genealogy.EU (Blois 1): "Thibaut I "le Tricheur", Cte de Blois, de Rennes, de Chartres et de Châteaudun, Vcte de Tours, sn de Chino, Samur et de Beaugency, *910, +16.1.975; m.943/4 Ledgard de Vermandois (*ca 920 +27.5.977/after 978); they had issue..."20

; Per Med Lands:
     "THIBAUT [II] de Blois, son of THIBAUT [I] "l'Ancien" Vicomte de Tours & his first wife --- ([910]-16 Jan [975/77]). "Le comte Thibault père de Thibault" relinquished rights relating to "les terres de Vancé, de Joué, de Martigny et de Berthenay" to Tours Saint-Martin and paid for his future burial in the abbey by charter dated to [944][35]. “Ledgardis comitissa necnon Hugo episcopus et filius meus et item filius meus Odo comes” donated property to Saint-Martin de Tours, for the souls of “Theobaldi comitis quondam senioris mei…Richildis quondam sanctimonialis, eiusque filii Richardi episcopi” (referring to “dicti comitis et fratris sui Theobaldi”, in relation to Bishop Richard), by charter dated to [980][36]. This confirms that Richildis was the mother of Richard and that Richard was the brother of Thibaut. However, the absence of a phrase in the text such as “matris sui” linking “Richildis” to “Theobaldi comitis” suggests that she was his mother and that therefore the brothers were born from different marriages of the same father. He succeeded [his father] in [944] as THIBAUT I "le Tricheur" Comte de Blois, Vicomte de Tours. He dominated Brittany as guardian of his nephew Drogo, after the death of his brother-in-law Alain II Duke of Brittany in 952[37]. The Gesta Normannorum records that he plotted against Richard I Comte [de Normandie], who defeated Thibaut’s forces in [955] after the French captured Evreux[38]. "Domnus Tetbaldus comes Turonis" withdrew his claims to a serf in favour of the monks of Saint-Martin de Tours by charter dated 957, signed by "domni Tetbaldi comitis, Tetbaldi filii ipsius…Alberici Aurelianensium vicecomitis…"[39]. "Teutbaldi comitis, Teutbaldi junioris, Gausfredi comitis, Hugonis comitis Cenomannorum…" subscribed the charter dated Sep 960 under which "Aremburgis" donated property to Saint-Florent de Saumur[40]. He gained control of the counties of Chartres and Châteaudun in [960], and became the vassal of Lothaire King of the West Franks in 963. He was excommunicated by Odalric Archbishop of Reims in 964 for taking Coucy and other estates from the archbishopric[41]. Seigneur de Chino, de Saumur et de Baugency. A charter dated May 974 records a donation by "comes Teutbaldus" to Saint-Florent de Saumur[42].
     "m ([943/44]) as her second husband, LUITGARDIS de Vermandois, widow of GUILLAUME I “Longuespée” Comte [de Normandie], daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois [Carolingian] & his wife Adela [Capet] (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[43]. The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum refers to the wife of "Tetbaudi comitis" as "sorore Herberti Trecorum comitis"[44]. "Theobaldi comitis…Ledgardis comitisse" subscribed the charter dated 950 under which Ragnfred Bishop of Chartres donated property to Chartres Saint-Père, although the relationship between the two is not specified[45]. "Ledgardis" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis ecclesiam", for the souls of "senioris mei…comitis Tedbaldi…patris mei Heirberti, Trecassini comitis", with the consent of "archipresule…Hugone et…comite Odone, filiis meis", by charter dated 5 Feb 978, signed by "…Emma comitissa Pictavæ urbis…"[46]. “Ledgardis comitissa necnon Hugo episcopus et filius meus et item filius meus Odo comes” donated property to Saint-Martin de Tours, for the souls of “Theobaldi comitis quondam senioris mei…Richildis quondam sanctimonialis, eiusque filii Richardi episcopi” (referring to “dicti comitis et fratris sui Theobaldi”, in relation to Bishop Richard), by charter dated to [980][47]. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[48]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[49]."
Med Lands cites:
[35] Tours Saint-Martin CXLIII, p. 144.
[36] Arbois de Jubainville (1859), Tome I, p. 461.
[37] Settipani (1993), p. 229.
[38] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 54-5.
[39] Mabille (1871), Pièces justificatives, X, p. cix.
[40] Latouche (1910), Pièces Justificatives 1, p. 161.
[41] McKitterick (1983), p. 322.
[42] Lex (1892), p. 59, quoting Housseau Collection de Touraine XII, no. 10335, from Cartulaire noir de Saint-Florent de Saumur, fo. XXXVII vo.
[43] Rodulfus Glaber, III.39, p. 165.
[44] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 387.
[45] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome II, Liber Primus, 130, p. 351.
[46] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Tertius, Cap. VIII, p. 63.
[47] Arbois de Jubainville (1859) Tome I, p. 461.
[48] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.
[49] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 23.8


; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolin p. 1): "Css Luitgarde de Vermandois, *ca 914, +9.2.978; m.943/4 Theobald II "le Tricheur", Cte de Blois, Ct of Chartres and Tours (*910 +975.)21"

; Per Weis: “Luitgarde de Vermandois, d. aft 978; m. (2) Theobald I (49-19), 'le Tricheur,' d. 978, Count of Blois (Saillot, 45).”.22

; Per Racines et Histoire (Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 9):
     "Luitgarde (Luitgardis, Ledgarde) de Vermandois ° avant 925 + un 14/11 avant 977 (souscrit une charte de donation en 950 de Ragnfred, Evêque de Chartres à Saint-Père de Chartres) ép. 1) 940 Guillaume 1er «Longuespée», comte de Normandie ° 885/890 +X 17/12/942 (ass. à Picquigny-sur-Somme) (fils de Robert 1er (Rollon), comte de Normandie, et de Poppa de Bayeux) ép. 2) 942/45 Thibaud «Le Tricheur», comte de Blois + 16/01/975 (fils de Thibaud «L’Ancien», comte de Blois, vicomte de Tours)"
Per Racines et Histoire (Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 2):
     "Thibaud 1er «Le Tricheur» ° 910 + 16/01/975 comte de Blois, de Rennes (959/60), vicomte puis comte de Tours (942), comte de Chartres et de Châteaudun (960), seigneur de Chinon, Saumur et Beaugency, Régent de Bretagne pour son neveu Dreu (Drogo) à la mort d’Alain II (952), vassal du Roi Lothaire (963), excommunié par l’Archevêque de Reims Odalric (964) pour la prise de Coucy, X contre Richard 1er de Normandie, battu (955) après la prise d’Evreux
ép. ~942/45 Luitgardis (Ledgarde, Liégard(e)) de Vermandois ° avant 925 (~915/920) + après 09/02/977/78 (peut-être un 14/11 ou un 27/05 ou peu après ?) dame d’Illiers-L’Evêque (27) (fille d’Hér(i)bert II, comte de Vermandois, et d’Adela de Francie ; veuve de Guillaume 1er «Longuespée» de Normandie, ép. ~940 + ass. 17/12/942 à Picquigny sur ordre du comte de Flandres) (souscrit charte en 950 de Ragnfred, Evêque de Chartres, en faveur de Saint-Père de Chartres.)13,17"
; Per Med Lands:
     "LUITGARDIS (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[235]. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “Normannorum Dux” and "Herbertus...filiam suam", encouraged by “Hugone Magno”, after the marriage of Guillaume’s sister Gerloc [which would date the marriage to [935] if that report is accurate][236]. The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum refers to the wife of "Tetbaudi comitis" as "sorore Herberti Trecorum comitis"[237]. "Theobaldi comitis…Ledgardis comitisse" subscribed the charter dated 950 under which Ragnfred Bishop of Chartres donated property to Chartres Saint-Père, although the relationship between the two is not specified[238]. "Ledgardis" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis ecclesiam", for the souls of "senioris mei…comitis Tedbaldi…patris mei Heirberti, Trecassini comitis", with the consent of "archipresule…Hugone et…comite Odone, filiis meis", by charter dated 5 Feb 978, signed by "…Emma comitissa Pictavæ urbis…"[239]. “Ledgardis comitissa necnon Hugo episcopus et filius meus et item filius meus Odo comes” donated property to Saint-Martin de Tours, for the souls of “Theobaldi comitis quondam senioris mei…Richildis quondam sanctimonialis, eiusque filii Richardi episcopi” (referring to “dicti comitis et fratris sui Theobaldi”, in relation to Bishop Richard), by charter dated to [980][240]. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[241]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[242].
     "m firstly ([935]) as his second wife, GUILLAUME I “Longuespée” Comte [de Normandie], son of ROBERT I [Rollo] Comte [de Normandie] & his [second] wife Poppa de Bayeux (-murdered Péquigny-sur-Somme 17 Dec 942, bur Rouen, cathédrale de Notre-Dame).
     "m secondly ([942/45]) THIBAUT [II] "le Tricheur" Comte de Blois, son of THIBAUT [I] "l'Ancien" Comte de Blois, Vicomte de Tours & his first wife --- (-16 Jan [975/77])."
Med Lands cites:
[235] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.39, p. 165.
[236] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234.
[237] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 387.
[238] Chartres Saint-Père, Liber Primus, 130, p. 351.
[239] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Tertius, Cap. VIII, p. 63.
[240] Arbois de Jubainville (1859), Tome I, p. 461.
[241] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.
[242] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 23.14

; Per Genealogy.EU (Blois 1): “Thibaut=Tetbald, Vicomte de Tours 908, and later was Comte de Blois, +ca 942; 1m: NN; 2m: Richildis de Blois (Paris) OR Richildis de Bourges (*892); he had two sons:
[2m.] Richard, Archbishop of Bourges, +969
[1m.] Thibaut I "le Tricheur", Cte de Blois, de Rennes, de Chartres et de Châteaudun, Vcte de Tours, sn de Chino, Samur et de Beaugency, *910, +16.1.975; m.943/4 Ledgard de Vermandois (*ca 920 +27.5.977/after 978);”.23
He was Comte de Blois between 928 and 975.4 He was Comte de Tours between 928 and 975.4 He was Comte de Rennes between 959 and 975.17 He was Comte de Châteaudun et Chartres between 960 and 975.4,17

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page ("THE HOUSE OF CHAMPAGNE-BLOIS"): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut I 'the Deceiver': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020499&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_I,_Count_of_Blois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Tetbald|Thibaut: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020500&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#_Toc4742197
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#ThibautIdied975
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richilde de Bourges: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020501&tree=LEO
  10. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 31, BLOIS 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 136-19, p. 119; line 49-18, p. 50. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Liutgarde/Ledgard de Vermandois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020498&tree=LEO
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vermandois, Valois & Vexin, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Vermandois-Valois-Vexin.pdf
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#Luitgarddiedafter977
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 10 November 2019), memorial page for Thibaut I “Le Tricheur” de Blois (unknown–16 Jan), Find A Grave Memorial no. 126438039, citing Abbaye de Marmoutier, Tours, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/126438039/thibaut_i-de_blois. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut I 'the Deceiver': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020499&tree=LEO
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Thibaud Ier de Blois: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thibaud_Ier_de_Blois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 49-19, p. 56.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Champagne-Blois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#B2T1
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Descendants of Charlemagne: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#LH2
  22. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed, Line 136-19, p. 131.
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, House of Champagne-Blois: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#T1T
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut/Tetbald de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020508&tree=LEO
  26. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 3.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugues de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020509&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Blois: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020503&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emma de Blois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020503&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EmmaBloisdiedafter1003
  31. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Emma de Champagne: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I15079&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020131&tree=LEO
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EudesIdied995

Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy1,2,3

M, #4367, b. circa 958, d. before 21 September 1026
FatherAdalbert (?) King of Lombardy, Marquis of Ivrea, Count of Aosta1,2,4,5,6 b. bt 932 - 936, d. c 20 Apr 975
MotherGerberge de Mâcon Countess of Burgundy1,7,2,4,5,6 b. 945, d. c 990
ReferenceGAV26 EDV27
Last Edited24 Sep 2020
     Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy married Adélaïde/Adèle (?)5 Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy was born circa 958 at Lombardy, Italy; Genealogy.EU says b. ca 958; Genealogics says b. ca 955; Med Lands says b. 960/962; The Henry Project says b bef ca 962.1,2,4,5 He married Ermentrude/Irmgard de Roucy Countess of Rheims, daughter of Renaud/Ragenold/Ragnvald (?) comte de Roucy & Rheims and Alberade (?) de Lorraine, in 982;
His 1st wife. Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1 page) says m. 975-980; Leo van de Pas syas m. 982; Med Lands says m. 970/72.1,8,9,10,11,2,4,5 Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy married Adélaïde/Adèle (?) before 1016;
His 2nd wife.
     Per Med Lands regarding Adelaide d'Anjou: "[m fifthly (before 1016) as his second wife, OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté], son of ADALBERTO associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge de Chalon ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026).]"
     However, per The Henry Project: "Conjectured fifth husband (very improbable): Otte-Guillaume, d. 1026×7, count of Burgundy.
     Otte-Guillaume is known to have had a second wife named Adélaïde or Adèle [Cart. Cluny 3: 721-2 (#2694); Cart. Mâcon, 271 (#471), 284-5 (#490)]. The suggestion that Otte-Guillaume's second wife was the same person as the several times widowed Adélaïde/Blanche goes back to René Poupardin, who himself referred back to an unspecified unpublished work of Ferdinand Lot [Poupardin (1907), 418 n. 6], and the suggestion was later also adopted by Constance Bouchard and Christian Settipani [Bouchard (1987), 270; Settipani (1997), 249].
     The hypothesis is based on a letter of Pope Benedict VIII, which mentions both [Otte-]Guillaume and Adélaïde/Blanche (under both of her names) "Sed et seniori quam reverendo domno Willelmo comiti, necnon praecipuae honitatis et dulcedinis domno Hugoni comiti, domnoque Rainaldo comiti filio supranominati Willelmi, bonae quoque indolis, ac totius affectu dilectionis amplectendo domno Ottoni comiti; [omni etiam reverentia et veneratione dignissime domnae Adeleidi comitissae, cognomento Blanchae, nuruque ejus domnae Gerberg[e] comitissae... et caeteris principibus et optimatibus totius Burgundiae, Aquitaniae et Provinciae ..." PL 139, 1603-4]. This letter does not mention any direct genealogical connection between [Otte-]Guillaume and Adélaïde/Blanche, but does call a countess Gerberge the nurus (daughter-in-law) of Adélaïde/Blanche. This Gerberge can be identified without any difficuly with Gerberge, daughter of Otte-Guillaume and wife of Guillaume II (or (III) of Provence, son of Adélaïde/Blanche.
     In his 1997 article on Adélaïde d'Anjou, Thierry Stasser emphasized that the letter made no mention of any relationship between Otte-Guillaume and Adélaïde/Blanche. In a posting on 18 June 2002 to the internet newsgroup/mailing list soc.genealogy.medieval/GEN-MEDIEVAL, Peter Stewart argued that the interpretation making Otte-Guillaume the husband of Adélaïde/Blanche was based on a misunderstanding of the word nurus [Stewart (2002)], and Settipani accepted this argument, reversing his earlier opinion [Settipani (2004), 313, n. 2]."

Conclusion: I have changed my databse to sever the link beteween Adelaide d'Anjou and substitute an otherwise unidentified Adelaide as Otto-Guillaume's second wife. GA Vaut.12,13,14,15,2,16,4,5,17
Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy died before 21 September 1026; The Henry Project says buried 21 Sept 1026 or 1027.1,2,4,5
Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy was buried on 21 September 1026 at Dijon Cathedral, Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     unknown, France
     DEATH     23 Oct 1026, Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France
     Born about 958 in Bourgogne, France. He died 5 on 23 Oct 1026 in St-Maixent, Pays de la Loire, France. He was buried in 1026 in Dijon, Cote d'Or, Bourgogne, France. He married Ermentrude de Roucy in 982 in France.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Adalbert Of Italy 936–961
     Spouse
          Ermentrude De Roucy Bourgogne unknown–1005
     Children
          Agnes of Burgundy unknown–1068
          Mathilde de Bourgogne Nevers unknown–1005
          Renaud I de Bourgogne unknown–1057
     BURIAL     Dijon Cathedral, Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France
     Created by: Brett Williams
     Added: 29 Dec 2011
     Find a Grave Memorial 82546330
     SPONSORED BY Christian H. F. Riley.18
     ; This is the same person as ”Otto-William, Count of Burgundy” at Wikipedia, as ”Otte-Guillaume de Bourgogne” at Wikipédia (FR), and as ”Otto alias Guillaume, or Otte-Guillaume” at The Henry Project.1953.19,20,5

; Per Genealogics:
     “Eudes Guillaume was born about 955, the son of Adalbert, markgrave of Ivrea, joint-king of Italy, and Gerberga de Mâcon. About 982 he married Ermentrude/Irmgard de Roucy, widow of Aubry II, comte de Mâcon et Salins, and daughter of Ragenold/Renaud, comte de Roucy, and Alverade de Lorraine. Eudes and Ermentrud had five children, of whom their son Renaud and three daughters would have progeny. From about 1015 Eudes Guillaume was married to an Adelaide whose origins are unknown.
     “Eudes' mother gave him what would become the free county of Burgundy (Franche-Comté) around Dôle in 982. Eudes also inherited the duchy of Burgundy on the other side of the Saône in 1002 from his stepfather Henri 'the Great', duc de Bourgogne. The duchy then corresponded to the diocese of Besançon in the Holy Roman Empire. He was also count of Maçon in France.
     “Burgundy was annexed to the crown of France by King Robert II in 1004. Determined to be sovereign ruler of his own lands, Eudes revolted against Emperor Heinrich II in 1016. This was after Rudolf III of Burgundy, the last king of that realm, had done homage to Heinrich at Strasbourg, making him his protector and heir.
     “Eudes died on 21 September 1026, and was succeeded as count of Burgundy by Renaud. However the county fell under the suzerainty of the German emperors.”.2

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 166.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.2
Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy was also known as Eudes Guillaume Comte de Bourgogne, Comte de Macon.21 GAV-26 EDV-27 GKJ-28.22

; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1): “E1. Othon Guillaume, adopted by his stepfather, whereby he became Cte de Bourgogne (995-1026); Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, pretender to the Duchy of Bourgogne (1002-05); *958/9, +21.9.1026; 1m: 975/980 Ermentrude de Roucy (*ca 950 +1002/5), dau.of Ragenold de Roucy; 2m: before 1016 Adelaide=Blanche d'Anjou (+1026); all kids were by 1m.”.13

; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1): “E1. Othon Guillaume, adopted by his stepfather, whereby he became Cte de Bourgogne (995-1026), Cte de Nevers (980-989), Cte de Besançon (982-1026), Cte de Mâcon (982-1006), pretender to the Duchy of Bourgogne (1002-05); *958/9, +21.9.1026; 1m: 975/980 Ermentrude de Roucy (*ca 950 +1002/5), dau.of Ragenold de Roucy; 2m: before 1016 Adelaide=Blanche d'Anjou (+1026); all kids were by 1m.”.23

