Ankaret le Strange Baroness Strange of Blackmere1,2

F, #4411, b. circa 1361, d. 1 June 1413
FatherJohn le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere1,3,4 b. c 19 Apr 1332, d. 12 May 1361
MotherLady Mary (Isabel) Fitz Alan de Arundel1,5,6 d. 29 Aug 1396
ReferenceGKJ18
Last Edited7 Sep 2019
     Ankaret le Strange Baroness Strange of Blackmere was born circa 1361.7,1,8 She married Sir Richard Talbot 4th Lord Talbot de Blackmere, son of Sir Gilbert Talbot 3rd Lord Talbot and Lady Pernel Butler, before 23 August 1383.9,1,10,8 Ankaret le Strange Baroness Strange of Blackmere married Thomas de Neville 5th Lord Furnivall, son of Sir John de Neville K.G., 3rd Lord Neville of Raby and Maud de Percy, before 4 July 1401.11,12,1,10
Ankaret le Strange Baroness Strange of Blackmere died on 1 June 1413.7,13,1,10,8
     ; ANKARET Lestrange; s her er niece 1383 according to later legal doctrine as BARONESS STRANGE in her own right; b c 1361; m 1st by 23 Aug 1383 Sir Richard TALBOT (d 7/8 Sept 1396), who was called to Parl as LORD (Baron) TALBOT (of Blackmere) between 3 March 1383/4 and 17 Dec 1387, but this is usually seen as a fresh cr rather than as a summons to attend Parl as a peer in right of his w, and had issue; m 2nd between 8 March 1400/1 and 4 July 1401, as his 2nd w, Thomas NEVILL(E), 6th LORD (Baron) FURNIVALL(E) in right of his 1st w (he dspm 14 March 1406/7), and d 1 June 1413, leaving four sons (see SHREWSBURY and WATERFORD, E, for subsequent history of the Baronies of Furnivall(e), Strange (of Blackmere) of the 1360 cr and Talbot.)1 GKJ-18.

Family 1

Sir Richard Talbot 4th Lord Talbot de Blackmere b. c 1361, d. bt 8 Sep 1396 - 9 Sep 1396
Children

Family 2

Thomas de Neville 5th Lord Furnivall b. c 1362, d. 14 Mar 1406

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Saint Davids Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1720] David Utz, "Utz email #2 29 May 2005 "Aline de Gai's descents to Robert Abell"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 May 2005, 8 Richard Talbot, Sir b: Abt. 1361 in Blackmere, ENG d: Abt. 08 September 1396 in London, ENG
    .... +Ankaret Lestrange b: Abt. 1361 m: Bef. 23 August 1383 d: 01 June 1413. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email #2 29 May 2005."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Le Strange: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140341&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Blackmere 9: p. 110. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1773] Brad Verity, "Verity email 5 April 2005 "CP Addition: Marriage of John d'Arundel, Lord Mautravers & Elizabeth Talbot"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 5 April 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Verity email 5 April 2005."
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026724&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 8-33, p. 11. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1720] David Utz, "Utz email #2 29 May 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 29 May 2005.
  9. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 348. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  10. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page.
  11. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, TALBOT 8, p. 349.
  12. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, ABERGAVENNY Family Page.
  13. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 34-8, p. 44. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  14. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  15. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, de Courtenay Family Page.
  16. [S1901] Brad Verity, "Verity email 24 July 2005: "Some Descendants of Alice Talbot, Dame Barre"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 24 July 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Verity email 24 July 2005."
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice Talbot: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00417921&tree=LEO
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice Talbot: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00417921&tree=LEO
  19. [S1787] Gordon Banks, "Banks email 30 July 2005 "Re: Descendants of Sir Richard de Lucy and Rohese of Boulogne"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 30 July 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Banks email 30 July 2005."
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary Talbot: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00198884&tree=LEO
  21. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Greene 12: p. 356.

Isabel le Despenser Countess of Arundel1,2,3,4,5

F, #4412, b. circa 1312, d. after 1356
FatherSir Hugh "the Younger" le Despenser Knt., 1st Lord le Despenser, of Hanley Castle, Worcestershire1,6,2,7,4,8,9 b. c 1287, d. 24 Nov 1326
MotherLady Eleanor (Alionore) de Clare1,6,2,10,4,8,9 b. Oct 1292, d. 30 Jun 1337
ReferenceGAV21 GKJ18
Last Edited16 Nov 2020
     Isabel le Despenser Countess of Arundel was born circa 1312; Richardson says b. ca 1313 "aged 8 in 1321"; Med Lands says b. 1312; Genealogics says b. ca 1312.11,4,8,9 She married Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne, son of Sir Edmund de Arundel Knt., 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, on 9 February 1320/21 at Havering-Atte-Bower, England;
His 1st wife.12,13,14,3,4,15,16,8,9
Isabel le Despenser Countess of Arundel was buried after 1356 at Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Tewkesbury Borough, Gloucestershire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1312, England
     DEATH     1356 (aged 43–44), Herefordshire, England
     Daughter of Hugh Despenser, the Younger, Knight and 2nd Lord Despenser and Eleanor de Clare, daughter of Gilbert.
     First wife of Richard FitzAlan Lord Arundel, married 09 Feb 1321 in the King's Chapel at Havering-atte-Bower, Essex. Isabel was eight, Richard was fifteen. They had one son, Sir Edmund FitzAlan who married Sybil de Montagu.
     The marriage to Richard was annulled 04 Dec 1344, as Richard claimed they had been forced to marry, and force with blows to conceive a child. and Edmund was bastardized and unable to inherit from his father. Richard promptly married Eleanor of Lancaster, with whom he had been having an affair. Isabel retired to one of the manors in Essex given to her by Richard.
     When Richard died, Edmund fought his half siblings for his father's estates, but was imprisoned in the Tower of London for a year, until he was released based on the requests made by his brothers-in-law, Humphrey de Bohun and Thomas Holand.
     When Isabel's father, Hugh, was executed for treason in 1326, as were a great many of Despensers, Isabel avoided confinement in a nunnery because she was married at the time.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Hugh le Despenser 1286–1326
          Eleanor de Clare 1292–1337
     Spouse
          Richard FitzAlan de Arundel 1306–1376 (m. 1321)
     Siblings
          Hugh le Despencer 1308–1349
          Edward Le Despenser 1310–1342
          Elizabeth le Despenser Berkeley 1326–1389
     Children
          Mary FitzAlan L'Estrange unknown–1396
          Edmund d'Arundel 1327–1377
     BURIAL     Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Tewkesbury Borough, Gloucestershire, England
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: P Fazzini
     Added: 1 Dec 2010
     Find a Grave Memorial 62397103.17
Isabel le Despenser Countess of Arundel died after 1356; Genealogics says d. aft 1356; Langston & Buck [1974:II:27] says d. ca 1372.8,18
     ; This is the same person as Isabel le Despenser, Countess of Arundel at Wikipedia.19

; Per Med Lands:
     "ISABEL ([1312]-). The Chronicle of Lanercost records that "comes Arundeliæ" married "filiam domini Hugonis, junioris"[177].
     "m (1321, annulled 1344) as his first wife, RICHARD FitzAlan, son of EDMUND FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Alice de Warenne ([1313]-Arundel 24 Jan 1376, bur Lewes Priory, Sussex). He was restored as Earl of Arundel in 1330, known as "Copped Hat". "
Med Lands cites: [177] Lanercost Chronicle, 1326, p. 256.9

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 201.
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: I 243.8
GAV-21 GKJ-18.

; Per Genealogy.EU: "D1. Richard FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel, *Arundel, Sussex 1306, +Arundel Castle 24.1.1375, bur Lewes Priory, Sussex; 1m: 9.2.1321 (div 1344) Isabel Le Despencer, dau.of Hugh, Baron Le Despencer by Lady Alianore de Clare; 2m: Ditton 5.2.1345 Eleanor of Lancaster (*1318, +11.1.1372.)20" The marriage of Isabel le Despenser Countess of Arundel and Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne was annulled on 4 December 1344.21,14,4,22,16,8,9 Isabel le Despenser Countess of Arundel was living between 1351 and 1352.4

Family

Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne b. c 1314, d. 24 Jan 1375/76
Child

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Despencer - Barons Despencer, Earl of Gloucester, pp. 166-7. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Despenser 7: p. 267. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Despenser 7.ii: p. 268.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 10: pp. 317-318.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel le Despenser: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108700&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugh le Despenser: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027818&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel le Despenser: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108700&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#IsabelDespencerMRichardFitzAlanArundel. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Clare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027819&tree=LEO
  11. [S1502] Brad Verity, "Verity email "Descendants of Eleanor de Clare, lady of Tewkesbury & Glamorgan"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 20 October 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Verity email 2-20 October 2003."
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 8-31, p. 11. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Falmouth Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arundel 1 page (The House of Arundel): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel1.html
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard 'Copped Hat' FitzAlan: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015391&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL1.htm#RichardArundeldied1376B
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 May 2020), memorial page for Isabella le Despenser FitzAlan (1312–1356), Find a Grave Memorial no. 62397103, citing Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Tewkesbury Borough, Gloucestershire, England ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62397103/isabella-fitzalan. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S753] Jr. Aileen Lewers Langston and J. Orton Buck, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. II (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974 (1996 reprint)), p. 27. Hereinafter cited as Langston & Buck [1974] - Charlemagne Desc. vol II.
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabel_le_Despenser,_Countess_of_Arundel. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Arundel: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel1.html
  21. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 73-74. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015391&tree=LEO
  23. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, CERGEAUX 9, p. 74.
  24. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Sergeaux 11: p. 646.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Edmund Fitzalan (de Arundell): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00315543&tree=LEO
  26. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), line 28-34, p. 36. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.

Sir Hugh "the Younger" le Despenser Knt., 1st Lord le Despenser, of Hanley Castle, Worcestershire1,2

M, #4413, b. circa 1287, d. 24 November 1326
FatherHugh "the Elder" le Despenser Knt., Lord le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester2,3 b. bt 1 Mar 1260 - 1261, d. 27 Oct 1326
MotherIsabel de Beauchamp4,2,3 b. c 1260, d. b 30 May 1306
ReferenceGAV22 EDV18
Last Edited24 May 2020
     Sir Hugh "the Younger" le Despenser Knt., 1st Lord le Despenser, of Hanley Castle, Worcestershire was buried at Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Tewkesbury Borough, Gloucestershire, England.

He was born circa 1287.5 He married Lady Eleanor (Alionore) de Clare, daughter of Sir Gilbert de Red de Clare Knt., 6th Earl of Hertford & Gloucester and Joan of Acre (?) Princess of England, Countess of Gloucester and Hertford, after 14 June 1306 at Westminster, London, City of London, Greater London, England; her 1st husband
Ravilious cites:
4. G. E. Cokayne, "The Complete Peerage," 1910 - [microprint, 1982 (Alan Sutton) ], The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom.6,5,2,7
Sir Hugh "the Younger" le Despenser Knt., 1st Lord le Despenser, of Hanley Castle, Worcestershire died on 24 November 1326 at Herefordshire, England; convicted as a traitor and hanged.8,9,5,2,3
     ; HUGH le DESPENSER ('THE YOUNGER DESPENSER'), 1st Lord (Baron) le Despenser of the 29 July 1314 cr, KB; associated with his f in the period of ascendancy over EDWARD II in the early 1320s but reckoned more deserving than his f of the hatred of the generality of the baronial class; m 1306 Lady Eleanor de Clare (m 2nd 1st Lord (Baron) Zouche (of Richard's Castle, Mortimer or Ashby) see ZOUCHE, B) and d 30 June 1337), dau of 6th Earl of Gloucester and Hertford by his 2nd w Joan (dau of EDWARD I); convicted as a traitor and hanged 29 Nov 1326, when all his honours were forfeited.9 He was 1st Lord (Baron) le Despenser of the 29 July 1314 cr.1

; A quick revision of the children of Hugh le Despenser the Younger and Eleanor de Clare, with 4 sons and 5 daus:

1) Hugh le Despenser, lord of Glamorgan, b. abt. 1308/9, dsp 8 Feb. 1349

2) Sir Edward le Despenser, b. before 1315, d. 30 Sep. 1342. Had 4 sons:
A)Edward le Despenser, lord of Glamorgan, b. 24 Mar. 1336, d. 11 Nov. 1375.
B)Sir Thomas le Despenser, of Essenden, Rutland, b. 1337/8, dsp. Feb. 1381.
C)Sir Hugh le Despenser, of Solihull, Warwick, b. 1339/40, d. at Padua, Italy March 1374; m. (contract 24 Feb. 1352), Alice, daughter of John de Hothum, of Kilkenny Castle, Ireland, son of Sir Peter de Hothum. She m. 2nd, Sir John Trussell, and d. 6 Oct. 1379. They had 1 son & 1 dau.
D)Henry le Despenser, Bishop of Norwich, b. 1341/2, dunm. 23 Aug. 1406.

3) John le Despenser, alive in 1351, may have died June 1366.

4) Sir Gilbert le Despenser, b. before July 1321, m. before 1360, Ella, sister and co-heiress of John de Calverley, of Calverley, co. Norfolk. She was dead before Dec. 1361 (when her brother died). Sir Gilbert died 23 April 1381. Had 1 son:
A) John le Despenser, b. 1360/1, d. a minor 16 Aug. 1375

1) Isabel le Despenser, b. about 1312, d. after 1351/2, m. 9 Feb. 1321 (annulled Dec. 1344), Richard Fitzalan, Earl of Arundel. They had 1 son.

2) Joan le Despenser, dispensation in 1323 to marry John, son & heir of Thomas, Earl of Kildare; became a nun at Shaftesbury Abbey, Dorset, d. 15 Nov. 1384.

3) Eleanor le Despenser, contracted to marry in 1325, Laurence Hastings, one of the heirs of the Earl of Pembroke; became a nun at Semplingham Priory, Lincoln 1327; d. after 1360.

4) Margaret le Despenser, became a nun at Watton Priory 1327, d. 1337.

5) Elizabeth le Despenser, b. about 1325/6, contracted in Aug. 1338 to marry Maurice, Lord Berkeley; d. 13 July 1389. They had 4 sons and 3 daus.
-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
Nichol wrote on 12-31-2002 in the thread 'Children of HUGH DESPENCER d
24 Nov 1326 and ELEANOR (ALAINOR) (DE) CLARE':

"Here Ms. Underhill includes a footnote that reads "The problem with
this last entry, dated October 6, 1338, is that it refers to Joan and
Eleanor, daughters of 'Hugh Despenser the elder'. Hugh Despenser III
had been rehabilitated by 1338, so perhaps the 'elder' refers to his
father, not his grandfather, who was designated 'the elder' in the
1320s.""

There seems to have been confusion on the part of the Chancery clerks
as to which daughters of Hugh the Younger were sent to which
nunneries. Eleanor was ordered to Semplingham Priory in Lincoln, a
Gilbertine convent, while her younger sister Margaret was sent to
Watton, a sister-priory of Semplingham.

Underhill has Joan le Despenser dead in 1351, probably due to the
Chancery entry:

>From Close Rolls: "15 Feb. 1351, Westminster. To the sheriff of
Lincoln for the present or the future. Order to pay to Eleanor,
daughter of Hugh le Despenser the elder, what is in arrear to her of
20l. yearly of the issues of the county of Lincoln, and to pay her
that sum yearly henceforth for her life, notwithstanding that Joan her
sister is dead, as on 26 June in the 11th year of the reign the king
granted to Eleanor and to Joan, Hugh's daughters, nuns of the house of
Sempyngham, 20l. to be received yearly for their lives of the said
issues, in aid of their maintenance and clothing in recompense for
20l. which they used to receive yearly of the manor of Loughteburgh.
By K. and pet. of parliament, on the information of John de Wynwyk.
Et erat patens."

The problem is Joan was not dead in Feb. 1351 - she did not die until
15 November 1384, and she was a nun at Shaftesbury Abbey, a
Benedictine (not Gilbertine) convent in Dorset (not Lincoln).

So what probably happened is the Chancery mixed up the sisters' names,
substituting 'Joan' for 'Margaret'. As Margaret died in 1337/8,
according to Underhill, this would explain the discrepancy.

I wrote, on 5-26-2003:

"Since Sir Gilbert le Despenser's 1381 IPM has his great-nephew Thomas
le Despenser as his next closest heir, Gilbert's son John must have
died before his father. He may be the John le Despenser who died
shortly before 10 June 1366, when a writ was issued to the escheator
of Southampton to take his lands into the king's hand."

Actually, there is a Norfolk IPM for Gilbert's son John le Despenser.
John died on "Thursday after the Assumption last [16 August 1375],
being a minor aged 14 years."

"As for the list of Eleanor's Despenser children, T.B. Pugh overlooked
the daughters Margaret and Elizabeth, and added an additional son,
John le Despenser. As he didn't cite a specific source for this list
of Despensers, I'm not sure what to think of third son John le
Despenser, who is not mentioned at all by historian Natalie Fryde in
"The Tyranny and Fall of Edward II" or historian Frances Underhill in
"For Her Good Estate: The Life of Elizabeth de Burgh, Lady of Clare".
Perhaps Sir Gilbert le Despenser's son John became mistaken somehow as
a son of Hugh Despenser the Younger."

Actually, it turns out that historian T.B. Pugh was correct - Hugh the
Younger did have a son, John le Despenser, as the following Chancery
Roll entry shows:

>From Close Rolls: "9 Sept. 1351, Westminster. To Saier de Rocheford,
escheator in the county of Lincoln. Order to deliver to John le
Despenser, brother of Hugh le Despenser, a messuage, 8 carucates of
land and 20s. rent in Carleton in the Moreland, as the king has
learned by inquisition taken by the escheator that Richard Blundel at
his death held the premises for life of Hugh's grant, with remainder
for John for his life, and that the said messuage, land and rent are
held in chief as of the honour of Albemarle, in the king's hand, by
fealty, and the king has taken John's fealty for the messuage, land
and rent."

It may be this John le Despenser who died in June 1366.10 GAV-22 EDV-18 GKJ-19.

; MCS4 14-6 Sir Hugh le Despenser hanged and quartered 24 Nv. 1326 Lord Despenser
m. 1306 after 14 Jun Alianore de Clare.
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-.-.-.
Faris (1999) pp. 83-84: [quote] ALIANOR DE CLARE, was born at Caerphilly Castle in October 1292 and was sister and co-heiress to Gilbert de Clare. She was married at Westminster in 1306, after 14 June, to HUGH LE DESPENSER, Knt., 2nd Lord Despenser, son and heir of Hugh le Despenser, Km., of Loughborough, co. Leicester, etc. (descendant of Charlemagne), by Isabel (of Magna Carta Surety descent), daughter of William de Beauchamp, of Elmley, co. Worcester, 9th Earl of Warwick (descendant of Charlemagne). He was summoned to Parliament from 29 July 1314 by writs directed Hugoni le Despenser juniori. He was disinherited and exiled on 19 Aug. 1321. He took refuge in the Cinque Ports, and, engaging in piracy, with the King's connivance, did considerable damage. After the battle of Boroughbridge, he received large grants of the lands forfeited by the rebels. He accompanied the King in his flight to Wales in October 1326, and with the King, was captured near Llantrisant, co. Glamorgan, on 16 Nov. 1326. HUGH LE DESPENSER, Lord Le Despenser, was taken to Hereford, tried, without being allowed to speak in his own defence, condemned to death as a traitor, and hanged on 24 Nov. 1326, buried some years afterwards at Tewkesbury Abbey. His widow was married for the second time, as his second wife, about January 1328/9 to WILLIAM LA ZOUCHE DE MORTIMER, Knt., who had abducted her from Hanley Castle. He died 28 Feb. 1336/7. ALIANOR DE CLARE died on 30 June 1337.
C.P. 1:243 (1910). C.P. 4:267-271 (1916). TAG 69:138 (July 1994).
Children of Hugh le Despenser, by Alianor de Clare:
i.     EDWARD LE DESPENSER [see next].
ii.     ISABEL LE DESPENSER, married RICHARD FITZ ALAN [see CERGEAUX 1O].
iii.     ELIZABETH LE DESPENSER, married MAURICE DE BERKELEY [see BERKELEY 9]. [end quote]11,12,13

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Norfolk Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Despenser 7: p. 267. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Hugh le Despenser: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027818&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2035] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 1 Feb 2006: "The Kinsmen of Sir Hugh de Hastings (d. 1347) and the Elsing Brass"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 1 Feb 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 1 Feb 2006."
  5. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  6. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 83. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Montagu 6.ii: p. 506.
  8. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 84.
  9. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Falmouth Family Page.
  10. [S1502] Brad Verity, "Verity email "Descendants of Eleanor de Clare, lady of Tewkesbury & Glamorgan"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 20 October 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Verity email 2-20 October 2003."
  11. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  12. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 74-332, p. 74. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  14. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Despencer - Barons Despencer, Earl of Gloucester, pp. 166-7. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  15. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 10: pp. 317-318.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel le Despenser: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108700&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#IsabelDespencerMRichardFitzAlanArundel. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  18. [S1720] David Utz, "Utz email #2 29 May 2005 "Aline de Gai's descents to Robert Abell"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 May 2005, 6 [19] Edward le Despenser d: 30 September 1342 in Morlaix
    .... +[18] Anne de Ferrers m: 20 April 1335 in Groby, LEI, ENG d: 08 August 1367. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email #2 29 May 2005."
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Edward le Despenser: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00113940&tree=LEO
  20. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's Dromant, Abeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 44.
  21. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Berkeley 9: p. 99.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth le Despenser: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027821&tree=LEO

John le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere1,2,3,4

M, #4414, b. circa 19 April 1332, d. 12 May 1361
FatherJohn le Strange 2nd Baron Strange of Blackmere1,2,5,4 b. c 1306, d. 21 Jul 1349
MotherAnkaret Boteler6,1,2,7,8,4 d. 8 Oct 1361
ReferenceGKJ19
Last Edited12 Oct 2008
     John le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere was born circa 19 April 1332 at Whitchurch, Shropshire, England.9,10,1,2,4,3 He married Lady Mary (Isabel) Fitz Alan de Arundel, daughter of Sir Edmund de Arundel Knt., 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, before 1353.1,2,4,3,11,12
John le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere died on 12 May 1361.13,1,2,4,3
     GKJ-19.

; JOHN LESTRANGE, 1st LORD (Baron) STRANGE or LESTRANGE of a new cr by writ of summons 3 April 1360, JP (Salop 1360); b 1332; m Lady Mary FitzAlan (d 29 Aug 1396), dau of 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel (see NORFOLK, D), and d 12 May 1361.1

; van de pas cites: 1.A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 516
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: Q 99361 106522.4

; Faris (1999, pp. 73-74): "MARY FITZ ALAN, died 29 Aug. 1363; married JOHN LE STRANGE, 4th Lord Strange, born at Whitchurch about Easter 1332, summoned to Parliament 3 Apr. 1360 by writ directed Johanni Lestraunge, died 12 May 1361. C.P. 12(1):344-345. Paget (1957) 509:3."13 He was 1st LORD (Baron) STRANGE or LESTRANGE of a new cr by writ of summons 3 April 1360 on 3 April 1360.1

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Saint Davids Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arundel 1 page (The House of Arundel): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel1.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Blackmere 9: p. 110. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Le Strange: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140341&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Le Strange: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00327676&tree=LEO
  6. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 234, le STRANG 6:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ankaret Le Botiler: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00327677&tree=LEO
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Blackmere 8: p. 109.
  9. [S1799] David Utz, "Utz email #2 20 Aug 2005 "Descents from Rohese of Boulogne to Robert Abell"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 20 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email #2 20 Aug 2005."
  10. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 73-74. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026724&tree=LEO
  12. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 9.v: p. 317.
  13. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).

Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne1,2

M, #4415, b. circa 1314, d. 24 January 1375/76
FatherSir Edmund de Arundel Knt., 9th Earl of Arundel3,4,5,6,7,8 b. 1 May 1285, d. 17 Nov 1326
MotherAlice de Warenne3,4,5,9,7,8 b. bt 1285 - 1287, d. b 23 May 1338
ReferenceGAV17 EDV17
Last Edited16 Nov 2020
     Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne was born circa 1314 at Arundel, co. Sussex, England; Genealogics says b. ca 1307; Richardson says "aged 7 in 1321" (i.e., ca 1314); Burke's says b. ca 1314; Genealogy.EU says b. 1306; Med Lands says b. 1313.4,7,2,10,8 He married Isabel le Despenser Countess of Arundel, daughter of Sir Hugh "the Younger" le Despenser Knt., 1st Lord le Despenser, of Hanley Castle, Worcestershire and Lady Eleanor (Alionore) de Clare, on 9 February 1320/21 at Havering-Atte-Bower, England;
His 1st wife.11,12,4,1,2,7,8,13,14 Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne married Alianor (Eleanor) Plantagenet of Lancaster, Countess of Arundel, daughter of Sir Henry (?) Knt., 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maude de Chaworth, on 5 February 1344/45 at Ditton Church, Stokes Poge, Buckinghamshire, England;
Her 2nd husband; his 2nd wife.15,4,2,16,17,7,8
Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne was buried after 24 January 1376 at Chichester Cathedral, Chichester, Chichester District, West Sussex, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1306, England
     DEATH     24 Jan 1376 (aged 69–70), Arundel, Arun District, West Sussex, England
     10th Earl of Arundel, of the castle and honor of Arundel. Earl of Surrey. Baron of Oswestry, Shropshire. Constable of Chirk, Portchester and Caernarvon Castles, Justiciar of North Wales, Sheriff of Shropshire, Admiral of the West, Constable of the Army. Knight of the Garter. Nicknamed "Copped Hat."
     Richard has a cenotaph at Lewes Priory, memorial #109796154.
     Son and heir to Sir Edmund de Arundel FitzAlan and Alice de Warrene. Grandson of Sir William de Warrene and Joan de Vere, Sir Richard Fitzalan and Alice, daughter of Tommaso I, Marquis of Saluzzo.
     Husband of Isabel le Despenser, the daughter of Hugh le Despenser "the younger" executed in 1326, and Eleanor de Clare, the daughter of the Earl of Gloucester and Hertford. They were married in the King's Chapel at Havering-atte-Bower, Essex on 09 Feb 1321. They had one son, Sir Edmund, who married Sibyl Montacute. After they were married, her father settled on them, and their heirs, the manors of Keevil, Wiltshire and Wing and Blakewell, Buckinghamshire. The marriage was advantageous in that he allied himself with Edward II's favorites, but Richard had the marriage annulled and his son bastardized on the grounds that he was underage at the time of the marriage and never agreed to the marriage. The marriage was happily annulled by Pope Clement VI in December of 1344, especially since Richard had been living with Eleanor, his second wife. Historian theorize that after Isabel's father was executed, she was suddenly destitute and had no family estate, Richard simply wished to be rid of her.
     Secondly, he became the husband of Eleanor Plantagenet of Lancaster, the daughter of Henry Plantagenet, the Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth, and the widow of Sir John de Beaumont who died 14 April 1342. They were married in the presence of King Edward III at Ditton in Stoke Pogis, Buckinghamshire on 05 Feb 1345 by Papal dispensation as they were related in the 3rd and 4th degrees of kindred. Richard and Eleanor had three sons and two daughters:
1. Sir Richard, 11th Earl of Arundel
2. Sir John, Lord Arundel
3. Thomas, Archbishop of Canterbury
4. Joan Arundel, wife of Sir Humphrey de Bohun
5. Alice Arundel, wife of Sir Thomas de Holand
     Richard also had an illegitimate daughter, Eleanor, who married John de Bereford.
     Richard's father, Edmund, was executed by Queen Isabel and her minion, Richard de Mortimer, resulting in the forfeiture of his lands and honors. In 1331, Richard was fully restored to his legacy, obtained the Castle and honors of Arundel, thusly becoming Lord Arundel. Heir to his uncle, Sir John de Warenne, he inherited vast estates including those in Surrey, and Norfolk. He also regained family estates in Sussex and the Welsh Marches as one of Edward, the Black Prince's most trusted advisers. In 1359, he loaned the Prince £2000, receiving as security the gold crown and star of the French King. Richard also loaned Edward III large sums of money. When his uncle's wife, Joan of Bar died in 1361, Richard became the Earl of Surrey.
     Sir Richard distinguished himself in the French and Scottish wars, fought at the Battle of Sluys, then Tournai, became Warden o the Scottish Marches, and appointed Lieutenant of Aquitaine in 1340. Sir Richard was one of the principal English commanders in the second division at the Battle of Crecy in 1346.
     Richard FitzAlan of Arundel became one of the most powerful of the lords of the northern March, who had 1900 pounds in his coffers at Holt and Clun. In an era where a magnificent tomb of marble cost £8, this was an enormous sum.
     Despite his high offices in Wales, in the following decades Arundel spent much of his time fighting in Scotland (during the Second Wars of Scottish Independence) and France (during the Hundred Years' War). In 1337, Arundel was made joint commander of the English army in the north, and the next year he was made the sole commander. He fought in the fall of Calais in 1347.
     Richard died at Arundel Castle and was buried at Lewes Priory in Lewes, Sussex, England. In his will Richard requested to be buried "near to the tomb of Eleanor de Lancaster, my wife; and I desire that my tomb be no higher than hers, that no men at arms, horses, hearse, or other pomp, be used at my funeral, but only five torches...as was about the corpse of my wife, be allowed."
     Despite all records indicating Richard and Eleanor were buried at Lewes Priory, there is a tomb for them at Chicester Cathedral as well. Richard's death is recorded as 24 January 1376 in Sussex, England. One more source says he wrote his will on 5 December 1375, and died on 14 January 1376 at Arundel Castle.
     This burial per the memorial's originator.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Edmund Fitzalan 1285–1326
          Alice De Warenne Fitzalan 1287–1338
     Spouses
          Isabella le Despenser FitzAlan 1312–1356 (m. 1321)
          Eleanor Plantagenet FitzAlan of Arundel 1318–1372 (m. 1345)
          Eleanor Plantagenet FitzAlan de Arundel 1318–1372
     Siblings
          Elizabeth de Arundel Latimer unknown–1384
          Aline FitzAlan L'Estrange unknown–1386
     Children
          Mary FitzAlan L'Estrange unknown–1396
          Edmund d'Arundel 1327–1377
          Richard FitzAlan 1346–1397
          Joan FitzAlan de Bohun 1347–1419
          John Arundel FitzAlan 1348–1379
          Alice FitzAlan Holland 1350–1415
          Thomas Arundel 1353–1414
     BURIAL     Chichester Cathedral, Chichester, Chichester District, West Sussex, England
     Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Originally Created by: G. N.
     Added: 29 Aug 2002
     Find a Grave Memorial 6732730
     SPONSORED BY Matt Pryber.18
Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne was buried after 24 January 1376 at Lewes Priory, Lewes, Lewes District, East Sussex, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1306, England
     DEATH     24 Jan 1376 (aged 69–70), England
     Cenotaph for Richard FitzAlan de Arundel, 10th Earl of Arundel and Earl of Surrey, son of Sir Edmund FitzAlan of Arundel and Alice de Warrene.
     Husband of Isabel le Despenser, daughter of Hugh le Despenser "the younger" executed in 1326, and Eleanor de Clare. Father of Edmund le Despenser.
     Secondly, husband of Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of Henry Plantagenet, the Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth.
     Records state Richard and Eleanor were buried at Lewes Priory, and there is a tomb at Chichester Cathedral; it would appear that Richard and Eleanor were moved. Lewes Priory is now ruins.
     Please see his burial at Chichester Cathedral for a more extensive bio.
     Burial per Richardson's Magna Carta page 62
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Eleanor Plantagenet FitzAlan of Arundel 1318–1372 (m. 1345)
     BURIAL     Lewes Priory, Lewes, Lewes District, East Sussex, England
     CENOTAPH     Lewes Priory, Lewes, Lewes District, East Sussex, England
     Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Added: 1 May 2013
     Find a Grave Memorial 109796154
     SPONSORED BY Matt Pryber.8,19
Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne died on 24 January 1375/76 at Arundel Castle, Arundel, co. Sussex, England; died testate.20,4,2,7,8
     ; Per Burke's: "RICHARD Fitz ALAN, 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel, as which restored 1331 (confirmation 1351 and 1354), getting Arundel Castle back also Dec 1330-31 from the widow of Edmund Earl of Kent (see above); after death of his maternal uncle 8th Earl of Surrey's widow 31 Aug 1361 assumed additional title of (9th) EARL OF SURREY; known as 'Copped Hat'; b c 1313; Justiciar N Wales for life 1334, Govr Carnarvon Castle 1339, Sheriff Salop for life 1345; Adml of the West 1340-41 and 1345-47; cmded 2nd division at Crécy 1346 and assisted at taking of Calais 1347; m 1st 9 Feb 1320/1 (annulled 4 Dec 1344) Isabel, dau of 1st Lord (Baron) le Despenser of the 29 July 1314 cr (see FALMOUTH, V), and had issue (bastardised by the papal annulment of 1344). The 10th/3rd Earl m 2nd 5 Feb 1344/5 his mistress Eleanor, dau of 3rd Earl of Lancaster (ggs of HENRY III) of the 1267 investiture (by his 1st w Maud de Chaworth) and widow of 2nd Lord (Baron) Beaumont (see BEAUMONT, Bt), and d 24 Jan 1375/6."10

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: page 195
2. The Ancestry of Elizabeth of York, 1999 , Lewis, Marlyn, Reference: 78
3. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 , Reference: page 197
4. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 201 ; first marriage pl Adrian Channing.
5. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. 1:242-4.
6. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.7


; Per Genealogics:
     "Richard Fitzalan, earl of Arundel, was the eldest son of Edmund Fitzalan, earl of Arundel, and Alice de Warren. His maternal grandparents were William de Warren and Joane de Vere. William was the only son of John de Warren, earl of Warren and Surrey.
     "Richard's birth date is uncertain, but could not have been before 1307. Around 1321 his father allied with King Edward II's favourites, Hugh le Despenser, 1st earl of Winchester and his namesake son. In that year Richard was married to Isabel le Despenser, daughter of Hugh the Younger. About 1327 they had a son Edmund Fitzalan who would have progeny.
     "Fortune turned against the Despenser party, and in 1326 Richard's father was executed, and Richard did not succeed to his father's estates or titles. However, political conditions had changed by 1330, and over the next few years Richard was gradually able to reacquire the earldom of Arundel as well as the great estates his father had held in Sussex and in the Welsh Marches. Beyond this, in 1334 he was made justice of North Wales (later his term in this office was made for life), sheriff for life of Caernarvonshire, and governor of Caernarvon Castle.
     "Despite his high offices in Wales, in the following decades Richard spent much of his time fighting in Scotland (during the Second Wars of Scottish Independence) and France (during the Hundred Years War). In 1337 Richard was made joint commander of the English army in the north, and the next year he was made the sole commander.
     "In 1340 he fought at the Battle of Sluys, and then at the siege of Tournai. After a short term as warden of the Scottish Marches, he returned to the continent, where he fought in a number of campaigns, and was appointed joint lieutenant of Aquitaine in 1340.
     "Richard repudiated his wife Isabel le Despenser, and had the marriage annulled on the grounds that he had never freely consented to it. His son Edmund Fitzalan was rendered illegitimate by the annulment. Edmund married Sibyl de Montagu, a daughter of William de Montagu, 1st earl of Salisbury, 3rd lord Montagu.
     "After the annulment of Richard's first marriage, on 5 February 1345 he married Eleanor of Lancaster, daughter of Henry, 3rd earl of Lancaster and Leicester, and Maud de Chaworth. Eleanor's grandfather was Edmund 'Crouchback', earl of Lancaster, earl of Leicester, brother of King Edward I. Richard and Eleanor had five children, of whom four, their sons Richard and John, and daughters Joan and Alice, would have progeny. A third son Thomas became archbishop of Canterbury, archbishop of York and lord chancellor of England. Richard succeeded his father as earl; and John, who was marshal of England, drowned in 1379. Joan married Humphrey de Bohun, 7th earl of Hereford, and Alice married Thomas Holand, 2nd earl of Kent.
     "Richard the Elder was one of the three principal English commanders at the Battle of Crécy in 1346. He spent much of the following years on various military campaigns and diplomatic missions. On the death of John de Warren, 8th earl of Surrey and Warren in 1347, Richard succeeded to the earldom of Surrey and Warren, which even further increased his great wealth. He did not however use the additional title until after the death of Jeanne de Bar, the dowager countess of Surrey in 1361. He made very large loans to King Edward III, but on his death on 24 January 1375 he still left behind a great sum in hard cash."7 GAV-17 EDV-17 GKJ-18.