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUGLIELMO di Ivrea, son of ADALBERTO II associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge [de Chalon] ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026, bur Dijon, Abbaye de Saint-Bénigne). Rodulfus Glaber names "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" and records that, as a boy, he was secretly stolen from the land of the Lombards and restored to his mother "with no small cunning by a certain monk"[60]. "Einricus…imperator" confirmed the property of the abbey of Fruttuaria, referring to property donated by "Otto qui et Vuillielmus comes filius Adalberti nepos Berengarii regis", by charter dated 1014[61]. It is assumed therefore that Guillaume was imprisoned as a child by Emperor Otto I in Italy after his father and paternal grandfather were deposed as kings of Italy. The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Guilelmum Ottonem et eius matrem Gerbergam" when recording that he was adopted by his mother's second husband "dux Burgundie Henricus"[62]. He adopted the name OTHON-GUILLAUME. He succeeded in [981] as Comte de Mâcon, by right of his first wife. He was declared heir to the duchy of Burgundy and installed as Comte de Nevers by his stepfather in 986. He was recognised as duke of Burgundy on the death of his stepfather in 1002, but deprived of his inheritance by Robert II King of France in Spring 1003 when the latter invaded Burgundy with troops lent by Richard II Duke of Normandy. Rodulfus Glaber records that "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" rebelled against the king [Robert II] on one occasion, supported by his son-in-law Landry Comte de Nevers[63]. "Comes Otto" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon for the souls of "Heinrici ducis qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genetricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti ducis ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis" by charter dated 1004[64]. Comte Othon continued to claim the duchy of Burgundy, but reconciled himself with the king of France in 1005, finally renouncing his claims in 1015. He was designated comes Burgundiæ[65], presumably a descriptive title with no precise territorial significance at that time although Othon did own extensive territories in Burgundy. “Comes Octo cognomento Vuillelmus” donated property “mihi secundum parentum successionem...infra alpes Pinninarum et flumen Padum et flumen Duriæ Bauticæ quod iuxta urbem Euoreiam” to Fruttuaria monastery, for the souls of “meæ et uxoris et filiorum et filiarum”, by charter dated 28 Oct 1019[66]. The Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon records the death in 1027 of "Otto qui et Willelmus dictus est comes" and his burial at St Bénigne[67]. The memorial on the tomb of "Nobiliter natus Guillelmus et Otho vocatus" records his death "1027 XI Kal Oct"[68]. The necrology of Autun Saint-Martin records the death “XVI Id Dec” of “Guillelmus dux Burgundie, anno 1025”[69].
     "m firstly (before [981/82]) as her second husband, ERMENTRUDE, widow of AUBRY [II] Comte de Mâcon, daughter of RAGENOLD Comte de Roucy & his wife Alberade of Lotharingia ([947/52]-[5 Oct 1002/1004]). "Ermentrudis" is named as daughter of "Alberada filia …Gerbergæ" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which does not name either her father or her husband but specifies that Ermentrude was the mother of Agnes[70], the latter naming both her parents in charters (see below). Bouchard highlights the absence of proof that the husband of Alberade of Lotharingia was Ragenold Comte de Roucy[71]. Her birth date is estimated from her son by her first marriage being named in 971. "Ermentrudis conjuge sua" consented to the donation of land "in Aponiaco villa" by "Albericus comes Matisconensis" to Cluny by charter dated 14 Jan 971[72]. The genealogy of the Comtes de Mâcon, included in the cartulary of Saint-Vincent de Mâcon, records the marriage of "dominus Guillelmus comes" with the wife of "Albericus filius Letaudi comitis"[73]. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" married the sister of "Brunone Lingonensi episcopo" who supported him in his rebellion against the king [Robert II][74]. "Otto comes, Irvis comitissa" subscribed a charter dated to [994] under which "Milo…uxoris mee Ermengarde" donated property to Cluny[75]. It is assumed that "Irvis" is a copyist error or abbreviation for "Ermentrudis" as no other reference to a countess of this name has been found. Her date of death is indicated by the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which records a donation by "Otto comes cognomento Willelmus" with "filii eius Rainaldi" dated 1004 "pro anima Hinrici Ducis, qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genitricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti Ducis, ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis"[76]. This is presumably the donation recorded in the charter dated 1004 under which "Comes Otto" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon for the souls of "Heinrici ducis qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genetricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti ducis ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis"[77].
     "m secondly (before 1016) ADELAIS, daughter of --- (-29 May 1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles). "Otto comes et uxor mea Adila" donated property to Saint-Vincent de Mâcon by two charters dated to 1015 or before (during the reign of Robert I King of France) both subscribed by "Rainaldi filii sui"[78]. "Otto comes et uxor mea Adeleidis et filius meus Rainaldus atque Otto nepos meus" donated property to Cluny by charter dated to [1015][79]. "Otto comes qui nominatur Willelmus" issued a charter dated 2 Nov 1023 subscribed by "Raynardi comitis, Adheleydis uxoris eius"[80]. The origin of Otto-Guillaume's second wife is not known with certainty. Most secondary source genealogies assume that she was Adelais [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow firstly of Etienne de Brioude, widow secondly of Raymond Comte de Toulouse, divorced wife thirdly of Louis V King of the Franks, widow fourthly of Guillaume [II] Comte de Provence, daughter of Foulques II "le Bon" Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge ---. Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's wife is named Adelais in several charters[81], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband[82], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelaide-Blanche d’Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn. It is perfectly possible that Adelais-Blanche was named in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume’s daughter. If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly sixty years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely. Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon. These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[83]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[84]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[85]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[86]."
Med Lands cites:
[60] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, pp. 105-7.
[61] D H II 305, p. 379.
[62] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1002, MGH SS XXIII, p. 778.
[63] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 105.
[64] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 228, p. 24.
[65] Bouchard (1987), p. 265, although the author does not cite her primary source for this statement.
[66] Historiæ patriæ monumenta, Chartarum, Tome I, CCXLIX, col. 428.
[67] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 181.
[68] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 181 footnote 2 which quotes the memorial but comments that it has since disappeared from the church.
[69] Autun Saint-Martin, Tome II, Extrait du nécrologe de Saint-Martin d’Autun, p. 383.
[70] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[71] Bouchard (1987), p. 169.
[72] Cluny, Tome II, 1291, p. 368.
[73] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 7, p. 6.
[74] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 105.
[75] Cluny, Tome III, 2267, p. 398.
[76] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 163.
[77] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 228, p. 24.
[78] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 471 and 490, pp. 271 and 284.
[79] Cluny, Tome III, 2694, p. 721.
[80] Cluny, Tome III, 2782, p. 807.
[81] Mâcon 471, 490, pp. 271, and 284-5, and Cluny Tome IV, 2694, p. 721-22.
[82] Bouchard (1987), p. 270, citing Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, quoted in Manteyer (1908), p. 274.
[83] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[84] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 225, p. 252.
[85] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo.
[86] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "ERMENTRUDE ([947/52]-[5 Oct 1002/1004]). "Ermentrudis" is named as daughter of "Alberada filia …Gerbergæ" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which does not name either her father or her husband but specifies that Ermentrudis was the mother of Agnes (Ctss de Poitou)[362], the latter naming both her parents in charters[363]. Her birth date range is estimated on the basis of her son by her first marriage being named in 971. "Ermentrudis conjuge sua" consented to the donation of land "in Aponiaco villa" by "Albericus comes Matisconensis" to Cluny by charter dated 14 Jan 971[364]. The date of her first marriage is indicated by her absence from the charter of "Albericus comes Matisconensis" dated Mar 966[365]. The genealogy of the Comtes de Mâcon, included in the cartulary of Saint-Vincent de Mâcon, records the marriage of "dominus Guillelmus comes" with the wife of "Albericus filius Leotaldi comitis"[366]. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" married the sister of "Brunone Lingonensi episcopo" who supported him in his rebellion against the king [Robert II][367]. Ermentrude's date of death is indicated by the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which records a donation by "Otto comes cognomento Willelmus" with "filii eius Rainaldi" dated 1004 "pro anima Hinrici Ducis, qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genitricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti Ducis, ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis"[368].
     "m firstly (before 971) AUBRY [II] Comte de Mâcon, son of LETAUD Comte de Mâcon & his first wife Ermengarde [de Chalon] ([935/40]-after 17 Nov [before 981/82][369]).
     "m secondly (before [981/82]) as his first wife, OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté], son of ADALBERTO associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge de Chalon ([960/2]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026)."
Med Lands cites:
[362] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[363] Cluny, Tome III, 2742, p. 765, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 270.
[364] Cluny, Tome II, 1291, p. 368.
[365] Cluny, Tome II, 1198, p. 280.
[366] Mâcon Saint-Vincent, 7, p. 6.
[367] Rodulfus Glaber, III.6, p. 105.
[368] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 163.
[369] When his wife's second husband first appears as Comte de Mâcon, Cluny, Tome II, 1291, p. 368, and 1580, p. 624, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 264.10

; Per Racines et Histoire (Roucy): “Ermentrude (Hermentrudis) de Roucy ° ~947/52 + entre 05/10/1002 et 1004 (citée charte d’Aubri, comte de Mâcon, du 14/01/971 à Cluny)
     ép. 1) dès 971 (~967 ou ~01/971) Aubri II (Albéric) de Salins (ou de Mâcon), vicomte d’Orléans ° 935/40 + un 17/11/ dès 981/82 (fils de Létaud, comte de Mâcon, et d’Ermengarde de Chalon)
     ép. 2) dès 981/82 Othon (Otto, Otte) Guillaume de Bourgogne ° 958/59 ou 960/62 + 21/09/1026 (Dijon) comte de Bourgogne, Macon et Nevers (fils d’Adalbert, Roi associé en Italie, et de Gerberge de Chalon)”.24
; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELAIS [Blanche] d'Anjou ([940/50]-[29 May 1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles]). Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy which names "comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella…Pontius et Bertrandus eius nepotes…matre eorum Adalaide sorore ipsius"[60], the brothers Pons and Bertrand being confirmed in other sources as the sons of Etienne de Brioude (for example the charter dated 1000 under which "duo germani fratres…Pontius, alter Bertrandus" donated property to Saint-Chaffre for the souls of "patris sui Stephani matrisque nomine Alaicis")[61]. Adelais's second and third marriages are confirmed by Richer who records the marriage of Louis and "Adelaidem, Ragemundi nuper defuncti ducis Gothorum uxorem" and their coronation as king and queen of Aquitaine[62]. The Chronicon Andegavensi names "Blanchiam filiam Fulconis Boni comitis Andegavensis" as wife of the successor of "Lotharius rex Francorum", but confuses matters by stating that the couple were parents of "filiam Constantiam" wife of Robert II King of France[63]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Blanchiam" as the wife of "Lotharius rex…Ludovicum filium" but does not give her origin[64]. She was crowned Queen of Aquitaine with her third husband on the day of their marriage. The Libro de Otiis Imperialibus names "Blanchiam" as wife of "Ludovicus puer [filius Lotharii]"[65]. Rodulfus Glaber refers to the unnamed wife of "Ludowicum" as "ab Aquitanis partibus uxorem", recounting that she tricked him into travelling to Aquitaine where "she left him and attached herself to her own family"[66]. Richer records her marriage with "Wilelmum Arelatensem" after her divorce from Louis[67]. Her fourth marriage is confirmed by the Historia Francorum which names "Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of "Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis"[68]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as mother of "Constantia [uxor Robertus rex]", specifying that she was "soror Gaufridi Grisagonelli"[69]. The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Blanca sorore eius" ("eius" referring incorrectly to Foulques III "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou) as wife of "Guillelmi Arelatensis comitis" and as mother of Constance, wife of Robert II King of France[70]. "Adalaiz comitissa" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated 1003[71]. This charter is subscribed by "Emma comitissa…Wilelmus comes", the second of whom was presumably the son of Adelais but the first of whom has not been identified. "Pontius…Massiliensis ecclesie pontifex" issued a charter dated 1005 with the consent of "domni Rodhbaldi comitis et domne Adalaizis comitisse, domnique Guillelmi comitis filii eius"[72]. "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018 (this document makes no mention of Adelais’s supposed fifth husband)[73]. No explanation has been found for her having been named Adelais in some sources and Blanche in others: it is difficult to interpret all these documents to mean that they referred to two separate individuals. Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's second wife is named Adelais in several charters[74], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband in a document dated Sep 1016[75], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelais-Blanche d’Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn. It is perfectly possible that the Pope named Adelais-Blanche in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume’s daughter. If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly sixty years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely. Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon. These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[76]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[77]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[78]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[79]. An enquiry dated 2 Jan 1215 records that "comitissa Blanca" was buried "apud Montem Majorem"[80].
     "m firstly ([950/60]) as his second wife, ETIENNE de Brioude, son of BERTRAND --- & his wife Emilgarde [Emilde] --- (-before [970/75]).
     "m secondly ([970/75]) RAYMOND IV Comte de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND III Comte de Toulouse & his wife Gundinildis --- ([945/55]-killed "Carazo" [972/79]).
     "m thirdly (Vieux-Brioude, Haute-Loire 982, divorced 984) LOUIS associate King of the Franks, son of LOTHAIRE King of the Franks & Emma d'Arles [Italy] ([966/67]-Compiègne 21 May 987, bur Compiègne, église collégiale de Saint-Corneille). Crowned King of Aquitaine the day of his marriage in 982. He succeeded his father in 986 as LOUIS V King of the Franks.
     "m fourthly ([984/86]) as his second wife, GUILLAUME [II] "le Libérateur" Comte d'Arles Marquis de Provence, son of BOSON [II] Comte d'Arles & his wife Constantia [de Vienne] ([955]-Avignon 993 after 29 Aug, bur Sarrians, église de Sainte-Croix).
     "[m fifthly (before 1016) as his second wife, OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté], son of ADALBERTO associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge de Chalon ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026).]"
Med Lands cites:
[60] Saint-Chaffre, Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152.
[61] Saint-Chaffre CXLIV, p. 70.
[62] Richer, III.XCII and XCIV, pp. 112 and 114.
[63] Chronico Andegavensi 987, RHGF X, p. 271.
[64] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d’Anjou, p. 382.
[65] Libro Otiis Imperialibus, RHGF IX, p. 45.
[66] Rodulfus Glaber, Historiarum I.7, p. 17.
[67] Richer III.XCV, p. 116.
[68] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.
[69] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780.
[70] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 110.
[71] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 653, p. 645.
[72] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 15, p. 18.
[73] Marseille Saint-Victor I, 630, p. 626.
[74] Mâcon, 471, 490, pp. 271, 284-5, and Cluny, Tome IV, 2694, p. 721.
[75] Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 270, and quoted in Manteyer (1908), p. 274.
[76] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[77] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 225, p. 252.
[78] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo.
[79] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482.
[80] Manteyer (1908), p. 274, quoting Biblioth. Méjanes ms. 812, recueil Bouquier, t. 1, pp. 145-6, Catal. des mss. Départements, t. XVI, Aix, 1894 ms. 915.25
He was living between 958 and 1026.26 He was Comte de Mâcon (jure uxoris) between 981 and 1003.4 He was Comte de Bourgogne between 995 and 1026.1

Family 1

Ermentrude/Irmgard de Roucy Countess of Rheims b. c 950, d. bt 5 Mar 1003 - 1004
Children

Family 2

Adélaïde/Adèle (?)

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#OG
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes Guillaume: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036188&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005: "Ahnentafel Petronille de Comminges-Bigorre"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/soc.genealogy.medieval/YzUpz3CDrCM/zTYWP3a3pRkJ;context-place=forum/soc.genealogy.medieval) to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005, 498. Othon-Guillaume, comte de Bourgogne et de Nevers (958-1026). Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005."
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#OthonIMacondied1026. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Otto alias Guillaume, or Otte-Guillaume: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/otwil000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adalberto: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adalb002.htm
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberga de Macon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120952&tree=LEO
  8. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005, 498. Othon-Guillaume, comte de Bourgogne et de Nevers (958-1026) 499. m. 982, Ermentrude de Roucy (+ 1002/05).
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrud/Irmgard de Roucy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020659&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfralaoncou.htm#Ermentrudedied10021005
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/ermen101.htm
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 1 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou1.html#Erm
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#OG
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#AdelaisM1M2LouisVFranksdied987M3M4.
  15. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adélaïde/Alix (Adelaidis, Alaiz, Adelax, Alaicis) alias Blanche (Blanca, Candida) of Anjou: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/adela000.htm
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  17. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 24 July 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  18. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 24 July 2020), memorial page for Otto “Count of Macon” Guillaume de Bourgogne I (unknown–23 Oct 1026), Find a Grave Memorial no. 82546330, citing Dijon Cathedral, Dijon, Departement de la Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France; Maintained by Brett Williams (contributor 47234529), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/82546330. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto-William,_Count_of_Burgundy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Otte-Guillaume de Bourgogne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otte-Guillaume_de_Bourgogne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes Guillaume: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036188&tree=LEO
  22. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#OG
  24. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de ROUCY & comtes de Reims, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Roucy.pdf
  25. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, Comtes d'Anjou: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#AdelaisM1M2LouisVFranksdied987M3M4.
  26. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005.
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120906&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberge de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120778&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#GerbergeBourgognedied1020
  31. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Gerberge de Bourgogne: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I14578&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Renaud I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026535&tree=LEO
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20Kingdom.htm#RenaudIComtedied1057B
  34. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#Ag
  35. [S1677] Peter Stewart, "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004 "Re: Clarification on William III/V and William VI/VIII, county Poitou, Dukes Acquitaine requested"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 16 Sept 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Stewart email 16 Sept 2004."
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020876&tree=LEO
  37. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#AgnesBourgognedied1068

Ermentrude/Irmgard de Roucy Countess of Rheims1,2,3

F, #4368, b. circa 950, d. between 5 March 1003 and 1004
FatherRenaud/Ragenold/Ragnvald (?) comte de Roucy & Rheims4,5,6,7 b. c 900, d. 10 May 967
MotherAlberade (?) de Lorraine8,6,5,7 b. bt 929 - 930, d. 15 Mar 973
ReferenceGAV26 EDV27
Last Edited24 Sep 2020
     Ermentrude/Irmgard de Roucy Countess of Rheims was born circa 950 at Reims, Departement de la Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France; Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1 page) says b. ca 950; Genealogics says b. 958/9; Med Lands says b. 947/952; The Henry Project says "say 950."4,8,6,7 She married Aubry/Alberic II de Mâcon Comte de Mâcon, son of Liétaud II de Mâcon Comte de Bourgogne, Comte de Mâcon and Ermengarde de Châlons, circa 970;
Her 1st husband. Genealogics says m. ca 970; Med Lands says m. bef 971.9,3,8,6,10,7 Ermentrude/Irmgard de Roucy Countess of Rheims married Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy, son of Adalbert (?) King of Lombardy, Marquis of Ivrea, Count of Aosta and Gerberge de Mâcon Countess of Burgundy, in 982;
His 1st wife. Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1 page) says m. 975-980; Leo van de Pas syas m. 982; Med Lands says m. 970/72.4,2,5,6,7,11,12,13
Ermentrude/Irmgard de Roucy Countess of Rheims died between 5 March 1003 and 1004 at France; Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1 page) says d. 1002-1005; Genealogics says d. 5 March 1003/4; Med Lands says b. 5 Oct 1002/1004; The Henry Project says d. 5 March, 1002-4.4,8,6,7
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1): “E1. Othon Guillaume, adopted by his stepfather, whereby he became Cte de Bourgogne (995-1026), Cte de Nevers (980-989), Cte de Besançon (982-1026), Cte de Mâcon (982-1006), pretender to the Duchy of Bourgogne (1002-05); *958/9, +21.9.1026; 1m: 975/980 Ermentrude de Roucy (*ca 950 +1002/5), dau.of Ragenold de Roucy; 2m: before 1016 Adelaide=Blanche d'Anjou (+1026); all kids were by 1m.”.14

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUGLIELMO di Ivrea, son of ADALBERTO II associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge [de Chalon] ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026, bur Dijon, Abbaye de Saint-Bénigne). Rodulfus Glaber names "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" and records that, as a boy, he was secretly stolen from the land of the Lombards and restored to his mother "with no small cunning by a certain monk"[60]. "Einricus…imperator" confirmed the property of the abbey of Fruttuaria, referring to property donated by "Otto qui et Vuillielmus comes filius Adalberti nepos Berengarii regis", by charter dated 1014[61]. It is assumed therefore that Guillaume was imprisoned as a child by Emperor Otto I in Italy after his father and paternal grandfather were deposed as kings of Italy. The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Guilelmum Ottonem et eius matrem Gerbergam" when recording that he was adopted by his mother's second husband "dux Burgundie Henricus"[62]. He adopted the name OTHON-GUILLAUME. He succeeded in [981] as Comte de Mâcon, by right of his first wife. He was declared heir to the duchy of Burgundy and installed as Comte de Nevers by his stepfather in 986. He was recognised as duke of Burgundy on the death of his stepfather in 1002, but deprived of his inheritance by Robert II King of France in Spring 1003 when the latter invaded Burgundy with troops lent by Richard II Duke of Normandy. Rodulfus Glaber records that "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" rebelled against the king [Robert II] on one occasion, supported by his son-in-law Landry Comte de Nevers[63]. "Comes Otto" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon for the souls of "Heinrici ducis qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genetricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti ducis ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis" by charter dated 1004[64]. Comte Othon continued to claim the duchy of Burgundy, but reconciled himself with the king of France in 1005, finally renouncing his claims in 1015. He was designated comes Burgundiæ[65], presumably a descriptive title with no precise territorial significance at that time although Othon did own extensive territories in Burgundy. “Comes Octo cognomento Vuillelmus” donated property “mihi secundum parentum successionem...infra alpes Pinninarum et flumen Padum et flumen Duriæ Bauticæ quod iuxta urbem Euoreiam” to Fruttuaria monastery, for the souls of “meæ et uxoris et filiorum et filiarum”, by charter dated 28 Oct 1019[66]. The Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon records the death in 1027 of "Otto qui et Willelmus dictus est comes" and his burial at St Bénigne[67]. The memorial on the tomb of "Nobiliter natus Guillelmus et Otho vocatus" records his death "1027 XI Kal Oct"[68]. The necrology of Autun Saint-Martin records the death “XVI Id Dec” of “Guillelmus dux Burgundie, anno 1025”[69].
     "m firstly (before [981/82]) as her second husband, ERMENTRUDE, widow of AUBRY [II] Comte de Mâcon, daughter of RAGENOLD Comte de Roucy & his wife Alberade of Lotharingia ([947/52]-[5 Oct 1002/1004]). "Ermentrudis" is named as daughter of "Alberada filia …Gerbergæ" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which does not name either her father or her husband but specifies that Ermentrude was the mother of Agnes[70], the latter naming both her parents in charters (see below). Bouchard highlights the absence of proof that the husband of Alberade of Lotharingia was Ragenold Comte de Roucy[71]. Her birth date is estimated from her son by her first marriage being named in 971. "Ermentrudis conjuge sua" consented to the donation of land "in Aponiaco villa" by "Albericus comes Matisconensis" to Cluny by charter dated 14 Jan 971[72]. The genealogy of the Comtes de Mâcon, included in the cartulary of Saint-Vincent de Mâcon, records the marriage of "dominus Guillelmus comes" with the wife of "Albericus filius Letaudi comitis"[73]. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" married the sister of "Brunone Lingonensi episcopo" who supported him in his rebellion against the king [Robert II][74]. "Otto comes, Irvis comitissa" subscribed a charter dated to [994] under which "Milo…uxoris mee Ermengarde" donated property to Cluny[75]. It is assumed that "Irvis" is a copyist error or abbreviation for "Ermentrudis" as no other reference to a countess of this name has been found. Her date of death is indicated by the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which records a donation by "Otto comes cognomento Willelmus" with "filii eius Rainaldi" dated 1004 "pro anima Hinrici Ducis, qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genitricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti Ducis, ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis"[76]. This is presumably the donation recorded in the charter dated 1004 under which "Comes Otto" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon for the souls of "Heinrici ducis qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genetricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti ducis ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis"[77].
     "m secondly (before 1016) ADELAIS, daughter of --- (-29 May 1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles). "Otto comes et uxor mea Adila" donated property to Saint-Vincent de Mâcon by two charters dated to 1015 or before (during the reign of Robert I King of France) both subscribed by "Rainaldi filii sui"[78]. "Otto comes et uxor mea Adeleidis et filius meus Rainaldus atque Otto nepos meus" donated property to Cluny by charter dated to [1015][79]. "Otto comes qui nominatur Willelmus" issued a charter dated 2 Nov 1023 subscribed by "Raynardi comitis, Adheleydis uxoris eius"[80]. The origin of Otto-Guillaume's second wife is not known with certainty. Most secondary source genealogies assume that she was Adelais [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow firstly of Etienne de Brioude, widow secondly of Raymond Comte de Toulouse, divorced wife thirdly of Louis V King of the Franks, widow fourthly of Guillaume [II] Comte de Provence, daughter of Foulques II "le Bon" Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge ---. Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's wife is named Adelais in several charters[81], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband[82], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelaide-Blanche d’Anjou's son by her fourth husband. However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn. It is perfectly possible that Adelais-Blanche was named in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume’s daughter. If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly sixty years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely. Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon. These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[83]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[84]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[85]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[86]."
Med Lands cites:
[60] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, pp. 105-7.
[61] D H II 305, p. 379.
[62] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1002, MGH SS XXIII, p. 778.
[63] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 105.
[64] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 228, p. 24.
[65] Bouchard (1987), p. 265, although the author does not cite her primary source for this statement.
[66] Historiæ patriæ monumenta, Chartarum, Tome I, CCXLIX, col. 428.
[67] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 181.
[68] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 181 footnote 2 which quotes the memorial but comments that it has since disappeared from the church.
[69] Autun Saint-Martin, Tome II, Extrait du nécrologe de Saint-Martin d’Autun, p. 383.
[70] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[71] Bouchard (1987), p. 169.
[72] Cluny, Tome II, 1291, p. 368.
[73] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 7, p. 6.
[74] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 105.
[75] Cluny, Tome III, 2267, p. 398.
[76] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 163.
[77] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 228, p. 24.
[78] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 471 and 490, pp. 271 and 284.
[79] Cluny, Tome III, 2694, p. 721.
[80] Cluny, Tome III, 2782, p. 807.
[81] Mâcon 471, 490, pp. 271, and 284-5, and Cluny Tome IV, 2694, p. 721-22.
[82] Bouchard (1987), p. 270, citing Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, quoted in Manteyer (1908), p. 274.
[83] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626.
[84] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 225, p. 252.
[85] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo.
[86] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482.12


; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 1): “E1. Othon Guillaume, adopted by his stepfather, whereby he became Cte de Bourgogne (995-1026); Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, pretender to the Duchy of Bourgogne (1002-05); *958/9, +21.9.1026; 1m: 975/980 Ermentrude de Roucy (*ca 950 +1002/5), dau.of Ragenold de Roucy; 2m: before 1016 Adelaide=Blanche d'Anjou (+1026); all kids were by 1m.”.15

Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 156.5

; This is the same person as ”Ermentrude de Roucy” at Wikipedia, and also as ”Ermentrude de Roucy” at The Henry Project.16,7
GAV-26 EDV-27 GKJ-28.17

; Per Racines et Histoire (Roucy): “Ermentrude (Hermentrudis) de Roucy ° ~947/52 + entre 05/10/1002 et 1004 (citée charte d’Aubri, comte de Mâcon, du 14/01/971 à Cluny)
     ép. 1) dès 971 (~967 ou ~01/971) Aubri II (Albéric) de Salins (ou de Mâcon), vicomte d’Orléans ° 935/40 + un 17/11/ dès 981/82 (fils de Létaud, comte de Mâcon, et d’Ermengarde de Chalon)
     ép. 2) dès 981/82 Othon (Otto, Otte) Guillaume de Bourgogne ° 958/59 ou 960/62 + 21/09/1026 (Dijon) comte de Bourgogne, Macon et Nevers (fils d’Adalbert, Roi associé en Italie, et de Gerberge de Chalon)”.18

; Per Med Lands:
     "ERMENTRUDE ([947/52]-[5 Oct 1002/1004]). "Ermentrudis" is named as daughter of "Alberada filia …Gerbergæ" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which does not name either her father or her husband but specifies that Ermentrudis was the mother of Agnes (Ctss de Poitou)[362], the latter naming both her parents in charters[363]. Her birth date range is estimated on the basis of her son by her first marriage being named in 971. "Ermentrudis conjuge sua" consented to the donation of land "in Aponiaco villa" by "Albericus comes Matisconensis" to Cluny by charter dated 14 Jan 971[364]. The date of her first marriage is indicated by her absence from the charter of "Albericus comes Matisconensis" dated Mar 966[365]. The genealogy of the Comtes de Mâcon, included in the cartulary of Saint-Vincent de Mâcon, records the marriage of "dominus Guillelmus comes" with the wife of "Albericus filius Leotaldi comitis"[366]. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" married the sister of "Brunone Lingonensi episcopo" who supported him in his rebellion against the king [Robert II][367]. Ermentrude's date of death is indicated by the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which records a donation by "Otto comes cognomento Willelmus" with "filii eius Rainaldi" dated 1004 "pro anima Hinrici Ducis, qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genitricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti Ducis, ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis"[368].
     "m firstly (before 971) AUBRY [II] Comte de Mâcon, son of LETAUD Comte de Mâcon & his first wife Ermengarde [de Chalon] ([935/40]-after 17 Nov [before 981/82][369]).
     "m secondly (before [981/82]) as his first wife, OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté], son of ADALBERTO associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge de Chalon ([960/2]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026)."
Med Lands cites:
[362] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[363] Cluny, Tome III, 2742, p. 765, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 270.
[364] Cluny, Tome II, 1291, p. 368.
[365] Cluny, Tome II, 1198, p. 280.
[366] Mâcon Saint-Vincent, 7, p. 6.
[367] Rodulfus Glaber, III.6, p. 105.
[368] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 163.
[369] When his wife's second husband first appears as Comte de Mâcon, Cluny, Tome II, 1291, p. 368, and 1580, p. 624, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 264.6


; Per Med Lands:
     "AUBRY [Alberic] [II] de Mâcon ([935/40]-[10 Sep], after 17 Nov [before 981/82]). The genealogy of the Comtes de Mâcon, included in the cartulary of Saint-Vincent de Mâcon, names "Albericus filius Letaudi comitis"[42]. "Letaudus comes et uxor mea Berta" donated property to Saint-Vincent-de-Mâcon for the souls of "patris mei Alberici…et matris mee Tolane…Irmengardis quondam uxoris sue" by charter dated to [941] subscribed by "Alberici filii sui"[43]. "Albericus" is named as son of Letaud in the latter's donations to Cluny dated 948 and [955][44]. "Albericus Matisconensis comes" names "Letaudi patris mei…[et] Ermengardis matris mee" in his donation of "ecclesiæ sancti Germani Ipgiacensis" to Cluny by charter dated Jan 962. He succeeded his father as Comte de Mâcon. "Albericus comes" donated property "in pago Matisconensi in villa…Lancus", which came to him from "Iohanne episcopo cum sorore sua Rotrude", to the abbey of Tournus by charter dated 14 Jan 971, signed by "Leotaldi, Alberici, Ermentrudis coniuge sua…"[45]. "Albericus comes" donated property "in pago Matisconensis in villa… Aponiacus" to Cluny by charter dated 14 Jan 971, subscribed by "Ermentrudis coniuge sua, Leotaldi, Umberti, Odoldrici…"[46]. The necrology of Mâcon Cathedral records the death "IV Id Sep" of "Albericus comes"[47], although this entry could alternatively refer to Count Aubry I (see above).
     "m ([Mar 966/14 Jan 971]) as her first husband, ERMENTRUDE, daughter of [RAGENOLD Comte de Roucy] & his wife Alberade of Lotharingia ([947/52]-[5 Oct 1002/1004]). "Ermentrudis conjuge sua" subscribed the charter dated 14 Jan 971 under which "Albericus comes Matisconensis" donated property "in Aponiaco villa" to Cluny[48]. Her marriage date is indicated by her absence from the charter of "Albericus comes Matisconensis" dated Mar 966[49]. "Ermentrudis" is named as daughter of "Alberada filia …Gerbergæ" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which does not name either her father or her husband but specifies that Ermentrudis was the mother of Agnes (Ctss de Poitou)[50]. Bouchard highlights the absence of proof that the husband of Alberade of Lotharingia was Ragenold Comte de Roucy[51]. The genealogy of the Comtes de Mâcon, included in the cartulary of Saint-Vincent de Mâcon, records the marriage of "dominus Guillelmus comes" with the wife of "Albericus filius Letaudi comitis"[52]. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" married the sister of "Brunone Lingonensi episcopo"[53]. She married secondly (before [981/82]) as his first wife, Othon Guillaume [di Ivrea], who succeeded as Comte de Mâcon in right of his wife."
Med Lands cites:
[42] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 7, p. 6.
[43] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 488, p. 283.
[44] Cluny, Tome I, 729, p. 685, and II.976, p. 72.
[45] Chifflet (1664), Preuves, p. 284.
[46] Cluny, Tome II, 1291, p. 368.
[47] Obituaires de Lyon II, Eglise cathédrale de Mâcon, p. 362.
[48] Cluny, Tome II, 1291, p. 368.
[49] Cluny, Tome II, 1198, p. 280.
[50] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407.
[51] Bouchard (1987), p. 169.
[52] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 7, p. 6.
[53] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 105.19

Family 2

Otto-Guillaume I (?) Comte de Bourgogne, Cte de Mâcon et de Nevers, King of Lombardy b. c 958, d. b 21 Sep 1026
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrud/Irmgard de Roucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020659&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005: "Ahnentafel Petronille de Comminges-Bigorre"," e-mail message from e-mail address (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/soc.genealogy.medieval/YzUpz3CDrCM/zTYWP3a3pRkJ;context-place=forum/soc.genealogy.medieval) to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005, 498. Othon-Guillaume, comte de Bourgogne et de Nevers (958-1026) 499. m. 982, Ermentrude de Roucy (+ 1002/05). Hereinafter cited as "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005."
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#OG
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrud/Irmgard de Roucy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020659&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfralaoncou.htm#Ermentrudedied10021005. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/ermen101.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alverade de Lorraine: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020659&tree=LEO
  9. [S1608] Banks/Dean Genealogy, online http://www.gordonbanks.com/gordon/family/2nd_Site/geb-p/index.htm, Person Page 93: http://www.gordonbanks.com/gordon/family/2nd_Site/geb-p/p93.htm#i5081. Hereinafter cited as Banks/Dean Genealogy.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aubry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036198&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eudes Guillaume: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036188&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#OthonIMacondied1026
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Otto alias Guillaume, or Otte-Guillaume: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/otwil000.htm
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#OG
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#OG
  16. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ermentrude_de_Roucy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  17. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de ROUCY & comtes de Reims, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Roucy.pdf
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#AubryIIMacondied981
  20. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Gâtinais et d’Anjou (& 1ers Plantagenêts), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf
  21. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Beaumont-du-Gâtinais ou -en-Gâtinais, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Beaumont-en-Gatinais.pdf
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#BeatriceMaconMGeoffroyIIIGatinais
  23. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Béatrix de Mâcon: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/beatr000.htm
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mathilde de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120906&tree=LEO
  26. [S1707] J Bunot, "Bunot email 26 Feb 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 26 Feb 2005.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerberge de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120778&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#GerbergeBourgognedied1020
  29. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Gerberge de Bourgogne: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I14578&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY%20Kingdom.htm#RenaudIComtedied1057B
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Renaud I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026535&tree=LEO
  32. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea1.html#Ag
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes de Bourgogne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020876&tree=LEO
  34. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#AgnesBourgognedied1068

Gerloc/Adèle (?) of Normandy, Comtesse de Poitiers, Duchesse d'Aquitaine1,2,3,4,5

F, #4369, b. circa 917, d. after 14 October 962
FatherRollo (Ganger Rolf, Rollon) "The Viking" (?) Duke of Normandy2,3,4,5 b. c 846, d. c 927
MotherPoopa (Poppa, Pope) (?) de Bayeux, Duchess of Normandy2,4,5 d. bt 917 - 945
ReferenceGAV27 EDV28
Last Edited22 Sep 2020
     Gerloc/Adèle (?) of Normandy, Comtesse de Poitiers, Duchesse d'Aquitaine was born circa 917; Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1 and Normandy) says b. ca 917; Geneagraphie says b. 897.2,6,7 She married Guillaume I/III "Tête-d'Étoupe" (?) Duc d'AquitaineComte de Poitou, Auvergne et Limoges, son of Ebalus Mancer (?) Comte de Poitou, Duc d'Aquitaine and Eremburg/Aremburga (?), in 935.8,2,6,9,10,4,5,11,7
Gerloc/Adèle (?) of Normandy, Comtesse de Poitiers, Duchesse d'Aquitaine died after 14 October 962; Genealogics says d. aft 14 Oct 962; Med Lands says d. aft 969; Geneagraphie says d. aft 14 Oct 962.2,6,4,5,11,7
     GAV-27 EDV-28 GKJ-29.

; This is the same person as ”Gerloc” at Wikipedia and as ”Adèle de Normandie (morte en 962)” at Wikipédia (FR).12,13

Reference: Genealogics cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 . 310.4

; Per Med Lands:
     "GERLOC (-after 969). Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo captured “Baiocasensem urbem” [Bayeux] along with "nobilissimam puellam...Popam filiam...Berengarii illustris viri" whom he married “more Danico” and by whom he had “Willelmum...filiamque...Gerloc”[70]. Robert of Torigny also names "Willermum Longum Spatam et Gerloch" as children of "Rollo dux Northmannorum" and Poppa[71]. The Chronico Richardi Pictavensis records that "Heblus…Pictavorum Comes et Dux Aquitaniæ duxit Adelam filiam Rolli Rothomagensis"[72], although this is presumably an error for Guillaume son of Ebles. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “dux...sororem eius...Gerlco” and "Willelmus Pictavensis comes”[73]. She adopted the name ADELA when baptised. "Guillelmi comitis, Adeleidis comitisse" subscribed a charter recording a donation to Cluny dated [963][74]. Lothaire King of France granted her 14 Oct 962 the right to dispose of extensive property in Poitiers, la Cour de Faye, this grant effectively putting an end to the long dispute between her husband and the family of Hugues "Capet". She used the property to found the Monastery of Sainte-Trinité[75].
     "m ([935]) GUILLAUME I "Tête d'Etoupe" Comte de Poitou, son of EBLES "Mancer" Comte de Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine & his first wife Aremburga ([900]-3 Apr 963). He succeeded in 959 as GUILLAUME III Duke of Aquitaine."
Med Lands cites:
[70] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber II, XII, p. 229.
[71] Robert de Torigny, Vol. I, 912, p. 14.
[72] Chronico Richardi Pictavensis, RHGF IX, p.21.
[73] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234.
[74] Cluny, Tome II, 1164, p. 251.
[75] Richard (1903), Tome I, pp. 129-30 and 142.5


; Per Racines et Histoire (Aquitaine): “2) Guillaume 1er (de Poitou et d’Auvergne, III d’Aquitaine) «Tête d’Etoupes» («Capite stupae») de Poitou ° 900/915 + 03/04/963 (Saint-Maixent) comte de Poitiers (934), d’Auvergne (950) et de Limoges, Abbé laïc de Saint-Hilaire (934), co-duc d’Aquitaine (934/36, seul duc 944, 959)
     ép. 935 Adèle (Gerloc) de Normandie ° ~917 + après 14/10/962 (fille de Rollon/Hrolf/Robert, duc de Normandie, et de Poppa dite «de Bayeux»)”


Per Racines et Histoire (Normandie): “Adèle (Gerloc) de Normandie ° ~917 + ~969
     ép. ~935 Guillaume III, duc d’Aquitaine, comte de Poitou, Auvergne et Limoges ° 915 + 03/04/963 ”.