; Per Med Lands:
     "RICHARD FitzAlan, son of EDMUND FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Alice de Warenne ([1313]-Arundel 24 Jan 1376, bur Lewes Priory, Sussex). His father's assets having been forfeited following his execution in 1326 (for supporting King Edward II against the Queen and Mortimer), Richard FitzAlan's inheritance was restored in 1330 and he succeeded as Earl of Arundel, known as "Copped Hat". He succeeded in 1347 to the estates of the Warenne family, on the death of his uncle John de Warenne Earl of Surrey, although he only assumed the title Earl of Surrey after the death of the deceased Earl's widow Joan in 1361[113]. The will of "Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey", dated 5 Dec 1375, chose burial “in...the priory of Lewes near to the tomb of Eleanor of Lancaster my wife” and bequeathed property to “Richard my son...my son Thomas Bishop of Ely...John my son...Joane my daughter [...Countess of Hereford]...Alice my daughter...the eldest daughter of my said son John...Henry and Edward the younger sons of my said son John...William another son of my said son John...my nephews and nieces sons and daughters of Roger le Strange and to my sister Dame Alaine le Strange wife to the said Roger...my...uncle John Arundell”[114]. The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death “1375 IX Kal Feb” of “Ricardus comes Arundell”[115].
     "m firstly (1321, annulled 1344) ISABEL Le Despencer, daughter of HUGH Le Despencer the younger, Lord Le Despencer & his wife Eleanor de Clare of Gloucester ([1312]-). The Chronicle of Lanercost records that "comes Arundeliæ" married "filiam domini Hugonis, junioris"[116].
     "m secondly (Ditton Church, Stoke Poges, Bucks 5 Feb 1345, Papal dispensation 4 Mar 1345) as her second husband, ELEANOR of Lancaster, widow of JOHN de Beaumont Lord Beaumont, daughter of HENRY Earl of Lancaster & his wife Matilda Chaworth ([1318]-Arundel Castle, Sussex 11 Jan 1372, bur Lewes Priory, Sussex). While her first husband was still alive, and before Earl Richard's annulment of his first marriage, she lived with her future second husband. The will of "Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey", dated 5 Dec 1375, chose burial “in...the priory of Lewes near to the tomb of Eleanor of Lancaster my wife”[117].
     "Earl Richard & his first wife had two children (bastardised in 1344 on the annulment of their parents’ marriage[118]).
     "Earl Richard & his second wife had eight children."
Med Lands cites:
[113] CP I 243.
[114] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 94.
[115] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, p. 141.
[116] Lanercost Chronicle, 1326, p. 256.
[117] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 94.
[118] CP I 243 footnote d.
[119] CP I 244 footnote b.8
Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne was also known as Richard Fitz Alan 5th Earl of Arundel.21

; This is the same person as Richard Fitzalan, 3rd Earl of Arundel at Wikipedia.22 Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne was also known as Richard (Copped Hat) Fitz Alan 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne.10,3,4,2,23

; Per Genealogy.EU: "D1. Richard FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel, *Arundel, Sussex 1306, +Arundel Castle 24.1.1375, bur Lewes Priory, Sussex; 1m: 9.2.1321 (div 1344) Isabel Le Despencer, dau.of Hugh, Baron Le Despencer by Lady Alianore de Clare; 2m: Ditton 5.2.1345 Eleanor of Lancaster (*1318, +11.1.1372.)24"
; Per Genealogy.EU: "E6. [1m.] Eleanor, *Grismond Castle 1311/18, +Arundel Castle 11.1.1372, bur Lewes Priory, Sussex; 1m: before 23.8.1337/II.1337 John, Lord Beaumont (*1318 +V.1342); 2m: Ditton 5.2.1345 Richard Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel (*1313 +24.1.1375.)25" He was Earl of Arundel between 1331 and 1376.22 The marriage of Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne and Isabel le Despenser Countess of Arundel was annulled on 4 December 1344.26,4,2,23,8,13,14 Richard 'Copped Hat' de Arundel 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel & Warenne was 9th Earl of Surrey between 1347 and 1376.27,22

Family 1

Isabel le Despenser Countess of Arundel b. c 1312, d. a 1356
Child

Family 2

Alianor (Eleanor) Plantagenet of Lancaster, Countess of Arundel b. 1318, d. 11 Jan 1372
Children

Citations

  1. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Despenser 7.ii: p. 268. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 10: pp. 317-318.
  3. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Fitz-Alan - Earls of Arundel, Baron Maltravers, p. 200. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arundel 1 page (The House of Arundel): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel1.html
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 9: pp. 316-317.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edmund Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015389&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard 'Copped Hat' FitzAlan: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015391&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL1.htm#RichardArundeldied1376B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015390&tree=LEO
  10. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Norfolk Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 8-31, p. 11. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Falmouth Family Page.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel le Despenser: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108700&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#IsabelDespencerMRichardFitzAlanArundel
  15. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 35, 143. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor|Alianor [Plantagenet], of Lancaster: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005202&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Eleanordied1372.
  18. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 May 2020), memorial page for Richard FitzAlan de Arundel (1306–24 Jan 1376), Find a Grave Memorial no. 6732730, citing Chichester Cathedral, Chichester, Chichester District, West Sussex, England ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6732730/richard-fitzalan_de_arundel. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  19. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 May 2020), memorial page for Richard Arundel FitzAlan (1306–24 Jan 1376), Find a Grave Memorial no. 109796154, citing Lewes Priory, Lewes, Lewes District, East Sussex, England ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/109796154/richard-arundel_fitzalan
  20. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 143-144.
  21. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 288.
  22. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Fitzalan,_3rd_Earl_of_Arundel. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015391&tree=LEO
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, The House of Arundel: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel1.html
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  26. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, pp. 73-74.
  27. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 60-32, pp. 65-66.
  28. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, CERGEAUX 9, p. 74.
  29. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arundel 1 page (The House of Arundel): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel1.html
  30. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Sergeaux 11: p. 646.
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Edmund Fitzalan (de Arundell): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00315543&tree=LEO
  32. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), line 28-34, p. 36. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  33. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Fitz-Alan - Earls of Arundel, Baron Maltravers, p. 201.
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026620&tree=LEO
  35. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p. 41.
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Arundel: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026715&tree=LEO
  37. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  38. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Wake Family Page.
  39. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Alice Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026707&tree=LEO
  40. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Kent 8: p. 420.
  41. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 September 2019), memorial page for Archbishop Thomas Arundel (1353–20 Feb 1414), Find A Grave Memorial no. 16992293, citing Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, City of Canterbury, Kent, England ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/16992293/thomas-arundel

Lady Eleanor (Alionore) de Clare1,2,3

F, #4416, b. October 1292, d. 30 June 1337
FatherSir Gilbert de Red de Clare Knt., 6th Earl of Hertford & Gloucester b. 2 Sep 1243, d. 7 Dec 1295; per Richardson "eldest daughter"4,2,1,5
MotherJoan of Acre (?) Princess of England, Countess of Gloucester and Hertford4,1,2,6,5 b. 1272, d. 7 Apr 1307
ReferenceGAV22 EDV18
Last Edited24 May 2020
     Lady Eleanor (Alionore) de Clare was born in October 1292 at Caerphilly Castle, Glamorgan, England.7,4,2 She married Sir Hugh "the Younger" le Despenser Knt., 1st Lord le Despenser, of Hanley Castle, Worcestershire, son of Hugh "the Elder" le Despenser Knt., Lord le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester and Isabel de Beauchamp, after 14 June 1306 at Westminster, London, City of London, Greater London, England; her 1st husband
Ravilious cites:
4. G. E. Cokayne, "The Complete Peerage," 1910 - [microprint, 1982 (Alan Sutton) ], The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom.8,4,2,3 Lady Eleanor (Alionore) de Clare married William La Zouche of Mortimer, 1st Lord Zouche, son of Robert de Mortimer and Joyce de la Zouche, circa January 1328/29; her 2nd husband.9,7,4,2
Lady Eleanor (Alionore) de Clare died on 30 June 1337 at age 44; died testate; Ravilious cites:
3. David Faris, "Plantagenet Ancestry of 17th Century Colonists," Baltimore: the Genealogical Pub. Company, 1st ed.7,4,2
     ; weis 8-30.10 GAV-22 EDV-18 GKJ-19.

; Eleanor de Clare*
----------------------------------------
Birth: Oct 1292, Caerphilly Castle[3]
Death: 30 Jun 1337[3]

eldest daughter and coheiress of her brother

her maritagium was a gift of £2,000 made by her grandfather, King
Edward I

her inheritance included 'nearly the whole of Glamorgan and the principal part of Gloucestershire (including the advowson of Tewkesbury Abbey).' [CP, Vol. V - Gloucester, p. 715n][4]

The manor of Great Marlow, co. Bucks. was also part of her inheritance: the fair at Great Marlow, identified in the IPM of Joan of Acre, '... 1307, amongst the property of the recently deceased Joan, wife of Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester and Hertford (CIPM, iv, p. 316)' was held by Eleanor's husband: ' On 10 Jun 1325, K Edw II granted an extension of the fair to Wed+2 Whit week to Hugh le Despenser, the younger (CChR, 1300–26, p. 477).'[5]

she m. lstly Hugh le Despenser,
2ndly William la Zouche Mortimer

Spouse: Hugh le Despenser
Death: 24 Nov 1326, Hereford (executed)[4]
Birth: ca 1287
Father: Sir Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester (1260-1326)
Mother: Isabel de Beauchamp (-<1306)
Marr: aft 14 Jun 1306[4]

Children: Hugh (<1309-<1357)
Sir Edward (-1342)
Isabel (ca1312-)
Gilbert (<1321-1381)
Eleanor
Joan
Margaret
Elizabeth (-1389)

Ravilious cites:
3. David Faris, "Plantagenet Ancestry of 17th Century Colonists," Baltimore: the Genealogical Pub. Company, 1st ed.
4. G. E. Cokayne, "The Complete Peerage," 1910 - [microprint, 1982 (Alan Sutton) ], The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom.
5. "Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs to 1516," www.histparl.ac.uk/cmh/gaz/.4

; PA1 Clare 11 Alianor de Clare was sister and coheiress of Gilbert de Clare. She
was married at Westminster in 1306, after 14 June to Hugh le Despenser Knight
2nd Lord Despenser, son and heir of Hugh le Despenser, Knight of Loughborough,
Co. Leicester, etc by Isabel daughter of William de Beauchamp of Elmley, co.
Worcester, 9th Earl of Warwick. He was summoned to Parliament from 29 July 1314
by writes directed Hugoni le Despenser Juniori. he was disinherited and exiled
on 19 Aug. 1321. He took refuge in the Cinque Ports, and engaging in piracy,
with the King's connivance, did considerable damage. After the battle of
Boroughbridge, he recieved large grants of the lands forfeited by the rebels.
He accompanied the King in his flight to Wales in Oct. 1326, and with the King
was captured near Llantrisant, co. Glamborgan, on 16 Nov. 1326. Hugh was taken
to Hereford, tried, without being allowed to speak in his own defence,
condemned to death as a traitor, and hanged on 24 Nov. 1326, buried some years
afterwards at Tewkesbury Abbey. His widow was married for the second time, as
his second wife, about Jan. 1328/9 to William la Zouche de Mortimer who had
abducted her from Hanley Castle. He died 28 Feb. 1336/7. Alianor de Clare died
on 30 June 1337.11,8

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Clare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027819&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Despenser 7: p. 267. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Montagu 6.ii: p. 506.
  4. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Montagu 6: pp. 505-506.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan of Acre of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005915&tree=LEO
  7. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Zouche Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  8. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 83. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  9. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 84.
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 246-25, p. 208. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  12. [S1502] Brad Verity, "Verity email "Descendants of Eleanor de Clare, lady of Tewkesbury & Glamorgan"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 20 October 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Verity email 2-20 October 2003."
  13. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Falmouth Family Page.
  14. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Despencer - Barons Despencer, Earl of Gloucester, pp. 166-7. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  15. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 10: pp. 317-318.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabel le Despenser: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00108700&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#IsabelDespencerMRichardFitzAlanArundel. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Edward le Despenser: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00113940&tree=LEO
  19. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Berkeley 9: p. 99.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth le Despenser: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027821&tree=LEO

Sir Gilbert de Red de Clare Knt., 6th Earl of Hertford & Gloucester1,2

M, #4417, b. 2 September 1243, d. 7 December 1295
FatherSir Richard de Clare 5th Earl of Hertford, 5th Earl of Gloucester3,2 b. 4 Aug 1222, d. 15 Jul 1262
MotherMaude de Lacy Countess of Lincoln4,3 b. c 1223, d. b 10 Mar 1289
ReferenceGAV19 EDV19
Last Edited18 Dec 2020
     Sir Gilbert de Red de Clare Knt., 6th Earl of Hertford & Gloucester was born on 2 September 1243 at Christ Church, co. Hampshire, England.5,6,1,3,2,7 He married Alice/Alix de Lusignan, daughter of Hugues XI "le Brun" de Lusignan Comte de la Marche et Angouleme,Comte de Ponthieu and Yolande de Dreux Cts de Penthievre et de Porhoet, in 1253; is 1st wife.5,8,1,2,9 Sir Gilbert de Red de Clare Knt., 6th Earl of Hertford & Gloucester and Alice/Alix de Lusignan were divorced on 18 July 1271; Faris (1999) p. 83: "They had two daughters, and were divorced, his wife Alice said to have become hypochondriacal in 1271."5,2,9 Sir Gilbert de Red de Clare Knt., 6th Earl of Hertford & Gloucester married Joan of Acre (?) Princess of England, Countess of Gloucester and Hertford, daughter of Edward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England and Doña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu, circa 30 April 1290 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.5,10,11,3,12,2,13,14
Sir Gilbert de Red de Clare Knt., 6th Earl of Hertford & Gloucester died on 7 December 1295 at Monmouth Castle, Monmouthshire, Wales, England (now), at age 52.5,6,1,3,2,7
Sir Gilbert de Red de Clare Knt., 6th Earl of Hertford & Gloucester was buried after 7 December 1295 at Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Tewkesbury Borough, Gloucestershire, England.5,1,2,7


     He was 3rd Earl of Gloucester.5 He was 9th Earl of Clare.5 He was 6th Earl of Hertford.5

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Gilbert "The Red" de Clare, 3rd Earl of Gloucester, *2.9.1243, +Monmouth Castle 7.12.1295, bur Tewkesbury Abbey, Gloucester; 1m: 1253 Alice de Lusignan; 2m: 30.4.1290 Joan Plantagenet (*1272 +23.4.1307.)1" He was 6th Earl of Gloucester and Hertford of the 1122 cr.15

; Faris (1999) p. 83: "GILBERT DE CLARE the Red, Knt., Baron of Clare, Suffolk, 9th Earl of Clare, 3rd Earl of Gloucester, 6th Earl of Hertford, son and heir of Richard de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford (of Magna Carta Surety descent and descendant of Charlemagne), by Maud, daughter of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, Magna Carta Surety (and descendant of Charlemagne). He was born at Christ Church, co. Hants, on 2 Sep. 1243. He had been married for the first time in the spring of 1253 to ALICE DE LUSIGNAN, daughter of Hughes XI de Lusignan le Brun, Comte de la Marche et de Angoulême (uterine brother of King Henry III of England), by Yolande, daughter of Pierre Mauclerk, Duc de Bretagne. They had two daughters, and were divorced, his wife Alice said to have become hypochondriacal in 1271. At the death of King Henry III on 16 Nov. 1272, the Earl took the lead in swearing fealty to Edward I, who was then in Sicily returning from the Crusade. He was Joint Guardian of England during the King's absence. Proposals for his marriage to the King's daughter were made as early as May 1283. Their daughter Alianor is probably the daughter born at Caerphilly Castle in October 1292, her mother having been purified there on 23 November following the birth of a daughter. GILBERT DE CLARE, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester, died at Monmouth Castle on 7 Dec. 1295, and was buried at Tewkesbury."16,17,18 GAV-19 EDV-19 GKJ-20. He was Baron of Clare.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "GILBERT de Clare, son of RICHARD de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford & his second wife Matilda de Lacy (Christchurch, Hampshire 2 Sep 1243-Monmouth Castle 7 Dec 1295, bur 22 Dec 1295 Tewkesbury). The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “in crastino Sancti Egidii apud Christi ecclesiam in Dorsetia” in 1243 of “filius…G.” to “R. de Clara”[1843]. The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Gilbertum secundum…dictus…Rubeus Comes” as son of “Ricardus de Clare secundus filius et hæres…Gilberti et Isabellæ” and his wife “Matildem…filiam comitis Lincolniæ”[1844]. He succeeded his father in 1262 as Earl of Hertford and Earl of Gloucester "the Red Earl". He was one of the leaders of the Barons' party in support of Simon de Montfort, taking the king prisoner at the battle of Lewes 14 May 1264. However, he changed sides and largely contributed to the king's victory at Evesham, commanding a division and receiving a pardon for his previous conduct. After the death of King Henry III, he was Joint Guardian of England until the return from Crusade of the new King Edward I. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "ante Natale domini" of "Gilebertus de Clare comes Gloverniæ" and his burial "apud Theukesbury"[1845]. The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the death “in castello de Monmouth VII Id Dec 1295” of “Gilbertus secundus” and his burial “apud Theokes, in sinistra Gilberti primi”[1846]. The Annals of Dunstable record that “Bono de Clare…pauper…[et] germanus dicti Bonus, comes Gloucestriæ” died in 1295[1847]. Inquisitions after a writ dated 14 Dec "24 Edw I", following the death of "Gilbert de Clare earl of Gloucester and Hertford" name “Gilbert his son aged 5 at the feast of St Mark last [...aged 4 at the feast of St George 23 Edw I] is his next heir”[1848].
     "m firstly (contract 2 Feb 1253, Spring 1253, separated Norwich 18 Jul 1271, annulled 16 May 1285) as her first husband, ALIX de Lusignan, daughter of HUGUES [XII] “le Brun” de Lusignan Comte de la Marche et d'Angoulême & his wife Yolande de Bretagne (-May 1290). Matthew Paris records the betrothal of “Ricardus comes Gloverniæ…filium tuum legitimum primogenitum“ and “filiæ Guidonis comitis Engolismi, fratris mei uterini” (referring to King Henry III), with a dowry of 5,000 marks, dated to 1253 from the context[1849]. A later passage in the same chronicle records that “comes Gloverniæ Ricardus et Willelmus de Valentia frater regis“ crossed (“transfretaverunt”) for the marriage between “filium eius Gilbertum primogenitum” and “filiam comitis Engolismi fratris Regis prælocutum”[1850]. These passages leave doubt about the identity of the bride’s father. The king’s uterine brother Hugues was the comte d’Angoulême, not his brother Guy. The question is therefore whether the error in Matthew Paris relates to the name or the title of the bride’s father. It is suggested that it is more likely that the chronicler’s recording of the title would be correct, as the individual would presumably have been referred to by his contemporaries by his title rather than his name. This suggestion appears to be supported by the reference to “crossing” for the marriage, which presumably indicates crossing the English Channel to France. Yet another passage in Matthew Paris records that "Guido frater domini regis uterinus" arrived back in England from Palestine in 1251[1851] (see above). Although this is not conclusive to indicate that Guy was still in England in 1253, it does suggest that England rather than France was his base and that, if his daughter had been the bride, no “crossing” would have been necessary. On the other hand, no record has so far been found to indicate that the base of Hugues Comte d’Angoulême was anywhere other than France. In addition, considering the prominent position of the de Clare family in England at the time, it appears more likely that a marriage would have been arranged between Gilbert de Clare and the daughter of the ruling count rather than the daughter of the count’s more obscure younger brother. The difficulty appears to be clarified by the dispensation for the second marriage of “Gileberto comiti Gloverniæ et Hertfordiæ” and “Johanna nata...Edvardi regis Angliæ”, dated 16 Nov 1289, which records the 2o and 3o affinity between the parties illustrated by the 2o and 3o consanguinity between “Aliciam natam quondam...Hugonis comitis Marchiæ” [the bridegroom’s first wife] and “prædictam Johannam”[1852]. It is assumed to be correct that Hugues Comte d’Angoulême, rather than Hugues’s younger brother Guy, was the father of Alix. Her name is confirmed by the Continuator of Florence of Worcester who records the divorce "XV Kal Aug apud Norwyciam" between "G. comitem Gloverniæ" and "Aliciam comitissam"[1853]. A different perspective on the parentage of Alix is provided by the Annals of Tewkesbury which record the proposed marriage in 1252 of “comite de Gloucestris…filii sui G.” and “filiæ sororis domini regis”, although a later passage in the same source appears to confirm the above interpretation of Alix’s parentage when it records that “Gilebertus de Clare filius et hæres…Ricardi de Clare comitis Gloucestriæ” was betrothed “in partibus transmarinis” in 1253 to “filiam comitis Marchiæ…sororem…electi Wyntoniæ et neptem domini regis” (although it was Alix’s father who was brother of Athelmar “electi Wyntoniæ”)[1854]. A charter dated 1285 records the divorce between “Gilbertum de Clare comitem Gloverniæ et Hertf.” and “dominam Aliciam de Marchia” and the grant of “manerium de Taxstede...” to the latter[1855]. She married secondly Gilbert de Lindsay. Her second marriage is indicated by inquisitions after a writ dated 14 Dec "24 Edw I", following the death of "Gilbert de Clare earl of Gloucester and Hertford", which record that the widow of the deceased had no seisin of “Thackstede...manor” in Essex “because it was held by Gilbert de Lyndeseye and Alice de la Marche his wife for the life of the latter, who was still living when Gilbert the earl gave his other lands to the king”[1856]. Alix is alleged to have become hypochondriac[1857].
     "m secondly (Papal dispensation 16 Nov 1289, Westminster Abbey early May 1290) as her first husband, JOAN of England "of Acre", daughter of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Acre, Palestine Spring 1272-Clare Manor, Suffolk 23 Apr 1307, bur 26 Apr 1307 Priory Church of the Austin Friars, Clare, Suffolk). The dispensation for the marriage of “Gileberto comiti Gloverniæ et Hertfordiæ” and “Johanna nata...Edvardi regis Angliæ”, dated 16 Nov 1289, records the 2o and 3o affinity between the parties illustrated by the 2o and 3o consanguinity between “Aliciam natam quondam...Hugonis comitis Marchiæ” [the bridegroom’s first wife] and “prædictam Johannam”[1858]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "ultimo die mensis Aprilis apud Westmonasterium" of "Gilbertus de Clare comes Gloverniæ" and "dominam Johannam dicta de Acra…filium regis Angliæ"[1859]. The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the marriage of “Gilbertus secundus” and “Johanna de Acres, filia regis Edwardi primi”[1860]. The Annals of Dunstable record that “Edwardus rex…Johannam filiam suam secundo genitam” married “Gilberto comiti Gloverniæ” in 1290[1861]. She married secondly (secretly early 1297 or [12 May/3 Jul] 1297) as his first wife, Ralph de Monthermer. The Annals of Dunstable record that “comitssa Gloverniæ, filia domini regis” married “cuidam militia sine assensu regio” in 1296[1862]. The primary source which confirms her second marriage more precisely has not yet been identified. A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1307 of “Johanna de Acres comitissa de Clare” and her burial “in ecclesia fratrum S. Augustini apud Clare”[1863]."
Med Lands cites:
[1842] Annales de Theokesberia, p. 159.
[1843] Annales de Theokesberia, p. 130.
[1844] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.
[1845] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 278.
[1846] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.
[1847] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 400.
[1848] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 371, p. 234.
[1849] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1253, p. 364.
[1850] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1253, p. 367.
[1851] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1251, p. 204.
[1852] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 57.
[1853] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 206.
[1854] Annales de Theokesberia, pp. 151 and 153-4.
[1855] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars II, p. 240.
[1856] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 371, p. 234.
[1857] CP V 707.
[1858] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 57.
[1859] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 242.
[1860] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.
[1861] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 359.
[1862] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 408.
[1863] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 148.7


; per Richardson: "He commanded the 2nd line at the Battle of Lewes...and took the king prisoner."2

Family 1

Alice/Alix de Lusignan b. c 1231, d. 1291
Children

Family 2

Joan of Acre (?) Princess of England, Countess of Gloucester and Hertford b. 1272, d. 7 Apr 1307
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Eu page (The Eu Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/eu.html#G3
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Montagu 6: pp. 505-506. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, pp. 505-506.
  5. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 83. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 63-30, p. 67. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#GilbertHertford6died1295. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 117-30, p. 106.
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Angouleme.pdf, p.7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 63-30, p. 67, 8-29, p. 11.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  12. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.19.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan of Acre of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005915&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Joandied1307.
  15. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Warwick, Brooke Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  16. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  17. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  18. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  19. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Hertford Family Page.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan de Clare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00308672&tree=LEO
  21. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 2nd edition (n.p.: n.pub., 2011), Vol III: Stafford 7: pp. 245-6. Hereinafter cited as Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry.
  22. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Despenser 7: p. 267.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Clare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027819&tree=LEO
  24. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), De Burgh - Earl of Ulster, p. 162. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Elizabeth de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027612&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#ElisabethClaredied1360
  27. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 11-30, p. 15.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.

Lady Mary (Isabel) Fitz Alan de Arundel1,2,3,4

F, #4418, d. 29 August 1396
FatherSir Edmund de Arundel Knt., 9th Earl of Arundel5,1,6,3,7,8 b. 1 May 1285, d. 17 Nov 1326
MotherAlice de Warenne1,6,3,7,9 b. bt 1285 - 1287, d. b 23 May 1338
ReferenceGKJ19
Last Edited12 Oct 2008
     Lady Mary (Isabel) Fitz Alan de Arundel married John le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere, son of John le Strange 2nd Baron Strange of Blackmere and Ankaret Boteler, before 1353.5,1,10,6,3,4
Lady Mary (Isabel) Fitz Alan de Arundel died on 29 August 1396.11,1,12,6,3
     ; van de pas cites: 1. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 201
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XII 344.3 GKJ-19. Lady Mary (Isabel) Fitz Alan de Arundel was also known as Mary of Arundel, Lady Strange of Blakemere.12 Lady Mary (Isabel) Fitz Alan de Arundel was also known as Mary de Arundel.4

Family

John le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere b. c 19 Apr 1332, d. 12 May 1361
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arundel 1 page (The House of Arundel): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel1.html
  2. [S1799] David Utz, "Utz email #2 20 Aug 2005 "Descents from Rohese of Boulogne to Robert Abell"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 20 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email #2 20 Aug 2005."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026724&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Fitz Alan 9.v: p. 317. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Saint Davids Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Blackmere 9: p. 110.
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 9: pp. 316-317.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edmund Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015389&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice de Warren: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015390&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Le Strange: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140341&tree=LEO
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 8-32, p. 11. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S1773] Brad Verity, "Verity email 5 April 2005 "CP Addition: Marriage of John d'Arundel, Lord Mautravers & Elizabeth Talbot"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 5 April 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Verity email 5 April 2005."

Joan of Acre (?) Princess of England, Countess of Gloucester and Hertford1,2,3,4,5

F, #4419, b. 1272, d. 7 April 1307
FatherEdward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England1,2,3,5,4,6,7 b. 17 Jun 1239, d. 7 Jul 1307
MotherDoña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu1,3,4,5,7,8 b. c 1241, d. 28 Nov 1290
ReferenceGAV19 EDV19
Last Edited18 Dec 2020
     Joan of Acre (?) Princess of England, Countess of Gloucester and Hertford was born in 1272 at Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Palestine (Israel now); Genealogy.EU says b. Spring 1272.5,9,10,11,1,12 She and Hartmann von Habsburg were engaged in 1276.13,12 Joan of Acre (?) Princess of England, Countess of Gloucester and Hertford married Sir Gilbert de Red de Clare Knt., 6th Earl of Hertford & Gloucester, son of Sir Richard de Clare 5th Earl of Hertford, 5th Earl of Gloucester and Maude de Lacy Countess of Lincoln, circa 30 April 1290 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England;
Her 1st husband; his 2nd wife.9,14,1,2,3,4,5,12 Joan of Acre (?) Princess of England, Countess of Gloucester and Hertford married Sir Ralph de Monthermer Knt., Earl of Gloucester and Hertford in 1297;
Her 2nd husband; his 1st wife.15,1,2,3,5,4,12,16
Joan of Acre (?) Princess of England, Countess of Gloucester and Hertford died on 7 April 1307 at Clare Manor, Clare, co. Suffolk, England; Genealogy.EU says d. 7 April 1307.1,9,5,4,12
Joan of Acre (?) Princess of England, Countess of Gloucester and Hertford was buried circa May 1307 at Austin Friar's Priory, Clare, co. Suffolk, England,

; Genealogy.EU says bur Augustinian Priory.9,1,4,12
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "GILBERT de Clare, son of RICHARD de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford & his second wife Matilda de Lacy (Christchurch, Hampshire 2 Sep 1243-Monmouth Castle 7 Dec 1295, bur 22 Dec 1295 Tewkesbury). The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “in crastino Sancti Egidii apud Christi ecclesiam in Dorsetia” in 1243 of “filius…G.” to “R. de Clara”[1843]. The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Gilbertum secundum…dictus…Rubeus Comes” as son of “Ricardus de Clare secundus filius et hæres…Gilberti et Isabellæ” and his wife “Matildem…filiam comitis Lincolniæ”[1844]. He succeeded his father in 1262 as Earl of Hertford and Earl of Gloucester "the Red Earl". He was one of the leaders of the Barons' party in support of Simon de Montfort, taking the king prisoner at the battle of Lewes 14 May 1264. However, he changed sides and largely contributed to the king's victory at Evesham, commanding a division and receiving a pardon for his previous conduct. After the death of King Henry III, he was Joint Guardian of England until the return from Crusade of the new King Edward I. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "ante Natale domini" of "Gilebertus de Clare comes Gloverniæ" and his burial "apud Theukesbury"[1845]. The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the death “in castello de Monmouth VII Id Dec 1295” of “Gilbertus secundus” and his burial “apud Theokes, in sinistra Gilberti primi”[1846]. The Annals of Dunstable record that “Bono de Clare…pauper…[et] germanus dicti Bonus, comes Gloucestriæ” died in 1295[1847]. Inquisitions after a writ dated 14 Dec "24 Edw I", following the death of "Gilbert de Clare earl of Gloucester and Hertford" name “Gilbert his son aged 5 at the feast of St Mark last [...aged 4 at the feast of St George 23 Edw I] is his next heir”[1848].
     "m firstly (contract 2 Feb 1253, Spring 1253, separated Norwich 18 Jul 1271, annulled 16 May 1285) as her first husband, ALIX de Lusignan, daughter of HUGUES [XII] “le Brun” de Lusignan Comte de la Marche et d'Angoulême & his wife Yolande de Bretagne (-May 1290). Matthew Paris records the betrothal of “Ricardus comes Gloverniæ…filium tuum legitimum primogenitum“ and “filiæ Guidonis comitis Engolismi, fratris mei uterini” (referring to King Henry III), with a dowry of 5,000 marks, dated to 1253 from the context[1849]. A later passage in the same chronicle records that “comes Gloverniæ Ricardus et Willelmus de Valentia frater regis“ crossed (“transfretaverunt”) for the marriage between “filium eius Gilbertum primogenitum” and “filiam comitis Engolismi fratris Regis prælocutum”[1850]. These passages leave doubt about the identity of the bride’s father. The king’s uterine brother Hugues was the comte d’Angoulême, not his brother Guy. The question is therefore whether the error in Matthew Paris relates to the name or the title of the bride’s father. It is suggested that it is more likely that the chronicler’s recording of the title would be correct, as the individual would presumably have been referred to by his contemporaries by his title rather than his name. This suggestion appears to be supported by the reference to “crossing” for the marriage, which presumably indicates crossing the English Channel to France. Yet another passage in Matthew Paris records that "Guido frater domini regis uterinus" arrived back in England from Palestine in 1251[1851] (see above). Although this is not conclusive to indicate that Guy was still in England in 1253, it does suggest that England rather than France was his base and that, if his daughter had been the bride, no “crossing” would have been necessary. On the other hand, no record has so far been found to indicate that the base of Hugues Comte d’Angoulême was anywhere other than France. In addition, considering the prominent position of the de Clare family in England at the time, it appears more likely that a marriage would have been arranged between Gilbert de Clare and the daughter of the ruling count rather than the daughter of the count’s more obscure younger brother. The difficulty appears to be clarified by the dispensation for the second marriage of “Gileberto comiti Gloverniæ et Hertfordiæ” and “Johanna nata...Edvardi regis Angliæ”, dated 16 Nov 1289, which records the 2o and 3o affinity between the parties illustrated by the 2o and 3o consanguinity between “Aliciam natam quondam...Hugonis comitis Marchiæ” [the bridegroom’s first wife] and “prædictam Johannam”[1852]. It is assumed to be correct that Hugues Comte d’Angoulême, rather than Hugues’s younger brother Guy, was the father of Alix. Her name is confirmed by the Continuator of Florence of Worcester who records the divorce "XV Kal Aug apud Norwyciam" between "G. comitem Gloverniæ" and "Aliciam comitissam"[1853]. A different perspective on the parentage of Alix is provided by the Annals of Tewkesbury which record the proposed marriage in 1252 of “comite de Gloucestris…filii sui G.” and “filiæ sororis domini regis”, although a later passage in the same source appears to confirm the above interpretation of Alix’s parentage when it records that “Gilebertus de Clare filius et hæres…Ricardi de Clare comitis Gloucestriæ” was betrothed “in partibus transmarinis” in 1253 to “filiam comitis Marchiæ…sororem…electi Wyntoniæ et neptem domini regis” (although it was Alix’s father who was brother of Athelmar “electi Wyntoniæ”)[1854]. A charter dated 1285 records the divorce between “Gilbertum de Clare comitem Gloverniæ et Hertf.” and “dominam Aliciam de Marchia” and the grant of “manerium de Taxstede...” to the latter[1855]. She married secondly Gilbert de Lindsay. Her second marriage is indicated by inquisitions after a writ dated 14 Dec "24 Edw I", following the death of "Gilbert de Clare earl of Gloucester and Hertford", which record that the widow of the deceased had no seisin of “Thackstede...manor” in Essex “because it was held by Gilbert de Lyndeseye and Alice de la Marche his wife for the life of the latter, who was still living when Gilbert the earl gave his other lands to the king”[1856]. Alix is alleged to have become hypochondriac[1857].
     "m secondly (Papal dispensation 16 Nov 1289, Westminster Abbey early May 1290) as her first husband, JOAN of England "of Acre", daughter of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Acre, Palestine Spring 1272-Clare Manor, Suffolk 23 Apr 1307, bur 26 Apr 1307 Priory Church of the Austin Friars, Clare, Suffolk). The dispensation for the marriage of “Gileberto comiti Gloverniæ et Hertfordiæ” and “Johanna nata...Edvardi regis Angliæ”, dated 16 Nov 1289, records the 2o and 3o affinity between the parties illustrated by the 2o and 3o consanguinity between “Aliciam natam quondam...Hugonis comitis Marchiæ” [the bridegroom’s first wife] and “prædictam Johannam”[1858]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "ultimo die mensis Aprilis apud Westmonasterium" of "Gilbertus de Clare comes Gloverniæ" and "dominam Johannam dicta de Acra…filium regis Angliæ"[1859]. The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the marriage of “Gilbertus secundus” and “Johanna de Acres, filia regis Edwardi primi”[1860]. The Annals of Dunstable record that “Edwardus rex…Johannam filiam suam secundo genitam” married “Gilberto comiti Gloverniæ” in 1290[1861]. She married secondly (secretly early 1297 or [12 May/3 Jul] 1297) as his first wife, Ralph de Monthermer. The Annals of Dunstable record that “comitssa Gloverniæ, filia domini regis” married “cuidam militia sine assensu regio” in 1296[1862]. The primary source which confirms her second marriage more precisely has not yet been identified. A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1307 of “Johanna de Acres comitissa de Clare” and her burial “in ecclesia fratrum S. Augustini apud Clare”[1863]."
Med Lands cites:
[1842] Annales de Theokesberia, p. 159.
[1843] Annales de Theokesberia, p. 130.
[1844] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.
[1845] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 278.
[1846] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.
[1847] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 400.
[1848] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 371, p. 234.
[1849] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1253, p. 364.
[1850] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1253, p. 367.
[1851] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1251, p. 204.
[1852] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 57.
[1853] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 206.
[1854] Annales de Theokesberia, pp. 151 and 153-4.
[1855] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars II, p. 240.
[1856] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 371, p. 234.
[1857] CP V 707.
[1858] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 57.
[1859] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 242.
[1860] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.
[1861] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 359.
[1862] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 408.
[1863] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 148.17