; Per Weis: “William I of Poitou (III of Aquitaine), bu (1), b. 900, d. 3 Apr. 963; m. 935, Adele (Gerloc) of Normandy, d. aft 969, dau. of Rollo (121E-18), Duke of Normandy. (Brandenburg, p. 66).”.11

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME de Poitou, son of EBALUS "Mancer" Comte de Poitou & his [second wife Emillane ---] ([900]-Poitiers 3 Apr 963, bur Saint-Cyprien). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Willelmus…cognomento Caput stupe" as one of the two sons of "Eblo duce", specifying that he was "Arvernis, Vallatis, Lemovice et Pictavis comes…dux Aquitaniæ"[352]. The Chronico Comitum Pictaviæ names "Willelmum Caput-stupæ" as son of "Ebles Dux Aquitaniæ et Pictaviæ Comes" & his wife Adellia[353]. Ademar names "Willelmum Caputstupæ" as son of Eble and "Adelam, filiam Rosi Rotomagensis", but evidently confuses the latter with Guillaume's own wife[354]. He succeeded his father as GUILLAUME I “Tête d'Etoupes/Caput-stupæ” Comte de Poitou. He was appointed lay abbot of Saint-Hilaire-de-Poitiers in Jan 942[355]. From the start of his reign, his possession of Poitou was disputed by Hugues "le Grand" Duc des Francs [Capet][356]. "Guillelmus comes vel abba summi pontificis domni nostri Hylarii" donated property "in pago Pictavo in viccaria Pictavis" to the church of Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jun 941 or 942[357]. Louis IV King of France confirmed the property of Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, in the presence of "Guillelmus comes et marchio et frater eius Ebolus atque Rotgarius comes", by charter dated 5 Jan 942[358]. Comte d'Auvergne et de Limoges 955. Around this same time, Lothaire King of France extended the authority of Comte Guillaume over the whole of Aquitaine. Although known to history as GUILLAUME III Duke of Aquitaine, charters record him as "Guillelmus…Aquitanici ducatus comes"[359] and "Guillelmus…Pictavensium sive Lemovicensium necne et Arvernensium comes insuper etiam Aquitainiæ comes palati"[360] as well as "Willelmi duci Aquitanorum cognomento Caput-Stupæ"[361]. He abdicated in 962, and became a monk at Saint-Cyprien de Poitiers[362]. The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Willelmo Capite stupæ" was buried "apud ecclesiam Sancti Cypriani"[363].
     "m ([935]) ADELA [Gerloc] de Normandie, daughter of ROBERT I [Rollo] Comte [de Normandie] & his [second] wife Popa [de Bayeux] (-after 969). Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo captured “Baiocasensem urbem” [Bayeux] along with "nobilissimam puellam...Popam filiam...Berengarii illustris viri" whom he married “more Danico” and by whom he had “Willelmum...filiamque...Gerloc”[364]. Robert of Torigny also names "Willermum Longum Spatam et Gerloch" as children of "Rollo dux Northmannorum" and Poppa[365]. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “dux...sororem eius...Gerlco” and "Willelmus Pictavensis comes”[366]. The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records the marriage of "filius Ranulfi Eblus" and "Adelam filiam Rosi Rotomagensis"[367]. The Chronico Richardi Pictavensis also records that "Heblus…Pictavorum Comes et Dux Aquitaniæ duxit Adelam filiam Rolli Rothomagensis"[368]. This information is contradicted by other sources, is difficult to sustain from a chronological point of view, and is presumably in error. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “dux...sororem eius...Gerlco” and "Willelmus Pictavensis comes”[369]. She adopted the name ADELA when baptised. "Guillelmi comitis, Adeleidis comitisse" subscribed a charter recording a donation to Cluny dated [963][370]. On 14 Oct 962, Lothaire King of France granted her the right to dispose of extensive property in Poitiers, la Cour de Faye, effectively putting an end to the long dispute between her husband and the family of Hugues "Capet". She used the property to found the Monastery of Sainte-Trinité[371]. "Vuillelmus dux Aquitanorum" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély for the soul of "…matre mea Addela…" by charter dated [971][372]. "
Med Lands cites:
[352] Adémar de Chabannes III, 25, p. 146.
[353] Chronico Comitum Pictaviæ, RHGF X, p. 294.
[354] Ademari Historiarum III.23, MGH SS IV, p. 125.
[355] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 115.
[356] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 110-12.
[357] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XVIII, p. 22.
[358] Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, XIX, p. 23.
[359] Saint-Maixent Vol. I, XX, p. 32.
[360] Saint-Maixent Vol. I, XXVII, p. 42.
[361] Saint-Maixent Vol. I, XXIII, p. 35.
[362] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 130.
[363] Adémar de Chabannes III, 30, p. 150.
[364] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber II, XII, p. 229.
[365] Delisle, L. (ed.) (1872) Chronique de Robert de Torigni, abbé de Mont-Saint-Michel (Rouen), Vol. I, 912, p. 14.
[366] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234.
[367] Adémar de Chabannes III, 23, p. 143.
[368] Chronico Richardi Pictavensis, RHGF IX, p.21.
[369] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234.
[370] Cluny Tome II, 1164, p. 251.
[371] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 129-30 and 142.
[372] Cartulaire de Saint-Jean d'Angély, Archives historiques de la Saintonge et de l'Aunis Tome XXX (Paris, Saintes, 1901) ("Saint-Jean d´Angély"), CXCII, p. 231.10


; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou 1): “D1. [2m.] Guillaume I (III) "Tete d'Etoupes", Ct of Poitou =Guillaume I, Auvergne and Limoges, Duke of Aquitaine (934-963) =Guillaume III, *915, +St.Maixent 3.4.963; m.935 Adela=Gerloc of Normandy (*ca 917 +after 14.10.962); Note: With Guillaume I (III) the numbering confusion begins; he was the first Duke William of Aquitaine of his family, but there had been two Duke Williams of the house of Autun; thus the ordinal confusion.”


Per Genealogy.EU (Normandy): “B2. Adela/Gerloc of Normandy, *ca 917, +after 969; m.935 Duke Guillaume III of Aquitaine, Cte de Poitou (*915 +3.4.963)”.14,15,16

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 181, NORMANDY 1:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adélaïde: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adela002.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerloc-Adele of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020070&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#Gerlocdiedafter969. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  7. [S4743] Geneagraphie - Families all over the world (Website), online <http://geneagraphie.com/>, Gerloc-Adele de Normandie: https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I14384&tree=1. Hereinafter cited as Geneagraphie.
  8. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 82. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I-III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020102&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIPoitoudied963
  11. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 144A-19, p. 143. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerloc. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Adèle de Normandie (morte en 962): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad%C3%A8le_de_Normandie_(morte_en_962). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G1
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou Notes page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/note.html
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html#AG
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume II-IV 'Fier a bras': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020502&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIIPoitoudied995
  20. [S4743] Geneagraphie, online http://geneagraphie.com/, Duc Guillaume II (IV) d' Aquitaine, "Fierebras": https://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I13868&tree=1

Rollo (Ganger Rolf, Rollon) "The Viking" (?) Duke of Normandy1,2

M, #4370, b. circa 846, d. circa 927
FatherRagnvald I "The Wise" Eysteinsson (?) 1st Earl of Orkney, Jarl of More3,2 b. 830, d. bt 890 - 894
MotherRagnhild (Hiltrude) Hrolfsdotter (?)3,2 b. 848, d. bt 849 - 916
ReferenceGAV28 EDV29
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Rollo (Ganger Rolf, Rollon) "The Viking" (?) Duke of Normandy was buried at Notre Dame, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France.4

He was born circa 846 at Maer, Norway.3 He married Poopa (Poppa, Pope) (?) de Bayeux, Duchess of Normandy, daughter of Berenger (?) Comte de Bayeux, in 886; Boyer (2001, p. 181, NORMANDY 1) "married in the Danish fashion."5,1,6 Rollo (Ganger Rolf, Rollon) "The Viking" (?) Duke of Normandy married Giselle (?) de France, daughter of Charles III "The Simple" (?) King of West Franks, Holy Roman Emperor and Frederuna (?) Queen of the West Franks, in 912.3,7
Rollo (Ganger Rolf, Rollon) "The Viking" (?) Duke of Normandy died circa 927; Leo van de Pas says d. 932; Dunnett says d. 931.4,3,8
     ; Rollo was baptized (912) under the name Robert, acquired middle Normandy (the Bessin, 924) and the western part of the duchy (Cotentin and Avranche, 933). Fresh settlers from Scandinavia were recruited for the colony for the best part of a century, and it was able to retain a strong local individuality. Yet soon after 1000, the duchy was French in both speech and law. Between this period and the accession of Duke William I (the Conqueror), Norman history is fragmentary.9

; King Charles III of France granted him an area (which became the nucleus of Normandy) in 911 on the condition that he be baptized and become a vassal of Charles. He founded the Cathedral of Rouen.1 GAV-28 EDV-29 GKJ-29.

; [2m.] Rollo of Normandy, Viking Chieftain, *846/870, +932; m.886 Poppa de Bayeux/de Senlis, Cts de Valois, dau.of Berengar de Bayeux/de Senlis.2

; Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family London, 1973 , Reference: 310.
2. A History of The Vikings, Oxford, 1968 , Jones, Gwyn. biographical details.3


; Weis [AR7] 121E-18.10 Rollo (Ganger Rolf, Rollon) "The Viking" (?) Duke of Normandy was also known as Hrolf/Rollo Ragnvaldsson.11 He was 1st Duke of Normandy between 911 and 932.3

Family 2

Giselle (?) de France d. 919

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 181, NORMANDY 1. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rollo: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020055&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121 E-18, p. 110. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 121E-18, p. 110.
  6. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Giselle de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020057&tree=LEO
  8. [S1842] Dorothy Dunnett, King Hereafter (New York: Vintage Books (Random House), 1982 (Oct. 1998)), Appendix chart: Kings of Scotland (Alba) and Earls of Northumberland (England). Hereinafter cited as Dunnett (1982) King Hereafter.
  9. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 177. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 121E-18, p. 110: "...banished from Norway to the Hebrides ca. 876, 890 participated in Viking attack on Bayeux, where Count Berenger of Bayeux was killed, and his dau. Poppa captured and taken, 886, by Rollo (now called Count of Rouen) as his "Danish" wife. Under Treadty of St. Claire 911, rec'd the duchy of Normandy from Charles II, "the Simple."
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I 'Longsword': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020058&tree=LEO
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Guillaume "Longue Épée" of Normandy [William "Longsword"]: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/willi000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  14. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#GuillaumeIdied942. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  15. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adélaïde: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adela002.htm
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerloc-Adele of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020070&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#Gerlocdiedafter969

Poopa (Poppa, Pope) (?) de Bayeux, Duchess of Normandy1,2

F, #4371, d. between 917 and 945
FatherBerenger (?) Comte de Bayeux3
ReferenceGAV28 EDV29
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Poopa (Poppa, Pope) (?) de Bayeux, Duchess of Normandy married Rollo (Ganger Rolf, Rollon) "The Viking" (?) Duke of Normandy, son of Ragnvald I "The Wise" Eysteinsson (?) 1st Earl of Orkney, Jarl of More and Ragnhild (Hiltrude) Hrolfsdotter (?), in 886; Boyer (2001, p. 181, NORMANDY 1) "married in the Danish fashion."4,1,3
Poopa (Poppa, Pope) (?) de Bayeux, Duchess of Normandy died between 917 and 945; WFT Est.5
     GAV-28 EDV-29 GKJ-29.

; NB: There is uncertainty about the father of the Poppa who m. Rollo.
See entries on Genealogics, Med Lands, Wikipedia (Fr.) and Wikipedai for discussions of this.6,7,8,9

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 181, NORMANDY 1. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bretagne 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bretagne/bretagne3.html
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121E-18, p. 110. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S640] Inc. Brøderbund Software, World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0021 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKISH%20NOBILITY.htm#Berengardied892. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Poppa de Bayeux: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poppa_de_Bayeux. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poppa_of_Bayeux. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Poppa|Papie of Bayeux: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020056&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I 'Longsword': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020058&tree=LEO
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Guillaume "Longue Épée" of Normandy [William "Longsword"]: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/willi000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#GuillaumeIdied942
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gerloc-Adele of Normandy: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020070&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#Gerlocdiedafter969

Guillaume I "Longsword" (?) Duke of Normandy1,2,3,4,5

M, #4372, b. between 900 and 905, d. 17 December 942
FatherRollo (Ganger Rolf, Rollon) "The Viking" (?) Duke of Normandy2,3,6,4,5 b. c 846, d. c 927
MotherPoopa (Poppa, Pope) (?) de Bayeux, Duchess of Normandy2,3,6,4,5 d. bt 917 - 945
ReferenceGAV30 EDV28
Last Edited15 Dec 2020
     Guillaume I "Longsword" (?) Duke of Normandy was born between 900 and 905 at prob. Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France; Weis says b. ca 891; Genealogy.EU Normandy page says b. ca 900; Genealogics says b. ca 900; Wikipedia says b. ca 893; Racines et Histoire says b. 900-907; Med Lands says b. 900/605.7,1,2,6,8,9,5 He married AdelaSprote (?) de Bretagne, daughter of Hubert (?) Count of Senlis, before 933; Per Wikipedia: "He fathered his son, Richard, with Sprota.[c] who was a Breton captive and his concubine.[32]"
Wikipedia cites:
[32] The Normans in Europe, ed. & trans. Elisabeth van Houts (Manchester; New York: Manchester University Press, 2000), p. 47.2,10,3,11,9,12,13,4 Guillaume I "Longsword" (?) Duke of Normandy married Luitgarde/Ledgarde (?) Cts de Vermandois, Duchess of Normandy, daughter of Heribert II (?) Cte de Vermandois et de Troyes and Adela/Hildebrante/Liegarde (?) of Neustria, Princess of France, circa 940;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife. Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1 page) says m. 943/4;
Genealogics says m. ca 940.14,15,16,6,4,17
Guillaume I "Longsword" (?) Duke of Normandy died on 17 December 942 at Picquigny-sur-Somme, France; killed in an ambush.18,1,2,9,6,8,19,5
Guillaume I "Longsword" (?) Duke of Normandy was buried after 17 December 942 at Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     893, France
     DEATH     17 Dec 942 (aged 48–49), Picardie, France
     William Longsword was the son of Rollo, founder of the Rollonid dynasty that would become dukes of Normandy and after 1066, kings of England. In William's day, however, the Rollonid principality was still a fragile entity centered around Rouen and, in terms of Realpolitik, not extending far west of the Seine. Most of William's career was spent in relative obscurity, but in the late 930s he suddenly emerged onto the stage of Frankish royal politics, first because of his war with Arnulf of Flanders, and then because of his support for King Louis IV (d'Outremer) at a time when Louis' star seemed to be fading. In December 942, at the peak of his good relations with Louis, Arnulf called for a peace conference with William; there, William was murdered (traditionally, Arnulf is said to have arranged the murder).
     5shellymk3@gmail.com: Shelly shared-All the biographies that I have found on William state that he was born in either Rouen, Normandy or Bayeux, Normandy and that he was killed by followers of Arnulf of Flanders I, Dec. 17, 942 after leaving a "peace treaty" meeting with Arnulf on the Island of Picquiny
(an island in the Somme River) in Picardy, Normandy.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Rollo Rognvaldsson 860–932
          Poppa 'Duchess of Normandy' De Valois 872–930
     Spouses
          Espriota Sprota Adela de Bretagne 911–945
          Luitgardis de Vermandois 914 – unknown
     Siblings
          Gerloc de Normandie d'Aquitaine
          Hrolf Thurstan More Brico
          Hrolf Rollo Thurstan Briquebec 885–945
          Gerloc Adela (or Adèle) of Aquitaine 912–962
     Children
          Richard I of Normandy 933–996
     BURIAL     Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
     Created by: Helen L. Smith Hoke
     Added: 2 Oct 2008
     Find A Grave Memorial 30273219
     SPONSORED BY Debbie Chandler.20,5
     ; Per Wikipedia:
     "William Longsword (French: Guillaume Longue-Épée, Latin: Willermus Longa Spata, Old Norse: Vilhjálmr Langaspjót; c. 893 – 17 December 942) was the second ruler of Normandy, from 927 until his assassination in 942.[1]
     "He is sometimes anachronistically dubbed "Duke of Normandy", even though the title duke (dux) did not come into common usage until the 11th century.[2] Longsword was known at the time by the title Count (Latin comes) of Rouen.[3][4] Flodoard—always detailed about titles—consistently referred to both Rollo and his son William as principes (chieftains) of the Norse.[5]
Birth
     "William Longsword was born "overseas" at an unknown age [6] to the Viking Rollo (while he was still a pagan) and his Christian wife Poppa of Bayeux.[7][8] Dudo of Saint-Quentin in his panegyric of the Norman dukes describes Poppa as the daughter of a Count Berengar, the dominant prince of that region.[9] In the 11th-century Annales Rouennaises (Annals of Rouen), she is called the daughter of Guy, Count of Senlis,[10] otherwise unknown to history.[b] Despite the uncertainty of her parentage she was undoubtedly a member of the Frankish aristocracy.[11] According to the Longsword's planctus, he was baptized a Christian probably at the same time as his father,[12] which Orderic Vitalis stated was in 912, by Franco, Archbishop of Rouen.[13]
Life
     "Willliam succeeded Rollo (who would continue to live for about another 5 years) in 927[14] and, early in his reign, faced a rebellion from Normans[15] who felt he had become too Gallicised and too soft.[16] According to Orderic Vitalis, the leader was Riouf of Evreux,[16][17][18] who was besieging William in Rouen. Sallying forth, William won a decisive battle, proving his authority to be duke.[19]:25–6 At the time of this 933 rebellion William sent his pregnant wife by custom, Sprota, to Fécamp where their son Richard was born.[20]
     "In 933 William recognized Raoul as King of Western Francia, who was struggling to assert his authority in Northern France. In turn, Raoul gave him lordship over much of the lands of the Bretons including Avranches, the Cotentin Peninsula and the Channel Islands.[21][22][23]:lii The Bretons did not agree to these changes and resistance to the Normans was led by Alan II, Duke of Brittany, and Count Berenger of Rennes but ended shortly with great slaughter and Breton castles being razed to the ground,[19]:24 Alan fled to England and Beranger sought reconciliation.[24]
     "In 935, William married Luitgarde,[1] daughter of Count Herbert II of Vermandois whose dowry gave him the lands of Longueville, Coudres and Illiers l'Eveque.[18] He also contracted a marriage between his sister Adela (Gerloc was her Norse name) and William, Count of Poitou, with the approval of Hugh the Great.[25] In addition to supporting King Raoul, he was now a loyal ally of his father-in-law, Herbert II, both of whom his father Rollo had opposed.[26] In January 936 King Raoul died and the 16-year-old Louis IV, who was living in exile in England, was persuaded by a promise of loyalty by William, to return and became king. The Bretons returned to recover the lands taken by the Normans, resulting in fighting in the expanded Norman lands.[23]:lii
     "The funerary monument of William Longsword in the cathedral of Rouen, France. The monument is from the 14th century.
The new king was not capable of controlling his Barons and after William's brother-in-law, Herluin II, Count of Montreuil, was attacked by Flanders, William went to their assistance in 939,[19]:28–9 Arnulf I, Count of Flanders retaliated by attacking Normandy. Arnulf captured the castle of Montreuil-sur-Mer expelling Herluin. Herluin and William cooperated to retake the castle.[27][28] William was excommunicated for his actions in attacking and destroying several estates belonging to Arnulf.[29]
     "William pledged his loyalty to King Louis IV when they met in 940 and, in return, he was confirmed in lands that had been given to his father, Rollo.[23]:liii[30] In 941 a peace treaty was signed between the Bretons and Normans, brokered in Rouen by King Louis IV which limited the Norman expansion into Breton lands.[23]:liii The following year, on 17 December 942 at Picquigny on an island on the Somme, William was ambushed and killed by followers of Arnulf while at a peace conference to settle their differences.[18][28]
Family
     "William had no children with his wife Luitgarde.[31] He fathered his son, Richard, with Sprota.[c] who was a Breton captive and his concubine.[32] Richard, then aged 10, succeeded as Duke of Normandy upon William's death in December 942.[31]
Notes
a. Neveux and other authorities believe this may have been in England, as Rollo left Neustria for several years, probably for England. See: Neveux, P. 62; Complainte sur l'assassinat de Guillaume Longue-?pée, duc de Normandie, poème inédit du Xe siècle, Gaston Paris; Jules Lair, Bibliothèque de l'école des chartes (1870), Volume 31, Issue 31, p. 397; Complainte de la mort de Guillaume Longue ?p?e; and Prentout, Etude critique sur Dudon de Saint-Quentin, 178–9 [ns].
b. See Commentary: The origin of Poppa at: Stewart Baldwin, The Henry Project: "Poppa" for more detailed discussion and opinions.
c. Sprota married Esperling, a rich miller in the Pont-de-l’Arche-Louviers region. By her, he had a son, Count Rodulf of Ivry, who was one of the most trusted advisers of his half-brother, Richard I of Normandy. See Searle, p. 108 and The Normans in Europe, p. 57
References
1. Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1 (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 79
2. David C. Douglas, 'The Earliest Norman Counts', The English Historical Review, Vol. 61, No. 240 (May, 1946), p. 130
3. David Crouch, The Normans: The History of a Dynasty, (London: Hambledon Continuum, 2007), p. 14.
4. The Normans in Europe, ed. & trans. Elisabeth van Houts (Manchester; New York: Manchester University Press, 2000), pp. 31, 41, 182
5. Eleanor Searle, Predatory Kinship and the Creation of Norman Power, 840–1066 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988), p. 45
6. François Neveux, A Brief History of the Normans, trans. Howard Curtis (London: Constable & Robbinson, Ltd, 2008), p. 62 & n. 111
7. David C. Douglas, 'Rollo of Normandy', The English Historical Review, Vol. 57, No. 228 (Oct., 1942), p. 422
8. Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. Marjorie Chibnall, Vol. II (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993), P. 7
9. Douglas, 'Rollo of Normandy', p. 417
10. K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, 'Poppa of Bayeux and Her Family', The American Genealogist, vol. 72, no. 4 (July–October 1997), p. 198
11. Neveux, pp. 60–1
12. Crouch, p. 9
13. Vitalis, p. 67 (Citing William of Jumièges, Book II, ch. 12[18])
14. Douglas, 'Rollo of Normandy', p. 435
15. The Normans in Europe, p. 41 (Citing the Planctus for William Longsword composed shortly after his murder in 942)
16. A Companion to the Anglo-Norman World, ed. Christopher Harper-Bill; Elisabeth Van Houts (Woodbridge, UK: The Boydell Press, 2007), p. 25
17. Crouch, p. 11
18. Neveux, p. 72
19. Duncan, Jonathan (1839). The Dukes of Normandy from the time of King Rollo to the expulsion of King John. Joseph Rickerby and Harvey & Darton.
20. Searle, p. 95
21. Pierre Riché, The Carolingians; A Family who Forged Europe, trans. Michael Idomir Allen (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993), pp. 252–3
22. The Annals of Flodoard of Reims; 916–966, eds. & trans. Steven Fanning and Bernard S. Bachrach (New York; Ontario Canada: University of Toronto Press, 2011), p. xvii & notes 15b, 85
23. Stapleton, Thomas (1840). Magni rotuli scaccarii Normanniæ sub regibus Angliæ.
24. The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumieges, Orderic Vitalis, and Robert of Torigni, ed. & trans. Elizabeth M.C. Van Houts, Vol. I (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992), p. 79
25. The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumieges, Orderic Vitalis, and Robert of Torigni, p. 81
26. The Annals of Flodoard of Reims, 916–966, p. xxi
27. Searle, p. 56
28. David Nicholas, Medieval Flanders (London: Longman Group UK Limited, 1992), p. 40
29. The Annals of Flodoard of Reims; 916–966, p. 31
30. The Annals of Flodoard of Reims; 916–966, p. 32
31. Neveux, p. 90
32. The Normans in Europe, p. 47
External links
** Planctus for William: http://vlib.iue.it/carrie/documents/planctus/planctus/index.html
** Stewart Baldwin on Guillaume "Longue Épée" of Normandy: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/willi000.htm."8

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 310.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.8


; Per Genealogics:
     "Guillaume was born in Bayeux about 900 (possibly in 893), the son of Rollo, Normandy's first duke, whom he succeeded, and Poppa/Papie of Bayeux. All that is known of Poppa is that she was a Christian, and the daughter of Berengar, comte de Bayeux, the previous lord of what became Normandy. According to Planctus, he was baptised a Christian.
     "Guillaume succeeded Rollo sometime around 928. It appears that he faced a rebellion early in his reign, from Normans who felt he had become too Frankified. When the Bretons rebelled he subdued them, taking Brittany, the Channel Islands, the Cotentin, and the Averanchin.
     "The following years are obscure. In 939 Guillaume became involved in a war with Arnulf I of Flanders, which soon became intertwined with the other conflicts of the reign of Louis IV of France. He was killed on 17 December 942 by the followers of Arnulf and Thibaut de Blois, while at a meeting to settle their conflict. His son Richard I of Normandy succeeded him."

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME (Rouen [900/05]-murdered Pequigny 17 Dec 942, bur ---, transferred [1064] to Rouen Cathedral[47]). Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo captured “Baiocasensem urbem” [Bayeux] along with "nobilissimam puellam...Popam filiam...Berengarii illustris viri" whom he married “more Danico” and by whom he had “Willelmum...filiamque...Gerloc”[48]. However, the Planctus for William Longsword[49], composed shortly after the murder of Guillaume, states that he had a Christian mother of overseas origin. Orderic Vitalis names "Willelmum cognomento Longam-Spatam" as the son of “Rollo dux” by his wife “Berengarium comitem...Popam...filiam eius”[50]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin states that he was born in Rouen and, in a later passage, describes him as a "young man" one year before his father's death[51]. His birth date is estimated based on the estimated birth date of his own son. His father chose him as heir one year before his death[52]. Flodoard records that "filius Rollonis" did homage to ex-king Charles III "le Simple" at "castellum…Auga" in 927[53]. He succeeded his father in [928/33] as GUILLAUME I "Longuespee" Comte [de Normandie]. Flodoard names "Willelmus princeps Nortmannorum" in 933[54]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin records that he quelled a rebellion led by the Viking chief Riulf after the latter besieged Rouen[55]. In return for swearing allegiance to Raoul King of France, Guillaume appears to have been granted rights to further territory along the coast in 933, maybe the Cotentin and Avranchin. If this is correct, it would have created rivalry with the dukes of Brittany. Dudo of Saint-Quentin describes Comte Guillaume's invasion of Brittany shortly after his accession to quell a rebellion against him, and his defeat of the rebels at Bayeux[56]. Responding to raids by Comte Guillaume, Arnoul I Count of Flanders invaded Ponthieu and in 939 captured Montreuil from Herluin Comte de Ponthieu, although it was recaptured by Comte Guillaume's forces. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis comes” captured "castrum...Monasteriolum" from “comiti...Herluino”, who sought help from “Normanniæ dominum” who recaptured the castle for Herluin[57]. In 939, Guillaume joined the alliance against Louis IV King of France which was led by Otto I "der Große" King of Germany who raided Frankish territory. Comte Guillaume, however, met King Louis at Amiens, receiving a confirmation of the grant of his lands in Normandy. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis” tricked "duci Willelmo" into a meeting to settle the dispute concerning Montreuil “apud Pinchiniacum”, where Guillaume was killed by “Henricus necnon Balzo, Robertus quoque atque Ridulphus quatuor diaboli filii” on “XVI Kal Jan” 943[58]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Willelmus dux" was killed in 942 “fraude Arnulphi Flandrensis satrapæ”[59]. The Annalibus Rotomagensibus record that "Willermus dux Normannorum filius Rollonis" was killed "943 XVI Kal Jan"[60]. The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rollo et Willelmus filius eius" were buried "apud Rothomagum in ecclesia beatæ Mariæ"[61]. Orderic Vitalis implies that the transfer of his body to Rouen Cathedral took place after the "the ninth year" in office of Archbishop Maurilius, who had succeeded Mauger de Normandie[62], which would date the event to [1064].
     "[m] firstly SPROTA, daughter of ---. Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the rebel “Riulfus” was defeated at the battle of "Pratum-belli", a messenger arrived “a...Fiscannensis castri” and reported to Guillaume the birth of his son to “nobilissima puella Danico more sibi iuncta...Sprota”[63]. This passage suggests that Sprota was Count Guillaume's concubine rather than wife, particularly as no reference has been found to a dissolution of any marriage before she married Esperleng or before Guillaume married his second wife. She married Esperleng de Pîtres. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures”[64].
     "m secondly ([935]) as her first husband, LUITGARDIS de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[65]. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “Normannorum Dux” and "Herbertus...filiam suam", encouraged by “Hugone Magno”, after the marriage of Guillaume´s sister Gerloc [which would date the marriage to [935] if that report is accurate][66]. She married secondly Thibaut [I] Comte de Blois. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[67]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[68]."
Med Lands cites:
[47] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91.
[48] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber II, XII, p. 229.
[49] The Planctus for William Longsword, Verse 2.
[50] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 7.
[51] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapters 15 and 16-17.
[52] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 17.
[53] Flodoardi Annales, 927, MGH SS III, p. 378.
[54] Flodoardi Annales, 933, MGH SS III, p. 381.
[55] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18.
[56] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18.
[57] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, X, p. 237.
[58] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, XI, XII, p. 238.
[59] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 9.
[60] Annalibus Rotomagensibus 943, MGH SS XXVI, p. 498.
[61] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 14.
[62] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91.
[63] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, II, p. 234.
[64] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288.
[65] Rodulfus Glaber, Historiarum III.39, p. 165.
[66] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234.
[67] Chartres Saint-Père, Vol. I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.21


; Per Genealogy.EU: "William "Longsword", Duke of Normandy, *ca 900, +murdered 17.12.942; m.Sprota de Bretagne."11

; This is the same person as ”Guillaume "Longue Épée" of Normandy [William "Longsword"]” at The Henry Project.4 Guillaume I "Longsword" (?) Duke of Normandy was also known as William I "Longsword" (?) Duke of Normandy.2 GAV-30 EDV-28 GKJ-28.

; Per Weis: “William I, 'Longsword,' b. abt 891, prob. Rouen, abt 927 succ. to County of Normandy, abt 930 the bretons rebelled, he subdued them, taking Brittany, the channel Islands, the Contentin, and the Averanchin, killed in treacherous ambush 17 Dec. 942 by servants of Theobald of Blois and arnulf of Flanders. (Isenburg; Onslow, pp. 46-62). He m. (1) Sprota; m. (2) Luitgarde de Vermandois (136-19), n.i., dau. of Herbert II (50-18), Count of Vermandois and Troyes.”.14

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME (Rouen [900/05]-murdered Pequigny 17 Dec 942, bur ---, transferred [1064] to Rouen Cathedral[47]). Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo captured “Baiocasensem urbem” [Bayeux] along with "nobilissimam puellam...Popam filiam...Berengarii illustris viri" whom he married “more Danico” and by whom he had “Willelmum...filiamque...Gerloc”[48]. However, the Planctus for William Longsword[49], composed shortly after the murder of Guillaume, states that he had a Christian mother of overseas origin. Orderic Vitalis names "Willelmum cognomento Longam-Spatam" as the son of “Rollo dux” by his wife “Berengarium comitem...Popam...filiam eius”[50]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin states that he was born in Rouen and, in a later passage, describes him as a "young man" one year before his father's death[51]. His birth date is estimated based on the estimated birth date of his own son. His father chose him as heir one year before his death[52]. Flodoard records that "filius Rollonis" did homage to ex-king Charles III "le Simple" at "castellum…Auga" in 927[53]. He succeeded his father in [928/33] as GUILLAUME I "Longuespee" Comte [de Normandie]. Flodoard names "Willelmus princeps Nortmannorum" in 933[54]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin records that he quelled a rebellion led by the Viking chief Riulf after the latter besieged Rouen[55]. In return for swearing allegiance to Raoul King of France, Guillaume appears to have been granted rights to further territory along the coast in 933, maybe the Cotentin and Avranchin. If this is correct, it would have created rivalry with the dukes of Brittany. Dudo of Saint-Quentin describes Comte Guillaume's invasion of Brittany shortly after his accession to quell a rebellion against him, and his defeat of the rebels at Bayeux[56]. Responding to raids by Comte Guillaume, Arnoul I Count of Flanders invaded Ponthieu and in 939 captured Montreuil from Herluin Comte de Ponthieu, although it was recaptured by Comte Guillaume's forces. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis comes” captured "castrum...Monasteriolum" from “comiti...Herluino”, who sought help from “Normanniæ dominum” who recaptured the castle for Herluin[57]. In 939, Guillaume joined the alliance against Louis IV King of France which was led by Otto I "der Große" King of Germany who raided Frankish territory. Comte Guillaume, however, met King Louis at Amiens, receiving a confirmation of the grant of his lands in Normandy. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis” tricked "duci Willelmo" into a meeting to settle the dispute concerning Montreuil “apud Pinchiniacum”, where Guillaume was killed by “Henricus necnon Balzo, Robertus quoque atque Ridulphus quatuor diaboli filii” on “XVI Kal Jan” 943[58]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Willelmus dux" was killed in 942 “fraude Arnulphi Flandrensis satrapæ”[59]. The Annalibus Rotomagensibus record that "Willermus dux Normannorum filius Rollonis" was killed "943 XVI Kal Jan"[60]. The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rollo et Willelmus filius eius" were buried "apud Rothomagum in ecclesia beatæ Mariæ"[61]. Orderic Vitalis implies that the transfer of his body to Rouen Cathedral took place after the "the ninth year" in office of Archbishop Maurilius, who had succeeded Mauger de Normandie[62], which would date the event to [1064].
     "Per Med Lands: [:TAB:]"GUILLAUME (Rouen [900/05]-murdered Pequigny 17 Dec 942, bur ---, transferred [1064] to Rouen Cathedral[47]). Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo captured “Baiocasensem urbem” [Bayeux] along with "nobilissimam puellam...Popam filiam...Berengarii illustris viri" whom he married “more Danico” and by whom he had “Willelmum...filiamque...Gerloc”[48]. However, the Planctus for William Longsword[49], composed shortly after the murder of Guillaume, states that he had a Christian mother of overseas origin. Orderic Vitalis names "Willelmum cognomento Longam-Spatam" as the son of “Rollo dux” by his wife “Berengarium comitem...Popam...filiam eius”[50]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin states that he was born in Rouen and, in a later passage, describes him as a "young man" one year before his father's death[51]. His birth date is estimated based on the estimated birth date of his own son. His father chose him as heir one year before his death[52]. Flodoard records that "filius Rollonis" did homage to ex-king Charles III "le Simple" at "castellum…Auga" in 927[53]. He succeeded his father in [928/33] as GUILLAUME I "Longuespee" Comte [de Normandie]. Flodoard names "Willelmus princeps Nortmannorum" in 933[54]. Dudo of Saint-Quentin records that he quelled a rebellion led by the Viking chief Riulf after the latter besieged Rouen[55]. In return for swearing allegiance to Raoul King of France, Guillaume appears to have been granted rights to further territory along the coast in 933, maybe the Cotentin and Avranchin. If this is correct, it would have created rivalry with the dukes of Brittany. Dudo of Saint-Quentin describes Comte Guillaume's invasion of Brittany shortly after his accession to quell a rebellion against him, and his defeat of the rebels at Bayeux[56]. Responding to raids by Comte Guillaume, Arnoul I Count of Flanders invaded Ponthieu and in 939 captured Montreuil from Herluin Comte de Ponthieu, although it was recaptured by Comte Guillaume's forces. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis comes” captured "castrum...Monasteriolum" from “comiti...Herluino”, who sought help from “Normanniæ dominum” who recaptured the castle for Herluin[57]. In 939, Guillaume joined the alliance against Louis IV King of France which was led by Otto I "der Große" King of Germany who raided Frankish territory. Comte Guillaume, however, met King Louis at Amiens, receiving a confirmation of the grant of his lands in Normandy. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis” tricked "duci Willelmo" into a meeting to settle the dispute concerning Montreuil “apud Pinchiniacum”, where Guillaume was killed by “Henricus necnon Balzo, Robertus quoque atque Ridulphus quatuor diaboli filii” on “XVI Kal Jan” 943[58]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Willelmus dux" was killed in 942 “fraude Arnulphi Flandrensis satrapæ”[59]. The Annalibus Rotomagensibus record that "Willermus dux Normannorum filius Rollonis" was killed "943 XVI Kal Jan"[60]. The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rollo et Willelmus filius eius" were buried "apud Rothomagum in ecclesia beatæ Mariæ"[61]. Orderic Vitalis implies that the transfer of his body to Rouen Cathedral took place after the "the ninth year" in office of Archbishop Maurilius, who had succeeded Mauger de Normandie[62], which would date the event to [1064]. [:TAB:]"[m] firstly SPROTA, daughter of ---. Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the rebel “Riulfus” was defeated at the battle of "Pratum-belli", a messenger arrived “a...Fiscannensis castri” and reported to Guillaume the birth of his son to “nobilissima puella Danico more sibi iuncta...Sprota”[63]. This passage suggests that Sprota was Count Guillaume's concubine rather than wife, particularly as no reference has been found to a dissolution of any marriage before she married Esperleng or before Guillaume married his second wife. She married Esperleng de Pîtres. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures”[64]. [:TAB:]"m secondly ([935]) as her first husband, LUITGARDIS de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[65]. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “Normannorum Dux” and "Herbertus...filiam suam", encouraged by “Hugone Magno”, after the marriage of Guillaume´s sister Gerloc [which would date the marriage to [935] if that report is accurate][66]. She married secondly Thibaut [I] Comte de Blois. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[67]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[68]." Med Lands cites: [LIND:][47] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91. [48] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber II, XII, p. 229. [49] The Planctus for William Longsword, Verse 2. [50] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 7. [51] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapters 15 and 16-17. [52] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 17. [53] Flodoardi Annales, 927, MGH SS III, p. 378. [54] Flodoardi Annales, 933, MGH SS III, p. 381. [55] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18. [56] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18. [57] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, X, p. 237. [58] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, XI, XII, p. 238. [59] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 9. [60] Annalibus Rotomagensibus 943, MGH SS XXVI, p. 498. [61] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 14. [62] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91. [63] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, II, p. 234. [64] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. [65] Rodulfus Glaber, Historiarum III.39, p. 165. [66] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234. [67] Chartres Saint-Père, Vol. I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.[:LIND] firstly SPROTA, daughter of ---. Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the rebel “Riulfus” was defeated at the battle of "Pratum-belli", a messenger arrived “a...Fiscannensis castri” and reported to Guillaume the birth of his son to “nobilissima puella Danico more sibi iuncta...Sprota”[63]. This passage suggests that Sprota was Count Guillaume's concubine rather than wife, particularly as no reference has been found to a dissolution of any marriage before she married Esperleng or before Guillaume married his second wife. She married Esperleng de Pîtres. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures”[64].
     "m secondly ([935]) as her first husband, LUITGARDIS de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[65]. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “Normannorum Dux” and "Herbertus...filiam suam", encouraged by “Hugone Magno”, after the marriage of Guillaume´s sister Gerloc [which would date the marriage to [935] if that report is accurate][66]. She married secondly Thibaut [I] Comte de Blois. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[67]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[68]."
Med Lands cites:
[47] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91.
[48] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber II, XII, p. 229.
[49] The Planctus for William Longsword, Verse 2.
[50] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 7.
[51] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapters 15 and 16-17.
[52] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 17.
[53] Flodoardi Annales, 927, MGH SS III, p. 378.
[54] Flodoardi Annales, 933, MGH SS III, p. 381.
[55] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18.
[56] Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Chapter 18.
[57] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, X, p. 237.
[58] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, XI, XII, p. 238.
[59] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 9.
[60] Annalibus Rotomagensibus 943, MGH SS XXVI, p. 498.
[61] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 14.
[62] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 91.
[63] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, II, p. 234.
[64] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288.
[65] Rodulfus Glaber, Historiarum III.39, p. 165.
[66] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234.
[67] Chartres Saint-Père, Vol. I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.5


; Per Racines et Histoire: "Guillaume 1er «Longue Epée» ° ~900/07 +x 17/12/942 (ass.) comte de Rouen, duc de Normandie (931) concubine 1) Sprota de Bretagne (origine viking ? ; ép. 2) Asperleng) ép. 2) ~940 Liég(e)ard(e) de Vermandois ° ~925 + un 27/05 (après 977/78) (veuve, elle ép. 2) 943/44 Thibaud «Le Tricheur» comte de Tours, Blois et Chartres.)9"