Reference: van de Pas cites: 1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 , Reference: page 197 & John Carmi Parsons
2. The Porteous Story, A Scottish Border Family from 1439 A.D., Volume I, Montreal, 1980, Porteous, Barry, Reference: biography page 308.5

; Per Med Lands:
     "JOAN "of Acre" (Acre, Palestine Spring 1272-Clare Manor, Suffolk 23 Apr 1307, bur 26 Apr 1307 Priory Church of the Austin Friars, Clare, Suffolk). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the birth at Acre in [1272] of "filiam…Johannam" to "Alienor uxor domini Eadwardi"[766]. The Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses record that "comes Hartmannus [filius reginæ uxoris Rudolfi Regis]" was betrothed to "filia regis Anglie"[767]. This betrothal was arranged by King Rudolf to exploit Anglo/French rivalry. Two charters dated 1276 record negotiations for the marriage between “dominus rex Alemaniæ...filium suum Hartmannum” and “filiam regis Angliæ Johannam”[768]. A charter dated Dec 1278 records the agreement that the marriage between “R. Romanorum rex...Hartmannum comitem de Habspurg et de Kyburg, Alsatiæ langravium natum suum” and “Johannæ...Edwardi...regis Angliæ...filiæ”, already betrothed, should be celebrated[769]. The marriage was postponed. The dispensation for the marriage of “Gileberto comiti Gloverniæ et Hertfordiæ” and “Johanna nata...Edvardi regis Angliæ”, dated 16 Nov 1289, records the 2o and 3o affinity between the parties illustrated by the 2o and 3o consanguinity between “Aliciam natam quondam...Hugonis comitis Marchiæ” [the bridegroom´s first wife] and “prædictam Johannam”[770]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "ultimo die mensis Aprilis apud Westmonasterium" of "Gilbertus de Clare comes Gloverniæ" and "dominam Johannam dicta de Acra…filium regis Angliæ"[771]. The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the marriage of “Gilbertus secundus” and “Johanna de Acres, filia regis Edwardi primi”[772]. The Annals of Dunstable record that “Edwardus rex…Johannam filiam suam secundo genitam” married “Gilberto comiti Gloverniæ” in 1290[773]. The Annals of Dunstable record that “comitissa Gloverniæ, filia domini regis” married “cuidam militia sine assensu regio” in 1296[774]. The primary source which confirms her second marriage more precisely has not yet been identified. Her second marriage was clandestine. The king, her father, did not know that Joan was already married when he agreed 16 Mar 1297 her marriage to Amédée Comte de Savoie. He confiscated Joan's lands 3 Jul 1297 when he found out about the marriage, but pardoned her 2 Aug 1297[775]. A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1307 of “Johanna de Acres comitissa de Clare” and her burial “in ecclesia fratrum S. Augustini apud Clare”[776].
     "Betrothed to HARTMANN von Habsburg Graf von Kiburg, son of RUDOLF I Graf von Habsburg King of Germany & his first wife Gertrud [Anna] von Hohenberg [Zollern] (Rheinfelden 1263-drowned between Breisach and Strasbourg 21 Dec 1281, bur Basel Münster).
     "m firstly (Papal dispensation 16 Nov 1289, Westminster Abbey 30 Apr 1290) as his second wife, GILBERT de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford "the Red Earl", son of RICHARD de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford & his second wife Maud de Lacy (Christchurch, Hampshire 2 Sep 1243-Monmouth Castle 7 Dec 1295, bur 22 Dec 1295 Tewkesbury).
     "m secondly (secretly early 1297 or [12 May/3 Jul] 1297) as his first wife, RALPH de Monthermer, son of --- (-5 Apr 1325, bur Salisbury, Grey Friars church). He was a member of the household of her first husband. He was imprisoned by the King at Bristol when he learned of his marriage, but pardoned at Eltham 2 Aug 1297[777]. He used the title Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, in right of his wife, but does not seem to have been so created."
Med Lands cites:
[766] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 210.
[767] Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 104.
[768] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars II, p. 154.
[769] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars II, p. 164.
[770] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 57.
[771] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 242.
[772] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.
[773] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 359.
[774] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 408.
[775] CP V 709.
[776] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 148.
[777] CP V 710.12


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Pss Joan of Acre, *Acre spring 1272, +Clare, Suffolk 7.4.1307, bur Augustinian Priory, Clare; 1m: Westminster Abbey 30.4.1290 Gilbert "the Red" de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford (*2.9.1243 +7.12.1295); 2m: 1297 Sir Ralph de Monthermer (*by 1290, +5.4.1325.)1"

; Per Genealogics:
     "Joan of Acre was born in 1272, one of the sixteen children of King Edward I of England and his first wife Eleanor of Castile, comtesse de Ponthieu. Joan got her name from her birthplace Akko (Acre), Hazofan, Palestine. It differentiates her from an earlier Joan born to her parents, who died in infancy. Joan of Acre was born while her parents were travelling to the Middle East on the Ninth Crusade. She spent at least part of her childhood in France with her maternal grandmother Jeanne de Dammartin, comtesse de Ponthieu.
     "In 1279, when only seven, Joan was betrothed to Hartman, son of Emperor Rudolf I. However on 21 December 1281, just before the marriage was to be contracted, he drowned in the Rhine. Shortly afterwards her father King Edward I wanted the goodwill of the premier peer of England, Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, which he achieved by giving the much younger Joan to him in marriage.
     "On 30 April 1290 at Westminster Abbey, Joan married Gilbert de Clare. He was nearly thirty years her senior. They had four children, of whom their three daughters would have progeny.
     "Following her husband's death in 1295, Joan clandestinely married Ralph de Monthermer, Baron de Monthermer, a knight in her household, in 1297. Her father was enraged by this lowly second marriage, especially since he was arranging a marriage for her to Amadeo V, Comte de Savoie. Edward had Monthermer thrown in prison, and Joan had to plead for the release of her husband. According to the St. Albans chronicler, she told her father, 'No one sees anything wrong if a great earl marries a poor and lowly woman. Why should there be anything wrong if a countess marries a young and promising man?' At last her father relented, released Monthermer from prison in August 1297, and allowed him to hold the title of Earl of Gloucester and Hereford during Joan's lifetime. Monthermer and Joan had four children: Mary and Thomas would both have progeny; Joan became a nun at Amesbury, and Edward fought in the Scottish campaign in 1335, but spent much of his life in service to his half-sister Elizabeth de Clare, who provided for him during his last illness and buried him next to their mother.
     "Joan died in childbirth on 7 April 1307 at the manor of Clare in Suffolk, England, a family possession, and was buried at the Augustinian priory there. Her child was stillborn. Miracles were said to occur at her grave, especially the healing of toothache, back pain and fever."5

Reference: Weis [1992] 8, 8a-.18

; Faris (1999) pp. 83-84: "JOAN OF ENGLAND [of Acre], second daughter, was born at Acre in the Holy Land probably early in 1272. She was married for the first time at Westminster Abbey about 30 Apr. 1290 to GILBERT DE CLARE the Red, Knt., Baron of Clare, Suffolk, 9th Earl of Clare, 3rd Earl of Gloucester, 6th Earl of Hertford, son and heir of Richard de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford (of Magna Carta Surety descent and descendant of Charlemagne), by Maud, daughter of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, Magna Carta Surety (and descendant of Charlemagne). He was born at Christ Church, co. Hants, on 2 Sep. 1243. He had been married for the first time in the spring of 1253 to ALICE DE LUSIGNAN, daughter of Hughes XI de Lusignan le Brun, Comte de la Marche et de Angoulême (uterine brother of King Henry III of England), by Yolande, daughter of Pierre Mauclerk, Duc de Bretagne. They had two daughters, and were divorced, his wife Alice said to have become hypochondriacal in 1271. At the death of King Henry III on 16 Nov. 1272, the Earl took the lead in swearing fealty to Edward I, who was then in Sicily returning from the Crusade. He was Joint Guardian of England during the King's absence. Proposals for his marriage to the King's daughter were made as early as May 1283. Their daughter Alianor is probably the daughter born at Caerphilly Castle in October 1292, her mother having been purified there on 23 November following the birth of a daughter. GILBERT DE CLARE, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester, died at Monmouth Castle on 7 Dec. 1295, and was buried at Tewkesbury. JOAN OF ENGLAND was married for the second time, clandestinely, presumably early in 1297, to RALPH DE MONTHERMER. He was born in 1262 of unknown parentage, and had been a squire in the late Earl's household. The marriage enraged her father, the King, and he committed Ralph to prison in Bristol Castle, and all Joan's lands were seized into the King's hand. By the mediation of Anthony Bec, Bishop of Durham, however, peace was made between the King and his daughter, and her lands were restored to her on 31 July 1297, Ralph having done homage. The King afterwards became much attached to his new son-in-law, who was summoned to Parliament as Earl of Gloucester and Hertford during the minority of his step-son, Gilbert de Dare. He was at the siege of Carlaverock in the summer of 1300. JOAN OF ENGLAND died, aged thirty-five, on 23 Apr. 1307, and was buried in the Austin Friars' at Clare, Suffolk. Ralph de Monthermer was summoned to Parliament from 4 Mar. 1308/9 by writs directed Raulpho de Monte Hermerii, and was granted the barony of Erlestoke, co. Wilts. He fought at Bannockburn in 1314. In December 1315 he had permission to go on pilgrimage to Santiago of Compostella in Spain. He was married for the second time before 20 Nov. 1318 to Isabel le Despenser, widow of John de Hastings, of Ashill, Norfolk (died 1313), and daughter of Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester, by Isabel, daughter of William de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick. RALPH DE MONTHERMER [Lord Monthermer] died testate aged sixty-three on 10 May or 5 Apr. 1325, and was buried at Grey Friars', Salisbury.
C.P. 1:346 (1910), CF. 3:244 (1913). C.P. 4:269 (1916). C.P. 5:346, 373, 702-712 (1926). CF. 6:503 (1926). C.P. 9:140-142, footnote c (1936) (Ralph probably pronounced his name Mehermer; it is so spelt in a deed of his, and in his petitions. His arms: Or, an eagle displayed yen--the arms of Lyndsey of Northumberland) (1936). Paget (1957) 130:13. Sanders (1960), pp. 6,34-35,42. TAG 69:138 (July 1994) (birthdates of daughters Alianor and Margaret).
Children of Gilbert de Clare, by Joan of England:
i.     ALIANOR DE CLARE [see next].
ii.     MARGARET DE CLARE, married HUGH DE AUDLEY [see STAFFORD 12].
iii.     ELIZABETH DE CLARE, married, first, JOHN DE BURGH [see BURGH 13]. married, second, THEOBALD DE VERDUN [see BURGH 13], married, third, ROGER DAMORY [see BURGH 13]
Child of Ralph de Monthermer, by Joan of England:
iv.     THOMAS DE MONTHERMER, married MARGARET _____ [see MONTAGU 12]."19,20,21 GAV-19 EDV-19 GKJ-20.

Family 1

Hartmann von Habsburg b. 1263, d. 21 Dec 1281

Family 2

Sir Gilbert de Red de Clare Knt., 6th Earl of Hertford & Gloucester b. 2 Sep 1243, d. 7 Dec 1295
Children

Family 3

Sir Ralph de Monthermer Knt., Earl of Gloucester and Hertford b. bt 1261 - 1262, d. bt 5 Apr 1325 - 10 May 1325
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  2. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.19. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Montagu 6: pp. 505-506.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan of Acre of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005915&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward I 'Longshanks': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000809&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIdied1307B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001694&tree=LEO
  9. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 83. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  10. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 126. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  11. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 590 (Chart 45). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Joandied1307.
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#Hartmanndied1281
  14. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 63-30, p. 67, 8-29, p. 11. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  15. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 17B-15, p. 22. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#RalphMonthermerdied1325
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#GilbertHertford6died1295
  18. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, Lines 8, 8a.
  19. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  20. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  21. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  22. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 2nd edition (n.p.: n.pub., 2011), Vol III: Stafford 7: pp. 245-6. Hereinafter cited as Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Clare: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027819&tree=LEO
  24. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Despenser 7: p. 267.
  25. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), De Burgh - Earl of Ulster, p. 162. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Elizabeth de Clare: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027612&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#ElisabethClaredied1360
  28. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 11-30, p. 15.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  29. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Montagu 6.i: p. 507.
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thomas de Monthermer: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00198880&tree=LEO

Edward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England1,2,3,4

M, #4420, b. 17 June 1239, d. 7 July 1307
FatherHenry III (?) of Winchester, King of England5,2,6,7,8,9 b. 1 Oct 1207, d. 16 Nov 1272
MotherEleanor (?) Countess of Provence Queen of Eng.2,10,8,9 b. 1223, d. 24 Jun 1291
ReferenceGAV18 EDV20
Last Edited15 Jul 2020
     Edward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England was born on 17 June 1239 at Westminster Palace, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England.1,11,12,13,8 He and Marie (?) of Brabant were engaged in 1247; Per Med Lands: "Betrothed (1247) to EDWARD of England, son of HENRY III King of England & his wife Eléonore de Provence (Palace of Westminster 17/18 Jun 1239-Burgh-on-Sands, Cumberland 8 Jul 1307, bur Westminster Abbey)."14,15,9 Edward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England married Doña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu, daughter of Saint Ferdinand III (?) King of Castile & Leon and JoanJeanne de Dammartin Countess of Ponthieu, Montreuil, and Aumale, on 18 October 1254 at Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now).12,11,5,16,2,17,3,8,9,18,19 Edward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England married Marguerite (?) de France, Queen of England, daughter of Philippe III "Le Hardi" ("The Bold") (?) King of France, King of Navarre, Cte de Champagne at de Brie and Marie (?) de Brabant, Queen of France, on 8 September 1299 at Canterbury, co. Kent, England.20,11,5,2,21,3,8,9,22,23
Edward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England died on 7 July 1307 at Burgh-on-the-Sands, near Carlisle, England, at age 68.11,20,1,13,3,8
Edward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England was buried after 7 July 1307 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     16 Jun 1239, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England
     DEATH     7 Jul 1307 (aged 68), Burgh-by-Sands, City of Carlisle, Cumbria, England
     English Monarch. The eldest son of Henry III and Eleanor of Provence, he was known as Longshanks and "Hammer of the Scots". He ascended the throne upon the death of Henry in 1272, but was not formally crowned until August 19, 1274. He married Eleanor of Castile at Burgos, Spain on October 18, 1254. To her he was a loving and devoted, if not entirely faithful, husband and they had 16 children. After Eleanor's death in 1290, he married Margaret of France on September 8, 1299. They had three children. Much of Edward's reign was spent at war. He completed the conquest of Wales, defeating and uniting the Welsh marches, and defended his duchy of Gascony in France. But the latter half of his reign would be consumed by trouble in Scotland. The death of the young Margaret, Maid of Norway left the throne of Scotland vacant, and Edward siezed upon the opportunity to establish his control. He appointed John Balliol to the throne, but retained direct rule over the Scots and Balliol. In 1297 William Wallace rebelled and recovered much of the country, but Edward crushed the rebellion, captured Wallace and had him executed. He then summoned a complete Parliament, including elected Scottish representatives, and it was decided that a Council would rule Scotland under Edward's supervision. But Robert the Bruce unexpectedly rebelled and murdered his fellow Councillors. Despite failing health, Edward once again went north. He died en route to Scotland at Burgh-On-Sands, Cumbria at the age of 68. He was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, Edward II. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
          Henry III 1207–1272
          Eleanor of Provence 1222–1291
     Spouses
          Eleanor of Castile 1240–1290
          Marguerite de France 1279–1318
     Siblings
          Margaret Plantagenet 1240–1275
          Béatrice d'Angleterre 1242–1275
          Edmund Plantagenet 1245–1296
          Richard of England 1247–1250
          John of England 1250–1252
          William Plantagenet 1251–1256
          Katherine of England 1253–1257
          Henry of England 1260–1260
     Children
          Katherine Plantagenet 1261–1264
          Plantagenet 1265–1265
          Plantagenet 1266–1271
          Henry Plantagenet 1267–1274
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1269–1298
          Joan of Acre 1272–1307
          Alfonso Plantagenet 1273–1284
          Margaret of England 1275–1318
          Berengaria Plantagenet 1276–1278
          Mary Plantagenet 1278–1332
          Isabella Plantagenet 1279–1279
          Elizabeth Plantagenet 1282–1316
          Edward II 1284–1327
          Thomas Plantagenet of Brotherton 1300–1338
          Edmund Plantagenet of Woodstock 1301–1330
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1306–1311
     BURIAL     Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 31 Dec 2000
     Find a Grave Memorial 1955
     Source citation.3,24
     ; Per Genealogics:
     “Edward I 'Longshanks', king of England, was born on 17 June 1239, the son of Henry III, king of England, and Eleanor de Provence. As a boy Edward was once in the middle of a game of chess with one of his knights in a vaulted room when suddenly, for no apparent reason, he got up and walked away. Seconds later, a massive stone, which would have completely crushed anyone who happened to be underneath it, fell from the roof on to the very spot where he had been sitting.
     “With his mother's strength but without her frivolity, Edward I became a great statesman and an able soldier. He supported his weak father, King Henry III, during the civil wars inflicted upon England by the barons.
     “He was only fifteen when he went to Spain to be knighted by King Alfonso X of Castile and to marry that king's half-sister, Eleanor. This marriage, like that of his parents, was a happy one and produced fifteen children, of whom only six reached adulthood.
     “After peace was restored in England, Edward went on crusade in 1270, accompanied by Eleanor. In June 1272 a member of the Hashshashin, a secret society of assassins, who was employed by one of the emirs in negotiation with Edward, obtained a private interview with him under pretence of important secret business, then suddenly attacked him with a dagger, wounding him in the arm. Edward repelled him with a vigorous kick and, seizing a stool, knocked him down and snatched the dagger from him. In doing this, however, he wounded himself in the forehead. As the dagger was poisoned, Edward's wounds gave cause for great anxiety; he made his will, appointing executors and guardians for his children. However the skills of his surgeon saved his life.
     “In November 1272, when Edward and Eleanor were in Sicily on their way back, his father died. As they knew Edward I's mother to be a capable regent, they did not hurry and so did not arrive in England until the summer of 1274. Edward and Eleanor were then crowned together in Westminster Abbey on 19 August 1274.
     “In 1279 he proclaimed an edict to the effect that clipped money should no longer be circulated, nor should anyone be forced to accept it. He then designated a small number of places where money could be exchanged and within a short time no one would consider accepting it. Edward kept in touch with and encouraged the parliament. His continuous if unsuccessful attempts to rule Scotland earned him the name of 'Hammer of the Scots'. However, his sojourns into Wales were more successful, and after the death of the last two native princes, Llywellyn and David, Edward I created his son and heir Prince of Wales in February 1301.
     “In 1290 Eleanor died, and nine years later he married Margaret of France. This marriage was not unhappy and produced three more children. In 1296, while campaigning in Scotland, Edward removed the Stone of Scone on which the kings of Scots had always been crowned. He ordered a wooden chair to be made, which from then on contained the stone and was used for the coronation of English and British monarchs.
     “In 1298 Edward met William Wallace at the battle of Falkirk. On the night before the battle he slept on the ground, his shield for a pillow and his horse beside him. The horse stepped on his royal master as he lay asleep, and in the confusion of darkness the alarm spread that the king was wounded. Only slightly hurt, Edward went into battle in the morning, but his victory that day was not followed up.
     “Having survived the murderous attack in Palestine, there were still more miraculous escapes. In Paris lightning passed over his shoulders and slew two of his attendants; and when his horse leapt the town wall at Winchelsea he was uninjured. At the siege of Stirling a bolt from a crossbow struck his saddle as he rode unarmed, and a stone from a mangonel brought his horse down. Even illness had seemed to pass him by, but while on a military campaign he became ill with dysentery, and he died aged sixty-eight on 7 July 1307, at Burgh on the Sands near Carlisle in Scotland. In his last words he was still the warrior: 'Carry my bones before you on your march. For the rebels will not be able to endure the sight of me, alive or dead'.”.8

Reference: Weis [1992:3] Line 1-28.25 GAV-18 EDV-20 GKJ-20.

;      He was nicknamed Longshanks because he was 6 feet tall.
     He went on crusade in 1270-1273. He hears that his father dies and he is made king. He returns to England in 1274. Edward invades north Wales to compel Prince Llywelyn to pay homage to him in 1277. He again invades in 1282 and late Llywelyn is killed. He makes Wales part of his kingdom and names his son as Prince of Wales in 1301. He picks John Baliol to be King of Scotland. When Balliol is asked to invade France with Edward, he sides with French and Edward invades Scotland. He defeats the Scots and takes the Stone of Scone to Westminster. In 1297 the Scots rise against English with William Wallace and defeat Edward at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297. Edward invades Scotland again in 1298 and defeats William Wallace at the Battle of Falkirk. Wallace is betrayed and executed in London in 1305. Robert Bruce takes over leadership of Scottish resistance and is crowned King in 1306. Edward invades again in 1307 but dies on way. He expelled all Jews from England in 1290. He was given the nickname "Hammer of the Scots" as he tried to unite the two kingdoms.
Per Faris [1999:281-4]:
     "EDWARD I OF ENGLAND [Longshanks], King of England, son and heir, was born at Westminster, Middlesex, on 17 June 1239, and was named after the Anglo-Saxon King Edward the Confessor whose memory was honoured by King Henry. He was granted Gascony and was created Earl of Chester on 14 Feb. 1254. To prevent the rebellious Gascons from obtaining help from Castille, his marriage was arranged. He was married for the first time at the monastery of Las Huelgas in Spain on 18 Oct. 1254 (he being fifteen and she thirteen years of age) to ALLANORE DE CASTILLE [LEONOR DE CASTILLA or ELEANOR OF CASTILE], daughter of Fernando III, Rey de Castilla y Leon (descendant of Charlemagne), by his second wife Jeanne, daughter of Simon de Dammartin, Comte d'Aumale et de Ponthieu (descendant of Charlemagne). She was born about 1241. In the conflict between his father, King Henry III, and the barons led by Simon de Montfort, Edward at first supported Montfort, hut then supported his father, slaying Montfort at Evesham on 4 Aug 1265. Edward took the cross in 1268 and was on crusade at Acre in the Holy Land from May 1271 to September 1272. On his return journey to England, he was in the kingdom of Sicily when he learned of his father's death, and paid homage at Paris to his cousin the French King, Philippe III, for his French lands. He landed at Dover in England on 2 Aug. 1274, and was crowned King of England at Westminster on 19 Aug. 1274. Having learned much from the civil war of his father's reign, he embarked on the restoration of royal authority with the institution of inquiries into the authority by which landowners held their jurisdictions and overhauled the civil and criminal law. From 1275 to 1307, he summoned, as had Montfort before him, representatives of the shires and boroughs to parliaments, that is, meetings of the king with the principal men of the realm. This improved relations between the king and the borough communities and committed them to some support of his policies, although Edward had no intention of sharing royal authority. Edward was much concerned with asserting his claims to sovereignty over the whole of Britain. In 1277 he defeated Llewellyn, Prince of North Wales, and in the early 1280s conquered the latter's principality and annexed it to the English Crown. The hereditary Anglo-Norman lords continued to rule the marches of Wales with the overlordship of the English Crown. The dying out of the direct Scottish royal line in 1290 enabled Edward to press his claim to the overlordship of Scotland, but he met resistance from his choice as King of the Scots, John Balliol. In 1296 Edward invaded Scotland, deposed Balliol and sought to occupy the kingdom. William Wallace, a supporter of Balliol, began a successful rebellion, but was decisively defeated by Edward at Falkirk in 1298. Robert de Brus, whose grandfather had been a claimant to the Scottish throne, and who was a rival of the Balliols, rebelled, and was crowned king in 1306. In 1294 Edward had become embroiled in war with his overlord, the French king, Philippe IV, who was asserting himself in the affairs of Edward's Duchy of Gascony. The extortionate demands for services and money to fight Philippe and to suppress Scottish resistance alienated his English subjects in his later years and provoked renewed baronial opposition. His wife and consort died aged forty-nine at Herdeby, co. Nottingham, on 29 Nov. 1290. Edward I was married for the second time at Canterbury on 8 Sep. 1299 to MARGUERITE DE FRANCE, daughter of Philippe III de France le Hardi [the Bold], Roi de France (descendant of Charlemagne), by his second wife Maria von Brabant, daughter of Heinrich III Herzog von Brabant (descendant of Charlemagne). She was born in 1279. Their sons were born at Brotherton in 1300, and at Woodstock in 1301. EDWARD I OF ENGLAND, King of England, died at Burgh-on-Sands, near Carlisle, Cumberland, on 7 July 1307, when preparing once again to invade Scotland, and was buried at Westminster Abbey. His widow died at Marlborough Castle on 4 Feb. 1317.
     "East Herts.Arch.Soc. 1:333 -334 (1902) (Eleanor died at the house of Richard de Weston or of Sir John Weston at Hardby in Nottinghamshire about ten miles from Clipstone) (her body was taken to Lincoln on December 4th, and the procession to Westminster Abbey stopped the next successive days at Grantham, Stamford, Geddington, Northampton, Stony Stratford, Woburn, Dunstable, St. Albans, Waltham, Westcheap and Charing. "In every town and place where the corpse rested, the King commanded a cross of admirable workmanship to be erected to the Queens memory" of which Northhampton Geddington and Waltham remain). D.N.B. 6:432-456 (1908). C.P. 6:469 (1926). Paget (1977), pp. 18-20. Powicke (1961), pp. 34-35. Mediaeval Studies 46:245-265 (1984) ('The accounts kept by the queen's executors show that on the first anniversary of her death, the number of paupers paid to carry candles in the procession was forty nine, an unusual number which may well correspond lo Eleanor's age at her death1t) (birth of children provided by John Carmi Parsons).
     "Children of Edward 1 of England, by Alianore de Castille:
i.     daughter, died 29 May, buried Bordeaux.
ii.     KATHERINE OF ENGLAND, died 5 Sep. 1264, buried Westminster Abbey.
iii.     JOAN OF ENGLAND, born January 1265, died before 7 Sep. 1265, buried Westminster Abbey.
iv.     JOHN OF ENGLAND, born Windsor 13 July 1266, died Wallingford while in care of his uncle Richard of Cornwall, his father on crusade, 3 Aug 1271, buried Westminster Abbey.
v.     HENRY OF ENGLAND, born May 1268, died 14 Oct. 1274, buried Westminster Abbey.
vi.     ALIANOR OF ENGLAND, born about 18 July 1269, married HENRI III, Comte de Bar.
vii.     daughter, born Acre 1271, died infancy.
viii.     JOAN OF ENGLAND, married, first, GILBERT DE CLARE, second, RALPH DE MONTHERMER.
ix.     ALPHONSO OF ENGLAND, born Bayonne 24 Nov. 1273, Earl of Chester, died 19 Aug. 1284, buried Westminster Abbey
x.     MARGARET OF ENGLAND born 11 Mar 1275, married JOHN II, Duke of Brabant.
xi.     BERENGARIA OF ENGLAND, born Kempton, Middlesex, 1 May 1276, died 1278.
xii.     daughter, born Westminster 3 Jan. 1278, died infancy.
xiii.     MARY OF ENGLAND, born Woodstock 11 Mar. 1279, nun at Amesbury, died 29 May 1332.
xiv.     ELIZABETH OF ENGLAND, married HUMPHREY DE BOHUN.
xv.     EDWARD II OF ENGLAND.

     "Children of Edward I of England, by Marguerite de France:
xvi.     THOMAS OF NORFOLK [of Brotherton], married ALICE DE HALES [see NORFOLK 12].
xvii.     EDMUND OF KENT [of Woodstock], married MARGARET WAKE [see HOLAND 10].
xviii.     ALIANOR OF ENGLAND, born 4 May 1306, died 1311."26,27,28,29,12


; This is the same person as ”Edward I of England” at Wikipedia.30

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis. 3.
3. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. vol I 19,20 date of death.
3. IGI Mormon Church.8


; Per Genealogy.EU (Anjou 3): “King EDWARD I "Longshanks" of England (1272-1307), *Westminster Palace 17.6.1239, +Burgh on the Sands, nr Carlisle 8.7.1307, bur Westminster Abbey; 1m: Burgos 18.10.1254 Leonor of Castile (*1240/41 +29.11.1290); 2m: Canterbury 8.9.1299 Marguerite de France (*1275/79 +14.2.1317)”.2

; Per Racines et Histoire (Plantagenêts): “2) Edward 1er «Longshanks» d’Angleterre ° 17-18/06/1239 (Westminster) + 07-08/07/1307 (Burgh-on-Sands, Cumberland) earl of Chester (14/02/1254-24/12/1264), Lord of Ireland, croisé (24/06/1268, embarque 11/08/1270, retour 15/08/1272), Roi d’Angleterre (1272, couronné 19/08/1274 à Westminster), duc de Guyenne
     ép. 1) 18/10/1254 (Las Huelgas, Burgos) Leonor (Eleanor) de Castilla, comtesse de Ponthieu (1279) et de Montreuil ° ~1241 + 28/11/1290 (Harby, Nottinghamshire) (fille de Fernando III, roi de Castille, Leon, Galice, Tolède, Cordoue, Jaen et Séville, et de Jeanne de Dammartin, comtese de Ponthieu)
     ép. 2) 08/09/1299 (Canterbury, disp. 01/07/1298 pour degrés de consanguinité (du 2° au 4°) Marguerite de France, Reine d’Angleterre (1299-1307) ° 1279 ou 1282 ? + 14/02/1317/18 (Marlborough Castle, Londres) (fille de Philippe III «Le Hardi», Roi de France, et de Marie de Brabant-Lorraine)”.31

; Per Med Lands:
     "EDWARD, son of HENRY III King of England & his wife Eléonore de Provence (Palace of Westminster 17 Jun 1239-Burgh-on-Sands, Cumberland 8 Jul 1307, bur Westminster Abbey). The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “XIV Kal Jul…Londoniæ apud Westmonasterium” of “filius…Eadwardus” to “regi Henrico Angliæ filio regis Johannis…de regina sua Alienora filia comitis de Provencia”[727]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the birth "XIV Kal Jul" [1239] of "Edwardum filium suum primogenitum" to "Alienor regina Angliæ"[728]. Matthew Paris records that Edward was installed as Duke of Gascony in 1252, after the territory was subdued by Simon de Montfort[729]. Henry III King of England granted “totam terram Vasconie” to “Eudoardo primogenito filio nostro” by charter dated 8 Jun 1252[730]. He was created Earl of Chester 14 Feb 1254. Taken prisoner with his father at the battle of Lewes 14 May 1264 by the rebel barons under Simon de Montfort, he managed to escape 26 May. As a means of making peace, he delivered the earldom of Chester to Simon de Montfort 24 Dec 1264, though it was restored to Edward after the battle of Evesham 4 Aug 1265. He left England in summer 1270 intending to join Louis IX King of France in Tunisia. On learning of the king's death after arriving in Africa, Edward wintered in Sicily with King Charles and the following spring sailed for Palestine, landing at Acre 9 May 1271, but he had insufficient resources to make any headway against the Mameluk Sultan Baibars and signed a peace agreement with the Sultan at Caesarea 22 May 1272[731]. An attempt was made on his life 16 Jun 1272 when an Assassin stabbed him with a poisoned dagger, the after effects of which left Edward seriously ill for several months, and left Acre for England 22 Sep 1272[732]. He succeeded his father in 1272 as EDWARD I “Longshanks” King of England, when he was in Sicily returning from the Crusade. He arrived back in England in Aug 1274, and was crowned 19 Aug 1274 at Westminster Abbey. A strong king, he increased the power of the crown during his reign at the expense of the barons, probably setting the scene for the problems faced by his weaker son Edward II.
     "Betrothed (1247) to [MARIE] de Brabant, daughter of HENRI II Duke of Brabant & his first wife Maria von Staufen (-beheaded Donauwörth 1256, bur Donauwörth Heiliges Kreuz Stift). The betrothal of one of the daughters of Duke Henri II to Edward of England is recorded by Matthew Paris[733]. It is not certain that Marie was the daughter in question. However, she is the most likely candidate as her two older sisters were already married and her younger half-sister was only an infant at the time.
     "m firstly (Betrothed 1253, Burgos 18 Oct 1254) Infanta doña LEONOR de Castilla, daughter of FERNANDO III “el Santo” King of Castile & his second wife Jeanne de Dammartin-Ponthieu (1240-Harby, Nottinghamshire 29 Nov 1290, bur Westminster Abbey). The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "circa translationem beati Edwardi regis apud Boures" in 1254 of "Edwardus filius regis Henrici" and "Alienoram iuvenculam…sororem regis Hispanniæ"[734]. This marriage was first proposed in 1253 in connection with settlement of the Spanish claim to Gascony, according to Matthew Paris who refers to her as "sororem suam uterinani" in reference to "rex Hispaniæ" but does not give her name[735]. She accompanied her husband on crusade 1270/72. Crowned Queen 19 Aug 1274 at Westminster Abbey. She succeeded her mother in 1279 as Ctss de Ponthieu et de Montreuil. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Kal Dec apud Herdeby in comitatu Lincolniensi" of "Alienora regina Angliæ domini regis consors"[736].
     "m secondly ([Betrothed 12 May 1299] contract Montreuil 19 Jun 1299, Canterbury Cathedral 8 or 9 Sep 1299) MARGUERITE de France, daughter of PHILIPPE III King of France & his second wife Marie de Brabant ([1277/83]-Marlborough Castle, Wiltshire 14 Feb 1318, bur Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London). The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis names "Ludovicum comitem Ebroiciæ civitatis, Margaretamque reginam Angliæ ac Blancham ducissam Austriæ" as the three children of King Philippe III and his second wife, recording in a later passage the marriage of Marguerite "apud Cantuariam" in 1299[737]. Edward I King of England appointed “Amadeum comitem Sabaudiæ consanguineum nostrum” as proxy for the marriages between “nos et Margaretam sororem...regis Franciæ...ac inter Edwardum filium nostrum et Isabellam...regis Franciæ filiam” by charter dated 12 May 1299[738]. The Annals of Worcester record the marriage “Sep…IV Id…in ecclesia Cantuarensi” in 1299 of “Edwardus rex” and “Margareta soror Philippi Regis Franciæ”[739]. A charter dated 27 Sep 1299 lists the dower assigned by King Edward to “Margaretam sororem...regis Franciæ” in England[740]. The Chronique Parisienne Anonyme de 1316 à 1339 records the death [in 1318] of “Marguerite roynne d’Engleterre, fille du roy Philippe...fame segonde au grant Edouart jadiz roy de Engleterre...”[741]. King Edward II issued a charter dated 18 Apr 1318 to “Thomæ comiti Norffolciæ et marescallo Angliæ et Edmundo de Wodestok fratribus nostris...executoribus testamenti bonæ memoriæ Margaretæ nuper reginæ Angliæ matris nostræ”[742]."
Med Lands cites:
[727] Annales de Theokesberia, p. 112.
[728] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 177.
[729] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1252, pp. 313-5.
[730] Champollion Figeac (1843), Tome II, XXVII, p. 49.
[731] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 335-7.
[732] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 338.
[733] Matthew Paris, Vol. IV, 1247, pp. 623 and 645.
[734] Annales Londonienses, p. 47.
[735] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1253, pp. 396-7, and 1255, p. 511, a betrothal ceremony.
[736] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 244.
[737] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 571 and 581.
[738] Rymer (1740), Tome I, Pars III, p. 206.
[739] Annales de Wigornia, p. 542.
[740] Rymer (1740), Tome I, Pars III, p. 213.
[741] Mémoires de la Société de l’Histoire de Paris et de L’Ile-de-France, Tome XI (Paris, 1885) Chronique Parisienne Anonyme de 1316 à 1339, 15, p. 31.
[742] Rymer (1739), Tome II, Pars I, p. 149.9


; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 6): “E13. [2m.] Infta Leonor, Cts de Ponthieu, *1240/41, +Herdeby, Lincs 28.11.1290; m.Burgos 1254 King Edward I of England (*1239 +1307)”.17

; Per Med Lands:
     "Infanta doña LEONOR de Castilla y León (1240-Herdeby, Lincolnshire 29 Nov 1290, bur Westminster Abbey). The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "circa translationem beati Edwardi regis apud Boures" in 1254 of "Edwardus filius regis Henrici" and "Alienoram iuvenculam…sororem regis Hispanniæ"[1051]. This marriage was first proposed in 1253 in connection with settlement of the Spanish claim to Gascony, according to Matthew of Paris who refers to her as "sororem suam uterinani" in reference to "rex Hispaniæ" but does not give her name[1052]. She accompanied her husband on crusade 1270/72. Crowned Queen 19 Aug 1274 at Westminster Abbey. She succeeded her mother in 1279 as Ctss de Ponthieu, in place of her nephew Jean de Ponthieu Comte d'Aumâle, as the closer direct relation. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Kal Dec apud Herdeby in comitatu Lincolniensi" of "Alienora regina Angliæ domini regis consors"[1053].
     "m (Burgos 18 Oct 1254) as his first wife, EDWARD Earl of Chester, son of HENRY III King of England & his wife Eléonore de Provence (Palace of Westminster 17/18 Jun 1239-Burgh-on-Sands, Cumberland 8 Jul 1307, bur Westminster Abbey). He succeeded his father in 1272 as EDWARD I “Longshanks” King of England."
Med Lands cites:
[1051] Annales Londonienses, p. 47.
[1052] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1253, pp. 396-7, and 1255, p. 511, a betrothal ceremony.
[1053] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 244.19


; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 5): “D6. Marguerite, *1275, +Marlborough Castle/London 14.2.1317 !dwid!/1318, bur Grey Friars, London; m.Canterbury 8.9.1299 King Edward I of England (*17.6.1239 +8.7.1307)”.32

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGUERITE de France ([1277/83]-Marlborough Castle, Wiltshire 14 Feb 1318, bur Grey Friars, London). The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis names "Ludovicum comitem Ebroiciæ civitatis, Margaretamque reginam Angliæ ac Blancham ducissam Austriæ" as the three children of King Philippe III and his second wife, recording in a later passage the marriage of Marguerite "apud Cantuariam" in 1299[739]. Edward I King of England appointed “Amadeum comitem Sabaudiæ consanguineum nostrum” as proxy for the marriages between “nos et Margaretam sororem...regis Franciæ...ac inter Edwardum filium nostrum et Isabellam...regis Franciæ filiam” by charter dated 12 May 1299[740]. The Annals of Worcester record the marriage “Sep…IV Id…in ecclesia Cantuarensi” in 1299 of “Edwardus rex” and “Margareta soror Philippi Regis Franciæ”[741]. A charter dated 27 Sep 1299 lists the dower assigned by King Edward to “Margaretam sororem...regis Franciæ”[742]. The Chronique Parisienne Anonyme de 1316 à 1339 records the death [in 1318] of “Marguerite roynne d’Engleterre, fille du roy Philippe...fame segonde au grant Edouart jadiz roy de Engleterre...”[743]. King Edward II issued a charter dated 18 Apr 1318 to “Thomæ comiti Norffolciæ et marescallo Angliæ et Edmundo de Wodestok fratribus nostris...executoribus testamenti bonæ memoriæ Margaretæ nuper reginæ Angliæ matris nostræ”[744].
     "m ([Betrothed 12 May 1299] treaty Montreuil 19 Jun 1299, Canterbury Cathedral 8 Sep 1299) as his second wife, EDWARD I King of England, son of HENRY III King of England & his wife Eléonore de Provence (Palace of Westminster 17/18 Jun 1239-Burgh-on-Sands, Cumberland 8 Jul 1307, bur Westminster Abbey)."
Med Lands cites:
[739] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 571 and 581.
[740] Rymer, T. (1745) Fœdera, Conventiones, Literæ 3rd Edn (London), Tome I, Pars III, p. 206.
[741] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1869) Annales Monastici Vol. IV, Annales de Oseneia, Chronicon Thomæ Wykes, Annales de Wigornia (London), p. 542.
[742] Rymer (1740), Tome I, Pars III, p. 213.
[743] Mémoires de la Société de l’Histoire de Paris et de L’Ile-de-France, Tome XI (Paris, 1885) Chronique Parisienne Anonyme de 1316 à 1339, 15, p. 31.
[744] Rymer (1745), Tome II, Pars I, p. 149.23


; Per Med Lands:
     "MARIE de Brabant (-beheaded Donauwörth 18 Jan 1256, bur Donauwörth Heilige Kreuz-Stift). The Oude Kronik van Brabant names (in order) "Mechtildim comitissam Atrebatensem et Sancti Pauli, Mariam comitissam palatinam Reni, Beatricem lantgraviam Thuringie postea comitissam Flandrie, et Margaretam sanctiomonialem, postea abbatissam in Valle Ducis" as the daughters of "Henricus secundus et quintus dux Brabancie" and his first wife Marie[308]. The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Maria" as second of the four daughters of "Henricus…secundus dux" and his wife Maria, and her husband "duci Bavarie", specifying that he "impie et crudeliter" killed her[309]. The betrothal of one of the daughters of Henri II Duke of Brabant to Edward of England is recorded by Matthew Paris[310]. It is not certain that Marie was the daughter in question. However, she is the most likely candidate as her two older sisters were already married and her younger half-sister was only an infant at the time. The Annales Mellicenses in 1256 record that "Lodwicus Reni comes palatinus" had "Mariam uxorem suam, filiam ducis Brabancie" beheaded by her jailers "apud Werdam"[311]. The Continuatio Lambacensis clarifies that she was killed because of her adultery[312]. The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record that Duke Ludwig beheaded his wife "Mariam ducissam Brabancie" in "castro Werde Suevico"[313]. The necrology of Freising Weihenstephan records the death "XV Kal Feb" of "Maria palatine Reni decollate a sponse eius Ludovico palatino Reni"[314].
     "Betrothed (1247) to EDWARD of England, son of HENRY III King of England & his wife Eléonore de Provence (Palace of Westminster 17/18 Jun 1239-Burgh-on-Sands, Cumberland 8 Jul 1307, bur Westminster Abbey). He succeeded his father in 1372 as EDWARD I “Longshanks” King of England.
     "m (2 Aug 1254) as his first wife, LUDWIG II "der Strenge" joint Duke of Bavaria, son of OTTO II "dem Erlauchten" Duke of Bavaria & his wife Agnes von Braunschweig (Heidelberg 13 Apr 1229-Heidelberg 1/2 Feb 1294, bur Fürstenfeld)."
Med Lands cites:
[308] Oude Kronik van Brabant, p. 65.
[309] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 8, MGH SS XXV, p. 390.
[310] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1874) Matthæi Parisiensis, Monachi Sancti Albani, Chronica Majora (London) (“MP”), Vol, IV, 1247, pp. 623 and 645.
[311] Annales Mellicenses 1256, MGH SS IX, p. 509.
[312] Continuatio Lambacensis 1256, MGH SS IX, p. 559.
[313] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75.
[314] Necrologium Weihenstephanense, Freising Necrologies, p. 203.14
He was Crusade between May 1271 and September 1272 at Acre, HaTzafon (Northern District), Palestine (Israel now).33 He was King of England. Coronation 19 August 1274 between 20 November 1272 and 7 July 1307.20,30

Family 1

Marie (?) of Brabant b. c 1226, d. 18 Jan 1256

Family 2

Doña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu b. c 1241, d. 28 Nov 1290
Children

Family 3

Marguerite (?) de France, Queen of England b. 1279, d. 14 Feb 1317
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 201, PLANTAGENET 10:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.16. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Kent: p. 416.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000808&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIIIdied1272B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward I 'Longshanks': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000809&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIdied1307B.
  10. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.15.
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-28, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 281-284. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  13. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm#MarieBrabantdied1256.
  15. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_of_Brabant,_Duchess_of_Bavaria. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  16. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001694&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Leonordied1290MEdwardIEngland
  20. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 282.
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00003852&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Margueritedied1318
  24. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 12 July 2020), memorial page for Edward I (16 Jun 1239–7 Jul 1307), Find a Grave Memorial no. 1955, citing Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1955. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  25. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, p. 3; Line 1-28.
  26. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  27. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  28. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  29. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  30. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_I_of_England
  31. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Plantagenêts (d’Angleterre) Lancaster & Tudor, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Plantagenets.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  32. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html#MP3
  33. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, pp. 282.
  34. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.19.
  35. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan of Acre of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005915&tree=LEO
  36. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Montagu 6: pp. 505-506.
  37. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.20.
  38. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p. 20.
  39. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005912&tree=LEO
  40. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf, p. 4.
  41. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Elizabethdied1316.
  42. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000810&tree=LEO
  43. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIIdied1327B.
  44. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Norfolk 6: pp. 550-1.
  45. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Kent 6: p. 416.
  46. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edmund of Woodstock: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007045&tree=LEO
  47. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#EdmundKentdied1330
  48. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p. 21.

Edward II "of Caernarvon" (?) King of England1,2,3

M, #4421, b. 25 April 1284, d. 21 September 1327
FatherEdward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England1,4,5,6,7,3 b. 17 Jun 1239, d. 7 Jul 1307
MotherDoña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu1,6,8,7,3 b. c 1241, d. 28 Nov 1290
ReferenceEDV18
Last Edited28 Oct 2020
     Edward II "of Caernarvon" (?) King of England was born on 25 April 1284 at Caernarvon Castle, Caernarvon, Caernarvonshire, Wales.9,10,11,1,2,7,3 He and Margaret (?) Maid of Norway, Queen of Scots were engaged in July 1290; Per Med Lands "m. Papal dispensation 16 Nov 1289, Birgham Jul 1290."2,3,12 Edward II "of Caernarvon" (?) King of England and Blanche (?) de France, Cts d'Alsace, Duchess of Austria were engaged on 31 July 1291.3 Edward II "of Caernarvon" (?) King of England and Philippa/Philippine de Dampierre were engaged on 7 January 1297; Per Med Lands "contract 7 Jan 1297"; Genealogics says engaged 1294.3,7,13,14 Edward II "of Caernarvon" (?) King of England married Isabelle (?) de France, Queen of England, Ducehesse d'Aquitaine, Cts de Ponthieu, daughter of Philippe IV "the Fair/le Bel" (?) King of France and Navarre and Juana (Joan, Jeanne) I (?) Queen of Navarre, Cts de Champagne, Brie et Bigorre, on 25 January 1308 at Boulogne-sur-Mer, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France; Per Med Lands "contract 12 May 1299, betrothed 20 May 1303, Boulogne-sur-Mer 22 Jan 1308.)10,1,15,2,7,3,16,17"
Edward II "of Caernarvon" (?) King of England died on 21 September 1327 at Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire, England, at age 43; murdered.11,1,2,7,3
Edward II "of Caernarvon" (?) King of England was buried after 21 September 1327 at Benedictine Abbey (now Gloucester Cathedral), Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England,

; Fropm Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     25 Apr 1284, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, Wales
     DEATH     21 Sep 1327 (aged 43), Berkeley, Stroud District, Gloucestershire, England
     English Monarch. The eldest surviving son of Edward I and Eleanor of Castile, he succeeded his father in 1307, and was crowned on his birthday in 1308. Edward lacked the royal dignity and military skill of his father, and was a complete failure as king. He married Isabella of France at Boulogne-sur-Mer on January 28, 1308. The marriage was also a failure, though four children were born. Edward relied heavily on court favourites, much like his grandfather Henry III. Edward's favourite was his former tutor and most certainly his lover, Piers Gaveston. This relationship angered the nobles, and in 1312 they revolted, murdering Gaveston and forcing Edward to accept restrictions of his power. But Gaveston was soon replaced by another despicable favourite and lover, Hugh Despenser. Edward rallied an army and met the rebellious nobles at the Battle of Boroughbridge. Edward prevailed, and he and Despenser ruled the government, gaining even more enemies. Edward's queen, who had been sent to France to negotiate her husband's affairs in Gascony, began an affair with one of the exiled nobles, Roger Mortimer. Together they raised an army, and in September of 1326, they invaded, landing at Essex. Edward's followers deserted him, and the king fled London. His wife followed, Despenser was killed, and Edward was taken prisoner. He was imprisoned at Kenilworth Castle and forced by Parliament to abdicate on January 20, 1327. Isabella and Mortimer took up the reigns of power as regents for the young Edward III. The king was systematically ill-treated in hopes he would die of disease. When his constitution proved too strong, he was secretly murdered. He was 43 years old. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
          Edward I 1239–1307
          Eleanor of Castile 1240–1290
     Spouse
          Isabella of France 1292–1358
     Siblings
          Katherine Plantagenet 1261–1264
          Joan Plantagenet 1265–1265
          John Plantagenet 1266–1271
          Henry Plantagenet 1267–1274
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1269–1298
          Joan of Acre 1272–1307
          Alfonso Plantagenet 1273–1284
          Margaret of England 1275–1318
          Berengaria Plantagenet 1276–1278
          Mary Plantagenet 1278–1332
          Isabella Plantagenet 1279–1279
          Elizabeth Plantagenet 1282–1316
     Half Siblings
          Thomas Plantagenet of Brotherton 1300–1338
          Edmund Plantagenet of Woodstock 1301–1330
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1306–1311
     Children
          Edward III 1312–1377
          John Plantagenet of Eltham 1316–1336
          Eleanor Of Woodstock 1318–1355
          Joan Plantagenet 1321–1362
     BURIAL     Gloucester Cathedral, Gloucester, City of Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 31 Dec 2000
     Find a Grave Memorial 1956.1,2,3,18
     ; This is the same person as ”Edward II of England” at Wikipedia.19 EDV-18 GKJ-19.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Edward II, king of England, was born on 25 April 1284, the eldest surviving son of Edward I 'Longshanks', king of England, and Eleanor of Castile, comtesse de Ponthieu. In 1294 a marriage was arranged for him with Philippa de Dampierre. However King Philippe IV of France imprisoned her father and two of her brothers, forcing the marriage to be called off. Philippa was imprisoned in Paris until her death in 1306.
     “Edward was about 17 when his father created him Prince of Wales. His parent's sixteenth child, he had lost his mother at the age of six, and his father was away most of the time. Probably because of this he was very much attached to 'favourites'. The first was Piers Gaveston who became a close companion to the lonely prince until Piers made himself unpopular by his sarcasm and the offensive nicknames he bestowed on several of the courtiers.
     “Shortly before he died, Edward I banished Piers Gaveston from court. However, as soon as Edward II became king he recalled Piers and created him Earl of Cornwall. When Edward II went to France in 1308 to marry Isabelle de France, daughter of Philippe IV 'le Bel', king of France, and Jeanne I, queen of Navarre, he left Piers Gaveston as regent in charge of England. On his return with his young bride, Edward II showed so much affection for Gaveston that not only the bride but also two uncles accompanying her became alarmed. When Edward II and Isabelle were crowned on 25 February 1308, Piers Gaveston was again bestowed with greater honours than the king's cousins. Offended, these cousins almost attacked Gaveston in Westminster Abbey.
     “Edward II gave his own niece in marriage to Piers Gaveston. However, when he realised how unpopular Gaveston was he sent him to Ireland. Unable to do without him he recalled him a year later. For the next three years Gaveston, back in royal favour continued to offend, until Guy de Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, who had been nicknamed 'The Black Dog of Arden' by Gaveston, kidnapped and murdered Gaveston in June 1312.
     “In 1314 Edward campaigned against Scotland, but was defeated at Bannockburn by Robert the Bruce. In 1318 he appointed Hugh le Despenser as his chamberlain, who then became his next 'favourite'. Hugh and his father, also named Hugh, the earl of Winchester, had been supporters of Piers Gaveston and now supported the king against the barons and even against the queen.
     “In 1324 they suggested that the king take the queen's estate. When he did so Isabelle left for France, and with her lover Roger Mortimer she returned with an army in 1326. The Despensers were captured and executed while Edward II was imprisoned and it is generally believed that he was hideously murdered in Berkeley Castle on 21 September 1327. Ian Mortimer (Dr). Hon. Fellow, Department of History, University of Exeter, has cast an interesting new light on this story.
     “'For centuries it was widely believed that Edward II was murdered in Berkeley Castle on 21 September 1327. This was due to a heavy reliance on chronicles for narrative history, coupled with a trust that all public records were written accurately and in good faith. However, new research casts grave doubt on this. It may be shown that no chronicler had any first-hand information about what happened in Berkeley Castle. But more significantly it may be shown conclusively that all public records relating to the death were based on an initial, deliberately false piece of information. Contrary to public opinion, there was no check on the identity of the corpse buried as that of Edward II in December 1327. News of the death was carried in a letter from Lord Berkeley at Berkeley Castle to the fourteen-year-old Edward III at Lincoln (110 miles away). It arrived on the night of 23 September.
     “'The very next day Edward started disseminating the news, which means that he wholly trusted Lord Berkeley's letter. When the corpse was exhibited, it was totally embalmed and covered in wax-cloth: there was no exposure of the face. It was only after the burial that the young king consulted the woman who embalmed his supposed father and learnt the facts. Lord Berkeley had lied in his letter. Thus the court and the whole country had been told and believed that Edward II was dead simply on the strength of one fraudulent message from Lord Berkeley.
     “'In 1328 the Earl of Kent learnt that Berkeley and Maltravers were keeping Edward II alive at Corfe Castle, and tried to rescue him in March 1330. He was discovered and promptly sentenced to death by parliament for attempting to set Edward II up as king again. Later that year, after the arrest of Roger Mortimer (Lord Berkeley's father-in-law and the architect of the plot to announce the ex-king's 'death'), Lord Berkeley confessed he had lied in his original letter, but his confession was quashed by the king.
     “'It suited Edward III to maintain that his father was dead, and he allowed Lord Berkeley to give a false alibi. Edward III then began on a very thorough programme of propaganda to maintain the official line that Roger Mortimer had ordered Edward II to be murdered. Only Lord Berkeley's attempted confession to parliament, the discovery of a papal notary's narrative of Edward II's life to 1336, the piecing together of the events of the Earl of Kent's plot and trial, and two references to a possible meeting of Edward III and his father in Germany in 1338 slipped through the propaganda net to show that Edward III managed one of the most effective cover-ups in history.'
     “Edward and Isabelle had four children of whom a daughter Eleanor and his successor Edward III would have progeny.”.7

; Per Weis: King of England 1307-1327


Per Christou Gedcom: "He was the only surviving son of Edward I. He was not close to his father and raised by his sisters. He became reliant on his homosexual friend Piers Gaveston who was murdered by his nobles in 1312 and Hugh Despenser and his son Hugh who were put to death in 1326. He was deposed in favor of his son and was murdered by his wife. He was disembowelled by sticking a red hot iron into his rectum (a conventional death for homosexuals at the time.) Edward II is routed at the Battle of Bannockburn by Robert Bruce.


Per Faris [1999:284-5]:
     "EDWARD II OF ENGLAND [of Caernarvon] eldest surviving son and heir, was born at Caernarvon, Co. Caernarvon, Wales, on 25 Apr. 1284. He was married at Boulogne on 25 Jan. 1308 to ISABELLE DE FRANCE, daughter of Philippe IV, Roi de France (descendant of Charlemagne), by Joan, daughter of Henri I, Roi de Navarre et Comte de Champagne (descendant of Charlemagne). She was born in 1292. Their children were born at Windsor in 1312, at Eltham in 1316, at Woodstock in 1318, and at the Tower of London in 1321. He was crowned on 25 Feb. 1308. He had little success in meeting the problems left by his father in Scotland and Gascony, and with the barons. He failed to appease the barons by consultation or the borough communities by curbing the activities of his officials, and angered them by the favours which he bestowed on a foreigner, Peter de Gaveston. In 1310 Edward agreed to a degree of baronial control over government. The barons seized Gaveston and executed him in June 1312. Robert I de Brus, King of Scotland, threatened to overthrow the English overlordship. Edward led an army into Scotland and was decisively defeated by Bruce at Bannockburn on 24 June 1314, and was unable to defend northern England against Scottish devastation. Edward found new favourites, the two Hughs le Despenser, father and son. The territorial ambitions of the Despensers in Wales antagonised the Welsh marcher lords. They made an alliance with Edward's cousin, Thomas of Lancaster, but were defeated by Edward at Boroughbridge, co. York, in March 1322. His reliance on the Despensers aroused the resentment of his queen, Isabelle. While on a diplomatic mission in 1325 to Paris involving the dispute over Edward's French lands, she became the mistress of Roger Mortimer, an exiled baronial opponent of Edward. In 1326 Isabelle and Roger invaded England, executed the Despensers, and deposed Edward on 7 Jan. 1327 in favour of his son Edward. EDWARD II OF ENGLAND, King of England, was murdered in Berkeley Castle on 21 Sep. 1327, apparently in an attempt to escape the castle, and was buried, it is said, at Gloucester. His widow died at Hertford Castle on 22 Aug. 1358.
     "D.N.B.     6:456-466 (1908). Paget (1977), p. 20. Powicke (1961), p. 35. Ancient Deeds A 15644, dated
1349 (petition dated 1349 of Sées Abbey to the lady Isabel Mounthaut, mother of the King of
England, to receive Michael de Nonchal elected by then prior of their priory of Arundel).
     "Children of Edward II of England, by Isabelle de France:
i.     EDWARD III OF ENGLAND, born 13 Nov. 1312 [see next].
ii.     JOHN OF ENGLAND [of Eltham], born at Eltham Manor House, Kent, 25 Aug. 1316, Earl of Cornwall, died unmarried 13 Sep. 1336, aged twenty, being slain, it is said, by his brother, King Edward III. CF. 3:434-435 (1913).
iii.     ALIANOR OF ENGLAND, born 8 June 1318, married REYNOLD II, Duke of Gueldres.
iv.     JOAN OF ENGLAND, born 5 July 1321, married DAVID II LE BRUS, King of Scots"
.20,21,22,9

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973.
2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis. 3.
3. IGI Mormon Church.7


; Per Genealogy.EU (Anjou 3): “D4. King EDWARD II of England (1307-27), abdicated I.1327, *Caernarvon Castle 25.4.1284, +murdered at Berkeley Castle 21.9.1327, bur Benedictine Abbey, Gloucester, now Gloucester Cathedral; m.Boulogne 25.1.1308 Isabelle de France (*1295 +22.8.1358)"


Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 5): “E7. Isabelle, *Paris 1292, +Hertford Castle/Roseing 22.8.1358, bur Grey Friars, London; m.Boulogne 25.1.1308 King Edward II of England (*25.4.1284 +21.9.1327)”.23,24

; Per Racines et Histoire (Plantagenêts): “1) Edward II «of Caernavon» d’Angleterre ° 24-25/04/1284 (Caernavon) +X 21/09/1327 (ass., Berkeley) prince of Wales (1301-1307), Roi d’Angleterre (08/07/1307-1327, couronné 25/02/1308 Westminster), Lord of Ireland, duc de Guyenne (05/1306), comte de Ponthieu
     ép. 25/01/1308 (Boulogne, disp. 01/07/1298 consanguinité 3° et 4° degrés) Isabelle de France, Reine d’Angleterre (1308-1327), crééé comtesse de Ponthieu (24/09/1334) ° 1292 (Paris) + 22/08/1358 (Hertford) (fille de Philippe IV «Le Bel» et de Jeanne de Navarre) ”.25

; Per Med Lands:
     "EDWARD "of Caernarvon", son of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Caernarvon Castle 25 Apr 1284-murdered Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire 21 Sep 1327, bur Gloucester Cathedral). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the birth "die S Marci Evangelistæ" 25 Apr [1284] at Caernarvon of "domini regi Angliæ filius…Eadwardus"[826]. He succeeded his mother in 1290 as Comte de Ponthieu et de Montreuil. Created Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester 7 Feb 1301. Created Duke of Aquitaine in May 1306. He succeeded his father in 1307 as EDWARD II King of England. Crowned in Westminster Abbey 24/25 Feb 1308. The barons, weakened by the strong rule of Edward's father, took the opportunity to regain their position under the new king of weaker character. A crisis was triggered immediately after his accession due to the unpopularity of his favourite Piers Gaveston. Edward was obliged to accept a committee of Lords Ordainers to control his excesses, remove his own advisers and impose reforms. Gaveston was captured, tried and beheaded near Warwick 19 Jun 1312. Edward's first cousin Thomas Earl of Lancaster led the discontented barons, but lacked the ability to push through the reforms which were needed. Political confusion increased, but the various baronial factions found common cause in opposition to the king's new favourite Hugh Despenser the younger. The Earl of Lancaster, by now in open rebellion, was captured and beheaded at his castle in Pontefract. The other rebellious barons were defeated at Boroughbridge in 1322. But Edward lacked the leadership to push his advantage. Matters came to a head with the queen's affair with Roger Mortimer of Wigmore. The couple attracted baronial support to overthrow the king, who fled to Wales Oct 1326. His son Edward was appointed "Keeper of the Realm" by an extraordinary council at Bristol 26 Oct 1326. He was deposed 20 Jan 1327 by a Parliament convened without his authority, and he formally abdicated in favour of his son 25 Jan 1327. The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records in graphic detail the king´s privations while imprisoned and the brutality of his murder[827].
     "Betrothed (Papal dispensation 16 Nov 1289, Birgham Jul 1290) to MARGARET Queen of Scotland "the Maid of Norway", daughter of ERIK II King of Norway & his wife Margaret of Scotland (Tönsberg before 9 Apr 1283-on board ship off Orkney [26 Sep] 1290, bur Bergen, Christ's Church). The dispensation for the marriage of “Edwardo nato...Edvardi regis Angliæ” and “Margareta nata...Erici Norwegiæ regis, neptis...regis Scotiæ”, dated 16 Nov 1289, records the 3o consanguinity between the parties[828]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun (Continuator - Annals) records the betrothal between "Edward I king of England…Edward his son and heir" and "Margaret the daughter of the king of Norway…the true heiress of Scotland" in 1290[829]. This betrothal was agreed under the Treaty of Birgham in Jul 1290 which confirmed that Scotland would retain its independence after the marriage took place[830]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester confirms the betrothal of "Margareta filia Irici regis Norwegiæ…" and "Eadwardo regis Eadwardi filio" when recording her death[831].
     "Betrothed (31 Jul 1291) to BLANCHE de France, daughter of PHILIPPE III "le Hardi" King of France & his second wife Marie de Brabant ([1278/85]-Vienna 14 Mar 1306, bur Vienna, Minoritenkirche).
     "Betrothed (contract 7 Jan 1297) to PHILIPPINE de Flandre, daughter of GUY Count of Flanders & his second wife Isabelle de Luxembourg Ctss of Namur (-Paris 1304). The Annals of Worcester record the betrothal of “Edwardum filium regis” and “filiam comitis Flandriæ” as part of the treaty agreed between England and Flanders “die Purificationis beatæ Mariæ” (2 Feb) in 1296[832]. The Chronique Normande names "Philippe" as the daughter of "conte en Flandres…Guy de Dampierre" by his second wife "fille au conte de Luxembourg", adding that she was betrothed to "le roy d´Angleterre…Edouart son filz"[833]. The marriage contract between “Edward...Edward nostre...fiuz” and “Guy conte de Flandres et marchis de Namur...Phelippe fille au dit conte” is dated 7 Jan 1296 (O.S.)[834]. Philippe IV King of France obliged her father to abandon the betrothal after summoning him to Paris and imprisoning him for four months with two of his sons. Philippine was sent to Paris for her education[835].
     "m (contract 12 May 1299, betrothed 20 May 1303, Boulogne-sur-Mer 22 Jan 1308) ISABELLE de France, daughter of PHILIPPE IV "le Bel" King of France & his wife doña Juana I Queen of Navarre (Paris [1291/92]-Castle Rising, Norfolk or Hertford Castle 21 Nov 1358, bur Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London). Père Anselme states that Isabelle was born in 1292 but does not cite the primary source on which he bases this date[836]. The chronology of the births of Philippe IV’s children is tight and would fit better if Isabelle was born in 1291. Edward I King of England appointed “Amadeum comitem Sabaudiæ consanguineum nostrum” as proxy for the marriages between “nos et Margaretam sororem...regis Franciæ...ac inter Edwardum filium nostrum et Isabellam...regis Franciæ filiam” by charter dated 12 May 1299[837]. The betrothal contract between “Ed. filz du roi d´Angleterre” and “Isabel fille du roi de France” is dated 20 May 1303[838]. The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "apud Boloniam…in festo Conversionis Sancti Pauli" in 1308 of "rex Edwardus" and "Isabellam filiam regis Franciæ Philippi"[839]. The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in Jan 1308 "apud Boloniam supra mare" of "Eduardus Angliæ rex" and "filiam unicam regis Franciæ Philippi...Isabellam"[840]. The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records the marriage “apud Boloniam...V Kal Feb” of “rex Edwardus” and “Isabellam filiam...regis Francie”[841]. She was crowned Queen of England with her husband [23/25] Feb 1308. The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records the return of the couple to England 5 Feb and their coronation “VII Kal Mar...apud Westmonasterium”[842]. Her relationship with her husband steadily deteriorated over the years, culminating in her flight to France to seek the protection of her brother Philippe V King of France. In 1325, Roger [V] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer became her lover, and together they plotted her husband's overthrow. She was declared head of the Council of Regency by Parliament on the deposition of her husband. However, her rule was unpopular. She signed an unfavourable treaty with France and recognised Robert Bruce as king of Scotland for the first time. In addition, Mortimer alienated the barons with his territorial ambitions. Her son seized power, had Mortimer arrested after a Great Council meeting at Nottingham 19 Oct 1330 and condemned him to death. Isabelle thereafter lived in retirement. Froissart records that Isabelle went to "Ostrevant en Haynau en un chastel…Buignicourt dont messires Nicoles d´Aubrecicourt estoit sires"[843]. The Chronicon Angliæ records the death “die Sancti Rufi martyris” of “domina mater regis Edwardi domina Ysabella” and her burial “in ecclesia Fratrum Minorum Londoniis”, dated to 1357 from the context[844].
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of Edward's mistress is not known."
Med Lands cites:
[826] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 232.
[827] Chronicon Galfridi le Baker, pp. 28-33.
[828] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 57.
[829] John of Fordun, Annals, LXXXIII, p. 313.
[830] Young (1998), pp. 104-5.
[831] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 244.
[832] Annales de Wigornia, p. 529.
[833] Chronique Normande (14th century), p. 1.
[834] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 170.
[835] Nicholas (1992), pp. 187-8.
[836] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 91.
[837] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 206.
[838] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 26.
[839] Annales Londonienses, p. 152.
[840] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 597.
[841] Chronicon Galfridi le Baker, p. 3.
[842] Chronicon Galfridi le Baker, p. 3.
[843] Froissart, Tome I, Livre 1, 8, pp. 20-1.
[844] Chronicon Angliæ 1328-1388 (1874), p. 38.3


; Per Med Lands:
     "ISABELLE de France (Paris [1291/92]-Castle Rising, Norfolk or Hertford Castle 21 Nov 1358, bur Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London). Père Anselme states that Isabelle was born in 1292 but does not cite the primary source on which he bases this date[787]. The chronology of the births of Philippe IV’s children is tight and would fit better if Isabelle was born in 1291. Edward I King of England appointed “Amadeum comitem Sabaudiæ consanguineum nostrum” as proxy for the marriages between “nos et Margaretam sororem...regis Franciæ...ac inter Edwardum filium nostrum et Isabellam...regis Franciæ filiam” by charter dated 12 May 1299[788]. The betrothal contract between “Ed. filz du roi d´Angleterre” and “Isabel fille du roi de France” is dated 20 May 1303[789]. The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "apud Boloniam…in festo Conversionis Sancti Pauli" in 1308 of "rex Edwardus" and "Isabellam filiam regis Franciæ Philippi"[790]. The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in Jan 1308 "apud Boloniam supra mare" of "Eduardus Angliæ rex" and "filiam unicam regis Franciæ Philippi...Isabellam"[791]. The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records the marriage “apud Boloniam...V Kal Feb” of “rex Edwardus” and “Isabellam filiam...regis Francie”[792]. She was crowned Queen of England with her husband [23/25] Feb 1308. The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records the return of the couple to England 5 Feb and their coronation “VII Kal Mar...apud Westmonasterium”[793]. Her relationship with her husband steadily deteriorated over the years, culminating in her flight to France to seek the protection of her brother Philippe V King of France. In 1324, she started a love affair with Roger Mortimer, and together they plotted her husband's overthrow. She was declared head of the Council of Regency by Parliament on the deposition of her husband. However, her rule was unpopular. She signed an unfavourable treaty with France and recognised Robert Bruce as king of Scotland for the first time. In addition, Mortimer alienated the barons with his territorial ambitions. Her son seized power, had Mortimer arrested after a Great Council meeting at Nottingham 19 Oct 1330 and condemned him to death. Isabelle thereafter lived in retirement. Froissart records that Isabelle went to "Ostrevant en Haynau en un chastel…Buignicourt dont messires Nicoles d´Aubrecicourt estoit sires"[794]. The Chronicon Angliæ records the death “die Sancti Rufi martyris” of “domina mater regis Edwardi domina Ysabella” and her burial “in ecclesia Fratrum Minorum Londoniis”, dated to 1357 from the context[795].
     "m (contract 12 May 1299, betrothed 20 May 1303, Boulogne-sur-Mer 22 Jan 1308) EDWARD II King of England, son of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Caernarvon Castle 25 Apr 1284-murdered Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire 21 Sep 1327, bur Gloucester Cathedral).
     "Mistress ([1324/30]) of ROGER [V] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer, son of EDMUND [I] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer & his wife Margaret de Fiennes (25 Apr or 3 May 1287-executed Tyburn, London 29 Nov 1330, bur Shrewsbury, Church of the Grey Friars). He was created Earl of March in 1328."
Med Lands cites:
[787] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 91.
[788] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 206.
[789] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 26.
[790] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1882) Annales Londonienses and Annales Paulini (London), Annales Londonienses, p. 152.
[791] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 597.
[792] Thompson, E. M. (1889) Chronicon Galfridi le Baker de Swynebroke (Oxford) (“Chronicon Galfridi le Baker”), p. 3.
[793] Chronicon Galfridi le Baker, p. 3.
[794] Luce, S. (ed.) (1869) Chroniques de J. Froissart (Paris) ("Froissart"), Tome I, Livre 1, 8, pp. 20-1.
[795] Thomson, E. M. (1874) Chronicon Angliæ 1328-1388 (London) (“Chronicon Angliæ 1328-1388 (1874)), p. 38.17


; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGARET "the Maid of Norway" (Tönsberg before 9 Apr 1283-on board ship off Orkney [26 Sep] 1290, bur Bergen, Christ's Church). John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the death "V Id Apr" in 1283 of "domina Margareta Noricorum regina" leaving "unicam filiam…Margaretam"[651]. Acknowledged as heir to the throne by the magnates of Scotland in Feb 1284, she succeeded her grandfather in 1286 as MARGARET Queen of Scotland, although her succession was, according to John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator), considered provisional depending whether her grandfather's widow was pregnant[652]. The Liber Pluscardensis records that "domino episcopo Sanctiandreæ, domino Willelmo Frasier, domino comite de Fife Duncano cum domino Duncano de Cumyn comite de Buchan…ex parte boriali aquæ de Forth" and "ex parte…australi…Robertus episcopus Glasquensis cum domino Johanne Cumyn et Jacobo senescallo Scociæ" were appointed guardians of the realm after the death of King Alexander[653]. Negotiations for her return from Norway were preceded by the Treaty of Salisbury 9 Nov 1289 under which Edward I King of England confirmed that the government of the guardians in Scotland should be obeyed. The dispensation for the marriage of “Edwardo nato...Edvardi regis Angliæ” and “Margareta nata...Erici Norwegiæ regis, neptis...regis Scotiæ”, dated 16 Nov 1289, records the 3o consanguinity between the parties[654]. The Treaty of Birgham Jul 1290 confirmed the Queen's betrothal and that Scotland would retain its independence after the marriage took place[655]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun (Continuator - Annals) records the betrothal between "Edward I king of England…Edward his son and heir" and "Margaret the daughter of the king of Norway…the true heiress of Scotland" in 1290[656]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death in Orkney of "Margareta filia Irici regis Norwegiæ et Margaretæ filiæ Alexandri regis Scotiæ et Margaretæ reginæ filiæ Henrici regis Anglorum", adding that she was betrothed to "Eadwardo regis Eadwardi filio"[657]. The Icelandic Annals record the death in 1290 of "virgo Margareta filia Erici regis Norvegiæ"[658]. Queen Margaret's premature death plunged Scotland into a succession crisis, during which thirteen rival claimants to the throne emerged. King Edward I intervened more forcibly in Scottish affairs, acquiring the right to reappoint the guardians 11 Jun 1291 after which he became effective direct ruler of Scotland[659]. The choice of the new ruler was submitted in Aug 1291 to a specially appointed court, Robert Bruce and John Balliol emerging as leading candidates, the final judgment 17 Nov 1292 favouring the latter.
     "Betrothed (Papal dispensation 16 Nov 1289, Birgham Jul 1290) to EDWARD Prince of Wales, son of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Caernarvon Castle 25 Apr 1284-murdered Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire 21 Sep 1327, bur Gloucester Cathedral). He succeeded his father in 1307 as EDWARD II King of England."
Med Lands cites:
[651] Johannis de Fordun (Goodall), Vol. II, Lib. X, Cap. XXXVII, p. 125.
[652] Johannis de Fordun (Goodall), Vol. II, Lib. XI, Cap. III, p. 138.
[653] Liber Pluscardensis, Vol. I, Liber VIII, CI, p. 118.
[654] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 57.
[655] Young (1998), pp. 104-5.
[656] John of Fordun (Skene), Annals, LXXXIII, p. 313.
[657] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 244.
[658] Annales Islandici, 1290, p. 165.
[659] Young (1998), pp. 112 and 130.12

; Per Med Lands:
     "BLANCHE de France Ctss d'Alsace ([1278/85]-Vienna 19 Mar 1306, bur Vienna, Minoritenkirche). The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis names "Ludovicum comitem Ebroiciæ civitatis, Margaretamque reginam Angliæ ac Blancham ducissam Austriæ" as the three children of King Philippe III and his second wife, recording in a later passage the marriage of Blanche and "regis Romanorum Alberti filius Radulfus dux Austriæ" in 1299 "apud Parisius"[745]. [The Annals of Worcester record that Edward I King of England was absorbed by “immoderatus amor” for “mulieris Gallicæ et neptis propriæ” in 1294[746]. The source does not record the person to whom it refers. The editor of the edition consulted suggests in a footnote that she was Blanche, daughter of King Philippe III, citing “Bart. Cott. p. 232”.] Her Austrian marriage was arranged to confirm King Albrecht's new alliance with France[747]. The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in Mar 1306 of "ducissa Austriæ Blancha, regis Franciæ soror ex patre...cum filio suo unico", poisoned[748]. The Grandes Chroniques de France record the death “empoisonnée par ledit duc, si comme l’en disoit...ou moys de mars” of “Blanche duchesse d’Austrie seur du roy de par son pere”[749]. The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "XIV Kal Apr" of "domina Blanka" without giving further details to identify her[750]. The necrology of Feldbach records the death "XIV Kal Apr" of "Blanka relicta Ruodolfi quondam regis Boemie"[751], although this implies, wrongly it appears, that her husband predeceased her. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XIV Kal Apr 1305" of "Blanka filia regis Francie, ducissa Austrie et Styrie"[752]. The necrology of Minoritenkirche, Vienna records the death "XIV Kal 1305" of "Blanka ducissa Austrie filia Philippi regis Francie consors Rudolfi ducis Austrie hic sepulta"[753]. The necrology of Rein records the death "IV Non Mar" of "Planca ducissa Austrie et Stirie"[754], although this date is inconsistent with other sources.
     "Betrothed (Sep 1290) to JEAN de Flandre, son of GUY Count of Flanders & his second wife Isabelle de Luxembourg Ctss de Namur ([1267/75]-[28 Oct 1329/31 Jan 1330], Bruges, église des Cordeliers). He succeeded in 1298 as JEAN I Comte de Namur.
     "Betrothed (31 Jul 1291) to EDWARD Prince of Wales, son of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Caernarvon Castle 25 Apr 1284-murdered Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire 21 Sep 1327, bur Gloucester Cathedral). He succeeded his father in 1307 as EDWARD II King of England.
     "Betrothed (1296) JEAN de Hainaut Graaf van Oostrevant, son of JEAN II Comte de Hainaut & his wife Philippine de Luxembourg (-killed in battle near Courtrai 11 Jul 1302).
     "m (by treaty Aug 1299, Paris 29 May 1300) as his first wife, RUDOLF III Duke of Austria, son of ALBRECHT I King of Germany & his wife Elisabeth Queen of Hungary and Bohemia ([1282]-Heerlager [Horazdiowitz/Horaždovice] an der Otava/Mottawa 4 Jul 1307, bur Prague, St Veit’s Cathedral). He succeeded in 1306 as RUDOLF King of Bohemia."
Med Lands cites:
[745] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 571 and 582.
[746] Annales de Wigornia, p. 515.
[747] Leuschner, J. (1980) Germany in the Late Middle Ages (North Holland Publishing Company), p. 100.
[748] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 591.
[749] Viard, Tome VIII (1934), LVIII, p. 243.
[750] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357.
[751] Necrologium Feldbacense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 389.
[752] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
[753] Necrologium Patrum Minorum ad S Crucem Vindobonæ, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 166.
[754] Necrologium Runense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 341.26


; Per Racines et Histoire (Flandres): “2) Philippa (Philippine) de Flandres + 02/02/1304 (Paris) ? (selon Medlands & Euweb) ou 05/1306 ? (Blois ?) (date selon Le Glay)
     fiancée par le traité de Lier (31/08/1294) à Edward (II) d’Angleterre, Prince of Wales, comte de Ponthieu et de Montreuil, Roi d’Angleterre (1307) ° 25/04/1284 (Caernavon) + 21/09/1327 (ass., Berkeley castle, Gloucestershire) (fils d’Edward 1er, Roi d’Angleterre et de l’Infante doña Leonor de Castilla), «défiancée» par le Roi Philippe IV (1300), retenue & élevée captive à Paris pendant une dizaine d’années”.27

; Per Med Lands:
     "PHILIPPINE de Flandre (-Paris 2 Feb 1304). The Chronique Normande names "Philippe" as the daughter of "conte en Flandres…Guy de Dampierre" by his second wife "fille au conte de Luxembourg", adding that she was betrothed to "le roy d´Angleterre…Edouart son filz"[745]. The Annals of Worcester record the betrothal of “Edwardum filium regis” and “filiam comitis Flandriæ” as part of the treaty agreed between England and Flanders “die Purificationis beatæ Mariæ” (2 Feb) in 1296[746]. The marriage contract between “Edward...Edward nostre...fiuz” and “Guy conte de Flandres et marchis de Namur...Phelippe fille au dit conte” is dated 7 Jan 1296 (O.S.)[747]. Philippe IV King of France obliged her father to abandon the betrothal after summoning him to Paris in 1300 and imprisoning him for four months with two of his sons. Philippine was sent to Paris for her education[748].
     "Betrothed (contract 7 Jan 1297) to EDWARD of England Prince of Wales, Comte de Ponthieu et de Montreuil, son of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Caernarvon Castle 25 Apr 1284-murdered Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire 21 Sep 1327, bur Gloucester Cathedral). He succeeded his father in 1307 as EDWARD II King of England. "
Med Lands cites:
[745] Chronique Normande (14th century), p. 1.
[746] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1869) Annales Monastici Vol. IV, Annales de Oseneia, Chronicon Thomæ Wykes, Annales de Wigornia (London), Annales de Wigornia, p. 529.
[747] Rymer, T. (1745) Fœdera, Conventiones, Literæ 3rd Edn (London), Tome I, Pars III, p. 170.
[748] Nicholas (1992), pp. 187-8.
[749] Iohannis de Thielrode Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ MGH SS IX, p. 335.14
He was King of England, EDWARD II. Married to Isabelle, daughter of Philip IV of France. A weak ruler and the tool of ambitious favorites, Edward was dominated first by the Gascon Piers Gaveston (d. 1312), probably his lover. The Scottish war was continued in desultory fashion. The baronage, angered by Gaveston, followed the leadership of Edward's nephew, Thomas, duke of Lancaster, an ambitious, incompetent person. They forced Edward to accept a committee of reform, the 21 Lords Ordainers (1310), whose reform ordinances, suggestive of the Provisions of Oxford, were confirmed by parliament (1311). The ordinances required a baronial consent to royal appointments, to a declaration of war, and to the departure of the king from the realm, this consent to be given through parliament. Gaveston was captured and slain (1312).

1322-1326: Rule of the Despensers, father and son: Scottish truce (1323); decline of the popularity of the Despensers; alienation of Queen Isabelle. Isabelle went to France (1325), arranged the marriage of her son, the future Edward III, to Philippa of Hainault, and returned (1326) with Mortimer and foreign troops. Supported by the barons, Isabelle gained London, the Despensers were hanged, and the parliament of Westminster (1327), dominated by Isabelle and by Edward's enemies, forced an abdication that was tantamount to deposition. Edward was brutally murdered in prison eight months later.

1305: The conquest of Scotland by Edward I of England saved the country from civil war. Edward's plan of union seemed possible for a brief period, until the emergence of Bruce's great-grandson, Robert, who turned against the English and maintained himself until the incompetence of Edward II gave him a chance to extend the opposition to the English.

1323: A truce of five years with England was followed by the Treaty of Northampton, which recognized Robert Bruce's title and provided for the marriage of his son David to Joan, daughter of Edward II. between 25 February 1307 and January 1327.11,10,28

; Per Enc. of World History: The Scottish War. By 1313 only the castle of Stirling remained in the hands of the English. Edward set out (1314) to relieve the castle, but at Bannockburn (1314) he was overwhelmingly defeated, and Scottish independence was won."28

Family 1

Margaret (?) Maid of Norway, Queen of Scots b. b 9 Apr 1283, d. 26 Sep 1290

Family 2

Blanche (?) de France, Cts d'Alsace, Duchess of Austria b. 1278, d. bt 19 Mar 1305 - 1306

Family 3

Philippa/Philippine de Dampierre d. May 1306

Family 4

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p. 21. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIIdied1327B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward I 'Longshanks': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000809&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIdied1307B.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000810&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001694&tree=LEO
  9. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  10. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 284. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-29, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Margaretdied1290
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Philippa de Dampierre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00105961&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FLANDERS,%20HAINAUT.htm#Philippinedied1304.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de France: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001692&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Isabelledied1358
  18. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 13 July 2020), memorial page for Edward II (25 Apr 1284–21 Sep 1327), Find a Grave Memorial no. 1956, citing Gloucester Cathedral, Gloucester, City of Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1956. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_II_of_England. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, p. 3, Line 1-29.
  21. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  22. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 5: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet5.html#IP4
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Plantagenêts (d’Angleterre) Lancaster & Tudor, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Plantagenets.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#Blanchedied1306
  27. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Flandres.pdf, p. 15.
  28. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 239. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  29. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p. 23.
  30. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p. 22.
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000811&tree=LEO
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIIIdied1377B.
  33. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  34. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, pp. 22-23.

Elizabeth 'of Rhuddlan' (?) Princess of England, Countess of Holland1,2,3,4,5

F, #4422, b. 7 August 1282, d. 5 May 1316
FatherEdward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England1,6,2,3,4,7,8,9 b. 17 Jun 1239, d. 7 Jul 1307
MotherDoña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu1,2,4,8,10,11,9 b. c 1241, d. 28 Nov 1290
ReferenceEDV19
Last Edited7 Oct 2020
     Elizabeth 'of Rhuddlan' (?) Princess of England, Countess of Holland was born on 7 August 1282 at Rhuddlan Castle, Rhuddlan, Denbighshire, Wales, England.12,13,1,14,11,9 She married Jan/John I (?) Graaf van Holland, son of Floris V (?) Count of Holland and Beatrix de Dampierre of Flanders, on 7 January 1296/97 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England;
Her 1st husband. Med Lands says Betrothed 1285, Ipswich Priory Church, Suffolk 18 Jan 1297.13,1,11,9,15,16 Elizabeth 'of Rhuddlan' (?) Princess of England, Countess of Holland married Humphrey VIII de Bohun Lord Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex, Baron of Kington, son of Humphrey VII de Bohun Lord Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford, Earl of Essex and Mathilde (Mahaut, Maud) de Fiennes, on 14 November 1302 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England;
Her 2nd husband. Med Lands says Papal dispensation 10 Aug 1302, Westminster Abbey 14 Nov 1302.1,13,17,2,18,11,9,19,14,20
Elizabeth 'of Rhuddlan' (?) Princess of England, Countess of Holland died on 5 May 1316 at Quendon, Uttlesford District, co. Essex, England, at age 33; died after childbirth.21,12,22,1,3,4,9,23
Elizabeth 'of Rhuddlan' (?) Princess of England, Countess of Holland was buried after 5 May 1316 at Walden Abbey, Saffron Walden, Uttlesford District, co. Essex, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     7 Aug 1282, Rhuddlan, Denbighshire, Wales
     DEATH     5 May 1316 (aged 33), Quendon, Uttlesford District, Essex, England
     English Royalty. Born at Rhuddlan Castle in Wales, she was the daughter of King Edward I and Eleanor of Castile. She married John I, Count of Holland and Zealand, on January 18, 1297 at Ipswitch Priory. She was widowed two years later. She then married Humphrey de Bohun, 4th earl of Hereford, on November 14, 1302. They had 11 children. Elizabeth died at Quendon, Essex while giving birth to her 11th child at the age of about 34. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
          Edward I 1239–1307
          Eleanor of Castile 1240–1290
     Spouse
          Humphrey de Bohun 1276–1322
     Siblings
          Katherine Plantagenet 1261–1264
          Joan Plantagenet 1265–1265
          John Plantagenet 1266–1271
          Henry Plantagenet 1267–1274
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1269–1298
          Joan of Acre 1272–1307
          Alfonso Plantagenet 1273–1284
          Margaret of England 1275–1318
          Berengaria Plantagenet 1276–1278
          Mary Plantagenet 1278–1332
          Isabella Plantagenet 1279–1279
          Edward II 1284–1327
     Half Siblings
          Thomas Plantagenet of Brotherton 1300–1338
          Edmund Plantagenet of Woodstock 1301–1330
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1306–1311
     Children
          Humphrey de Bohun
          Mary de Bohun
          Margaret De Bohun 1302–1304
          Eleanor de Bohun Butler 1304–1363
          John de Bohun 1306–1336
          Humphrey De Bohun 1309–1361
          Margaret de Bohun Courtenay 1311–1391
          William De Bohun 1312–1360
          Isabel de Bohun 1316–1316
     BURIAL     Walden Abbey, Saffron Walden, Uttlesford District, Essex, England
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: Kristen Conrad
     Added: 27 Nov 2005
     Find a Grave Memorial 12535575.22,1,23
     EDV-19 GKJ-20.

Reference: Weis [1992:9] Line 6-29.24

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 , Reference: page 197.
2. Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E., Reference: page 18.
3. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: page 57.
4. The Royal Daughters of England and their Representatives, London, 1910, 2 volumes, Lane, Ch., Reference: vol I pp 200-202 year of birth.
5. Ancestral Story - Grace Viell 2009 , Fettes, Ian Dundas. nr 2837.25,11


; This is the same person as ”Elizabeth of Rhuddlan” at Wikipedia.5

; Per Genealogy.EU (Anjou 3): “D17. Pss Elizabeth, *Rhuddlan Castle, Carnarvon 7.8.1282, +Quendon, Essex 5.5.1316, bur Walden Abbey; 1m: Ipswich 1297 Ct John I of Holland (+1299); 2m: Westminster 14.11.1302 Humphrey VIII de Bohun, Earl of Hereford & Essex (*Pleshy Castle ca 1276, +k.a.Boroughbridge 16.3.1321, bur Friar´s Preacher, York)”.1

; Per Med Lands:
     "ELIZABETH (Rhuddlan Castle, Flintshire Aug 1282-Quendon, Essex [5] May 1316, bur Walden Abbey, Essex). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the birth "apud Rothelan" in 1282 of "filiam…Elizabetham" to "Alienora regina Angliæ"[805]. Floris V Count of Holland agreed the dowry for the marriage of "Edwardi regis Anglorum...dominum Alfonsum dicti domini regis primogenitum" and “Margaretam filiam nostram” by charter dated 12 Aug 1283, which also provides for the marriage between “Johannis filii nostri” and “eius filiam”[806]. The marriage contract between "Edwardum...regem Anglie...filie sue Elizabethe" and “dominum Florentium comitem Hollandie...Johannis filii sui primogeniti” is dated 1285[807]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jan and "Elizabeth…Eduardi regis filia", recording in a later passage that she returned to England after her husband died and married (secondly) "comes Erffordie"[808]. The dispensation for the marriage of “Humfrido comiti Herefordensi” and “Elizabetæ natæ...Edvardi regis Angliæ...relictæ quondam Johannis comitis Hollandiæ” is dated 10 Aug 1302[809]. The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "in festo Sanctæ Katerinæ…apud Caversham juxta Redyng" in 1302 of "Margareta filia regis Angliæ, comitissa Hoylandiæ et Salondiæ" and "domino Humfrido de Bohun comiti Herefordiæ"[810]. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordiæ et Essex, constabularius Angliæ et dominus Breconiæ” married “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that she was buried “apud Waldene”[811]. The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Quenden” of “quædam filia” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethæ…regis Angliæ Edwardi…filiæ” during whose birth her mother died, and in a later passage her burial at Waldon[812].
     "m firstly (Betrothed 1285, Ipswich Priory Church, Suffolk 18 Jan 1297) JAN I Count of Holland and Zeeland, son of FLORIS V Count of Holland & his wife Béatrice de Flandre [Dampierre] (before 12 Aug 1283-10 Nov 1299).
     "m secondly (Papal dispensation 10 Aug 1302, Westminster Abbey 14 Nov 1302) HUMPHREY [VIII] de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex, son of HUMPHREY [VII] de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his wife Mathilde de Fiennes ([1276]-killed in battle Boroughbridge 16 Mar 1322, bur York, church of the Friars Preachers). He succeeded his father in 1298 as Earl of Hereford and Essex, Constable of England."
Med Lands cites:
[805] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 228.
[806] Oorkondenboek Holland (1873), 512, p. 226.
[807] Oorkondenboek Holland (1873), 581, p. 254.
[808] Chronologia Johannis de Beke (The Hague), 74e and 77b, pp. 229 and 253.
[809] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 17.
[810] Annales Londonienses, p. 129.
[811] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135.
[812] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, pp. 139 and 140.9


; Per Med Lands:
     "HUMPHREY [VIII] de Bohun ([1276]-killed in battle Boroughbridge 16 Mar 1322, bur York, Church of the Friars Preachers). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordiæ et Essex, constabularius Angliæ et dominus Breconiæ” as son of “Humfredus septimus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem de Fenes”[580]. He succeeded his father in 1298 as Earl of Hereford and Essex, hereditary Constable of England. He was deprived of his office of Constable in 1302, but was restored as such 28 Aug 1311. He was among the Barons who forced King Edward II to agree to the appointment of the Ordainers, of whom he became one himself. He opposed the Despensers, joined the rebellion of Thomas Earl of Lancaster, and was killed while trying to force the bridge at Boroughbridge. The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records that “Humfridus de Bohun” was killed “ad pontem de Burrowbrigge” and was buried at York[581]. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus octavus” died 16 Mar 1321 and was buried “apud Ebor, inter Fratres Prædicatores”[582].
     "m (Papal dispensation 12 Aug 1302, Westminster 14 Nov 1302) as her second husband, ELIZABETH of England, widow of JAN I Count of Holland and Zeeland, daughter of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Rhuddlan Castle, Flintshire Aug 1282-Quendon, Essex [5] May 1316, bur Walden Abbey, Essex). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the birth "apud Rothelan" in 1282 of "filiam…Elizabetham" to "Alienora regina Angliæ"[583]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jan and "Elizabeth…Eduardi regis filia", recording in a later passage that she returned to England after her husband died and married (secondly) "comes Erffordie"[584]. The dispensation for the marriage of “Humfrido comiti Herefordensi” and “Elizabetæ natæ...Edvardi regis Angliæ...relictæ quondam Johannis comitis Hollandiæ” is dated 10 Aug 1302[585]. The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "in festo Sanctæ Katerinæ…apud Caversham juxta Redyng" in 1302 of "Margareta filia regis Angliæ, comitissa Hoylandiæ et Salondiæ" and "domino Humfrido de Bohun comiti Herefordiæ"[586]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jan and "Elizabeth…Eduardi regis filia", recording in a later passage that she returned to England after her husband died and married (secondly) "comes Erffordie"[587]. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordiæ et Essex, constabularius Angliæ et dominus Breconiæ” married “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that she was buried “apud Waldene”[588]. The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Quenden” of “quædam filia” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethæ…regis Angliæ Edwardi…filiæ” during whose birth her mother died, and in a later passage her burial at Waldon[589]."
Med Lands cites:
[580] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135.
[581] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, p. 139.
[582] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135.
[583] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 228.
[584] Chronologia Johannis de Beke, 74e and 77b, pp. 229, 253.
[585] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 17.
[586] Annales Londonienses, p. 129.
[587] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 74e and 77b, pp. 229 and 253.
[588] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135.
[589] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, pp. 139 and 140.20


; Per Racines et Histoire (de Bohun): “Humphrey VIII de Bohun ° 02/1276 +X 16/03/1322 (Boroughbridge, Yorkshire) Lord Bohun, 4ème earl of Hereford and Essex, Connétable d’Angleterre
     ép. 14/11/1302 Elizabeth Plantagenêt, comtesse Holland ° 07/08/1282 (Rhuddlan) + 05/05/1316 (fille du Roi Edward 1er et d’Eleanor de Castille) ”.26

; Per Genealogy.EU (de Bohun): “G1. Humphrey, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex, Constable of England, *Pleshy Castle 1276, +k.a.Boroughbridge 16.3.1321, bur Friar's Preacher, York; m.Westminster 14.11.1302 Elizabeth of England, Dowager Css of Holland (*7.8.1281 +5.5.1316)”.27

; Per Med Lands:
     "JAN (before 12 Aug 1283-Haarlem 10 Nov 1299). He succeeded his father in 1296 as JAN I Count of Holland, under the guardianship of Wolfart van Borselen who was murdered in 1298 on the orders of Jean Comte de Hainaut who seized Count Jan and his wife and succeeded as guardian. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1299 IV Kal Nov apud Harlem" of "Iohannes domicellus"[602]. Count Jan died of a gastric complaint, allegedly poisoned by Comte Jean who succeeded him as Count of Holland[603].
     "m (Betrothed 1285, Ipswich Priory Church, Suffolk 18 Jan 1297) as her first husband, ELIZABETH of England, daughter of EDWARD I “Longshanks” King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Rhuddlan Castle, Flintshire Aug 1282-Quendon, Essex [5] May 1316, bur Walden Abbey, Essex). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the birth "apud Rothelan" in 1282 of "filiam…Elizabetham" to "Alienora regina Angliæ"[604]. Floris V Count of Holland agreed the dowry for the marriage of "Edwardi regis Anglorum...dominum Alfonsum dicti domini regis primogenitum" and “Margaretam filiam nostram” by charter dated 12 Aug 1283, which also provides for the marriage between “Johannis filii nostri” and “eius filiam”[605]. The marriage contract between "Edwardum...regem Anglie...filie sue Elizabethe" and “dominum Florentium comitem Hollandie...Johannis filii sui primogeniti” is dated 1285[606]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jan and "Elizabeth…Eduardi regis filia", recording in a later passage that she returned to England after her husband died and married (secondly) "comes Erffordie"[607]. She married secondly (Papal dispensation 10 Aug 1302, Westminster Abbey 14 Nov 1302) Humphrey [VIII] de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex. The dispensation for the marriage of “Humfrido comiti Herefordensi” and “Elizabetæ natæ...Edvardi regis Angliæ...relictæ quondam Johannis comitis Hollandiæ” is dated 10 Aug 1302[608]. The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "in festo Sanctæ Katerinæ…apud Caversham juxta Redyng" in 1302 of "Margareta filia regis Angliæ, comitissa Hoylandiæ et Salondiæ" and "domino Humfrido de Bohun comiti Herefordiæ"[609]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jan and "Elizabeth…Eduardi regis filia", recording in a later passage that she returned to England after her husband died and married (secondly) "comes Erffordie"[610]. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordiæ et Essex, constabularius Angliæ et dominus Breconiæ” married “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that she was buried “apud Waldene”[611]. The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Quenden” of “quædam filia” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethæ…regis Angliæ Edwardi…filiæ” during whose birth her mother died, and in a later passage her burial at Waldon[612]. "
Med Lands cites:
[602] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 77b, p. 253.
[603] Ghent, pp. 42-3.
[604] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 228.
[605] Oorkondenboek Holland (1873), 512, p. 226.
[606] Oorkondenboek Holland (1873), 581, p. 254.
[607] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 74e and 77b, pp. 229 and 253.
[608] Rymer, T. (1745) Fœdera, Conventiones, Literæ 3rd Edn (London), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 17.
[609] Annales Londonienses, p. 129.
[610] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 74e and 77b, pp. 229 and 253.
[611] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135.
[612] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, pp. 139 and 140.16

Family 1

Jan/John I (?) Graaf van Holland b. 12 Aug 1284, d. 10 Nov 1299

Family 2

Humphrey VIII de Bohun Lord Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex, Baron of Kington b. c Feb 1276, d. bt 16 Mar 1321 - 1322
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p. 20. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005912&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_of_Rhuddlan. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  6. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward I 'Longshanks': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000809&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIdied1307B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Elizabethdied1316.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001694&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005912&tree=LEO
  12. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  13. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 33. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Bohun , p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jan I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007054&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#JanIdied1299
  17. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, Abeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 57. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  18. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Butler: p. 176.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Humphrey de Bohun: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007055&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#HumphreyBohunHereforddied1322
  21. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  22. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 33-34.
  23. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 15 July 2020), memorial page for Elizabeth Plantagenet (7 Aug 1282–5 May 1316), Find a Grave Memorial no. 12535575, citing Walden Abbey, Saffron Walden, Uttlesford District, Essex, England; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/12535575. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  24. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), p. 9, Line 6-29. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  25. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  26. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Bohun, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, de Bohun: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/bohun.html#H4
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00464372&tree=LEO
  29. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's Dromant, Abeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 58.
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028705&tree=LEO
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Humphrey de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00464373&tree=LEO
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Humphrey de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007056&tree=LEO
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028611&tree=LEO
  34. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Courtenay 9: pp. 238-239.
  35. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028609&tree=LEO
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aeneas de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00464374&tree=LEO
  37. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabella de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00464375&tree=LEO

Sir Gilbert Talbot 3rd Lord Talbot1,2

M, #4423, b. circa 1332, d. 24 April 1387
FatherSir Richard Talbot KB, 2nd Lord Talbot3,4,2 b. c 1305, d. 23 Oct 1356
MotherElizabeth Comyn3,4,2 b. 1 Nov 1299, d. 20 Nov 1372
ReferenceEDV18 GKJ19
Last Edited30 Dec 2012
     Sir Gilbert Talbot 3rd Lord Talbot was born circa 1332 at Ecclesfield, Herefordshire, England.5,3,2 He married Lady Pernel Butler, daughter of Sir James Butler KB, 1st Earl of Ormond and Eleanor (Alianor) de Bohun, before 8 September 1352.6,3,2 Sir Gilbert Talbot 3rd Lord Talbot married Joan de Stafford, daughter of Sir Ralph de Stafford KG, KB, 2nd Earl of Stafford and Margaret de Audley Baroness Audley suo jure, before 7 February 1377; her 2nd husband.7,3,8,9,2,10
Sir Gilbert Talbot 3rd Lord Talbot died on 24 April 1387 at Roales, Spain.11,4,8,2
     EDV-18 GKJ-19. He was 3rd Lord Talbot.12

; van de Pas cites: 1. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938, Reference: Page 2236
2. [S00058] The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XII 614.2

; Weis AR Lord Talbot of Ecclesfield, Co Hereford, Member of Parliament 1362
*****
Faris (1999, p. 348): [end quote] PERNEL BUTLER, was married before 8 Sep. 1352 to GILBERT TALBOT, Knt., of Eccleswall, co. Hereford, 3rd Lord Talbot, son of Richard Talbot, 2nd Lord Talbot (descendant of Charlemagne), by Elizabeth, daughter and co-heiress of John Comyn, of Badenoch in Scotland (of Magna Carta Surety descent and descendant of Charlemagne). He was born about 1332. She was living on 28 May 1365, and is said to have died in 1368. He was summoned to Parliament from 14 Aug. 1362. He was married for the second time before 16 Nov. 1379 to Joan de Stafford, widow of John Cherleton, 3rd Lord Cherleton, lord of Powis (died 13 July 1374), and daughter of Ralph de Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford, by Margaret (descendant of King Edward I), daughter and heiress of Hugh de Audley, Earl of Gloucester. He accompanied Edmund of York [of Langley], Earl of Cambridge, on his expedition to Portugal, 138 1-82, and was with John of Gaunt's unsuccessful expedition to Spain and Portugal from July 1386. GILBERT TALBOT, 3rd Lord Talbot, died aged about fifty-five of the pestilence at Roales, Spain, on 24 Apr. 1387. His widow died before 1397.
Collins-Brydges (1812) 3:8. C.P. 3:161 (1913). C.P. 6:177 (1926). Bulkeley (1933), p. 72. CF. 12(1):614-616 (1953).
Children of Gilbert Talbot, by Pernel Butler:
i.     RICHARD TALBOT [see next].
ii.     ELIZABETH TALBOT, married HENRY GREY [see WILTON 9]. [end quote]13,14 He was M. P. in 1362.5

Family 1

Lady Pernel Butler b. c 1332, d. bt 28 May 1365 - 1368
Children

Family 2

Joan de Stafford b. bt 1338 - 1340, d. b 8 Feb 1397

Citations

  1. [S1720] David Utz, "Utz email #2 29 May 2005 "Aline de Gai's descents to Robert Abell"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 May 2005, 7 Gilbert Talbot, Sir b: Abt. 1332 d: 24 April 1387 in Roales, ESP
    .... +Pernel Butler b: Abt. 1332 m: Bef. 08 September 1352 d: Abt. 1368. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email #2 29 May 2005."
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert Talbot: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028780&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  4. [S1720] David Utz, "Utz email #2 29 May 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 29 May 2005.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 95-32, p. 92. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 73-33, p. 74; line 95-32, p. 92.
  7. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 348. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  8. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Cherleton 10: p. 198. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan Stafford: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028780&tree=LEO
  10. [S2371] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 2nd edition (n.p.: n.pub., 2011), Vol III: Stafford 8.v: p. 249. Hereinafter cited as Richardson [2011] Plantagenet Ancestry.
  11. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 348: "died of the pestilence at Roales, Spain, on 24 Apr 1387."
  12. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 26-7, p. 33. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  13. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  14. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  15. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Grey, Baron Family Page.

Lady Pernel Butler1,2

F, #4424, b. circa 1332, d. between 28 May 1365 and 1368
FatherSir James Butler KB, 1st Earl of Ormond1,3,4 b. c 1305, d. 6 Jan 1336/37
MotherEleanor (Alianor) de Bohun5,4 b. b 17 Oct 1304, d. 7 Oct 1363
ReferenceEDV18 GKJ19
Last Edited16 Aug 2008
     Lady Pernel Butler was born circa 1332.2 She married Sir Gilbert Talbot 3rd Lord Talbot, son of Sir Richard Talbot KB, 2nd Lord Talbot and Elizabeth Comyn, before 8 September 1352.6,1,7
Lady Pernel Butler died between 28 May 1365 and 1368; Utz #2 29 May 2005 says d. ca 1368.8,2
     EDV-18 GKJ-19.

; living 1365 dead 1368.9,10 Lady Pernel Butler was also known as Lady Petronilla Butler.

Family

Sir Gilbert Talbot 3rd Lord Talbot b. c 1332, d. 24 Apr 1387
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1720] David Utz, "Utz email #2 29 May 2005 "Aline de Gai's descents to Robert Abell"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 May 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email #2 29 May 2005."
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, James Butler: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00126341&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Butler 9: pp. 176-177. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028705&tree=LEO
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 73-33, p. 74; line 95-32, p. 92. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gilbert Talbot: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028780&tree=LEO
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 73-33, p. 74.
  9. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  10. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).

Sir James Butler KB, 1st Earl of Ormond1,2,3

M, #4425, b. circa 1305, d. 6 January 1336/37
FatherEdmund le Boteler Earl1,2 b. c 1285, d. 13 Sep 1321
MotherJoan Fitz Thomas2 b. c 1285
ReferenceEDV19
Last Edited14 Aug 2019
     Sir James Butler KB, 1st Earl of Ormond was born circa 1305 at Carrickfergus Castle, Carrickfergus, co. Antrim, Ireland.4,1,3 He married Eleanor (Alianor) de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey VIII de Bohun Lord Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex, Baron of Kington and Elizabeth 'of Rhuddlan' (?) Princess of England, Countess of Holland, in 1327; her 1st husband.5,6,1,2,3
Sir James Butler KB, 1st Earl of Ormond was buried after 6 January 1337 at Gowran.2,3


Sir James Butler KB, 1st Earl of Ormond died on 6 January 1336/37; van de Pas says d. 6 Jan 1338.4,1,2
     He was Hereditary Chief Butler of Ireland.1 EDV-19 GKJ-20.