; Per Med Lands:
     "LUITGARDIS (before 925-14 Nov after 985, bur Chartres, Abbaye de Saint-Père). Rodulfus Glauber refers to the wife of Comte Guillaume as "sororem [Heribertum Trecorum comitem]", specifying that she was childless by her first husband, when recording her second marriage to "Tetbaldus"[235]. Guillaume of Jumièges records the marriage of “Normannorum Dux” and "Herbertus...filiam suam", encouraged by “Hugone Magno”, after the marriage of Guillaume’s sister Gerloc [which would date the marriage to [935] if that report is accurate][236]. The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum refers to the wife of "Tetbaudi comitis" as "sorore Herberti Trecorum comitis"[237]. "Theobaldi comitis…Ledgardis comitisse" subscribed the charter dated 950 under which Ragnfred Bishop of Chartres donated property to Chartres Saint-Père, although the relationship between the two is not specified[238]. "Ledgardis" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis ecclesiam", for the souls of "senioris mei…comitis Tedbaldi…patris mei Heirberti, Trecassini comitis", with the consent of "archipresule…Hugone et…comite Odone, filiis meis", by charter dated 5 Feb 978, signed by "…Emma comitissa Pictavæ urbis…"[239]. “Ledgardis comitissa necnon Hugo episcopus et filius meus et item filius meus Odo comes” donated property to Saint-Martin de Tours, for the souls of “Theobaldi comitis quondam senioris mei…Richildis quondam sanctimonialis, eiusque filii Richardi episcopi” (referring to “dicti comitis et fratris sui Theobaldi”, in relation to Bishop Richard), by charter dated to [980][240]. "Hugonis ducis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis sanctæ Bituricensis archipræsulis, Letgardis comitissæ, Bertæ comitissæ, Gauzfridi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated 985 under which "Robertus" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis", on the advice of "Odonem, simul cum sua matre Ledgarde, pariterque dominam meam Bertam, ipsius æque coniugem"[241]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Letgardis comitissa"[242].
     "m firstly ([935]) as his second wife, GUILLAUME I “Longuespée” Comte [de Normandie], son of ROBERT I [Rollo] Comte [de Normandie] & his [second] wife Poppa de Bayeux (-murdered Péquigny-sur-Somme 17 Dec 942, bur Rouen, cathédrale de Notre-Dame).
     "m secondly ([942/45]) THIBAUT [II] "le Tricheur" Comte de Blois, son of THIBAUT [I] "l'Ancien" Comte de Blois, Vicomte de Tours & his first wife --- (-16 Jan [975/77])."
Med Lands cites:
[235] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.39, p. 165.
[236] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber III, III, p. 234.
[237] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 387.
[238] Chartres Saint-Père, Liber Primus, 130, p. 351.
[239] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Tertius, Cap. VIII, p. 63.
[240] Arbois de Jubainville (1859), Tome I, p. 461.
[241] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Tertius, Cap. XVIII, p. 77.
[242] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 23.22


; per Racines et Histoire (Comtes de Bayeux, p. 2): "Sprota dite «de Senlis» probablement bretonne d’origine est devenue la concubine de Guillaume «Longue-Epée» à la suite d’une expédition de celui-ci en Bretagne (932); elle est la mère de Richard 1er ° 934 (Fécamp). Elle ép. 2) Asperleng, riche meunier des moulins de la Risle selon les chroniqueurs et possédant des biens au Vaudreuil et à Pîtres, d’où est issu Raoul, investi du comté d’Ivry et de biens à Bayeux par son demi-frère le duc. Osbern de Crépon, sénéchal du duc, est fils d’Herfast, frère de la duchesse Gonnor (épouse de Richard 1er) ; Herfast s’est fait moine à Saint-Père de Chartres (entre 1022 et 1026.)23"

Family 1

AdelaSprote (?) de Bretagne b. c 911, d. c 945
Child

Family 2

Luitgarde/Ledgarde (?) Cts de Vermandois, Duchess of Normandy b. bt 915 - 920, d. a 9 Feb 978

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 181, NORMANDY 2. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d'Eu, p. 2. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Guillaume "Longue Épée" of Normandy [William "Longsword"]: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/willi000.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#GuillaumeIdied942. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I 'Longsword': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020058&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 121E-19, p. 110. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Longsword. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs de Normandiw, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Normandie.pdf
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bayeux-Ivry.pdf, p. 2.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sprota: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020059&tree=LEO
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, "Sprota": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/sprot000.htm
  14. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 121E-19, p. 121.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 2.
  17. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Liutgarde de Vermandois: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liutgarde_de_Vermandois. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  18. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 121E-19, p. 110: "...killed in treacherous ambush 17 Dec. 942 by servants of Theobald of Blois and Arnulf of Flanders."
  19. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Guillaume "Longue Épée" of Normandy [William "Longsword"]: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/willi000.htm
  20. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 10 November 2019), memorial page for William “Longsword” of Normandy, I (893–17 Dec 942), Find A Grave Memorial no. 30273219, citing Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France ; Maintained by Helen L. Smith Hoke (contributor 46540075), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/30273219/william-of_normandy. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#RobertIdied928
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/nfravalver.htm#Luitgarddiedafter977
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes & Vicomtes de Bayeux, & Seigneurs de Bréval & d’Ivry, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bayeux-Ivry.pdf
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Normandy page - Normandy Family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/normandy/normandy.html

Ebalus Mancer (?) Comte de Poitou, Duc d'Aquitaine1

M, #4373, b. between 867 and 872, d. 932
FatherRainulf II (?) Count of Poitou, Duke/King of Aquitaine2,3,1,4 b. 855, d. 5 Aug 890
MotherErmengarde (?)5,1
ReferenceGAV28 EDV29
Last Edited22 Sep 2020
     Ebalus Mancer (?) Comte de Poitou, Duc d'Aquitaine was born between 867 and 872; Genealogy.EU says b. 867-872; Genealogics says b. ca 870.2,1 He married Eremburg/Aremburga (?) between 10 October 891 and 892;
His 1st wife. Weis [1992:128] line 144A-18 says m. 892; Poitou 1 page says m. after 10.10.891; Med Lands says m. bef 10 Oct 892.5,2,4,6 Ebalus Mancer (?) Comte de Poitou, Duc d'Aquitaine married Emliane/Emilienne (?) before February 911;
His 2nd wife.5,2,1,4,7
Ebalus Mancer (?) Comte de Poitou, Duc d'Aquitaine died in 932; Weis [AR7] line 144A-18 says d. 932; Genealogy.EU says d. 934/935; Genealogics says d. 934.2,5,1
     ; Per Genealogics:
     “Ebalus Mancer (also known as Manzer, Manser and Manzeras) was born about 870, an illegitimate son of Ramnulf II, comte de Poitou. The meaning of Mancer is disputed. Mancer is a Germanic habitational name, but also a Germanic personal name formed from 'magin', meaning 'strength' or 'might' (magnus). It may also be a corruption of the Hebrew 'mamzer', meaning 'bastard', hence the appellation sometimes seen, Ebalus 'the Bastard', and his supposed Jewish mother. The same name was used by another prince from Occitania. Arnaud Manzer, count of Angoulême (born 952 - died 988/92) who was also a bastard. This fact makes problematic the speculation about the Germanic origin of the name.
     “Ebalus was count of Poitou and duke of Aquitaine on two occasions: from 890 to 892 and from 902 (Poitou) and 927 (Aquitaine) to his death. He succeeded his father Ramnulf in 890, but was driven out in 892 by Aymar, who was supported by Eudes of France. Ebalus gained the backing of Guillaume I 'le Pieux', count of Auvergne, who placed Aquitaine under his own authority in 893.
     “About 892 Ebalus married Aremburgis and they had two sons: Ebalus who became bishop of Limoges, and Guillaume who would have progeny.
     “In 902 Ebalus launched the reconquest of his county with an army lent by his distant relative Guillaume I 'le Pieux'. He took Poitiers while Aymar was away and established control of the county. He was invested as count by Charles III, with whom Ebalus had been raised. The comital title was the only one to which he ever had legitimate investiture. Ebalus allotted the abbey of Saint-Maixent to Savary, viscount of Thouars, who had been his constant supporter. He restructured Poitou by creating new viscounties in Aulnay and Melle, and he dissolved the title and position of viscount of Poitou upon the death of its holder Maingaud in 925.
     “In 904 Ebalus conquered the Limousin. In 911 he was in Chartres with an army to oppose Rollo, the Viking leader to whom King Charles 'the Simple' gave Normandy the same year. Guillaume, the son of Ebalus, would marry Gerloc of Normandy, daughter of Rollo, in 935.
     “In 927, Guillaume II, successor of Guillaume I 'le Pieux', and then his Guillaume II's successor, his brother Acfred, died within a year. Acfred had made Ebalus his heir; Ebalus thus found himself duke of Aquitaine, and count of Berry, Auvergne, and Velay.
     “In 929 Raoul, king of France, started to reduce the power of Ebalus. He withdrew from him access to Berry, then in 932 he transferred the titles of Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Auvergne to Raymond Pons, comte de Toulouse. Moreover, the territory of La Marche, which was under the control of the lord of Charroux, a vassal of Ebalus, was transformed into an independent county.
     “Ebalus died in 934, and was succeeded by his son Guillaume.”.1

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried. 135.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.1
GAV-28 EDV-29 GKJ-30. Ebalus Mancer (?) Comte de Poitou, Duc d'Aquitaine was also known as Ebles Mancer (?) Count of Poitou.8,2

; This is the same person as:
”Ebalus, Duke of Aquitaine” at Wikipedia and as
”Ebles Manzer” at Wikipédia (FR.)9,10

; K. F. Werner [1967] showed in "Die Nachkommen Karls des Großen bis um das Jahr 1000", that Ebalus was 2 times married and he cites 2 sources:
10/10/891: sponsa eius (sc. Ebali) nomine _Aremburgis_, quam per sponsalia iura in futuris nuptitis oberratam habet (at that time betrothed), February 911: domnum Ebolum comitem et...zxorem eius _Emillane_.
The mother of Guillaume I then was Emillane.11

; Per Med Lands:
     "EBLE "Mancer", illegitimate son of RAINULF II Comte de Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine & his mistress --- ([870/75]-[932/34]). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Eblum" as son of "Ramnulfus…comes Pictaviensis", another manuscript specifying that he was born "ex concubina"[325]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Ramnulfus comes…Pictavensis…filium Eblum"[326]. The Chronico Richardi Pictavensis names "Ramnulfus Comes Pictavis filium…Eblum"[327]. He succeeded his father in 890 as EBLE "Mancer" Comte de Poitou, his illegitimacy apparently presenting no obstacle to his succession, although he was opposed by Adémar, son of Comte Emenon. Comte Eble found refuge first with Géraud Seigneur d'Aurillac, later with Guillaume "le Pieux" Comte d'Auvergne, his uncles Gauzbert and Eble assuming the defence of his rights to Poitou until their deaths in late 892[328]. Poitou was captured by the forces of Eudes King of France, who gave the county to his brother Robert, who was expelled by Comte Aimar[329]. Comte Eble expelled Comte Aimar in 902 and was restored as Comte de Poitou. He was recognised as Comte du Limousin in 904[330]. Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo invaded “Leugas...montis” and that "Ebulus...Pictavensis comes" was unable to defeat him[331]. Acfred Duke of Aquitaine appointed Eble as his heir, who succeeded as Duke of Aquitaine and Comte d'Auvergne in 927[332]. Raoul King of France transferred Aquitaine to Raymond Comte de Toulouse in 932[333]. "Ebolus…Pictavorum…comes" donated "in pago Alninse, Ingolinis, in villa…Verzeria" to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated Jan 934 ("anno XI regnante Radulfo rege")[334]. On the other hand, a charter dated 932 was confirmed by "Guillelmus comes…post mortem patris sui"[335]. It is assumed that one of the documents is incorrectly dated.
     "[m firstly] (betrothed before 10 Oct 892) AREMBURGE, daughter of ---. She is named as the betrothed of Eble in his charter dated 10 Oct 890[336]: "Ebolus […comite] iuuenili adhuc ætate florens" donated "alodum…Aleriacum in pago Briocinse in vicaria Sauiniacinse super fluvium Carantum…Ciliacum…Curcolmum" to Tours Saint-Martin, for the souls of "genitoris mei Ramnulfi…ac avunculorum meorum Gauzberti et Eboli", and naming "sponsa eius…Aremburgis…in futuris nuptiis", by charter dated 10 Oct 892[337]. This document is redated to 10 Oct 890 by Mabille[338]. No document has been found which confirms that the marriage was ever finalised.
     "m [secondly] (before Feb 911) EMILLANE, daughter of --- (-after [932/36]). "Emmena femina" granted property "allodus situs in pago Pictavo in vicaria Salvinse in villa…Baidonnus" to "domnum Ebolum comitem et…uxorem eius Emillane" by charter dated Feb 911[339]. Ademar names "Adelam, filiam Rosi Rotomagensis" as wife of Eble and mother of "Willelmum Caputstupæ", but this is chronologically impossible, the individual being confused no doubt with the wife of Comte Guillaume I[340]. The Chronico Comitum Pictaviæ names "Hadelliam…Adestani regis Angliæ filiam" as wife of "Ebles Dux Aquitaniæ et Pictaviæ Comes"[341], but this also appears impossible. "Willelmi comitis, Alaine comitisse que fuit monacha" subscribed the donation by "Rotbertus clericus" of property to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated [932/36][342], it being assumed that "Alaine" was the mother of Comte Guillaume I although no relationship is stated in the document."
Med Lands cites:
[325] Adémar de Chabannes III, 21, pp. 139 and 140.
[326] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 372.
[327] Chronico Richardi Pictavensis, RHGF IX, p.21.
[328] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 68-9.
[329] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 72.
[330] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 83.
[331] Willelmi Gemmetensis monachi Historiæ Normannorum, Du Chesne, A. (1619) Historiæ Normannorum Scriptores Antiqui (Paris) (“Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619)”), Liber II, XVI, p. 230.
[332] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 95.
[333] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 99.
[334] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 528, p. 318, and footnote 1 (continuation on p. 319).
[335] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 126, p. 90.
[336] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 73.
[337] Besly (1647), p. 209.
[338] Mabille, E. (ed.) (1866) La pancarte notre de Saint-Martin de Tours brulée en 1793 (Paris, Tours) ("Tours Saint-Martin") XVII, p. 68.
[339] Saint-Maixent, Vol. I, VIII, p. 19.
[340] Ademari Historiarum III.23, MGH SS IV, p. 125.
[341] Chronico Comitum Pictaviæ, RHGF X, p. 294.
[342] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 23, p. 27.4


; Per Racines et Histoire (Aquitaine-Poitou): “?) Ebles II «Manzer» (Ebalus «Mancer») de Poitou «Le Bâtard» ° ~870/75 + ~934/35 comte de Poitiers (890-902-934, succède à Aymar sous la tutelle de Guillaume «Le Pieux»), abbé laïc de Saint-Hilaire (890-893, 902-934), duc d’Aquitaine et comte d’Auvergne et du Velay (927/28-934, choisi comme héritier : succède à Acfred) (contre son compétiteur Ademar (fils d’Emenon) ; il est soutenu par Géraud, comte d’Aurillac, Guillaume «Le Pieux», comte d’Auvergne, ses oncles Gauzbert et Ebles, restauré en 902 comme comte de Poitou), comte de Limousin (904), spolié par le Roi Eudes (don du Poitou à son frère Robert, chassé par Aimar) puis par le Roi Raoul au profit de Raymond, comte de Toulouse (cité donation à Saint-Cyprien 01/934)
     ép. 1) fiançailles ~10/10/890/891 Aremburge
     ép. 2) dès 02/911 Emilienne (Emiliane, Emillane) + 932/36
     [ invraisemblable : ép. 3?) Adèle (Alaine) de Wessex (fille d’Edward 1er, Roi du Wessex) ]”.12

; Per Weis: "Ebles Mancer, a bastard of Ranulf II, d. 932, Count of Poitou 890-892, 903, by Ermengarde, prob. a concubine; m. (1) 892, Eremburg; m. (2) 911, Emliane. (Moriarty, The Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 26)."5

; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou): “C2. [illegitimate] Ebles Mancer, Ct of Poitou and Auvergne (908-934), Duke of Aquitaine (927-934), *867/872, +934/935; 1m: after 10.10.891 Aremburga N; 2m: before II.911 Emilienne N.”.13,1 He was Duc d'Aquitaine between 890 and 892.2,9 He was comte de Poitiers between 902 and 935.2,10,9 He was Duc d'Aquitaine between 928 and 932.9

Family 2

Emliane/Emilienne (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ebalus Mancer: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036227&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 144A-17 and 144A-18, p. 128. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Ebalusdied934B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 144A-18, p. 128.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aremburgis: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036228&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emillane: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036229&tree=LEO
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 144A-18, p. 128: "...bastard of Ranulf II."
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebalus,_Duke_of_Aquitaine. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Ebles Manzer: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebles_Manzer. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  11. [S4778] Karl Ferdinand Werner, Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen bis um das Jahr 1000, in: Karls des Großen Lebenswerk und Nachleben (n.p.: W. Braunfels, 1967). Hereinafter cited as Werner (1967) Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen.
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs d’Aquitaine & Comtes de Poitou, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aquitaine-Poitou.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  14. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 144A-18 and 144A-19, p. 143. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume I-III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020102&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIPoitoudied963

Emliane/Emilienne (?)1,2

F, #4374
Last Edited22 Sep 2020
     Emliane/Emilienne (?) married Ebalus Mancer (?) Comte de Poitou, Duc d'Aquitaine, son of Rainulf II (?) Count of Poitou, Duke/King of Aquitaine and Ermengarde (?), before February 911;
His 2nd wife.2,1,3,4,5
     ; K. F. Werner [1967] showed in "Die Nachkommen Karls des Großen bis um das Jahr 1000", that Ebalus was 2 times married and he cites 2 sources:
10/10/891: sponsa eius (sc. Ebali) nomine _Aremburgis_, quam per sponsalia iura in futuris nuptitis oberratam habet (at that time betrothed), February 911: domnum Ebolum comitem et...zxorem eius _Emillane_.
The mother of Guillaume I then was Emillane.6
; Per Racines et Histoire (Aquitaine-Poitou): “?) Ebles II «Manzer» (Ebalus «Mancer») de Poitou «Le Bâtard» ° ~870/75 + ~934/35 comte de Poitiers (890-902-934, succède à Aymar sous la tutelle de Guillaume «Le Pieux»), abbé laïc de Saint-Hilaire (890-893, 902-934), duc d’Aquitaine et comte d’Auvergne et du Velay (927/28-934, choisi comme héritier : succède à Acfred) (contre son compétiteur Ademar (fils d’Emenon) ; il est soutenu par Géraud, comte d’Aurillac, Guillaume «Le Pieux», comte d’Auvergne, ses oncles Gauzbert et Ebles, restauré en 902 comme comte de Poitou), comte de Limousin (904), spolié par le Roi Eudes (don du Poitou à son frère Robert, chassé par Aimar) puis par le Roi Raoul au profit de Raymond, comte de Toulouse (cité donation à Saint-Cyprien 01/934)
     ép. 1) fiançailles ~10/10/890/891 Aremburge
     ép. 2) dès 02/911 Emilienne (Emiliane, Emillane) + 932/36
     [ invraisemblable : ép. 3?) Adèle (Alaine) de Wessex (fille d’Edward 1er, Roi du Wessex) ]”.7
; Per Weis: "Ebles Mancer, a bastard of Ranulf II, d. 932, Count of Poitou 890-892, 903, by Ermengarde, prob. a concubine; m. (1) 892, Eremburg; m. (2) 911, Emliane. (Moriarty, The Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 26)."2
; Per Genealogy.EU (Poitou): “C2. [illegitimate] Ebles Mancer, Ct of Poitou and Auvergne (908-934), Duke of Aquitaine (927-934), *867/872, +934/935; 1m: after 10.10.891 Aremburga N; 2m: before II.911 Emilienne N.”.8,3
; Per Med Lands:
     "EBLE "Mancer", illegitimate son of RAINULF II Comte de Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine & his mistress --- ([870/75]-[932/34]). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Eblum" as son of "Ramnulfus…comes Pictaviensis", another manuscript specifying that he was born "ex concubina"[325]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Ramnulfus comes…Pictavensis…filium Eblum"[326]. The Chronico Richardi Pictavensis names "Ramnulfus Comes Pictavis filium…Eblum"[327]. He succeeded his father in 890 as EBLE "Mancer" Comte de Poitou, his illegitimacy apparently presenting no obstacle to his succession, although he was opposed by Adémar, son of Comte Emenon. Comte Eble found refuge first with Géraud Seigneur d'Aurillac, later with Guillaume "le Pieux" Comte d'Auvergne, his uncles Gauzbert and Eble assuming the defence of his rights to Poitou until their deaths in late 892[328]. Poitou was captured by the forces of Eudes King of France, who gave the county to his brother Robert, who was expelled by Comte Aimar[329]. Comte Eble expelled Comte Aimar in 902 and was restored as Comte de Poitou. He was recognised as Comte du Limousin in 904[330]. Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo invaded “Leugas...montis” and that "Ebulus...Pictavensis comes" was unable to defeat him[331]. Acfred Duke of Aquitaine appointed Eble as his heir, who succeeded as Duke of Aquitaine and Comte d'Auvergne in 927[332]. Raoul King of France transferred Aquitaine to Raymond Comte de Toulouse in 932[333]. "Ebolus…Pictavorum…comes" donated "in pago Alninse, Ingolinis, in villa…Verzeria" to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated Jan 934 ("anno XI regnante Radulfo rege")[334]. On the other hand, a charter dated 932 was confirmed by "Guillelmus comes…post mortem patris sui"[335]. It is assumed that one of the documents is incorrectly dated.
     "[m firstly] (betrothed before 10 Oct 892) AREMBURGE, daughter of ---. She is named as the betrothed of Eble in his charter dated 10 Oct 890[336]: "Ebolus […comite] iuuenili adhuc ætate florens" donated "alodum…Aleriacum in pago Briocinse in vicaria Sauiniacinse super fluvium Carantum…Ciliacum…Curcolmum" to Tours Saint-Martin, for the souls of "genitoris mei Ramnulfi…ac avunculorum meorum Gauzberti et Eboli", and naming "sponsa eius…Aremburgis…in futuris nuptiis", by charter dated 10 Oct 892[337]. This document is redated to 10 Oct 890 by Mabille[338]. No document has been found which confirms that the marriage was ever finalised.
     "m [secondly] (before Feb 911) EMILLANE, daughter of --- (-after [932/36]). "Emmena femina" granted property "allodus situs in pago Pictavo in vicaria Salvinse in villa…Baidonnus" to "domnum Ebolum comitem et…uxorem eius Emillane" by charter dated Feb 911[339]. Ademar names "Adelam, filiam Rosi Rotomagensis" as wife of Eble and mother of "Willelmum Caputstupæ", but this is chronologically impossible, the individual being confused no doubt with the wife of Comte Guillaume I[340]. The Chronico Comitum Pictaviæ names "Hadelliam…Adestani regis Angliæ filiam" as wife of "Ebles Dux Aquitaniæ et Pictaviæ Comes"[341], but this also appears impossible. "Willelmi comitis, Alaine comitisse que fuit monacha" subscribed the donation by "Rotbertus clericus" of property to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated [932/36][342], it being assumed that "Alaine" was the mother of Comte Guillaume I although no relationship is stated in the document."
Med Lands cites:
[325] Adémar de Chabannes III, 21, pp. 139 and 140.
[326] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 372.
[327] Chronico Richardi Pictavensis, RHGF IX, p.21.
[328] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 68-9.
[329] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 72.
[330] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 83.
[331] Willelmi Gemmetensis monachi Historiæ Normannorum, Du Chesne, A. (1619) Historiæ Normannorum Scriptores Antiqui (Paris) (“Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619)”), Liber II, XVI, p. 230.
[332] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 95.
[333] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 99.
[334] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 528, p. 318, and footnote 1 (continuation on p. 319).
[335] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 126, p. 90.
[336] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 73.
[337] Besly (1647), p. 209.
[338] Mabille, E. (ed.) (1866) La pancarte notre de Saint-Martin de Tours brulée en 1793 (Paris, Tours) ("Tours Saint-Martin") XVII, p. 68.
[339] Saint-Maixent, Vol. I, VIII, p. 19.
[340] Ademari Historiarum III.23, MGH SS IV, p. 125.
[341] Chronico Comitum Pictaviæ, RHGF X, p. 294.
[342] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 23, p. 27.4


Reference: Genealogics cites: Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried. 135.5

Family

Ebalus Mancer (?) Comte de Poitou, Duc d'Aquitaine b. bt 867 - 872, d. 932
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 144A-18, p. 128. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ebalus Mancer: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036227&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Ebalusdied934B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Emillane: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036229&tree=LEO
  6. [S4778] Karl Ferdinand Werner, Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen bis um das Jahr 1000, in: Karls des Großen Lebenswerk und Nachleben (n.p.: W. Braunfels, 1967). Hereinafter cited as Werner (1967) Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs d’Aquitaine & Comtes de Poitou, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aquitaine-Poitou.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html

Rainulf II (?) Count of Poitou, Duke/King of Aquitaine1,2,3

M, #4375, b. 855, d. 5 August 890
FatherRainulf I (?) comte d’Angoulême, Comte Poitou3,2,4 b. bt 815 - 820, d. Oct 866
MotherBilichildis/Bilichilde (?) de Maine2,3
ReferenceGAV29 EDV30
Last Edited10 Jul 2020
     Rainulf II (?) Count of Poitou, Duke/King of Aquitaine was born in 855; Weis [AR7] line 144A-17 says b. 855; Poitou 1 page says b. 850.3,2 He married Irmingarde/Ada (?) in 867.3,2
Rainulf II (?) Count of Poitou, Duke/King of Aquitaine died on 5 August 890.3,2
     GAV-29 EDV-30 GKJ-31.

; Rainulf II, Ct of Poitou, King of Aquitaine 888, *850, +5.8.890; m.867 Irmingarde/Ada N.2 He was King of Aquitaine in 888.2

Citations

  1. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 82. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 144A-17, p. 128. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Ducs d’Aquitaine & Comtes de Poitou, p. 5: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aquitaine-Poitou.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 144A-17 and 144A-18, p. 128.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ebalus Mancer: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036227&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Ebalusdied934B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Irmingarde/Ada (?)1,2

F, #4376
Last Edited1 Sep 2004

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 144A-17, p. 128. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Louis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #4377, b. 1 November 846, d. 10 April 879
FatherCharles II "The Bald" (?) King of West Franks, King of Aquitaine, Holy Roman Emperor5,4,7,8,6 b. 13 Jun 823, d. 6 Oct 877
MotherErmentrudeErmengardeHermintrudis (?) of Orleans5,4,8,9,6 b. 27 Sep 830, d. 6 Oct 869
ReferenceGAV30 EDV30
Last Edited4 Sep 2020
     Louis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks was born on 1 November 846 at France; The Henry Project says b. 1 Nov ca 846.5,4,6 He and NN (?) de Bretagne were engaged between February 856 and December 857.10 Louis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks married Ansgarde (?) de Bourgogne, daughter of Harduin (?) Cte de Bourgogne, in March 862.11,5,6 Louis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks and Ansgarde (?) de Bourgogne were divorced in 866; repudiated.5 Louis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks married Adélaïde/Adelais (?) of Paris, daughter of Adalhard/Alard (?) Count Palatine of Paris, in 875; Charlemagne Descendants, Vol 1 says m. bet 868 and 870.1,12,13,6
Louis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks died on 10 April 879 at Compiègne, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France (now), at age 32.14,15,4,5,16,6
Louis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks was buried after 10 April 879 at Compiegne Abbey, Compiègne, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1 Nov 846, France
     DEATH     10 Apr 879 (aged 32), Delincourt, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France
     Born Nov 1 846, Died in Peronne Apr 10 879, Son of Charles the Bald and Ermentrude of Orléans, Husband of Adelaide of Paris Father of Charles III The Simple.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Charles II Emperor of the Holy Empire 823–877
          Ermentrude 823–869
     Spouse
          Adelaide Judith of Paris unknown–901
     Siblings
          Judith de France 844–870
          Godehilde Carolingian de France 864–923
     Half Siblings
          Rothilde de France 871–927
     Children
          Ermentrude of France
     King Louis 863–882
          Charles III Carolingian 879–929
     BURIAL     Compiegne Abbey, Compiegne, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France
     Created by: Brett Williams
     Added: 20 Feb 2011
     Find A Grave Memorial 65927243.17
Louis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks was buried after 10 April 879 at Compiegne Abbey, Compiègne, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France (now),

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1 Nov 846, France
     DEATH     10 Apr 879 (aged 32), Delincourt, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France
     Born Nov 1 846, Died in Peronne Apr 10 879, Son of Charles the Bald and Ermentrude of Orléans, Husband of Adelaide of Paris Father of Charles III The Simple.
     Louis the Stammerer (French: Louis le Bègue) (1 November 846 – 10 April 879) was the King of Aquitaine and later King of West Francia. He was the eldest son of Charles the Bald and Ermentrude of Orleans. He succeeded his younger brother in Aquitaine in 866 and his father in West Francia in 877, though he was never crowned Emperor. In the French monarchial system, he is considered Louis II.
     Twice married, he and his first wife, Ansgarde of Burgundy, had two sons: Louis (born in 863) and Carloman (born in 866), both of whom became kings of France, and two daughters: Hildegarde (born in 864) and Gisela (865–884), who married Robert, Count of Troyes.
     With his second wife, Adelaide of Paris, he had one daughter, Ermentrude (875–914) — who was the mother of Cunigunde, wife of the Count Palatine Wigerich of Bidgau; they were the ancestors of the House of Luxemburg —, and a posthumous son, Charles the Simple, who would become, long after his elder brothers' deaths, king of France.
     He was crowned on 8 December 877 by Hincmar, archbishop of Rheims, and was crowned a second time in September 878 by Pope John VIII at Troyes while the pope was attending a council there. The pope may even have offered the imperial crown, but it was declined. Louis the Stammerer was said to be physically weak and outlived his father by only two years. He had relatively little impact on politics. He was described "a simple and sweet man, a lover of peace, justice, and religion". In 878, he gave the counties of Barcelona, Girona, and Besalú to Wilfred the Hairy. His final act was to march against the Vikings who were then the scourge of Europe. He fell ill and died on 10 April or 9 April 879 not long after beginning his final campaign. On his death, his realms were divided between his two sons, Carloman and Louis.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Charles II Emperor of the Holy Empire 823–877
      Ermentrude 823–869
     Spouse
      Adelaide Judith of Paris unknown–901
     Siblings
      Judith de France 844–870
      Godehilde Carolingian de France 864–923
     Half Siblings
      Rothilde de France 871–927
     Children
      Ermentrude of France
      King Louis 863–882
      Charles III Carolingian 879–929
     BURIAL     Compiegne Abbey, Compiegne, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France
     Created by: Brett Williams
     Added: 20 Feb 2011
     Find A Grave Memorial 65927243.16
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Louis II 'the Stammerer' was born on 1 November 846, the eldest son of Emperor Charles 'the Bald' and Ermentrudis of Orléans. He succeeded his younger brother in Aquitaine in 866 and his father in West Francia in 877, though he was never crowned emperor.
     "Twice married, he and his first wife Ansgard de Bourgogne, daughter of Harduin, comte de Bourgogne, had two sons, Louis and Karlmann, both of whom became kings of France, and two daughters, Hildegard and Gisla, who married Robert, count of Troyes. No progeny is recorded for these children.
     "With his second wife Adelheid, daughter of Adalhard, count palatine, he had a daughter Ermentrud who would become the mother of Kunigund, wife of the Wigerich, Graf im Bidgau und Ardennengau; they were the ancestors of the House of Luxemburg. Louis and Adelheid also had a posthumous son Charles, who would be known as 'the Simple' and become, long after his elder brothers' deaths, king of France.
     "Louis was crowned on 8 December 877 by Hincmar, archbishop of Rheims, and was crowned a second time in September 878 by Pope John VIII at Troyes while the pope was attending a council there. The pope may even have offered the imperial crown, but it was declined.
     "Louis was said to be physically weak and outlived his father by only two years. He had relatively little impact on politics. He was described 'a simple and sweet man, a lover of peace, justice, and religion'. In 878 he gave the counties of Barcelona, Gerona, and Besalú to Wifredo I 'el Velloso' (the Hairy) as reward for his service to Louis and his father Charles 'the Bald' against the rebel Bernard of Gothia, count of Barcelona, Roussillon, and numerous other Septimanian counties.
     "Louis' final act was to march against the Vikings who were then the scourge of Europe. He fell ill and died at Compiègne on 10 April 879 not long after beginning his final campaign. On his death, his realms were divided between his sons Louis and Karlmann." GAV-30 EDV-30 GKJ-31.

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Louis II, known as Louis the Stammerer (French: Louis le Bègue; 1 November 846 – 10 April 879), was the King of Aquitaine and later the King of West Francia. He was the eldest son of emperor Charles the Bald and Ermentrude of Orléans. Louis the Stammerer was physically weak and outlived his father by only two years.
     "He succeeded his younger brother Charles the Child as the ruler of Aquitaine in 866 and his father in West Francia in 877, but he was never crowned Holy Roman Emperor.
     "Louis was crowned king on 8 October 877 by Hincmar, archbishop of Reims, at Compiegne[1] and was crowned a second time in August 878 by Pope John VIII at Troyes while the pope was attending a council there.[2] The pope may have even offered him the imperial crown, but it was declined. Louis had relatively little impact on politics. He was described "a simple and sweet man, a lover of peace, justice, and religion".[citation needed] In 878, he gave the counties of Barcelona, Girona, and Besalú to Wilfred the Hairy. His final act was to march against the invading Vikings, but he fell ill and died on 9 April or 10 April 879, not long after beginning this final campaign. On his death, his realms were divided between his two sons, Carloman II and Louis III of France.
Family
     "During the peace negotiations between his father and Erispoe, duke of Brittany, Louis was betrothed to an unnamed daughter of Erispoe in 856. It is not known if this was the same daughter who later married Gurivant. The contract was broken in 857 after Erispoe's murder.
     "Louis was married twice. His first wife Ansgarde of Burgundy had two sons: Louis (born in 863) and Carloman (born in 866),[1] both of whom became kings of West Francia, and three daughters: Hildegarde (born in 864), Gisela (865–884) and Ermentrude (874-914).
     "He had a posthumous son, Charles the Simple, by his second wife, Adelaide of Paris,[1] who would become, long after his elder brothers' deaths, king of West Francia.
Notes
1. Rosamond McKitterick, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians, (Pearson Education Limited, 1999), 258.
2. John VIII, Pierre Riche, The Papacy: Gaius-Proxies, Vol. 2, ed. Philippe Levillain, (Routledge, 2002), 837.
References
** This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Louis II. of France". Encyclopædia Britannica. 17 (11th ed.) Cambridge University Press. p. 34."18

; This is the same person as ”Louis II le Bègue (the Stammerer)” at The Henry Project.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "LOUIS, son of CHARLES II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks & his first wife Ermentrudis [d'Orléans] (1 Nov 846-Compiègne 11 Apr 879, bur Compiègne, église collégiale Saint-Corneille). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hludovicum Karolum Karlomannum et Hlotharium" as the four sons of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina"[288]. His father awarded him the duchy of Mans and part of Neustria and arranged his betrothal in Feb 856, from which time he seems to have received the title king. He was expelled from Brittany after the rebellion which followed the murder of King Erispoé, and sought refuge with his father. He was suspected of having helped his sister Judith elope with Comte Baudouin and was obliged to flee in 861. He revolted against his father in 862, the revolt being instigated by the Rorgonid family[289]. He was pardoned by his father, given the county of Meaux in 862, and entrusted with the governorship of the whole of Neustria with the title king in 865. The latter appointment was removed from him in the following year[290]. His father invested him as Comte d'Autun in 866. He was installed as King of Aquitaine in Mar 867, following the death of his brother Charles[291]. He succeeded his father in 877 as LOUIS II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks, and LUDWIG III King of West Lotharingia, crowned at Compiègne 8 Dec 877 and at Troyes 7 Sep 878 by Pope John VIII. The Gesta Francorum records the death "879 III Id Apr…apud Compendium…palatium" of "Hludowicus Karoli regis filius" and his burial in the same place[292]. The Annales Fuldenses record the death "879 III Id Apr apud Compendium" of "Hludowicus, Karoli regis filius" and his burial in the same place[293]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "III Id Apr" of "Ludovicus rex"[294]. The necrology of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death [879] “III Kal Apr” of “domni Luduvici regis”[295].
     "Betrothed (Feb 856, contract broken end 857) to ---[de Bretagne], daughter of ERISPOE King of Brittany & his wife ---. The Annales Bertiniani record the betrothal of "Respogio Brittone…filiam eius" and "Karlus rex…filio suo Ludoico" in early 856[296].
     "m firstly (Mar 862, repudiated [876/77]) ANSGARDIS, daughter of comte HARDUIN & his wife --- (-2 Nov [880/82]). The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage in 862 of "Hludowicus frater Karoli [regis Aquitannorum, Karoli regis filius]" and "filiam Harduini…sororem…Odonis", against the will of his father[297]. Regino names "Ansgard" wife of "Hludowicus rex filius Caroli" without giving her origin, specifying that they married without the consent of his father who obliged his son to repudiate his wife[298]. The necrology of Reims Cathedral records the death "IV Non Nov" of "Ansgardis regina"[299].
     "m secondly ([875][300]) ADELAIS, daughter of ADALHARD Comte Palatin [Angoulême] & his wife --- ([855/60]-18 Nov [901], bur Compiègne, église abbatiale Saint-Corneille). Regino names "Adalheidis" second wife of "Hludowicus rex filius Caroli", married after he repudiated his first wife[301]. Her paternity is indicated by Wulfhard (who would have been the brother of Adelais) being named sororius of King Louis II[302]. Her marriage was not recognised by the church which did not accept her husband's separation from his first wife. The Pope refused to crown her with her husband at Troyes 878, considering that she was not his legitimate wife[303]. Her children were considered illegitimate by the church.
Med Lands cites:
[288] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[289] McKitterick (1983), p. 266.
[290] McKitterick (1983), p. 266.
[291] Settipani (1993), pp. 313-4.
[292] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 879, MGH SS I, p. 392.
[293] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 879, MGH SS I, p. 392.
[294] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 314.
[295] Longnon ‘Obituaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Germain des Prés’, p. 23.
[296] Annales Bertiniani II 856.
[297] Annales Bertiniani III 862.
[298] Reginonis Chronicon 878, MGH SS I, p. 589.
[299] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 272.19


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Gens Nostra Amsterdam , Reference: 1968.
2. Caroli Magni Progenies Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977. , Siegfried Rosch, Reference: 100.20


; Per Genealogy.EU: "C2. [1m.] King Louis II "the Stammerer", King of East Franks (855-877), King of Aquitaine 867, King of Franks (877-879), *1.11.846, +Compiegne 10.4.879, bur Notre-Dame; 1m: III.862 (reputiated 866) Ansgarde (+879), dau.of Cte Hardouin of Burgundy; 2m: ca 868 Adelaide, dau.of Ct Beggen/Adalhard of Paris (*850/55/60 +ca 18.10.900.)21"

; Per Med Lands:
     "ADELAIS ([855/60]-18 Nov [901], bur Compiègne, église abbatiale Saint-Corneille). Regino names "Adalheidis" second wife of "Hludowicus rex filius Caroli", stating that he married her after repudiating his first wife[212]. Her paternity is indicated by Vulfard (who would have been the brother of Adelais) being named sororius of King Louis II[213]. Her marriage was not recognised by the church which did not accept her husband's separation from his first wife. The Pope refused to crown Adelais with her husband at Troyes 878, considering that she was not his legitimate wife. Her children were considered illegitimate by the church.
     "m ([875][214]) as his second wife, LOUIS King of Aquitaine, son of CHARLES II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks & his first wife Ermentrudis [d'Orléans] (1 Nov 846-Compiègne 10 Apr 879, bur Compiègne, église collégiale Saint-Corneille). He succeeded his father in 875 as LOUIS II "le Bègue King of the West Franks."
Med Lands cites:
[212] Reginonis Chronicon 878, MGH SS I, p. 589.
[213] Settipani (1993), p. 316 footnote 857 which does not cite the source for this reference.
[214] Jackman (1997), p. 119, refers to the different theories concerning the date of King Louis II's second marriage, which support dates ranging from [866/69] to Dec 877.22
He was King of Neustria between 856 and 879.18 He was Count of Meauz between 862 and 877.18 He was King of Aquitaine between 866 and 877.18 He was King of the Franks/King of West Francia between 877 and 879.15,4,5,18 He was Emperor between 878 and 879.15