; van de Pas cites: 1. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938, Reference: Page 1909
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: X 116.1

; per van de Pas: [quote]In 1317 James was kept in Dublin Castle as a hostage for his father, and in 1325 had a protection as he was to leave overseas with the king. On 2 December 1325 the king took his homage and, for 2,000 marks, gave him licence to marry whomever he wished. In 1326 he received a protection in England on going over to Ireland, where he supported Mortimer's party.

He appears to have lived and fought chiefly in Ireland, though he had widely distributed properties in England. In 1327 he married Lady Eleanor de Bohun, a niece of the king; in this year he also obtained a grant or confirmation of the prisage of wines at Irish ports. This he regarded as appurtenant to his hereditary office of Butler.

As James le Botiller of Ireland he was created Earl of Ormonde in the Parliament which sat at Salisbury from 16 to 31 October 1328, the charter recording the creation of the dignity being dated 2 November 1328. In 1331, when it was proposed that the king should visit Ireland, Ormonde and the Earl of Ulster and others were summoned to England to discuss the matter. In 1335 and 1336 he was summoned to Scotland on the king's service. On 6 January 1337, he died 'in the flower of his youth' and was buried at Gowran.

On 2 April 1338, Dower was assigned to his widow. She resided mainly in England and, before 20 April 1344, married Sir Thomas de Dagworth, who was treacherously slain in Brittany in 1350. In 1361 and 1362 she was directed to send deputies to the King to confer as to the state of Ireland. She died 7 October 1363.[end quote]1

; created Earl of Ormond Oct 1328.
Collins RA: 1st Earl of Ormonde, Chief Butler of Ireland
AR7 7-30, 73-32
*********
Faris (1999, p. 59): [quote] ALIANOR DE BOHUN, second daughter, was married in 1327 to JAMES BUTLER (or LE BOTILLER), K.B., hereditary Chief Butler of Ireland, son and heir of Edmund Butler, Knt. (of Magna Carta Surety descent), by Joan, daughter of John Fitz Thomas Fitz Gerald, 1st Earl of Kildare. He was under age on 3 Dec. 1325, and was hostage in Dublin Castle for his father in 1317. In 1326 he received a protection in England on going over to Ireland. As James le Botiller of Ireland, he was created Earl of Ormond on 2 Nov. 1328 (Ormond was the northern part of co. Tipperary). JAMES BUTLER, 1st Earl of Ormond, died on 6 Jan. 1337/8, and was buried at Gowran (the chief seat of the family before the purchase of Kilkenny Castle). His widow was married for the second time before 20 Apr. 1344, with licence dated 24 Jan. 1343/4 to marry in the chapel of her manor of La Vacherie, in Cranley, Surrey, to THOMAS DE DAGWORTH, Knt., younger son of John de Dagworth, of Dagworth, Suffolk, and Bradwell, Essex (of Magna Carta Surety descent), by Alice, elder daughter and co-heiress of William Fitz Warm. He was one of the most famous captains of his time, and defeated Charles de Blois at the Battle of La Roche-Derien, near Tréguier, on 20 June 1347, and took him prisoner. He was summoned to Parliament from 13 Nov. 1347 by writs directed Thome de Dagworth'. THOMAS DE DAGWORTH [Lord Dagworth] died in July or Aug. 1350, being slain treacherously, in time of truce, in a skirmish near Aurai in Brittany. His widow died on 7 Oct. 1363.
C.P. 2:450 (1912). C.P. 4:27-31 (1916) (Dagworth arms: Ermine, on a fesse gules three roundlets or). C.P. 5:479, footnote b (1926). C.P. 10:116-119 (1945). C.P. 12(1):615 (1953).
Children of James Butler, by Alianor de Bohun:
i.     JAMES BUTLER [see next].
ii.     PERNEL BUTLER, married GILBERT TALBOT [see TALBOT 9].1
Child of Thomas de Dagworth, by Alianor de Bohun:
iii.     ALIANOR DE DAGWORTH, married WALTER FITZ WALTER [see FITZ WALTER 11]. [end quote]7,8 Sir James Butler KB, 1st Earl of Ormond was also known as James le Botiller KB, 1st Earl of Ormond.2 He was 1st Earl of Ormonde on 2 November 1328.3 He was 1st Earl of Ormonde on 2 November 1328.9,1,2

Family

Eleanor (Alianor) de Bohun b. b 17 Oct 1304, d. 7 Oct 1363
Children

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, James Butler: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00126341&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Butler 9: pp. 176-177. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 8-30, p. 11. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, Abeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 58. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028705&tree=LEO
  7. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  8. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  9. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 24-6, p. 32. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, James Butler: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00126343&tree=LEO
  11. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Shrewsbury and Waterford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Eleanor (Alianor) de Bohun1,2,3,4,5

F, #4426, b. before 17 October 1304, d. 7 October 1363
FatherHumphrey VIII de Bohun Lord Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex, Baron of Kington1,6,3,4,7,8,9 b. c Feb 1276, d. bt 16 Mar 1321 - 1322
MotherElizabeth 'of Rhuddlan' (?) Princess of England, Countess of Holland1,6,3,5,10,9 b. 7 Aug 1282, d. 5 May 1316
ReferenceEDV19
Last Edited15 Jul 2020
     Eleanor (Alianor) de Bohun was born before 17 October 1304.3 She married Sir James Butler KB, 1st Earl of Ormond, son of Edmund le Boteler Earl and Joan Fitz Thomas, in 1327; her 1st husband.1,3,11,2,5 Eleanor (Alianor) de Bohun married Sir Thomas de Dagworth Knt., Lord Dagworth, son of Sir John de Dagworth of Dagworth and Alice Fitz Warin, circa 25 January 1343 at La Vacherie (in Cranley), co. Surrey, England; Date is of contract or similar; her 2nd husband.12,1,3,13,2,5
Eleanor (Alianor) de Bohun died on 7 October 1363; died testate.12,3,2,5
     EDV-19 GKJ-20.

; van de Pas cites: 1. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, London, 1938, Reference: Page 1909
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: IV 28
3. The Royal Daughters of England and their Representatives, London, 1910, 2 volumes, Lane, Ch., Reference: vol I pp 200-202.3

; Faris (1999, p. 59): [quote] ALIANOR DE BOHUN, second daughter, was married in 1327 to JAMES BUTLER (or LE BOTILLER), K.B., hereditary Chief Butler of Ireland, son and heir of Edmund Butler, Knt. (of Magna Carta Surety descent), by Joan, daughter of John Fitz Thomas Fitz Gerald, 1st Earl of Kildare. He was under age on 3 Dec. 1325, and was hostage in Dublin Castle for his father in 1317. In 1326 he received a protection in England on going over to Ireland. As James le Botiller of Ireland, he was created Earl of Ormond on 2 Nov. 1328 (Ormond was the northern part of co. Tipperary). JAMES BUTLER, 1st Earl of Ormond, died on 6 Jan. 1337/8, and was buried at Gowran (the chief seat of the family before the purchase of Kilkenny Castle). His widow was married for the second time before 20 Apr. 1344, with licence dated 24 Jan. 1343/4 to marry in the chapel of her manor of La Vacherie, in Cranley, Surrey, to THOMAS DE DAGWORTH, Knt., younger son of John de Dagworth, of Dagworth, Suffolk, and Bradwell, Essex (of Magna Carta Surety descent), by Alice, elder daughter and co-heiress of William Fitz Warm. He was one of the most famous captains of his time, and defeated Charles de Blois at the Battle of La Roche-Derien, near Tréguier, on 20 June 1347, and took him prisoner. He was summoned to Parliament from 13 Nov. 1347 by writs directed Thome de Dagworth'. THOMAS DE DAGWORTH [Lord Dagworth] died in July or Aug. 1350, being slain treacherously, in time of truce, in a skirmish near Aurai in Brittany. His widow died on 7 Oct. 1363.
C.P. 2:450 (1912). C.P. 4:27-31 (1916) (Dagworth arms: Ermine, on a fesse gules three roundlets or). C.P. 5:479, footnote b (1926). C.P. 10:116-119 (1945). C.P. 12(1):615 (1953).
Children of James Butler, by Alianor de Bohun:
i.     JAMES BUTLER [see next].
ii.     PERNEL BUTLER, married GILBERT TALBOT [see TALBOT 9].
Child of Thomas de Dagworth, by Alianor de Bohun:
iii.     ALIANOR DE DAGWORTH, married WALTER FITZ WALTER [see FITZ WALTER 11]. [end quote]14,15

Family 1

Sir James Butler KB, 1st Earl of Ormond b. c 1305, d. 6 Jan 1336/37
Children

Family 2

Sir Thomas de Dagworth Knt., Lord Dagworth d. bt Jul 1350 - Aug 1350
Child

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, Abeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 58. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Butler 9: pp. 176-177. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028705&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Walter 8: pp. 328-329.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Butler: p. 176.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Humphrey de Bohun: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007055&tree=LEO
  8. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Bohun , p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#HumphreyBohunHereforddied1322. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005912&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, James Butler: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00126341&tree=LEO
  12. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 59. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thomas de Dagworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00126342&tree=LEO
  14. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  15. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, James Butler: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00126343&tree=LEO
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alianore de Dagworth: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00198905&tree=LEO

Humphrey VIII de Bohun Lord Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex, Baron of Kington1,2,3,4,5

M, #4427, b. circa February 1276, d. between 16 March 1321 and 1322
FatherHumphrey VII de Bohun Lord Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford, Earl of Essex2,4,6,7,8 b. c 1249, d. 31 Dec 1298
MotherMathilde (Mahaut, Maud) de Fiennes2,4,6,7,8 b. c 1254, d. 6 Dec 1298
ReferenceEDV19
Last Edited7 Oct 2020
     Humphrey VIII de Bohun Lord Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex, Baron of Kington was born circa February 1276 at Pleshey Castle, co. Essex, England.9,1,10,6,7,8 He married Elizabeth 'of Rhuddlan' (?) Princess of England, Countess of Holland, daughter of Edward I "Longshanks" (?) King of England and Doña Eleanor/Alianore (?) Infanta de Castilla, Cts de Pontheiu, on 14 November 1302 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England;
Her 2nd husband. Med Lands says Papal dispensation 10 Aug 1302, Westminster Abbey 14 Nov 1302.10,9,2,11,4,12,13,6,7,8
Humphrey VIII de Bohun Lord Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex, Baron of Kington died between 16 March 1321 and 1322 at Battle of Boroughbridge, Boroughbridge, Yorkshire, England; killed at the Battle of Boroughbridge having taken up arms against his own brother-in-law EDWARD II.14,1,15,2,10,7,6,8
Humphrey VIII de Bohun Lord Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex, Baron of Kington was buried after 16 March 1322 at Blackfriars Abbey Church (Defunct), York, York Unitary Authority, North Yorkshire, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     c.1276, Pleshey, Chelmsford Borough, Essex, England
     DEATH     16 Mar 1322 (aged 45–46), Boroughbridge, Harrogate Borough, North Yorkshire, England
     4th Earl of Hereford. Born the son of Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford and Maud de Fiennes at Pleshy Castle in Essex. In November 1302 he married King Edward I's daughter, Elizabeth Plantagenet, with whom he had at least eleven children. He held the office of Lord High Constable. He took part in the king's Scottish campaigns in the early 1300s. After the flight of Robert Bruce, de Bohun received many of Bruce's confiscated properties. At the battle of Bannockburn in 1314, he charged the Bruce, and his nephew Henry de Bohun was killed, but he was taken and held for ransom. He was eventually exchanged for Bruce's wife and daughter. He numbered among the peers who opposed Edward II's excesses and banished the royal favorite, Piers Gaveston. In 1316 he successfully led the suppression of the revolt of Llywelyn Bren. By 1322, however, he fell in with Lancaster's rebellion against Edward II, and as the rebels approached Boroughbridge in Yorkshire, de Bohun led an attempt to storm the bridge held by royal pike men. The Earl, however, was run through by pike men secreted beneath the bridge and died in the field, his gruesome death breaking the advance, and spelling failure for the rebels. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Humphrey de Bohun 1249–1298
          Maude de Fiennes Bohun 1250–1298
     Spouse
          Elizabeth Plantagenet 1282–1316
     Children
          Humphrey de Bohun
          Mary de Bohun
          Margaret De Bohun 1302–1304
          Eleanor de Bohun Butler 1304–1363
          John de Bohun 1306–1336
          Humphrey De Bohun 1309–1361
          Margaret de Bohun Courtenay 1311–1391
          William De Bohun 1312–1360
          Isabel de Bohun 1316–1316
     BURIAL     Blackfriars Abbey Church (Defunct), York, York Unitary Authority, North Yorkshire, England
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 13 Mar 2000
     Find a Grave Memorial 8865.14,10,3,8,16
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Anjou 3): “D17. Pss Elizabeth, *Rhuddlan Castle, Carnarvon 7.8.1282, +Quendon, Essex 5.5.1316, bur Walden Abbey; 1m: Ipswich 1297 Ct John I of Holland (+1299); 2m: Westminster 14.11.1302 Humphrey VIII de Bohun, Earl of Hereford & Essex (*Pleshy Castle ca 1276, +k.a.Boroughbridge 16.3.1321, bur Friar´s Preacher, York)”.10
; Per Med Lands:
     "ELIZABETH (Rhuddlan Castle, Flintshire Aug 1282-Quendon, Essex [5] May 1316, bur Walden Abbey, Essex). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the birth "apud Rothelan" in 1282 of "filiam…Elizabetham" to "Alienora regina Angliæ"[805]. Floris V Count of Holland agreed the dowry for the marriage of "Edwardi regis Anglorum...dominum Alfonsum dicti domini regis primogenitum" and “Margaretam filiam nostram” by charter dated 12 Aug 1283, which also provides for the marriage between “Johannis filii nostri” and “eius filiam”[806]. The marriage contract between "Edwardum...regem Anglie...filie sue Elizabethe" and “dominum Florentium comitem Hollandie...Johannis filii sui primogeniti” is dated 1285[807]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jan and "Elizabeth…Eduardi regis filia", recording in a later passage that she returned to England after her husband died and married (secondly) "comes Erffordie"[808]. The dispensation for the marriage of “Humfrido comiti Herefordensi” and “Elizabetæ natæ...Edvardi regis Angliæ...relictæ quondam Johannis comitis Hollandiæ” is dated 10 Aug 1302[809]. The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "in festo Sanctæ Katerinæ…apud Caversham juxta Redyng" in 1302 of "Margareta filia regis Angliæ, comitissa Hoylandiæ et Salondiæ" and "domino Humfrido de Bohun comiti Herefordiæ"[810]. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordiæ et Essex, constabularius Angliæ et dominus Breconiæ” married “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that she was buried “apud Waldene”[811]. The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Quenden” of “quædam filia” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethæ…regis Angliæ Edwardi…filiæ” during whose birth her mother died, and in a later passage her burial at Waldon[812].
     "m firstly (Betrothed 1285, Ipswich Priory Church, Suffolk 18 Jan 1297) JAN I Count of Holland and Zeeland, son of FLORIS V Count of Holland & his wife Béatrice de Flandre [Dampierre] (before 12 Aug 1283-10 Nov 1299).
     "m secondly (Papal dispensation 10 Aug 1302, Westminster Abbey 14 Nov 1302) HUMPHREY [VIII] de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex, son of HUMPHREY [VII] de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his wife Mathilde de Fiennes ([1276]-killed in battle Boroughbridge 16 Mar 1322, bur York, church of the Friars Preachers). He succeeded his father in 1298 as Earl of Hereford and Essex, Constable of England."
Med Lands cites:
[805] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 228.
[806] Oorkondenboek Holland (1873), 512, p. 226.
[807] Oorkondenboek Holland (1873), 581, p. 254.
[808] Chronologia Johannis de Beke (The Hague), 74e and 77b, pp. 229 and 253.
[809] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 17.
[810] Annales Londonienses, p. 129.
[811] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135.
[812] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, pp. 139 and 140.13
He was Earl of Essex.2

;
Per Burke's:
     "Humphrey de Bohun, as Earl of Hereford, Earl of Essex, and Lord High Constable. In the 30th Edward I., this nobleman gave and granted unto the king, by a formal conversance, the inheritance of all his lands and lordships, as also of his earldoms of Hereford and Essex, and the constableship of England, which, upon his marriage with Elizabeth Plantagenet, widow of John, Earl of Holland, and dau. of the king, were regranted to him, and entailed upon his issue lawfully begotten by the lady; in default thereof, and from and after the death of himself and wife, then the lordship of Plassets, and certain other lordships in Essex, and elsewhere, together with the constableship, should remain wholly to the king and his heirs for ever. In the 34th of the same reign he had a grant similarly entailed of the whole territory of Annandale, in Scotland. After this his lordship was in the wards of Scotland and was taken prisoner, in the 7th Edward II. (1313-14), at the disastrous battle (to the English) of Stryvelin. But he was exchanged for the wife of Robert Bruce, who had long been captive in England. From this period we find him constantly engaged in the service of the crown, until the 14th year of the king's reign, when Edward learning that the earl was raising forces in the marches of Wales, against Hugh de Spencer the younger, sent him a peremptory command to forbear, which his lordship not only refused obeying, but forthwith joined Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, in the great insurrection then incited by that nobleman, for the redress of certain grievances, and the banishment of the Spencers. In this proceeding, however, he eventually lost hislife, being run through the body by a soldier at the battle of Boroughbridge, in Yorkshire, where his party received so signal a defeat on 16 March, 1321. The earl had issue five surviving sons and two surviving daus., viz.,
     ---John; Humphrey; and Edward; successors primogeniturely to the honours
     ---William
     ---Alianore
     ---Margaret."17

; Per Genealogics:
     “Humphrey de Bohun was born in 1176, son of Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford and Essex, and Maud de Fiennes. In 1298 he succeeded his father as Earl of Hereford and Essex. Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and constable of England, married 14 November 1302 Elizabeth, Countess of Holland, widowed daughter of King Edward I. In 1310 he was appointed one of the twenty-one ordainers to regulate the king's conduct of affairs. In 1312 Humphrey joined the barons besieging Piers Gaveston Edward II's favourite at Scarborough.
     “Humphrey fought and was captured at the battle of Bannockburn in 1314 and was exchanged by the Scots for Robert Bruce's wife, who had been imprisoned in England.
     “Humphrey de Bohun became one of the major opponents of Edward II's later favourites the Despencers, and in 1321 joined the league of marcher lords who were demanding their exile. Alarmed by Edward's massacre of rebels defending Leeds castle, Humphrey surrendered his castles to the king's troops without resistance. Retreating before Edward's northwards advance, he was killed, 16 March 1321, at the battle of Boroughbridge.”.6

; This is the same person as ”Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford” at Wikipedia.18

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. The Plantagenet Encyclopedia, London, 1990 , Hallam, Elizabeth; General Editor. 33 biography.
2. Genealogie der Graven van Holland, Zaltbommel, 1969 , Dek, Dr. A. W. E. 18.
3. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard. 57.
4. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973.
5. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. page 79.
6. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden. 6:467-70.
7. Ancestral Story - Grace Viell 2009 , Fettes, Ian Dundas. nr 282.6
He was Lord High Constable of England.19,5

;
AR7 6-29, 97-31 Earl of Hereford and Essex
     Faris [1999:33-34]: "ELIZABETH OF ENGLAND was born at Rhuddlan Castle, co. Caernarvon, on 7 Aug. 1282. She was married for the first time at Ipswich on 7 Jan. 1296/7 to Johann, Graf von Holland (died 10 Nov. 1299 £p.) She was married for the second time at Westminster on 14 Nov. 1302 to HUMPHREY DE BOHUN, Baron of Kington, co. Hereford, lord of half the barony of Trowbridge, Co. Wilts, Earl of Hereford and Essex, hereditary Constable of England, son and heir of Humphrey de Bohun, Baron of Pleshey, Essex, Baron of Kington, co. Hereford, Earl of Hereford and Essex, hereditary Constable of England (of Magna Carla Surety descent and descendant of Charlemagne), by Maud, daughter of Enguerrand de Fiennes, Seigneur de Fienes in Guisnes (descendant of Charlemagne). He was born about 1276 (aged twenty-two at father's death). They had six children. He served in Scotland and was present at the siege of Carlaverock on 1 July 1300. He fought at Bannockburn, and was taken prisoner at Bothwell. He was exchanged for Elizabeth de Burgh, wife of Robert de Brus, King of Scotland. ELIZABETH OF ENGLAND died at Quendon, Essex, on 5 May 1316 after childbirth, and was buried at Walden Abbey, Essex. HUMPHREY DE BOHUN, Earl of Hereford and Essex, joined the rebellion against King Edward II, and was slain in battle at Boroughbridge on 16 Mar. 1321/2, and was buried in the church of the Friars Preachers at York (will dated 11 Aug. 1319 desired burial at Walden near the body of his wife).
C.P. 4:324 (1916). C.P. 5:135 (1926). C.P. 6:467-472 (1926) (his seal to the Barons' Letter to the Pope, 12 Feb. 1300/1, shows arms: "[azure] with a bend of [silver] and cotises of [gold] between six [golden] lioncels." The counterseal has "the arms of Bohun hung by a strap from the back of the Bohun swan). Paget (1957) 73:6-7. Mediaeval Studies 46:265 (1984).
Children of Humphrey de Bohun, by Elizabeth of England:
i.     WILLIAM DE BOHUN [see next].
ii.     MARGARET DE BOHUN, married HUGH DE COURTENAY [see COURTENAY 8].
iii.     ALIANOR DE BOHUN, married JAMES BUTLER [see BUTLER 10], married, second, THOMAS DE DAGWORTH [see BUTLER 10]."20,21 EDV-19 GKJ-20. He was 4th Earl of Hereford of the 1199 cr.19

; Per Med Lands:
     "HUMPHREY [VIII] de Bohun ([1276]-killed in battle Boroughbridge 16 Mar 1322, bur York, Church of the Friars Preachers). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordiæ et Essex, constabularius Angliæ et dominus Breconiæ” as son of “Humfredus septimus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem de Fenes”[580]. He succeeded his father in 1298 as Earl of Hereford and Essex, hereditary Constable of England. He was deprived of his office of Constable in 1302, but was restored as such 28 Aug 1311. He was among the Barons who forced King Edward II to agree to the appointment of the Ordainers, of whom he became one himself. He opposed the Despensers, joined the rebellion of Thomas Earl of Lancaster, and was killed while trying to force the bridge at Boroughbridge. The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records that “Humfridus de Bohun” was killed “ad pontem de Burrowbrigge” and was buried at York[581]. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus octavus” died 16 Mar 1321 and was buried “apud Ebor, inter Fratres Prædicatores”[582].
     "m (Papal dispensation 12 Aug 1302, Westminster 14 Nov 1302) as her second husband, ELIZABETH of England, widow of JAN I Count of Holland and Zeeland, daughter of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Rhuddlan Castle, Flintshire Aug 1282-Quendon, Essex [5] May 1316, bur Walden Abbey, Essex). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the birth "apud Rothelan" in 1282 of "filiam…Elizabetham" to "Alienora regina Angliæ"[583]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jan and "Elizabeth…Eduardi regis filia", recording in a later passage that she returned to England after her husband died and married (secondly) "comes Erffordie"[584]. The dispensation for the marriage of “Humfrido comiti Herefordensi” and “Elizabetæ natæ...Edvardi regis Angliæ...relictæ quondam Johannis comitis Hollandiæ” is dated 10 Aug 1302[585]. The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "in festo Sanctæ Katerinæ…apud Caversham juxta Redyng" in 1302 of "Margareta filia regis Angliæ, comitissa Hoylandiæ et Salondiæ" and "domino Humfrido de Bohun comiti Herefordiæ"[586]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jan and "Elizabeth…Eduardi regis filia", recording in a later passage that she returned to England after her husband died and married (secondly) "comes Erffordie"[587]. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordiæ et Essex, constabularius Angliæ et dominus Breconiæ” married “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that she was buried “apud Waldene”[588]. The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Quenden” of “quædam filia” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethæ…regis Angliæ Edwardi…filiæ” during whose birth her mother died, and in a later passage her burial at Waldon[589]."
Med Lands cites:
[580] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135.
[581] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, p. 139.
[582] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135.
[583] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 228.
[584] Chronologia Johannis de Beke, 74e and 77b, pp. 229, 253.
[585] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 17.
[586] Annales Londonienses, p. 129.
[587] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 74e and 77b, pp. 229 and 253.
[588] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135.
[589] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, pp. 139 and 140.8


; Per Genealogy.EU (de Bohun): “G1. Humphrey, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex, Constable of England, *Pleshy Castle 1276, +k.a.Boroughbridge 16.3.1321, bur Friar's Preacher, York; m.Westminster 14.11.1302 Elizabeth of England, Dowager Css of Holland (*7.8.1281 +5.5.1316)”.22

; Per Racines et Histoire (de Bohun): “Humphrey VIII de Bohun ° 02/1276 +X 16/03/1322 (Boroughbridge, Yorkshire) Lord Bohun, 4ème earl of Hereford and Essex, Connétable d’Angleterre
     ép. 14/11/1302 Elizabeth Plantagenêt, comtesse Holland ° 07/08/1282 (Rhuddlan) + 05/05/1316 (fille du Roi Edward 1er et d’Eleanor de Castille) ”.23

Family

Elizabeth 'of Rhuddlan' (?) Princess of England, Countess of Holland b. 7 Aug 1282, d. 5 May 1316
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 36, de BOHUN 6:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dromant, Abeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 57. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Humphrey de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007055&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Butler: p. 176. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Humphrey de Bohun: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007055&tree=LEO
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Bohun , p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#HumphreyBohunHereforddied1322. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 33. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  11. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p. 20.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005912&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Elizabethdied1316.
  14. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 33-34.
  15. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Hereford Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 15 July 2020), memorial page for Humphrey de Bohun (c.1276–16 Mar 1322), Find a Grave Memorial no. 8865, citing Blackfriars Abbey Church (Defunct), York, York Unitary Authority, North Yorkshire, England; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8865. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's Dromant, Abeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, pp. 57-58.
  18. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humphrey_de_Bohun,_4th_Earl_of_Hereford. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  19. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 18-5, p. 25. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  20. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  21. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, pp. 34-35.
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, de Bohun: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/bohun.html#H4
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Famille de Bohun, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bohun.pdf
  24. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Segrave of Isfield Place Family Page.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mary de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00464372&tree=LEO
  26. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's Dromant, Abeyant, Forgeited, and Extinct Peerages, p. 58.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028705&tree=LEO
  28. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Walter 8: pp. 328-329.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028611&tree=LEO
  30. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Courtenay 9: pp. 238-239.
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028609&tree=LEO
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aeneas de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00464374&tree=LEO
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabella de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00464375&tree=LEO

Eleanor (?) Countess of Provence Queen of Eng.1

F, #4428, b. 1223, d. 24 June 1291
FatherRaymond V Berenger (?) Comte de Provence & Forcalquier2,1,3,4 b. 1197/98, d. 19 Aug 1245
MotherBeatrix/Béatrice (?) Countess of Savoy1 b. bt 1198 - 1205, d. bt Dec 1266 - Jan 1267
ReferenceGAV19 EDV20
Last Edited12 Jul 2020
     Eleanor (?) Countess of Provence Queen of Eng. was born in 1223 at Aix-en-Provence, France; Louda & Macalagan says b. ca 1222; Genealogy.EU (Barcelona 2 page) says. b. 1217/23; Med Lands says b. 1223; Genealogics says b. ca 1233; Wikipedia says b. ca 1223.5,6,1,7,8,9 She married Henry III (?) of Winchester, King of England, son of John I "Lackland" (?) King of England and Isabelle d'Angouleme (?) comtesse d'Angouleme, Queen Consort of England, on 14 January 1236 at Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, co. Kent, England.10,11,12,5,2,6,1,13,14
Eleanor (?) Countess of Provence Queen of Eng. died on 24 June 1291 at Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; Genealogy.EU (Barcelona 2 page) says. d. 24 Jan 1291.10,15,6,1,13,9
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. page 196.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:70 year of birth.9


; Per Genealgoics:
     "Eleanor was born about 1223, the daughter of Raimund Berengar V, comte de Provence, and Béatrice de Savoie. She was about twelve when she had to leave the warmth of southern France to marry an unknown man in the cold of the English winter, becoming Henry III's queen on 4 January 1236. Henry had first tried to marry Jeanne, countess of Ponthieu, until he was told by his brother Richard of the beauty of the four Provence sisters. Richard married Sancha and the two other sisters were also married to two brothers: Marguerite to King Louis IX of France and Beatrice to Charles I Etienne, king of Naples and Louis IX's younger brother.
     "Eleanor and Henry had eight children of whom the first four would have progeny: Edward, Margaret, Beatrice, and Edmund. However tragedy plagued the early years of the marriage. Their eldest son Edward became very ill. Though he recovered, his siblings Richard, Henry, William, Katherine, and John died at very young ages, leaving their parents grief-stricken. Eleanor was especially upset over the death of her youngest daughter Katharine, who possibly had a degenerative disease that led her to become deaf, and she eventually died at the age of three.
     "The marriage remained happy, but Eleanor became unpopular when her uncles arrived from Savoy to become the king's favourites. At one point Eleanor was sailing on a barge that was attacked by London citizens. When Edmund Rich, archbishop of Canterbury, died in 1240, Eleanor wrote to the pope to have her uncle, Boniface of Savoy, take that position. However Boniface was resented, as was Eleanor's extravagance.
     "In 1252 Henry III went to France because of a revolt in Gascony, and Eleanor becoming regent together with the king's brother Richard. In 1254 Eleanor went with her son Edward to Spain to attend Edward's marriage to Eleanor of Castile, comtesse de Ponthieu; on the way back she and the young couple were invited to visit the French court. During the civil war between Henry III and the barons, Eleanor provided active support to Henry, raising money on her jewellery. After the Battle of Evesham in 1265, in which the barons led by Simon de Montfort were defeated and Montfort killed, she quickly joined her husband and son in England. In 1272 her husband died and Eleanor became regent until her son, now King Edward I, returned to England. In 1275 she lost both her daughters, Marguerite, queen of Scots and Beatrice, duchess of Brittany. In 1280 she retired to the convent of Amesbury, but was still involved in her family's affairs. She remained in Amesbury until her death in 1291."9



; Per Med Lands: " ELEONORE de Provence (Aix-en-Provence [1223]-Amesbury Abbey, Wiltshire 24/25 Jun 1291, bur Amesbury Abbey). A charter dated 22 Jun 1235 records the marriage agreement between "Henricus III Angliæ Rex" and "Amedeo IV Sab. Com. ac Willelmo electo Valentino fratribus…nepte, sororis illorum, comitissæ Provinciæ, filia"[447]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "Id Jan" [1236] in Canterbury of King Henry III and "Alienoram filiam comitis Proventiæ" and their joint coronation in London "XIII Kal Feb"[448]. Her marriage is recorded by Matthew Paris, who also states her parentage[449]. She was crowned Queen Consort 19/20 Jan 1236 at Westminster Abbey. Her marriage signalled the establishment of close ties between the English court and the house of Savoy, the foreign immigrants becoming increasingly unpopular in England and contributing to the difficulties experienced by King Henry III with his barons. The testament of “R. Berengarius…comes et marchio Provincie et comes Forcalquerii”, dated 20 Jun 1238, names “Margaritam filiam nostrum…reginam Francie…Elionors filiam nostrum…reginam Anglie…Sanciam filiam nostram” and appoints “Beatricem filiam nostrum heredem generalem”[450]. The testament of "Beatricis relictæ Raimundi Berengarii comitis Provinciæ", dated 14 Jan 1264, confirms her previous testaments appointing "Reginarum filiarum suarum Margarethæ Franciæ et Alienoræ Angliæ…" as her heirs[451]. She became a nun at Amesbury Abbey, Wiltshire 7 Jul 1284. The Annales Londonienses record the death "in crastino Sancti Johannis Baptistæ" in 1291 of "Elianora mater regis Edwardi" and her burial "apud Ambresbury in festo nativitate beatæ Virginis"[452]. m (Betrothed 22 Jun 1235, Canterbury 14 Jan 1236) HENRY III King of England, son of JOHN King of England & Isabelle d’Angoulême (Winchester Castle 1 Oct 1207-Palace of Westminster 16 Nov 1272, bur Westminster Abbey)."
Med Lands cites:
[447] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 96, p. 42.
[448] Florentii Wigorniensis Monachi Chronicon, Tomus II, Continuatio, p. 176.
[449] Matthew Paris, Vol. III, 1236, pp. 334-6.
[450] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2719, p. 378.
[451] State Archives, volume 104, page 11, fascicules 11.1, 2 and 3, and Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 636, p. 317.
[452] Annales Londonienses, p. 99.7


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Eleanor of Provence (c. 1223 – 24/25 June 1291[1]) was Queen consort of England, as the spouse of King Henry III of England, from 1236 until his death in 1272. She served as regent of England during the absence of her spouse in 1253.[2]
     "Although she was completely devoted to her husband, and staunchly defended him against the rebel Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, she was very much hated by the Londoners. This was because she had brought many relatives with her to England in her retinue; these were known as "the Savoyards", and they were given influential positions in the government and realm. On one occasion, Eleanor's barge was attacked by angry citizens who pelted her with stones, mud, pieces of paving, rotten eggs and vegetables.
     "Eleanor had at least five children, including the future King Edward I of England. She also was renowned for her cleverness, skill at writing poetry, and as a leader of fashion.
Early life
     "Born in Aix-en-Provence, she was the second daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence (1198–1245) and Beatrice of Savoy (1198–1267), the daughter of Thomas I of Savoy and his wife Margaret of Geneva. She was well educated as a child, and developed a strong love of reading. Her three sisters also married kings.[3] After her elder sister Margaret married Louis IX of France, their uncle William corresponded with Henry III of England to persuade him to marry Eleanor. Henry sought a dowry of up to twenty thousand silver marks to help offset the dowry he had just paid for his sister Isabella, but Eleanor's father was able to negotiate this down to no dowry, just a promise to leave her ten thousand when he died.
     "Like her mother, grandmother, and sisters, Eleanor was renowned for her beauty. She was a dark-haired brunette with fine eyes.[4] Piers Langtoft speaks of her as "The erle's daughter, the fairest may of life".[5] On 22 June 1235, Eleanor was betrothed to King Henry III (1207–1272).[1] Eleanor was probably born latest in 1223; Matthew Paris describes her as being "jamque duodennem" (already twelve) when she arrived in the Kingdom of England for her marriage.
Queen
     "Eleanor was married to King Henry III of England on 14 January 1236.[6] She had never seen him prior to the wedding at Canterbury Cathedral and had never set foot in his kingdom.[7] Edmund Rich, Archbishop of Canterbury, officiated. She was dressed in a shimmering golden dress that fitted tightly at the waist and flared out to wide pleats at her feet. The sleeves were long and lined with ermine.[8] After riding to London the same day where a procession of citizens greeted the bridal pair, Eleanor was crowned queen consort of England in a ceremony at Westminster Abbey which was followed by a magnificent banquet with the entire nobility in full attendance.[9] Her love for her husband grew significantly from 1236 onward.
Unpopularity
     "Eleanor was a loyal and faithful consort to Henry, but she brought in her retinue a large number of uncles and cousins, "the Savoyards", and her influence with the King and her unpopularity with the English barons created friction during Henry's reign.[10] Her uncle William of Savoy became a close advisor of her husband, displacing and displeasing English barons.[11]
     "Though Eleanor and Henry supported different factions at times, she was made regent of England when her husband left for Gascony in 1253. Eleanor was devoted to her husband's cause, stoutly contested Simon de Montfort, raising troops in France for Henry's cause.
     "On 13 July 1263, she was sailing down the Thames when her barge was attacked by citizens of London.[12] Eleanor stoutly hated the Londoners who returned her hatred; in revenge for their dislike Eleanor had demanded from the city all the back payments due on the monetary tribute known as queen-gold, by which she received a tenth of all fines which came to the Crown. In addition to the queen-gold other such fines were levied on the citizens by the Queen on the thinnest of pretexts.[13] In fear for her life as she was pelted with stones, loose pieces of paving, dried mud, rotten eggs and vegetables, Eleanor was rescued by Thomas Fitzthomas, the Mayor of London, and took refuge at the bishop of London's home.
Queen dowager
     "In 1272 Henry died, and her son Edward, who was 33 years old, became king of England. She remained in England as queen dowager, and raised several of her grandchildren—Edward's son Henry and daughter Eleanor, and Beatrice's son John. When her grandson Henry died in her care in 1274, Eleanor went into mourning and gave orders for his heart to be buried at the priory at Guildford which she founded in his memory. In January 1275 she expelled the Jews from all of her lands.[14] Eleanor's two remaining daughters died in 1275, Margaret on 26 February and Beatrice on 24 March.
     "She retired to a convent; however, she remained in contact with her son, King Edward, and her sister, Queen Margaret of France.
     "Eleanor died on 24/25 June 1291 in Amesbury, eight miles north of Salisbury, England. She was buried in Amesbury Abbey. The exact site of her grave at the abbey is unknown making her the only English queen without a marked grave. Her heart was taken to London where it was buried at the Franciscan priory of Greyfriars.[15]
Cultural legacy
     "Eleanor was renowned for her learning, cleverness, and skill at writing poetry,[7] as well as her beauty; she was also known as a leader of fashion, continually importing clothes from France.[5] She often wore parti-coloured cottes (a type of tunic), gold or silver girdles into which a dagger was casually thrust, she favoured red silk damask, and decorations of gilt quatrefoil, and to cover her dark hair she wore jaunty pillbox caps. Eleanor introduced a new type of wimple to England, which was high, "into which the head receded until the face seemed like a flower in an enveloping spathe".[5]
     "She had developed a love for the songs of the troubadors as a child, and continued this interest. She bought many romantic and historical books, covering stories from ancient times to contemporary romances written in the period (13th century).
     "Eleanor is the protagonist of The Queen From Provence, a historical romance by British novelist Jean Plaidy which was published in 1979. Eleanor is a main character in the novel Four Sisters, All Queens by author Sherry Jones, as well as the novels The Sister Queens by Sophie Perinot, and "My Fair Lady: A Story of Henry III's Lost Queen" by J.P.Reedman. She is also the subject of Norwegian Symphonic metal band Leave's Eyes in their song "Eleonore De Provence" from their album Symphonies of the Night.
Issue
     "Eleanor and Henry had at least five children together. Eleanor seems to have been especially devoted to her eldest son, Edward; when he was deathly ill in 1246, she stayed with him at the abbey at Beaulieu in Hampshire for three weeks, long past the time allowed by monastic rules.[16] It was because of her influence that King Henry granted the duchy of Gascony to Edward in 1249.[citation needed] Her youngest child, Katherine, seems to have had a degenerative disease that rendered her deaf. When the little girl died at the age of three, both her royal parents suffered overwhelming grief.[17]
1. Edward I (1239–1307), married Eleanor of Castile (1241–1290) in 1254, by whom he had issue, including his heir Edward II. His second wife was Margaret of France, by whom he had issue.
2. Margaret (1240–1275), married King Alexander III of Scotland, by whom she had issue.
3. Beatrice (1242–1275), married John II, Duke of Brittany, by whom she had issue.
4. Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster (1245–1296), married Aveline de Forz in 1269, who died four years later without issue; married Blanche of Artois in 1276, by whom he had issue.
5. Katherine (25 November 1253 – 3 May 1257)
     "Four others are listed, but their existence is in doubt as there is no contemporary record of them. These are:
1. Richard (1247–1256)
2. John (1250–1256)
3. William (1251–1256)
4. Henry (1256–1257)
References
Notes
1. Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Provence
2. Strickland, Agnes. Lives of the Queens of England: From the Norman Conquest
3. Cox 1974, p. 463.
4. Costain 1959, p. 125-126.
5. Costain 1959, p. 140.
6. Sadler 2008, p. 32.
7. Costain 1959, p. 127.
8. Costain 1959, p. 129.
9. Costain 1959, p. 129-130.
10. Costain 1959, p. 130-140.
11. Cox 1974, p. 50.
12. Costain 1959, p. 253-254.
13. Costain 1959, p. 206-207.
14. Alison Taylor, "Cambridge, the hidden history", (Tempus: 1999) ISBN 0752414364, p82
15. Howell 2004.
16. Costain 1959, p. 142.
17. Costain 1959, p. 167.
18. Selby, Walford Dakin; Harwood, H. W. Forsyth; Murray, Keith W. (1895). The genealogist. London: George Bell & Sons. p. 29.
19. Cox 1974, p. 462.
Bibliography
** Costain, Thomas B. (1959). The Magnificent Century. Garden City, New York: Doubleday and Company.
** Cox, Eugene L. (1974). The Eagles of Savoy. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0691052166.
** Howell, Margaret (1997). Eleanor of Provence: Queenship in Thirteenth-century England.
** Howell, Margaret (2004), "Eleanor (Eleanor of Provence) (c.1223–1291), queen of England", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford: Oxford University Press, retrieved 14 December 2010
** Sadler, John (2008). The Second Barons' War: Simon de Montfort and the Battles of Lewes and Evesham. Casemate Publishers. ISBN 978-1-84415-831-7.
** Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands Project on Eleonore Berenger of Provence, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[self-published source][better source needed]
** The Peerage: Eleanor of Provence: [1] https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#EleonoreMHenryIIIEnglanddied1272."8

GAV-19 EDV-20 GKJ-21.