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 132. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 175. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Luxemburg 1 page (The Luxemburg Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/luxemburg/luxemburg1.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis II 'the Stammerer': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020060&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Louis II le Bègue (the Stammerer): http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/louis001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles 'the Bald': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020041&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#CharlesIIleChauveB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrudis of Orléans: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020074&tree=LEO
  10. [S4753] Christian Settipani, La Préhistoire des Capétiens, 481-987, première partie - Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (n.p.: Van Kerrebrouck, 1993), pp. 313-4. Hereinafter cited as Settipani [1993] La Préhistoire des Capétiens.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ansgard de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120930&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036216&tree=LEO
  13. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adélaïde: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adela005.htm
  14. [S639] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 6 Oct 2000 from World Family Tree Vol. L1, Ed. 1, Family #0017 (n.p.: Release date: October 30, 1998, unknown publish date).
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 148-16, p. 129. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 October 2019), memorial page for Louis The Stammerer (1 Nov 846–10 Apr 879), Find A Grave Memorial no. 65927243, citing Compiegne Abbey, Compiegne, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France ; Maintained by Brett Williams (contributor 47234529), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/65927243/louis-the_stammerer. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 November 2019), memorial page for Louis The Stammerer (1 Nov 846–10 Apr 879), Find A Grave Memorial no. 65927243, citing Compiegne Abbey, Compiegne, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France ; Maintained by Brett Williams (contributor 47234529), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/65927243/louis-the_stammerer
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_the_Stammerer. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#LouisIIleBeguewestFranksB
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis II 'the Stammerer': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020060&tree=LEO
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Descendants of Charlemagne: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANKISH%20NOBILITY.htm#Adelaisdied901
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Karlmann: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050001&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#Carlomandied884
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050000&tree=LEO
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegard of Westfranken: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331021&tree=LEO
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisla of Westfranken: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331023&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ermentrud of Westfranken: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00091993&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles III 'the Simple': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020061&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#CharlesIIIleSimpleFrancesB

Ansgarde (?) de Bourgogne1,2

F, #4378
FatherHarduin (?) Cte de Bourgogne2,1
Last Edited4 Sep 2020
     Ansgarde (?) de Bourgogne married Louis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks, son of Charles II "The Bald" (?) King of West Franks, King of Aquitaine, Holy Roman Emperor and ErmentrudeErmengardeHermintrudis (?) of Orleans, in March 862.2,1,3 Ansgarde (?) de Bourgogne and Louis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks were divorced in 866; repudiated.1
     ; Per Genealogy.EU: "C2. [1m.] King Louis II "the Stammerer", King of East Franks (855-877), King of Aquitaine 867, King of Franks (877-879), *1.11.846, +Compiegne 10.4.879, bur Notre-Dame; 1m: III.862 (reputiated 866) Ansgarde (+879), dau.of Cte Hardouin of Burgundy; 2m: ca 868 Adelaide, dau.of Ct Beggen/Adalhard of Paris (*850/55/60 +ca 18.10.900.)4"

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ansgard de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120930&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Louis II le Bègue (the Stammerer): http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/louis001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Descendants of Charlemagne: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis II 'the Stammerer': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020060&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#Carlomandied884. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050000&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hildegard of Westfranken: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331021&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gisla of Westfranken: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331023&tree=LEO

Charles III "The Simple" (?) King of West Franks, Holy Roman Emperor1,2,3

M, #4379, b. 17 September 879, d. 7 October 929
FatherLouis II 'le Bègue/The Stammerer' (?) King of Neustria and the West Franks2,4,5,6 b. 1 Nov 846, d. 10 Apr 879
MotherAdélaïde/Adelais (?) of Paris7,2,8,4,5,9 b. c 855, d. a 11 Nov 901
ReferenceGAV29 EDV29
Last Edited27 Aug 2020
     Charles III "The Simple" (?) King of West Franks, Holy Roman Emperor was born on 17 September 879; b. posthumously.10,2,11,12,4,5 He married Frederuna (?) Queen of the West Franks, daughter of Count Theodoricus (?) and Gisela (?) of Lotharingia, circa 18 April 907;
His 1st wife.4,5,13,14 Charles III "The Simple" (?) King of West Franks, Holy Roman Emperor married Eadgifu/Edgiva/Ogive (?) of Wessex, daughter of Edward I "the Elder" (?) King of Wessex and Elfleda|Aelflaed (?), circa 917;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife
Genealogics m. 917; Genealogy.EU (Cerdic 1 page) says m. 918/919; Weis [AR7, 148-17] says m. ca 918; Med Lands says m. 917/919.10,15,16,17,18,4,5
Charles III "The Simple" (?) King of West Franks, Holy Roman Emperor died on 7 October 929 at Peronne, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France, at age 50.10,2,11,12,4,5
Charles III "The Simple" (?) King of West Franks, Holy Roman Emperor was buried after 7 October 929 at Abbey of Saint Fursy, Peronne, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     17 Sep 879
     DEATH     7 Oct 929 (aged 50), Peronne, Departement de Saône-et-Loire, Bourgogne, France
     (17 September 879 – 7 October 929), called the Simple or the Straightforward (from the Latin Karolus Simplex), was the undisputed King of France from 898 until 922 and the King of Lotharingia from 911 until 919/23. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the third and posthumous son of Louis the Stammerer by his second wife, Adelaide of Paris.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Louis The Stammerer 846–879
      Adelaide Judith of Paris unknown–901
     Spouses
      Frederonne 885–917
      Eadgifu of Wessex
     Siblings
      Ermentrude of France
      Louis III King of France 863–882
     Children
      Louis IV 920–954
     BURIAL     Abbey of Saint Fursy, Peronne, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France
     Added: 6 Jun 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 91469045.12,5
     GAV-29 EDV-29 GKJ-30.

; Per Enc. of World History: "Despite five years of civil war, Charles III ruled from Laon, the last Carolingian with any real authority in France. Charles, unable to expel the Northmen from the mouth of the Seine, granted (911) Rollo (Hrolf the Ganger, d. 931), a large part of what was later Normandy, for which Rollo did homage.”.19

; Per Genealogics:
     "Charles III 'the Simple' was born on 17 September 879, the son of Louis II 'the Stammerer', king of West-France, and Adelaide. He did not know his father, who died before Charles was born. Charles, a member of the Carolingian dynasty, ruled as king of France from 898 to 922. He married Frederuna who died in 917; he then married Eadgifu, the daughter of Edward 'the Elder' of England, on 7 October 919. As a child, Charles was prevented from succeeding to the throne when his half-brother Carloman died in 884, or when Charles 'the Fat', who succeeded Carloman, was deposed in 887. Odo, count of Paris, succeeded Charles 'the Fat'. Charles 'the Simple' became king at the death of Odo in 898.
     "The kingdom of Charles 'the Simple' was almost identical to today's France, but he was obliged to concede what would become known as Normandy to the Norsemen. In 922 some of the barons revolted and crowned Robert I, brother of Odo, as king. In 923, at the battle of Soissons, King Robert was killed, but Charles was also defeated. Rudolf II, duke of Burgundy was elected king, and Charles III was imprisoned.
     "Charles died on 7 October 929, in prison at Péronne and was buried there at the abbey of St.Fursy. His son with Eadgifu would eventually be crowned King Louis IV of France, and be known as Louis IV 'd'Outremer' as he was raised in England."4

Reference: Genealogics cites: Gens Nostra Amsterdam , Reference: 1968.3

; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1): “D5. [2m.] Charles III "the Simplex", King of West Franks (893-923), Emperor (898-929), *17.9.879, +Peronne 7.10.929; 1m: 907 Frederuna (+916/917); 2m: 918/919 Eadgifu of England (*896/902/904, +951/955)”.2

; Per Med Lands:
     "CHARLES, son of LOUIS II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks & his second wife Adelais (posthumously 17 Sep 879-Péronne 7 Oct 929, bur Péronne, monastère de Saint-Fursy). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Karolum quoque postumum et Irmintrudim" as children of "Hlodovicus rex…ex Adelheidi regina"[328]. His parentage is also given in the Annalista Saxo[329]. Regino specifies that he was born posthumously[330]. On the death of King Louis II, Emperor Charles III "le Gros" was elected King of the West Franks, and on the latter's death in 888, Eudes [Capet] was elected king. Louis II's son, Charles, sought refuge with Ramnulf II Comte de Poitou[331]. Regino names "Folcone episcopo, Heriberto et Pippino comitibus in Remorum civitate" when recording that they supported the accession of Charles as king in 892 in opposition to King Eudes[332]. Supported by Foucher Archbishop of Reims, he was crowned 28 Jan 893 at Reims as CHARLES III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, as anti-king to Eudes, who later agreed to appoint him as his successor and whom he succeeded from 1 Jan 898. The early years of his reign appear to have been dominated by Viking raids in the north which led to the treaty with Rollo in 911 and the grant of territory in the future duchy of Normandy. He was chosen as CHARLES King of Lotharingia 1 Nov 911, in succession to Ludwig IV "das Kind" King of the East Franks and Lotharingia, representing a significant extension of the royal domain. He used the title "King of the Franks/rex francorum", and later "King of France/rex franciæ". He captured Alsace early in 912, and fought the army of Konrad I King of Germany three times in Lotharingia[333]. From [920], he fell under the influence of Haganon, a Lotharingian described in a charter of 921 as his cousin on his mother's side[334]. This triggered the revolt of Robert Marquis en Neustrie [Capet] and other nobles during which King Charles was obliged to seek refuge with Hérivé Archbishop of Reims. Although the king was restored after seven months, tension continued and Charles's award of the monastery of Chelles to Haganon in 922 triggered another revolt which led to the king's deposition 30 Jun 922 in favour of Robert, who was elected as Robert I King of France. Ex-king Charles fled to Lotharingia. All these events are recorded by Flodoard[335]. He returned, but was defeated at Soissons 15 Jun 923, although King Robert was killed in the battle: Flodoard records in 923 that "Karolus cum suis Lothariensibus" crossed “Mosam...ad Atiniacum...et...super Axonam” where he lost the battle near Soissons in which “Rotbertus...rex” was killed[336]. Raoul de Bourgogne was elected king of France 13 Jul 923. Ex-king Charles was tricked into capture by Héribert II Comte de Vermandois and imprisoned at Château-Thierry: Flodoard records in 923 that "Heribertus comes" sent “Bernardum consobrinum suum” with a delegation “ad Karolum” who was “in castello suo super Somnam apud Sanctum Quintinum”, and who was detained “in...munitionem suam...Castellum Theoderici super Maternam fluvium”[337]. He was transferred in 924 to the château de Péronne, where he remained captive for the rest of his life[338]. He was briefly declared king once more in 927 by Comte Héribert during the latter's unsuccessful attempt to capture Laon[339]. According to Thietmar of Merseburg, Heinrich I King of Germany secured his release from prison and in return was rewarded with "the right hand of St Denis and the entire kingdom of the Lotharingians"[340].
     "m firstly ([1/18] Apr 907) FREDERUNA, sister of BOVO [II] Bishop of Châlons, daughter of --- (-10 Feb 917, bur Reims, église abbatiale de Saint-Rémi). The charter of "Karolus…rex" dated "907 XIII Kal Mai" refers to "quondam nobili prosapia puellam…Frederunam" who had recently become his wife[341]. The charter of "Karolus…rex" dated "917 VII Kal Aug" refers to "nostra uxor Frideruna…frater eius Bovo Catalannensis Antistes Ecclesiæ"[342]. Nothing definite is known about the origins of Bovo, although Flodoard refers to "Berengario Transrhenensi clerico" as "nepoti Bovonis Catalaunensis quondam episcopi" when recording his appointment as Bishop of Cambrai in 956[343]. McKitterick assumes that Frederuna was of Lotharingian origin[344]. Settipani speculates that Queen Frederuna was probably a close relation of Mathilde, second wife of Heinrich I King of Germany[345]. This could be explained if Mathilde's mother, Reginlind, was Queen Frederuna's sister, as hypothesised in the document REIMS. The charter of "Karolus…rex" dated "918 IV Id Feb" refers to the death of "nostræ…coniugis Friderunæ"[346], and the charter dated "918 II Id Mar" that she had died "IV Id Feb"[347]. The necrology of Reims Saint-Rémi records the death "IV Id Feb" of "Frederuna regina"[348].
     "m secondly ([917/19]) as her first husband, EADGIFU, daughter of EDWARD I "the Elder" King of England & his second wife Ælfleda ([902/05]-after 951, bur église Saint-Médard de Soissons). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names "Otgiva" wife of "Karolus rex" after the death of "Frederuna regina"[349]. She fled with her two-year-old son to England in 923 after her husband was deposed, returning to France in 936 after the death of King Raoul. Abbess of Notre-Dame de Laon, this was taken from her 951 by her son on her second marriage. She married secondly (951) Héribert [III] Comte "le Vieux" [de Vermandois] (-980/84). Flodoard records in 951 that “Ottogeba regina mater Ludowici regis” married “Heriberti...Adalberti fratris” and that “rex Ludowicus iratus” confiscated “abbatiam sanctæ Mariæ...Lauduni” from her and donated it to “Gerbergæ uxori suæ”[350].
     "Mistresses: ---. The names of King Charles III's mistresses are not known. "
Med Lands cites:
[328] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[329] Annalista Saxo 887.
[330] Reginonis Chronicon 878, MGH SS I, p. 589.
[331] Richard, Alfred (1903) Histoire des Comtes de Poitou (republished Princi Negue, 2003), Tome I, p. 57.
[332] Reginonis Chronicon 892, MGH SS I, p. 605.
[333] Settipani (1993), pp. 322-3.
[334] McKitterick (1983), p. 308.
[335] Flodoard 922, MGH SS III, p. 370.
[336] Flodoard 923, MGH SS III, p. 371.
[337] Flodoard 923, MGH SS III, p. 372.
[338] France, J., Bulst, N. and Reynolds, P. (eds. and trans.) (1989) Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum Libri Quinque, Rodulfus Glaber Opera (Oxford) I.5, p 13.
[339] McKitterick (1983), p. 312.
[340] Warner, D. A. (trans.) The Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg (2001) (Manchester University Press), 1. 23, p. 84.
[341] RHGF IX, XXXVII, p. 504.
[342] RHGF IX, LXVIII, p. 534.
[343] Flodoard Annales 956, MGH SS III, p. 403.
[344] McKitterick (1983), p. 308.
[345] Settipani (1993), p. 325 footnote 324.
[346] RHGF IX, LXV, p. 531.
[347] RHGF IX, LXIX, p. 536.
[348] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 273.
[349] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
[350] Flodoard 951, MGH SS III, p. 401.5


; Per Genealogy.EU (Carolin 1): “D5. [2m.] Charles III "the Simplex", King of West Franks (893-923), Emperor (898-929), *17.9.879, +Peronne 7.10.929; 1m: 907 Frederuna (+916/917); 2m: 918/919 Eadgifu of England (*896/902/904, +951/955)”.20

; Per Med Lands:
     "EADGIFU ([902/05]-26 Sep after 951, bur Abbaye de Saint-Médard de Soissons). William of Malmesbury names (in order) "Edfleda, Edgiva, Ethelhilda, Ethilda, Edgitha, Elfgiva" as the six daughters of King Eadweard & his wife "Elfleda", specifying that Edgiva married "king Charles"[1663]. The Book of Hyde names "Edgivam" as second of the six daughters of King Eadweard by his first wife "Elfelmi comitis filia Elfleda", specifying that she married "Karolo regi Francorum filio Lodowyci"[1664]. Her birth date range is estimated from the birth of Eadgifu's son in [920/21]. If this is correct, Eadgifu must have been one of King Edward's oldest children by his second marriage. She fled with her two-year-old son to England in 923 after her first husband was deposed. She returned to France in 936. Abbess of Notre Dame de Laon, until 951. Flodoard records in 951 that “Ottogeba regina mater Ludowici regis” married “Heriberti...Adalberti fratris” and that “rex Ludowicus iratus” confiscated “abbatiam sanctæ Mariæ...Lauduni” from her and donated it to “Gerbergæ uxori suæ”[1665].
     "m firstly ([917/19]) as his second wife, CHARLES III "le Simple" King of the Franks, son of LOUIS II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks & his second wife Adélaïde [d'Angoulême] (posthumously 17 Sep 879-Péronne 7 Oct 929, bur Péronne St Fursy).
     "m secondly (951) HERIBERT [III] Comte "le Vieux" [de Vermandois], son of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] ([910/15]-[980/984]). He succeeded his brother Robert in 967 as Comte de Meaux et de Troyes."
Med Lands cites:
[1663] William of Malmesbury 126, p. 110.
[1664] Liber Monasterii de Hyda XIV.4, p. 112.
[1665] Flodoard 951, MGH SS III, p. 401.16


; Per Genealogy.EU (Cerdic 1): “E9. [2m.] Edgiva (Eadgifu, Ogive), *ca 905, +953; 1m: 918/919 King Charles III of France (*17.9.879, +Peronne 7.10.929); 2m: St.Quentin, France 951 Cte Heribert de Meaux and Troyes (*ca 910, +980/4)”.21

; Per Med Lands:
     "FREDERUNA (-10 Feb 917, bur Reims, église abbatiale de Saint-Rémi). The charter of "Karolus…rex" dated "907 XIII Kal Mai" refers to "quondam nobili prosapia puellam…Frederunam" who had recently become his wife[676]. The charter of "Karolus…rex" dated "917 VII Kal Aug" refers to "nostra uxor Frideruna…frater eius Bovo Catalannensis Antistes Ecclesiæ"[677]. Nothing definite is known about the origins of Bovo, although Flodoard refers to "Berengario Transrhenensi clerico" as "nepoti Bovonis Catalaunensis quondam episcopi" when recording his appointment as Bishop of Cambrai in 956[678]. McKitterick assumes that Frederuna was of Lotharingian origin[679]. Settipani speculates that Queen Frederuna was probably a close relation of Mathilde, second wife of Heinrich I King of Germany[680]. This could be explained if Mathilde's mother, Reginlind, was Frederuna's sister, as hypothesised above. The charter of "Karolus…rex" dated "918 IV Id Feb" refers to the death of "nostræ…coniugis Friderunæ"[681], and the charter dated "918 II Id Mar" that she had died "IV Id Feb"[682].
     "m ([1/18] Apr 907) as his first wife, CHARLES III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, son of LOUIS II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks & his second wife Adelais (posthumously 17 Sep 879-Péronne 7 Oct 929, bur Péronne, monastère de Saint-Fursy)."
Med Lands cites:
[676] RHGF IX, XXXVII, p. 504.
[677] RHGF IX, LXVIII, p. 534.
[678] Flodoard Annales 956, MGH SS III, p. 403.
[679] McKitterick, R. (1983) Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians 751-987 (Longman, London and New York), p. 308.
[680] Settipani (1993), p. 325 footnote 324.
[681] RHGF IX, LXV, p. 531.
[682] RHGF IX, LXIX, p. 536.14
He was King of West Franks between 893 and 923.1,2,3 He was King of France between 898 and 922.11

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 175. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles III 'the Simple': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020061&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Charles III 'the Simple': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020061&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#CharlesIIIleSimpleFrancesB. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Louis II le Bègue (the Stammerer): http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/louis001.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  7. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 132. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00036216&tree=LEO
  9. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Adélaïde: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/adela005.htm
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 148-17, p. 129. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Eadweard (Edward) "the Elder": http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/edwar001.htm
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 05 October 2019), memorial page for Charles III “The Simple” Carolingian (17 Sep 879–7 Oct 929), Find A Grave Memorial no. 91469045, citing Abbey of Saint Fursy, Peronne, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France ; Maintained by Brett Williams (contributor 47234529), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/91469045/charles_iii-carolingian. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Frederuna: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020077&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/Reims.htm#Frederunadied917
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Cerdic 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eadgifu of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020062&tree=LEO
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Eadgifudiedafter951.
  19. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 177.
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html#HE
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Cerdic: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/cerdic1.html
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Giselle de France: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020057&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#Adelaisborn908916
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#ErmentrudeMGottfriedJulichgau
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis IV 'd'Outremer': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020063&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#LouisIVFranceB

Harduin (?) Cte de Bourgogne1,2

M, #4380
Last Edited27 Mar 2004

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Carolin 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/carolin/carolin1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Count Harduin de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00331020&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ansgard de Bourgogne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00120930&tree=LEO