Family

Henry III (?) of Winchester, King of England b. 1 Oct 1207, d. 16 Nov 1272
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raimund Berengar V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004071&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Beatrixdied1266. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 521 (Chart 38), 531-534. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty.
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#EleonoreMHenryIIIEnglanddied1272
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_of_Provence. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Provence: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002879&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-27, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 161-13, p. 189. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  12. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 280-281. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  13. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.13. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000808&tree=LEO
  15. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 201, PLANTAGENET 10. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIIIdied1272B.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  18. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.15.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edward I 'Longshanks': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000809&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#EdwardIdied1307B.
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005674&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Beatrixdied1275.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edmund 'Crouchback': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005190&tree=LEO
  24. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Edmunddied1296B.
  25. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.16.

Margaret (?) Princess of England1,2

F, #4429, b. 29 October 1240, d. February 1275
FatherHenry III (?) of Winchester, King of England3,4,1,2,5,6 b. 1 Oct 1207, d. 16 Nov 1272
MotherEleanor (?) Countess of Provence Queen of Eng.1,2 b. 1223, d. 24 Jun 1291
Last Edited7 Feb 2020
     Margaret (?) Princess of England was born on 29 October 1240 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Windsor and Maidenhead Royal Borough, Berkshire, England; Genealogy.EU says b. 29 Sept 1240.7,8,3,1,2 She married Alexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots, son of Alexander II "the Peaceful" (?) King of Scotland and Marie de Coucy Dowager Queen of Scotland, on 26 December 1251 at York, Yorkshire, England; his 1st wife.9,10,3,1,11,2
Margaret (?) Princess of England died in February 1275 at Cupar Castle, Fife, Scotland, at age 34; six months after 19 August 1274.12,3,1,2
Margaret (?) Princess of England was buried after 27 February 1275 at Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, Scotland.1,2


     ; Margaret, *Windsor Castle 29.9.1240, +Cupar Castle, Fife 26/27.2.1275, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife; m.York 26.12.1251 King Alexander III of Scots (+19.3.1286.)1

Family

Alexander III "the Glorious" (?) King of Scots b. 4 Sep 1241, d. 19 Mar 1286
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.15. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 12: Scotland: Kings until the accession of Robert Bruce.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000808&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIIIdied1272B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  8. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 280-281. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  9. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 281.
  10. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 397, 408-409. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Dunkeld page (The House of Dunkeld): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/dunkeld.html
  12. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 521 (Chart 38).
  13. [S761] John Cannon and Ralph Griffiths, The Oxford Illiustrated History of the British Monarchy (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1998), Appendix IV: The Scottish Royal Dynasties. Hereinafter cited as Cannaon & Griffits (1998) - British Monarchy.
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#Alexanderdied1283
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 07 February 2020), memorial page for Alexander Dunkeld (21 Jan 1264–28 Jan 1284), Find A Grave Memorial no. 10590843, citing Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/10590843/alexander-dunkeld. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.

Beatrice (?) of England, Countess of Richmond1,2,3,4

F, #4430, b. 25 June 1242, d. 24 March 1275
FatherHenry III (?) of Winchester, King of England1,5,6,7,8 b. 1 Oct 1207, d. 16 Nov 1272
MotherEleanor (?) Countess of Provence Queen of Eng.1,3,7,8 b. 1223, d. 24 Jun 1291
Last Edited20 Oct 2020
     Beatrice (?) of England, Countess of Richmond was born on 25 June 1242 at Bordeaux, Departement de la Gironde, Aquitaine, France.9,10,11,1,7,8 She married Jean II de Dreux Duc de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond, son of Jean I "le Roux" de Dreux Earl of Richmond, Duc de Bretagne and Blanca/Blanche (?) of Navarre, Duchess of Brittany, between 22 January 1259 and 1260 at l'Abbaye royale de Saint Denis, Saint- Denis, Departement Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France (now); Med Lands says "contract 13 Oct 1260, église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint Denis Nov 1260, Westminster Abbey [25 Dec] 1260."10,12,2,3,7,8,13,14
Beatrice (?) of England, Countess of Richmond died on 24 March 1275 at London, City of London, Greater London, England, at age 32.11,1,7,8
Beatrice (?) of England, Countess of Richmond was buried after 24 March 1275 at Grey Friars London, London, City of London, Greater London, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     25 Jun 1242, Bordeaux, Departement de la Gironde, Aquitaine, France
     DEATH     24 Mar 1275 (aged 32), London, City of London, Greater London, England
     Family Members
     Parents
          Henry III 1207–1272
          Eleanor of Provence 1222–1291
     Spouse
          Jean de Bretagne 1239–1305
     Siblings
          Edward I 1239–1307
          Margaret Plantagenet 1240–1275
          Edmund Plantagenet 1245–1296
          Richard of England 1247–1250
          John of England 1250–1252
          William Plantagenet 1251–1256
          Katherine of England 1253–1257
          Henry of England 1260–1260
     Children
          Artus de Bretagne 1262–1312
          Marie de Bretagne 1268–1339
          Jean de Bretagne 1269–1312
          Blanche de Bretagne 1270–1327
          Alienor de Bretagne 1275–1342
     BURIAL     Grey Friars London, London, City of London, Greater London, England
     Created by: Todd Whitesides
     Added: 3 Nov 2011
     Find a Grave Memorial 79828916.15
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 . 196.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von.
4. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.7


; This is the same person as:
”Beatrice of England” at Wikipedia and as
”Béatrice d'Angleterre” at Wikipédia (Fr.)4,16

; Per Genealogics:
     “Beatrice was born in Bordeaux on 25 June 1242, the second daughter of Henry III, king of England, and Eleanor de Provence. Henry and Eleanor enjoyed a happy marriage and Beatrice grew up in a loving environment, close to her siblings, though her younger siblings Richard, Henry, William, Katherine, and John died at very young ages.
     “At one point Henry conducted negotiations for Beatrice to marry the king of France and also rejected a proposal that she should wed the son of the king of Norway. On 22 January 1260 in the Basilica of St. Denis she married Jean II, duc de Bretagne, son of Jean I, duc de Bretagne, and Blanche de Champagne. Beatrice later changed her name to Beatrice de Dreux; she and Jean had six children of whom one son and two daughters would have progeny.
     “Beatrice died on 24 March 1275 in London. Jean II honoured his wife with a chantry, an institutional chapel on private land or within a greater church, which was to be finished when he died. Beatrice was buried at Grey Friars Church in Greenwich, London.”.7

; Per Racines et Histoire (Plantagenêts): “2) Béatrice d’Angleterre ° 25/01/1242 (Bordeaux) + 24/03/1275 (Londres) Princesse d’Angleterre
     ép. 13/01/1260 (Saint-Denis) Jean II de Dreux, comte de Richmond (1268) et de Bretagne (1286), duc de Bretagne (1297) ° 04/01/1240 + 18/11/1305 (Lyon)”


Per Racines et Histoire (Dreux): “Jean II de Dreux ° 1238/39 + 18/11/1305 duc de Bretagne, comte de Richmond (1268), Pair de France
     ép. 22/01/1259 Beatrix d’Angleterre (Plantagenêt) ° 25/06/1242 + 24/03/1275 (fille de Henry Plantagenêt, futur Henry III Roi d’Angleterre)”.17,18

; Per Genealogy.EU (Anjou 3): “C8. Beatrice, *Bordeaux 25.6.1242, +London 24.3.1275; m.St.Denis 22.1.1259/60 Jean II de Dreux, Duc de Bretagne (*1239 +1305)”


Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 16): “B1. Duc Jean II de Bretagne (1286-1305), *1239, +Lyon 18.11.1305, bur Ploermel; m.St.Denis 22.1.1259 Beatrix of England (*25.6.1242 +24.3.1275/77) dau.of King Henry III of England”.19,20

; Per Med Lands:
     "BEATRIX (Bordeaux 25 Jun 1242-London 24 Mar 1275, maybe bur Reading Abbey, probably transferred to Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London). The Annales Londonienses record the birth "apud Burdegalam" in 1242 of "filiam…Beatrice" to "regina Alienora"[708]. Her birth is recorded by Matthew Paris[709]. The Annales Londonienses record the marriage in 1260 of "Johannes filius comitis Britanniæ" and "Beatricem filiam regis Angliæ"[710]. The Chronicle of Thomas Wykes records the marriage “apud Westmonasterium” in 1259 of “Johannem filium et hæredum comitis Britanniæ” and “Beatriciam filiam regis”[711]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death in 1275 of "Margareta regina Scotie et Beatrix comitissa Britanniæ, filiæ Henrici"[712].
     "m (contract 13 Oct 1260, église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint Denis Nov 1260, Westminster Abbey [25 Dec] 1260) JEAN de Bretagne [Dreux-Capet] Earl of Richmond, son of JEAN I Duke of Brittany & his wife Blanche de Champagne Infanta de Navarra (4 Jan 1239-Lyon 16 Nov 1305, bur Ploërmel, Morbihan, église Notre Dame du couvent des Carmes). Accompanied King Louis IX on the Second Crusade. He succeeded his father in 1286 as JEAN II Duke of Brittany."
Med Lands cites:
[708] Annales Londonienses, p. 39.
[709] Matthew Paris, Vol. IV, 1242, p. 224.
[710] Annales Londonienses, p. 54.
[711] Thomas Wykes, p. 124.
[712] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 214.
[713] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1254, p. 447.8


; Per Med Lands:
     "JEAN de Bretagne, son of JEAN I Duke of Brittany & his wife Infanta doña Blanca de Navarra [Champagne] (3/4 Jan 1239-Lyon 16 Nov 1305, bur Ploërmel, Morbihan, église Notre dame du couvent des Carmes). The Chronicon Universum in the cartulary of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé records the birth "die martis infra octabas Sanctorum Innocentium" in 1239 of "Johannes primogenitus Johannis comitis Britannie"[397]. The Chronicon Kemperlegiense records the birth in 1240 of "Iohannes primogenitus Iohannis Comitis Britanniæ"[398]. Earl of Richmond 1268, when his father resigned the earldom. He accompanied his father and Louis IX King of France on the Crusade in 1270. William of Tyre (Continuation) records the arrival in Palestine of "Johan filz le conte de Bretaigne" 14 Sep 1272[399]. He succeeded his father in 1286 as JEAN II Duke of Brittany: the Chronicon Britannicum records the death "Id Oct" 1286 of “Joannes comes Britanniæ fundator abbatiæ de Precibus” and the succession of “Joannes filius eius”[400]. He received Papal recognition 1 Sep 1288. Philippe IV King of France confirmed his title of duke of Brittany, pair de France at Courtrai Sep 1297[401]. King Edward I of England confiscated his English possessions in 1296, for supporting the French, but they were restored to him 1 May 1304. He was killed by a falling wall, while leading the Pope's horse during the consecration of Pope Clement V. The testament of "Jehan Duc de Bretaigne Comte de Richemond", dated Jul 1304, bequeathed property to “Artur mon ainzné filz...Jean de Bretaigne mon filz...Alienor de Bretaigne ma fille nonain de Fontevrault...”[402]. The Chronicon Britannicum records the death “in Lugduno” 1305 of “Joannes dux Britanniæ” and the succession of “Arturus eius filius”[403].
     "m (contract 13 Oct 1260, église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint Denis Nov 1260, Westminster Abbey [25 Dec] 1260) BEATRIX of England, daughter of HENRY III King of England & his wife Eléonore de Provence (Bordeaux 25 Jun 1242-London 24 Mar 1275, maybe bur Reading Abbey, transferred to Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London). The Annales Londonienses record the marriage in 1260 of "Johannes filius comitis Britanniæ" and "Beatricem filiam regis Angliæ"[404]. The Chronicle of Thomas Wykes records the marriage “apud Westmonasterium” in 1259 of “Johannem filium et hæredum comitis Britanniæ” and “Beatriciam filiam regis”[405]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death in 1275 of "Margareta regina Scotie et Beatrix comitissa Britanniæ, filiæ Henrici"[406]."
Med Lands cites:
[397] Quimperlé Sainte-Trinité, Chronicon Universum, p. 109.
[398] Chronicon Kemperlegiense, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber I, Collectio Veterum, p. 526.
[399] William of Tyre Continuator XXXIV.XV, p. 462.
[400] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, Chronicon Britanicum, col. 112.
[401] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, col. 1122.
[402] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, col. 1185.
[403] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, Chronicon Britanicum, col. 112.
[404] Annales Londonienses, p. 54.
[405] Thomas Wykes, p. 124.
[406] Florentii Wigorniensis Monachi Chronicon, Tomus II, Continuatio, p. 214.14
She was Countess of Richmond between 1268 and 1275.4

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.15. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beatrice_of_England. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000808&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIIIdied1272B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005674&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Beatrixdied1275.
  9. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  10. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 281. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  11. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 521 (Chart 38). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005673&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRITTANY.htm#JeanIIdied1305B
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 14 June 2020), memorial page for Béatrice d'Angleterre (25 Jun 1242–24 Mar 1275), Find a Grave Memorial no. 79828916, citing Grey Friars London, London, City of London, Greater London, England; Maintained by Todd Whitesides (contributor 47553735), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/79828916. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  16. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Béatrice d'Angleterre: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9atrice_d%27Angleterre. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Plantagenêts (d’Angleterre) Lancaster & Tudor, p. 3: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Plantagenets.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  18. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Dreux, p. 10: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Dreux.pdf
  19. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  20. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html#J2
  21. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 18: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet18.html#PA
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 16: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet16.html#A1
  24. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), De Dreux - Earls of Richmond, p. 162. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  25. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Artois.pdf, p. 2.

Edmund (Crouchback) of Woodstock (?) Knt., Earl of Lancaster, Leicester, Derby1,2,3,4,5

M, #4431, b. between 16 January 1244 and 1245, d. 5 June 1296
FatherHenry III (?) of Winchester, King of England6,2,3,7,8,9,10 b. 1 Oct 1207, d. 16 Nov 1272
MotherEleanor (?) Countess of Provence Queen of Eng.2,3,9,10 b. 1223, d. 24 Jun 1291
ReferenceGAV19 EDV20
Last Edited16 Nov 2020
     Edmund (Crouchback) of Woodstock (?) Knt., Earl of Lancaster, Leicester, Derby was buried at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England.11

He was born between 16 January 1244 and 1245 at London, City of London, Greater London, England.11,1,6,2,12,9,10 He married Aveline de Forz, daughter of William III de Forz Lord of Holderness, Earl of Albemarle, Comte d'Aumale and Isabel de Reviers Countess of Devon, on 7 April 1269 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England;
His 1st wife.11,2,5,12,9,10,13,14 Edmund (Crouchback) of Woodstock (?) Knt., Earl of Lancaster, Leicester, Derby married Blanche (?) d'Artois, Queen of Navarre and Champagne, daughter of Robert I (?) de France, Comte d'Artois and Mathilde/Mahaut/Maud (?) of Brabant, Countess of Artois, between 18 January 1275 and 1276;
Her 2nd husband; Genealogy.EU (Capet 18 page) says m. 3 Feb 1276.1,11,6,2,5,15,16,17,18,19,9,10
Edmund (Crouchback) of Woodstock (?) Knt., Earl of Lancaster, Leicester, Derby died on 5 June 1296 at Bayonne, Departement des Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Aquitaine, France (now).1,11,6,12,9,10
Edmund (Crouchback) of Woodstock (?) Knt., Earl of Lancaster, Leicester, Derby was buried after 5 June 1296 at Westminster Abbey, City of Westminster, Greater London, England,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     16 Jan 1245, London, City of London, Greater London, England
     DEATH     5 Jun 1296 (aged 51), Bayonne, Departement des Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Aquitaine, France
     English Royalty. Born in London, the fourth child and second son of Henry III and Eleanor of Provence. In January 1254, he was invested as King Edmund of Sicily in direct conflict with Conrad IV of Germany who also claimed the title. Edmund abdicated as King of Sicily in 1263 and gained the title of Earl of Leicester in October 1265 and the title of 1st Earl of Lancaster in June 1267. He married Aveline de Forz in April 1269 at Westminster Abbey. In 1271 he joined the Ninth Crusade to Holy Land; some scholarship asserts that his participation was the cause of the nickname Crouchback which may have been a corruption of Crossback, meaning that he was entitled to wear a crusader's cross. Aveline died in 1274 and he married Blanche d'Artois, daughter of Robert I de France, in 1276. As a result of his marriage, he was styled Comte de Brie as well as Comte de Champagne. The couple had four children; Thomas; Henry; John of Beaufort; and Mary. Edmund died at age 51 in Bayonne, Bearn, France and was interred a month later at Westminster Abbey, London. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Henry III 1207–1272
          Eleanor of Provence 1222–1291
     Spouses
          Aveline de Forz Lancaster 1259–1274 (m. 1269)
          Blanche d'Artois 1248–1302
     Siblings
          Edward I 1239–1307
          Margaret Plantagenet 1240–1275
          Béatrice d'Angleterre 1242–1275
          Richard of England 1247–1250
          John of England 1250–1252
          William Plantagenet 1251–1256
          Katherine of England 1253–1257
          Henry of England 1260–1260
     Children
          Thomas Lancaster 1277–1322
          Henry of Lancaster 1281–1345
     BURIAL     Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Added: 19 Dec 2000
     Find a Grave Memorial 19130.20
     GAV-19 EDV-20 GKJ-20.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 , Reference: page 196.9

Reference:      Per Weis [1992:20-1] Line 17-28 "...called Crouchback...Created Earl of Lancaster and Leicester, and High Steward of England also Earl of Leicester; High Steward of England 1265; MP 1276. also Earl of Leicester; High Steward of England 1265; MP 1276."
     Per Faris (1999) p. 202: "EDMUND OF LANCASTER Crouchback [Gibbosus], fourth and youngest but second surviving son, Earl of Leicester, Derby and Lancaster, was born at London on 16 Jan. 1244/5. He was in the Holy Land in 1272. He was married for the first time at Westminster Abbey on 7 Apr. 1269 to AVELINE DE FORZ, daughter of William de Forz, titular Comte d'Aumale, Lord of Holderness, by Isabel, daughter and heiress of Baldwin de Redvers, 7th Earl of Devon. She was born 20 Jan. 1259, and died at Stockwell on 10 Nov. 1274 s.p., buried at Westminster Abbey. He was married for the second time at Paris shortly before 18 Jan. 1275/6 to BLANCHE D'ARTOIS, widow of Henri de France, Roi de Navarre (died 22 July 1276), and daughter of Robert, Comte d'Artois (descendant of Charlemagne), by Mathilde, daughter of Heinrich II, Herzog von Brabant (descendant of Charlemagne). In consequence of this marriage he was styled Comte de Champagne et Brie in France. He was summoned to Parliament on 24 June 1295 by writ directed Edmundo comiti Lancastr'. EDMUND OF LANCASTER, Earl of Lancaster, died at Bayonne on 5 June 1296, and was buried at Westminster Abbey. His widow died in Paris on 2 May 1302.
CF. (1929) 7:378-387 (1929). Schwennicke (1984) 2:83. CF. 14:421 (1998).
Children of Edmund of Lancaster, by Blanche d'Artois:
i.     THOMAS OF LANCASTER, son and heir, born about 1278, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, Leicester and Derby, Steward of England, present at the siege of Carlaverock 1 July 1300, Earl of Lincoln and Salisbury jure uxoris; throughout nearly the whole of his career his policy was one of obstruction to his cousin the King, which he carried to the extreme of having treasonable correspondence with the Scots; died 22 Mar. 1322 s.p., being beheaded outside Pontefract in the presence of his cousin, King Edward II, buried St. John's Priory, Pontefract; married 28 Oct. 1294 ALICE DE LACY, born 25 Dec. 1281, died 2 Oct. 1348 s.p., buried Barlings Abbey with second husband, daughter and heiress of Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln, by Margaret, daughter of William Longespée, Earl of Salisbury. She married, second, Ebles le Strange, Knt. (died 8 Sep. 1335); third, Hugh de Frene, Knt. (died December 1336 or January 1337. CF. 7:387-396 ((1929).
ii.     HENRY OF LANCASTER [see next].
iii.     JOHN OF LANCASTER, born before May 1286, died unmarried in France before 1327.
iv.     MARY OF LANCASTER, died young."21,22


; This is the same person as ”Edmund Crouchback” at Wikipedia.23

; Per Genealogy.EU (): "C2. Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Chester 1253, Leicester 25.10.1264, Derby 12.7.1265 and Lancaster 1267, *London 16.1.1245, +Bayonne 5.6.1296, bur Westminster Abbey; 1m: Westminster Abbey 9.4.1269 Css Aveline de Forez (*1259 +1274); 2m: Paris 3.2.1276 Blanche d'Artois (*ca 1243 +2.5.1302.)24"

; Per Med Lands:
     "EDMUND “Crouchback/Gibbosus”, son of HENRY III King of England & his wife Eléonore de Provence (London 16 Jan 1245-Bayonne 5 Jun 1296, bur Westminster Abbey). According to Matthew Paris, after his uncle Richard Earl of Cornwall refused the kingdom of Sicily, the Pope offered it to King Henry who accepted it on behalf of his son Edmund[989]. Nominated King of Sicily by Pope Innocent IV 14 May 1254, in opposition to Manfred von Hohenstaufen, invested 18 Oct 1255[990], although he never arrived in the country and was absolved of all his obligations with respect to Sicily by the Pope 8 Aug 1264. Created Earl of Leicester 26 Oct 1265, in succession to Simon de Montfort, and Earl of Lancaster 30 Jun 1267, although never referred to as Earl. Appointed Steward of England for life 9 May 1269, renounced 20 Aug 1274. He was on crusade in Palestine 1270-1272. Comte de Champagne et de Brie, in right of his second wife, 1276. Commander in Wales 8 Aug 1277. He captured Llywellyn Prince of Wales in 1282, beheaded him and set up his head in the Tower of London. He died during the siege of Bordeaux. The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death "in Gasconiam contra gentes regis Franciæ...apud Baionam" in 1296 of "Emundus regis Angliæ frater"[991].
     "m firstly (contract 6 Apr 1269, Westminster Abbey 8/9 Apr 1269) AVELINE de Forz, daughter of WILLIAM de Forz Lord of Holderness, titular Comte d'Aumâle & his wife Isabel de Reviers (Burstwick, Yorkshire 20 Jan 1259-Stockwell, Surrey 10 Nov 1274, bur Westminster Abbey). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "VI Id Apr" of "Eadmundus filius Henrici regis" and "filiam et hæredem comitis Aubemarliæ" at Westminster[992]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death in 1274 of "Avelina uxor domini Eadmundi regis filii comitissa Aubermarliæ"[993]. The Chronicle of Thomas Wykes records the death “circa festum Sancti Martini” in 1274 of “uxor domini Edmundi fratris…regis nostri”[994].
     "m secondly (before 3 Feb 1276, or [27 Jul/29 Oct] 1276) as her second husband, BLANCHE d'Artois, widow of ENRIQUE I King of Navarre [HENRI III Comte de Champagne], daughter of ROBERT I Comte d’Artois [Capet] & his wife Mathilde de Brabant (1248-Paris 2 May 1302, probably bur Minoresses Convent, Aldgate, London). The Chronicle of Thomas Wykes records the marriage in 1275 of “dominus Edmundus frater domini regis Anglorum” and “dominam reginam Naveriæ”[995]. The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1275 of "comes Attrebati Robertus...sororem...relictam regis Navarræ Henrici" and "Edmundo fratri regis Angliæ Edoardi"[996]. William of Tyre (Continuation) states that she was sister of the Comte d'Artois when recording the death of her first husband and remarriage in 1276 with Edmund[997]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage in 1276 of "Eadmundus comes Lancastriæ dominis regis frater" and "reginam Navarræ"[998]. "
Med Lands cites:
[989] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1254, p. 457.
[990] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1255, p. 515.
[991] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 578.
[992] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 203.
[993] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 213.
[994] Thomas Wykes, p. 261.
[995] Thomas Wykes, pp. 266-7.
[996] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 500.
[997] William of Tyre Continuator XXXIV.XXII, p. 469.
[998] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 216.10

; Per Med Lands:
     "BLANCHE d'Artois (1248-Paris 2 May 1302, probably bur Minoresses Convent, Aldgate, London). The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Henricus rex Navarræ comesque Campaniæ" married "sorore comitis Attrebatensis Roberti"[14]. The Chronicle of Thomas Wykes records the marriage in 1275 of “dominus Edmundus frater domini regis Anglorum” and “dominam reginam Naveriæ”[15]. The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1275 of "comes Attrebati Robertus...sororem...relictam regis Navarræ Henrici" and "Edmundo fratri regis Angliæ Edoardi"[16]. Regent of Navarre, during the minority of her daughter Juana Queen of Navarre, whose marriage with the future Philippe IV King of France she agreed at Orléans in May 1275.
     "m firstly (Melun, Seine-et-Marne 1269) Infante don ENRIQUE de Navarra, son of TEOBALDO I King of Navarre [THIBAUT IV Comte de Champagne] & his third wife Marguerite de Bourbon ([1244-Pamplona 22 Jul 1274, bur Pamplona). He succeeded his brother 1270 as ENRIQUE I King of Navarre, HENRI III Comte de Champagne.
     "m secondly (Paris before 3 Feb 1276, or [27 Jul/29 Oct] 1276) as his second wife, EDMUND “Crouchback/Gibbosus” of England Earl of Lancaster, son of HENRY III King of England & his wife Eléonore de Provence (London 16 Jan 1245-Bayonne 5 Jun 1296, bur Westminster Abbey)."
Med Lands cites:
[14] RHGF, Tome XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 494.
[15] Thomas Wykes, pp. 266-7.
[16] RHGF, Tome XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 500.19

; Per Genealogy.EU (Capet 18): “A2. Blanche, Regent of Navarre, *1248, +Paris 2.5.1302; 1m: 1269 King Enrique I of Navarre (*ca 1244 +22.7.1274); 2m: Paris 3.2.1276 Edmund, Earl of Lancaster (*London 16.1.1245 +Bayonne 5.6.1296)”.25
; Per Racines et Histoire (Artois): “Blanche d’Artois ° ~1248 + 02/05/1302 (Paris) Régente de Navarre (pendant la minorité de sa fille Juana et avant le mariage de celle-ci avec Philippe IV - agréé à Orléans en 05/1275)
     ép. 1) 1269 (Melun, 77) don Enrique 1° de Navarra (Henri IIIde Champagne dit «Le Gros») ° 1244 + 22/07/1274 (Pamplona/Pampelune) roi de Navarre (1270, succède à son frère), comte de Meaux et de Troyes (Henri III) (fils de Thibaud IV, comte de Champagne = Teobaldo 1°, roi de Navarre, et de Marguerite de Bourbon)
     ép. 2) avant 03/02/1276 (Paris) ou 27/07-29/10/1276 ? Edmund «Crouchback» (Gibbosus) Plantagenêt ° 16/01/1245 (Londres) + 05/06/1296 (Bayonne) roi titulaire de Sicile (1254), earl of Lancaster (1267) and Leicester (fils d’Henry III d’Angleterre et d’Eléonore de Provence)”.26

; Per Med Lands:
     "AVELINE de Forz (Burstwick, Yorks 20 Jan 1259-10 Nov 1274, bur Westminster Abbey). The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Hawysiam” as the child of “Willielmus Grossus comes Albemarliæ” and his wife, adding that he was succeeded by “Willielmus de Fortibus comes Albemarliæ”, in turn succeeded by “alter Willielmus de Fortibus”, and the latter by “Avelina” who married “Edmondo fratri domini Regis E” and died childless[964]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "VI Id Apr" of "Eadmundus filius Henrici regis" and "filiam et hæredem comitis Aubemarliæ" at Westminster[965]. An enquiry into the age of "Avelina the wife of Edmund the king’s brother, daughter and heir of William sometime earl of Albemarle" includes testimony that "Avelina was 14 on the day of SS Fabian and Sebastian last"[966]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death in 1274 of "Avelina uxor domini Eadmundi regis filii comitissa Aubermarliæ"[967]. The Chronicle of Thomas Wykes records the death “circa festum Sancti Martini” in 1274 of “uxor domini Edmundi fratris…regis nostri”[968]. A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother" names "four daughters of Hugh de Bulebec and...Ralph de Pleys are next heirs", reciting the full ancestry which proves their heirship: “Richard de Munfichet died without heir...and his inheritance descended to his three sisters, the first sister Margery married Hugh de Bulebec and from them issued Hugh de Bulebec who had four daughters, Philippa married to Roger de Lancastre, Margery married to Nicholas Corbet, Alice married to Walter de Huntercumbe and Maud married to Hugh de la Valle; the second sister Avelina married William de Forz Earl of Albemarle and from them issued William de Forz the last earl of Albemarle who had two sons Thomas and William who died without heirs...and one daughter Avelina whom Edmund the king’s brother took to wife..; the third sister Philippa married Hugh de Pleys and from them issued Richard de Pleys from whom issued Ralph de Pleys now aged 9 and in the wardship of Robert Aguilun”[969].
     "m (contract 6 Apr 1269, Westminster Abbey 8/9 Apr 1269) as his first wife, EDMUND “Crouchback/Gibbosus” of England Earl of Lancaster, son of HENRY III King of England & his wife Eléonore de Provence (London 16 Jan 1245-Bayonne 5 Jun 1296, bur Westminster Abbey)."
Med Lands cites:
[964] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 585.
[965] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 203.
[966] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 44, p. 33.
[967] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 213.
[968] Thomas Wykes, p. 261.
[969] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 130, p. 86.14
He was Earl of Chester in 1253.2 He was King of Sicily in 1257.6 He was Earl of Lancaster in 1267.27,2

Family 1

Aveline de Forz b. 20 Jan 1259, d. 10 Nov 1274

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 201, PLANTAGENET 10:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.15. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Lancaster 5: pp. 422-423.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edmund 'Crouchback': http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005190&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry III: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000808&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenryIIIdied1272B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edmund 'Crouchback': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005190&tree=LEO
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Edmunddied1296B.
  11. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 202. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  12. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Aumale.pdf, p. 4. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Aveline de Forz: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106031&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/enguntdk.htm#AvelineForzdied1274
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf, p. 10.
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Artois.pdf, p. 2.
  17. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Navarre 6: pp. 535-6.
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche d'Artois: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005198&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm#BlancheArtoisdied1302
  20. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 22 June 2020), memorial page for Edmund “Crouchback” Plantagenet (16 Jan 1245–5 Jun 1296), Find a Grave Memorial no. 19130, citing Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/19130. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  21. [S677] Jr. Christos Christou, GEDCOM file imported on 12 Feb 1999. Supplied by Christos Christou, Jr. - e-mail address (n.p.: Christos Christou, Jr.
    303 Nicholson Road
    Baltimore, MD 21221-6609
    Email: e-mail address, 1999).
  22. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), pp. 20-21, Line 17-28. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  23. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Crouchback. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 18: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet18.html#BR1
  26. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes d’Artois puis seigneurs de Conches (Capétiens), p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Artois.pdf
  27. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  28. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 4: England - Last Plantagenets.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005193&tree=LEO

Raymond V Berenger (?) Comte de Provence & Forcalquier1,2,3,4

M, #4432, b. 1197/98, d. 19 August 1245
FatherDon Alfonso II Alfonez (?) Infante de Aragón, Comte de Provence1,5,2,4,6,7 b. c 1180, d. 2 Feb 1209
MotherGersinda II de Sabran Cts de Forcalquier, Cts of Castellar1,5,2,4,8,7 b. c 1180, d. 1218
ReferenceGAV20 EDV21
Last Edited13 Jun 2020
     Raymond V Berenger (?) Comte de Provence & Forcalquier was born in 1197/98 at Bouches-Du-Rhone, Aix-En-Provence, France.9,5,2,4,10 He married Beatrix/Béatrice (?) Countess of Savoy, daughter of Tommaso I (?) Count of Savoy, Aosta and Moriana and Béatrice (?) de Genève, in December 1220 at Provence, France; Per Med Lands: Betrothed 5 Jun 1219.5,2,11,4,10
Raymond V Berenger (?) Comte de Provence & Forcalquier died on 19 August 1245 at France.9,5,2,4,10
Raymond V Berenger (?) Comte de Provence & Forcalquier was buried after 19 August 1245 at Eglise Saint Jean de Malte, Aix-en-Provence, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1198
     DEATH     19 Jul 1245 (aged 46–47)
     Nobility. Count of Provence and Forcalquier. He was the only son of Alfonso II de Provence, who died in 1209 during an epidemic in Palermo and Gersend de Sabran, Countess of Forcalquier. He married Beatrice of Savoy in 1220 who bore him five children. Their only son Raymond died young and their four daughters Marguerite, Eleanor, Sanchia, and Beatrice were all married to kings.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Alphonse II de Provence 1180–1209
          Garsende de Sabran
     Spouse
          Beatrice of Savoy 1198–1266 (m. 1220)
     Children
          Marguerite de Provence 1221–1295
          Eleanor of Provence 1222–1291
          Sanchia of Provence 1225–1261
          Beatrice de Provence 1234–1267
     BURIAL     Eglise Saint Jean de Malte, Aix-en-Provence, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 6 May 2007
     Find A Grave Memorial 19249752.12
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Raimund Berengar V, comte de Provence, was born about 1198, the son of Alfonso II, comte de Provence, and Gersende de Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death in 1209, Raimund was raised by the Knights Templar in the castle of Monzón in Aragón until he returned in 1216, and in 1219 he began his rule. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani (1276-1348) in his _Nuova Cronica_ had this to say about Raimund:
     "'Count Raimund was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragón, and to the family of the count of Toulouse. By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhône, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.'
     "On 5 June 1220 Raimund married Béatrice de Savoie, daughter of Tommaso I, comte de Savoie, and Béatrice de Genève. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by the Benedictine monk and English chronicler Matthew Paris (1220-1259) to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons, Raimund and Béatrice had four daughters, all of whom would marry kings and have progeny.
     "Raimund died in Aix-en-Provence on 19 August 1245. At least two _planhs_ (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour."13

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:70.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.13


; Per Med Lands:
     "RAYMOND BERENGER de Provence, son of ALPHONSE II Comte de Provence [Aragon-Barcelona] & his wife Gersende de Sabran Ctss de Forcalquier ([1198]-Aix 19 Aug 1245, bur Aix-en-Provence, église de Saint Jean de Jérusalem). “Garsendis uxor quondam Ildefonsi comitis Provinciæ” donated her rights “in comitatu Forcalqueriensi”, granted by “Guillelmo quondam comite Forcalqueriensi avo meo”, to “Raymundo Berengario filio meo” with “filiæ meæ sororis tuæ Garsendis” as substitute should he die, with the consent of “patre meo Raines de Castelar”, by charter dated 30 Nov 1209[428]. He succeeded his father in 1209 as RAYMOND BERENGER IV Comte de Provence et de Forcalquier. Under his testament dated 20 Jun 1238, he designated his fourth daughter as his heir[429]. The testament of “R. Berengarius…comes et marchio Provincie et comes Forcalquerii”, dated 20 Jun 1238, names “Margaritam filiam nostrum…reginam Francie…Elionors filiam nostrum…reginam Anglie…Sanciam filiam nostram” and appoints “Beatricem filiam nostrum heredem generalem”[430]. The Annales Sancti Victoris Massilienses record the death "1245 XIV Kal Sep" of "Raimundus Berengarius comes Provincie" at Aix[431]. The Obituaire of Forcalquier St Mary records the death "XIV Kal Sep" of "Raymundus Berengarii…comes Provincie et Forcalquerii"[432]. The Thalamus de Montpellier records the death Aug 1244 of "R. Berenguier coms de Proensa" at Aix[433].
     "m (Betrothed 5 Jun 1219, Dec 1220) BEATRIX de Savoie, daughter of THOMAS I Comte de Savoie & his wife Marguerite [Beatrix] de Genève ([1205][434]-Dec 1266 or 4 Jan 1267). Matthew of Paris names her as daughter of "comitis Sabaldiæ Thomæ iam mortui, sororem comitis Sabaldiæ adhuc viventis Amidei", when he records the marriage of her daughter to Henry III King of England[435]. The contract of marriage between "Thomas…comes Sabaldie et marchio in Ytalia…filia sua" and "Raimundi Berengarii…comitis Provinciæ et Forcalquerii" is dated 5 Jun 1219, and names "A. et V. filii Thomæ comitis et A. cometissa uxor eius" as guarantors[436]. She transformed the court at Aix into one of the most celebrated in Europe. After quarrelling with her son-in-law Charles Comte d'Anjou over the usufruct of the county of Provence she retired to Echelles in Savoy[437]. The marriage of her daughter Eléonore with Henry III King of England in 1236 signalled the establishment of close ties between the English court and the house of Savoy, the foreign immigrants becoming increasingly unpopular in England and contributing to the difficulties experienced by the king with his barons. The testament of "Beatricis relictæ Raimundi Berengarii comitis Provinciæ", dated 14 Jan 1264, confirms her previous testaments appointing "Reginarum filiarum suarum Margarethæ Franciæ et Alienoræ Angliæ, fratrum suorum Bonifacii archiepiscopi Cantuar. et Petri comitis Sabaudiæ" as her heirs, chooses burial "in hospitali Scalarum", and adds bequests to "Philippo electo Lugdun. fratri suo altero…Agneti comitissæ Sabaudiæ dominiæ Fuciniaci, Cæciliæ relictæ Amedei Sabaudiæ comitis, Beatrici relictæ Thomæ de Sabaudia comitis...Contissoni…Eleonoræ aliæ filiæ Thomæ comitis…Contissoni dominæ Medullionis nepti suæ…Margarithæ matri marchionis Montisferrati nepti suæ, Rodulpho archiepiscopo Tarantas, A. episcopo de Dyone consanguineo testatricis, Petro episcopo Hereford…filiabus Rodolphi et Henrici de Gebennis, et filiæ domini de Camera" as well as numerous bequests to religious institutions, orders "Contissona filia Amedei comitis…Eleonoræ filiæ Thomæ fratris sui" to fulfil religious bequests, and appoints "Johannem archiepiscopum Viennensem et Rodulphum Tarantasiensem, Philippum electum Lugdun. fratrem suum, episcopum Gratianopolitanum, Humbertum abbatem Altacumbæ et Stephanum archidiaconum Cantaruensium" as her executors[438]. A second testament of "Beatrix relicta…Dom. Reymundi Berengarii comitis provinciæ", dated 22 Feb 1264, chooses burial "in ecclesia Hospitalis S. Joannis Hierosolymitani", adds bequests to "Thomam Amedeum et Ludovicum filios quondam Dom. Thome fratris mei…Alienore filie predicti comitis Thome…filie Contissone de Medullione…filie domini de Camera…Beringarie filie Dom. Benedicti de Castellione…Beatrice Andegavie comitisse"[439]. The testament of "Bonifacius archiepiscopus Cantuarensis", dated 11 Oct 1264, made bequests to "sorori suæ comitissæ Provinciæ…sorori suæ alteræ comitissæ de Quiborc…"[440]. A second necrology of Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne records the death "II Non Jan" of "vidua dna comitssa Provincie"[441]."
Med Lands cites:
[428] Papon, Tome II (1778), Preuves, XXXVI, p. xxxviii.
[429] Matthew Paris, Vol. IV, 1245, p. 485.
[430] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2719, p. 378.
[431] Annales Sancti Victoris Massilienses 1245, MGH SS XXIII, p. 5.
[432] Forcalquier St Marie, p. 47.
[433] Société Archéologique de Montpellier (1841) Le petit Thalamus de Montpellier, extracts available at (23 Apr 2008).
[434] It is improbable that Béatrix de Savoie was born much later than 1205 as she gave birth to her first child in 1221.
[435] Matthew Paris, Vol. III, 1236, p. 335.
[436] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 49, p. 22.
[437] Marie José (1956), p. 40.
[438] State Archives, volume 104, page 11, fascicule 11.1, 2 and 3, and Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 636, p. 317.
[439] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 639, p. 320.
[440] State Archives, volume 104, pages 17 and 19, fascicules 13.1, 13.2 and 13.3, and Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 665, p. 342.
[441] Maurienne Chartes, Obituaire du Chapitre, p. 356.10


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Ramon Berenguer IV (French: Raimond-Bérenger; 1198 – 19 August 1245) was a member of the House of Barcelona who ruled as count of Provence and Forcalquier. He was the first count of Provence to live in the county in more than one hundred years.
Family
     "Ramon Berenguer was the son of Alfonso II, Count of Provence, and Garsenda, Countess of Forcalquier.[1] After his father's death (1209), Ramon's mother sent him to the Templar castle of Monzón in Aragon. He was accompanied by his cousin King James I of Aragon whose life was also under threat. He left Monzon around 1217 to claim his inheritance, which included the county of Forcalquier--inherited from his mother.
     "On 5 June 1219, Ramon Berenguer married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas, Count of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. The wedding also provided the 21-year-old Ramon with a powerful father-in-law to aid him in establishing his authority and protecting his interests.[2] They had four daughters who reached adulthood, all of whom were well educated and married kings.
1. stillborn son (1220)
2. Margaret of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX, King of France[3]
3. Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III, King of England[3]
4. Sanchia of Provence (1225–1261), wife of Richard, King of the Romans, brother of the king of England[3]
5. Beatrice of Provence (1229–1267), wife of Charles I, King of Sicily[4]

Rule
     "Ramon Berenguer and his wife were known for their support of troubadors, always having some around the court. He was known for his generosity, though his income did not always keep up. He wrote laws prohibiting nobles from performing menial work, such as farming or heavy labor.
     "Ramon Berenguer had many border disputes with his neighbors, the counts of Toulouse. In 1226, Ramon began to reassert his right to rule in Marseille. The citizens there initially sought the help of Ramon's father-in-law Thomas, Count of Savoy in his role as imperial vicar. However, they later sought the help of Raymond VII, Count of Toulouse.[5]
     "In 1228, Ramon Berenguer supported his father-in-law in a double-sided conflict against Turin and Guigues VI of Viennois. This small war was one of many rounds intended to more firmly establish control over trade from Italy into France, and Provence included several key routes.[6]
     "While the Albigensian Crusade worked in his favor against Toulouse, Ramon Berenguer was concerned that its resolution in the Treaty of Paris left him in a precarious position. Raymond turned his troops from fighting France to attempting to claim lands from Provence.[7] When Blanche of Castile sent her knight to both Toulouse and Provence in 1233, Ramon Berenguer entertained him lavishly, and the knight left well impressed by both the count and his eldest daughter, Margaret. Soon after, Blanche negotiated the marriage between Margaret and her son, Louis, with a dowry of ten thousand silver marks. Ramon Berenguer had to get contributions from allies for a portion, and had to pledge several of his castles to cover the rest. Ramon Berenguer and Beatrice travelled with their daughter to Lyon in 1234 to sign the marriage treaty, and then Margaret was escorted to her wedding in Sens by her uncles William and Thomas of Savoy.
     "Shortly after, William began negotiating on Ramon Berenguer's behalf with Henry III of England to marry his daughter Eleanor. Henry sent his own knight to Provence early in 1235, and again Ramon Berenguer and his family entertained him lavishly. Henry wrote to William on June 22 that he was very interested, and sent a delegation to negotiate the marriage in October. Henry was seeking a dowry of up to twenty thousand silver marks to help offset the dowry he had just paid for his sister, Isabella. However, he had drafted seven different versions of the marriage contract, with different amounts for the dowry, the lowest being zero. Ramon Berenguer shrewdly negotiated for that option, offering as consolation a promise to leave her ten thousand marks in his last will.
     "In 1238, Ramon Berenguer joined his brother-in-law Amadeus IV at the court of Emperor Frederick II in Turin. Frederick was gathering forces to assert more control in Italy. Raymond VII of Toulouse was also summoned, and all expected to work together in the war.[8]
     "In January 1244, Pope Innocent IV decreed that no one but the pope could excommunicate Ramon Berenguer.[9] In 1245, Ramon Berenguer sent representatives to the First Council of Lyon, to discuss crusades and the excommunication of Frederick.[10]
     "Ramon Berenguer died in August 1245 in Aix-en-Provence, leaving the county to his youngest daughter, Beatrice.[11]
Death and legacy
     "Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.
Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica said:
Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.[12]

Notes
1. Aurell 1995, p. 403.
2. Cox 1974, p. 21.
3. Cox 1974, p. 463.
4. Davin 1963, p. 182.
5. Cox 1974, p. 28.
6. Cox 1974, p. 12,29.
7. Cox 1974, p. 44-45.
8. Cox 1974, p. 65-66.
9. Cox 1974, p. 130.
10. Cox 1974, p. 142-143.
11. Cox 1974, p. 146.
12. Giovanni Villani, Rose E. Selfe, ed. (1906), "§90—Incident relating to the good Count Raymond of Provence.", Villani's Chronicle, Being Selections from the First Nine Books of the Croniche Fiorentine of Giovanni Villani (London: Archibald Constable & Co.), 196. The Provençal coblas and cansos referred to do not survive and Ramon Berenguer is not listed among the troubadours, though he was their patron.
Sources
** Aurell, Martin (1995). Les noces du comte: mariage et pouvoir en Catalogne (785-1213) (in French). Publications de la Sorbonne.
** Cox, Eugene L. (1974). The Eagles of Savoy. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0691052166.
** Häuptli, Bruno W. (2005). "Raimund Berengar V". In Bautz, Traugott (ed.) Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BBKL) (in German). 25. Nordhausen: Bautz. cols. 1118–1122. ISBN 3-88309-332-7.
** Howell, Margaret (2001). Eleanor of Provence: Queenship in Thirteenth-Century England. Wiley-Blackwell.
** Davin, Emmanuel (1963). "Béatrice de Savoie, Comtesse de Provence, mère de quatre reines (1198-1267)". Bulletin de l'Association Guillaume Budé (in French). n°2 juin.
External links
** Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands Project on Raymond Berenger de Provence, the fourth Count of Provence, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[self-published source]: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#RaymondBerengerIVdied1245.14 " GAV-20 EDV-21 GKJ-22.

Reference: Weis [1992:103] Line 111-29.1 He was Count of Provence between 1 December 1209 and 19 August 1245.5,2,14 He was Count of Forcalquier between 1217 and 1245.14

Family

Beatrix/Béatrice (?) Countess of Savoy b. bt 1198 - 1205, d. bt Dec 1266 - Jan 1267
Children

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 111-29, p. 103. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), France 5: p. 340. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raimund Berengar V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004071&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027265&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#AlfonsoIIdied1209A. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gersende de Sabran: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027266&tree=LEO
  9. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Beatrixdied1266
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page (The House of Savoy): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 December 2019), memorial page for Raimond Bérenger IV de Provence (1198–19 Jul 1245), Find A Grave Memorial no. 19249752, citing Eglise Saint Jean de Malte, Aix-en-Provence, Departement des Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/19249752/raimond_b_renger_iv-de_provence. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raimund Berengar V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004071&tree=LEO
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramon_Berenguer_IV,_Count_of_Provence. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 61: France - Early Capetian Kings.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Provence: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000018&tree=LEO
  17. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets.
  18. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Cornwall 4: pp. 230-231.
  19. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 104-28, p. 99.
  20. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Sicily 5: pp. 653-4.
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Provence: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004074&tree=LEO
  22. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#BeatriceCtssMCharlesISicilydied1285

Beatrix/Béatrice (?) Countess of Savoy1,2,3

F, #4433, b. between 1198 and 1205, d. between December 1266 and January 1267
FatherTommaso I (?) Count of Savoy, Aosta and Moriana4,2,5,6 b. bt 1177 - 1178, d. 1 Mar 1233
MotherBéatrice (?) de Genève2,7 b. c 1173, d. 8 Apr 1257
ReferenceGAV20 EDV21
Last Edited13 Jun 2020
     Beatrix/Béatrice (?) Countess of Savoy was born between 1198 and 1205 at Chambèry, Savoy, France; Genealogy.EU Savoy 1 page says b. 1206; Genalogics and Med Lands say b. 1205; Find A Grave and Wikipedia say b. 1198.2,3,8,9,10 She married Raymond V Berenger (?) Comte de Provence & Forcalquier, son of Don Alfonso II Alfonez (?) Infante de Aragón, Comte de Provence and Gersinda II de Sabran Cts de Forcalquier, Cts of Castellar, in December 1220 at Provence, France; Per Med Lands: Betrothed 5 Jun 1219.4,11,2,12,9
Beatrix/Béatrice (?) Countess of Savoy died between December 1266 and January 1267 at France.2,13,4,3,8,9,10
Beatrix/Béatrice (?) Countess of Savoy was buried after 1277 at Abbaye de Hautcombe, Saint-Pierre-de-Curtille, Departement de la Savoie, Rhône-Alpes, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1198
     DEATH     Dec 1266 (aged 67–68)
     Nobility. She was born as the second child of Thomas I and Beatrice de Geneve. She married Raimond Berenger de Provence in 1219. After two miscarriages she bore him a son and four daughters. Her son died young. The two elder daughters were married to reigning kings while the husbands of the younger two later rose to that rank. She was buried at the chapel in the Chateau de Menuet near Les Échelles. Her mausoleum was desecrated during the revolution and only her skull could be saved. It was deposited in her brother Bonifaces grave.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Thomas I of Savoy 1180–1233
          Beatrice Marguerite of Geneva 1179–1257
     Spouse
          Raimond Bérenger IV de Provence 1198–1245 (m. 1220)
     Siblings
          Alix of Savoy unknown–1277
          Amadeus IV of Savoy 1197–1253
          Beatrice of Savoy 1198–1266
          Thomas II of Savoy 1199–1259 (m. 1245)
          Guillaume of Savoy 1201–1239
          Pierre II of Savoy 1203–1268
          Boniface of Savoy 1207–1270
          Philippe I of Savoy 1207–1285
     Children
          Marguerite de Provence 1221–1295
          Eleanor of Provence 1222–1291
          Sanchia of Provence 1225–1261
          Beatrice de Provence 1234–1267
     BURIAL     Abbaye de Hautecombe, Saint-Pierre-de-Curtille, Departement de la Savoie, Rhône-Alpes, France
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 28 Jan 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 84113661.10
     ; Per Med Lands: " BEATRIX de Savoie ([1205]-Dec 1266 or 4 Jan 1267). Matthew of Paris names her as daughter of "comitis Sabaldiæ Thomæ iam mortui, sororem comitis Sabaldiæ adhuc viventis Amidei", when he records the marriage of her daughter to Henry III King of England[427]. It is improbable that she was born much later than 1205 as she gave birth to her first child in 1221. The contract of marriage between "Thomas…comes Sabaldie et marchio in Ytalia…filia sua" and "Raimundi Berengarii…comitis Provinciæ et Forcalquerii" is dated 5 Jun 1219, and names "A. et V. filii Thomæ comitis et A. cometissa uxor eius" as guarantors[428]. She transformed the court at Aix into one of the most celebrated in Europe. After quarrelling with her son-in-law Charles Comte d'Anjou over the usufruct of the county of Provence she retired to Echelles in Savoy[429]. The marriage of her daughter Eléonore with Henry III King of England in 1236 signalled the establishment of close ties between the English court and the house of Savoy, the foreign immigrants becoming increasingly unpopular in England and contributing to the difficulties experienced by the king with his barons. The testament of "Beatricis relictæ Raimundi Berengarii comitis Provinciæ", dated 14 Jan 1264, confirms her previous testaments appointing "Reginarum filiarum suarum Margarethæ Franciæ et Alienoræ Angliæ, fratrum suorum Bonifacii archiepiscopi Cantuar. et Petri comitis Sabaudiæ" as her heirs, chooses burial "in hospitali Scalarum", and adds bequests to "Philippo electo Lugdun. fratri suo altero…Agneti comitissæ Sabaudiæ dominiæ Fuciniaci, Cæciliæ relictæ Amedei Sabaudiæ comitis, Beatrici relictæ Thomæ de Sabaudia comitis...Contissoni…Eleonoræ aliæ filiæ Thomæ comitis…Contissoni dominæ Medullionis nepti suæ…Margarithæ matri marchionis Montisferrati nepti suæ, Rodulpho archiepiscopo Tarantas, A. episcopo de Dyone consanguineo testatricis, Petro episcopo Hereford…filiabus Rodolphi et Henrici de Gebennis, et filiæ domini de Camera" as well as numerous bequests to religious institutions, orders "Contissona filia Amedei comitis…Eleonoræ filiæ Thomæ fratris sui" to fulfil religious bequests, and appoints "Johannem archiepiscopum Viennensem et Rodulphum Tarantasiensem, Philippum electum Lugdun. fratrem suum, episcopum Gratianopolitanum, Humbertum abbatem Altacumbæ et Stephanum archidiaconum Cantaruensium" as her executors[430]. A second testament of "Beatrix relicta…Dom. Reymundi Berengarii comitis provinciæ", dated 22 Feb 1264, chooses burial "in ecclesia Hospitalis S. Joannis Hierosolymitani", adds bequests to "Thomam Amedeum et Ludovicum filios quondam Dom. Thome fratris mei…Alienore filie predicti comitis Thome…filie Contissone de Medullione…filie domini de Camera…Beringarie filie Dom. Benedicti de Castellione…Beatrice Andegavie comitisse"[431]. The testament of "Bonifacius archiepiscopus Cantuarensis", dated 11 Oct 1264, made bequests to "sorori suæ comitissæ Provinciæ…sorori suæ alteræ comitissæ de Quiborc…"[432]. A second necrology of Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne records the death "II Non Jan" of "vidua dna comitssa Provincie"[433]. m (Betrothed 5 Jun 1219, Dec 1220) RAIMOND BERENGER IV Comte de Provence, son of ALPHONSE II Comte de Provence [Aragon-Barcelona] & his wife Gersende de Sabran Ctss de Forcalquier ([1198]-19 Aug 1245, bur Aix-en-Provence, église de Saint Jean de Jérusalem)."
Med Lands cites:
[427] MP, Vol. III, 1236, p. 335.
[428] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 49, p. 22.
[429] Marie José (1956), p. 40.
[430] State Archives, volume 104, page 11, fascicules 11.1, 2 and 3, and Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 636, p. 317.
[431] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 639, p. 320.
[432] State Archives, volume 104, pages 17 and 19, fascicules 13.1, 13.2 and 13.3, and Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 665, p. 342.
[433] Maurienne Chartes, Obituaire du Chapitre, p. 356.9


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Beatrice of Savoy (c. 1198 – c. 1267)[1] was the daughter of Thomas I of Savoy and Margaret of Geneva. She was Countess consort of Provence by her marriage to Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence.
Family
     "Her paternal grandparents were Humbert III, Count of Savoy, and Beatrice of Viennois. Her maternal grandparents were William I, Count of Geneva and Beatrice de Faucigny. Beatrice of Savoy's mother, Margaret, was betrothed to Philip II of France. While Margaret was travelling to France for her wedding, she was captured by Beatrice's father, Thomas. He took her back to Savoy and married her himself. Thomas' excuse was that Philip II was already married, which was true.
     "Beatrice was the tenth of fourteen children born to her parents. Her siblings included: Amadeus IV, Count of Savoy; Thomas II of Piedmont; Peter II, Count of Savoy; Philip I, Count of Savoy; Boniface of Savoy, Archbishop of Canterbury; Avita the Countess of Devon; and Margherita of Savoy wife of Hartmann I of Kyburg.
Marriage and issue
     "Beatrice betrothed on 5 June 1219 to Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence; they married in December 1220. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened to that of a second Niobe by Matthew Paris. Ramon and Beatrice of Savoy had four daughters, who all lived to adulthood, and married kings. Their only son, Raymond died in early infancy.
1. Margaret, Queen of France (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France
2. Eleanor, Queen of England (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England
3. Sanchia, Queen of Germany (1225–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall
4. Beatrice, Queen of Sicily (1229–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily
5. Raymond of Provence, died young

At the English court
     "In 1242, Beatrice's brother Peter was sent to Provence by Henry III to negotiate the marriage of Sanchia to Richard. Another brother, Philip, escorted Beatrice and Sanchia to the English court in Gascony, arriving in May 1243. There they joined Henry, Eleanor, and their infant daughter, Beatrice of England. Henry was very happy at this occasion and gave many gifts to the various relatives.[2]
     "In November 1243, Beatrice and Sanchia travelled to England for the wedding.[3] This wedding did much to strengthen the bond between Richard and Henry III. She further strengthened the unity of the English royal family by convincing Henry III to help pay the debts of his sister Eleanor and her husband Simon de Montfort, who had often been at odds with Henry. In January 1244, Beatrice negotiated a loan for her husband from Henry of four thousand marks, offering the king five Provençal castles as collateral.[4]
Dowager Countess
     "When Ramon Berenguer died on 19 August 1245, he left Provence to his youngest daughter, and his widow was granted the usufruct of the county of Provence for her lifetime. Beatrice's daughter and namesake then became one of the most attractive heiresses in medieval Europe. Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor sent a fleet and James I of Aragon sent an army to seize her, so Beatrice placed herself and her daughter in a safe fortress in Aix, secured the trust of its people then sent to the Pope for his protection. The Pope was also a target for Frederick's military incursions in France. In Cluny during December 1245, a secret discussion, between Pope Innocent IV, Louis IX of France, his mother Blanche of Castile, and his brother Charles of Anjou, took place. It was decided that in return for Louis IX supporting the Pope militarily, the Pope would allow Charles of Anjou, youngest brother to the French King, to marry Beatrice of Provence. Mother and daughter were satisfied with this selection.[5] But Provence was to never go to France outright through Charles. It was agreed that if Charles and Beatrice had children, the county would go to them; if there was no issue, then the county would go to Sanchia of Provence. If Sanchia died without an heir, Provence would go to the King of Aragon.
     "Henry protested the selection, arguing that he had not yet received the full dowry for Eleanor nor his brother for Sanchia. He also still had the castles in Provence against the loan he had made to the former count.[6]
     "When Charles took over the administration of Provence in 1246, he did not respect Beatrice's rights within the county. She sought the aid of Barral of Baux and the Pope in protecting her rights within the area.[citation needed] The citizens of Marseille, Avignon, and Arles joined this resistance to Capetian control. In 1248, Charles began to seek peace with her so that he could join his brother's crusade. A temporary truce was reached to allow this.[7]
     "In 1248, she travelled back to England with her brother Thomas, to see their family there.[8]
     "In 1254, as Louis was returning from his crusade by way of Provence, Beatrice petitioned him for a more permanent resolution of the dispute with Charles. The French queen Margaret joined the petition, noting that Charles had not respected her dowry either. Beatrice travelled with them back to Paris. As the year progressed, Henry and his wife were invited to travel to Paris, and eventually all four daughters joined their mother there for Christmas.[9]
     "The generally good relationship among the four sisters did much to improve the relationship of the French and English kings. It brought about the Treaty of Paris in 1259, where differences were resolved.[10] Beatrice and all her four daughters participated in the talks.[11] While the family was still gathered, Louis IX finally persuaded Beatrice to surrender her claims and control in Provence in exchange for a sizeable pension to be paid to her. Charles also paid back the loan henry had made to the previous count, clearing his claims in the county.[12]
     "In 1262, Beatrice was part of the family discussion to try again to bring peace between Henry and Simon de Montfort.[13] When Henry was captured in 1264, Beatrice's brother Peter II, Count of Savoy took his army to join the efforts to free the king. He left Beatrice in charge of Savoy while he was gone.[14]
     "Beatrice outlived her third daughter Sanchia and came close to outliving her youngest daughter Beatrice, who died months after her mother (Beatrice the elder died in January, Beatrice the younger died in September). Beatrice of Savoy died on 1265[15] or 1266-1267.[16] · [17]
Notes
1. Davin, Emmanuel (1963). "Béatrice de Savoie, Comtesse de Provence, mère de quatre reines (1198-1267)". Bulletin de l'Association Guillaume Budé (in French). 1 (2): 176–189.
2. Cox 1974, p. 116-118.
3. Cox 1974, p. 119.
4. Cox 1974, p. 119-121.
5. Cox 1974, p. 146-149,153.
6. Cox 1974, p. 151-152.
7. Cox 1974, p. 160-163.
8. Cox 1974, p. 169-170.
9. Cox 1974, p. 246-249.
10. Sanders 1951, p. 88.
11. Hilton 2008, p. 206-207.
12. Cox 1974, p. 281-282.
13. Cox 1974, p. 311.
14. Cox 1974, p. 315.
15. Cox 1974, p. 463.
16. Michel Germain, Personnages illustres des Savoie, Autre Vue, 2007, 619 p. (ISBN 978-2-9156-8815-3), p. 507.
17. Marie José of Belgium, La Maison de Savoie: les origines, le comte vert, le comte rouge, vol. 1, Paris, A. Michel, 1956, 425 p., p. 40.
References
** Cox, Eugene L (1974). The Eagles of Savoy. Princeton, NJ.: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0691052166.
** Hilton, Lisa (2008). Queens Consort, England's Medieval Queens. Great Britain: Weidenfeld & Nichelson. pp. 206–207. ISBN 978-0-7538-2611-9.
** Sanders, I.J. (1951). "The Texts of the Peace of Paris, 1259". The English Historical Review. Oxford University Press. 66 (258): 81–97. doi:10.1093/ehr/lxvi.cclviii.81."8



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Tafel 110.
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald. page 67.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia. English - French and other sources.3


; Per Genealogics:
     "Béatrice was born in 1205, the daughter of Tommaso I, comte de Savoie, and Béatrice de Genève. She was the sister of three counts of Savoy, Amadeo IV, Peter II, and Philippe. As well, her brother Guillaume became bishop of Valence and Liège, and Boniface became bishop of Durham and archbishop of Canterbury.
     "On 5 June 1220 she married Raimund Berengar V, comte de Provence et Forcalquier, son of Alfonso II, comte de Provence, and Gersende de Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. Along with two stillborn sons, Raimund and Béatrice had four daughters, all of whom would marry kings and have progeny.
     "Béatrice was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by the Benedictine monk and English chronicler Matthew Paris (1220-1259) to that of a second Niobe. She was a skilled diplomat. While in England for the marriage of her daughter Sancha to Richard, earl of Cornwall, she persuaded her son-in-law King Henry III to grant his sister's second husband Simon VI de Montfort, 6th earl of Leicester, a yearly stipend (500 marks) since there had been no marriage portion. Henry also endowed Béatrice with an annual stipend of 400 pounds and agreed to lend her husband, for whom she was acting, 4000 marks on the security of five castles in Provence, which she would refuse to surrender to her son-in-law Charles Etienne, king of Naples and Sicily, the husband of her daughter Béatrice, until Henry released them in 1257.
     "When the occasion demanded, Béatrice was also a forceful ruler. When various suitors tried to seize her daughter Béatrice, the heir of Provence, the elder Béatrice placed her in a safe fortress, secured the support of its people, and went to the pope for his protection. When the pope turned to the Capetians to counter the moves of the Hohenstaufen, Béatrice agreed to the marriage of her daughter Béatrice with Charles Etienne of Anjou, brother of the king of France. However he failed to respect her claims in Provence - her husband had left her the usufruct of the county for her lifetime - so Béatrice (like her elder daughters) would be at odds with him for much of her life. From her seat in Forcalquier and Gap, the lands of her mother-in-law Gersende de Sabran, which she inherited from her husband and ruled from 1245 to 1256, she formed the nucleus of a powerful anti-Angevin party. In 1255, when her brother Tommaso II, comte de Piedmont, was captured by citizens of Asti, she closed the Piedmont routes through her territory and arrested the Lombards who came through. When a family member was not threatened, however, Béatrice was concerned about improving travel conditions in the Alps in lands left to her by her mother, and like her brother Boniface, left money in her will for bridge and road construction and repair.
     "The problems with her son-in-law Charles Etienne were resolved in stages. In 1248, in return for one-third the normal revenues of the comital treasury, Béatrice agreed to forego her claims on both usufruct of the county and on payment of arrears, and Charles promised to oblige his officers to swear to honour the commitments. All county officers were to render their accounts to her and to auditors to be selected by her and Charles. However Béatrice did not consider that Charles' officers respected the treaty. It was only after she had spent some time in the French court that she agreed to a large payment in return for surrendering her territories in Provence, but not trusting Charles, she insisted the money be paid through his brother King Louis IX. At the same time she promised to free the Lombards she still held, and Charles promised to pardon her supporters. The two swore to the stipulations in 1257.
     "In 1236 Béatrice's mother Béatrice de Genève died, leaving her daughter all her possessions in the Alps, and Béatrice took up residence in Menuet with a large entourage. She was patroness of the Order of Knights Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem, to whom she offered the château des Échelles in 1260, founding a hospital there to care for the poor, and she left money to almshouses and hospitals and for the repair of roads and bridges as well as to retainers and relatives. She died at Échelles in 1266.
     "Béatrice commissioned a text, the _Régime du corps,_ from Aldobrandino of Siena in 1256, which includes two chapters on paediatrics. Aimeric de Belenoi, Sordello, Giraut de Borneil, and Elias de Barjols wrote lyrics for her."3



; Per Genealogy.EU (Savoy 1): "Beatrice, *1206, +XII.1266; m.5.6.1219 Ct Raimund Berengar V of Provence (*1198 +19.8.1245.)2"

GAV-20 EDV-21 GKJ-22.

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 111-29, p. 103. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Savoy 1 page (The House of Savoy): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/savoy/savoy1.html
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béatrice de Savoie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004072&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thomas I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027292&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#ThomasIdied1233B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béatrice de Genève: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027293&tree=LEO
  8. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beatrice_of_Savoy. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#Beatrixdied1266
  10. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 December 2019), memorial page for Beatrice of Savoy (1198–Dec 1266), Find A Grave Memorial no. 84113661, citing Abbaye de Hautecombe, Saint-Pierre-de-Curtille, Departement de la Savoie, Rhône-Alpes, France ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/84113661/beatrice-of_savoy. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Barcelona 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/barcelona/barcelona2.html
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Raimund Berengar V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004071&tree=LEO
  13. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  14. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), France 5: p. 340. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Provence: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000018&tree=LEO
  16. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Cornwall 4: pp. 230-231.
  17. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 104-28, p. 99.
  18. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Sicily 5: pp. 653-4.
  19. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrice de Provence: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004074&tree=LEO
  20. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#BeatriceCtssMCharlesISicilydied1285

Henry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England1

M, #4434, b. 5 March 1133, d. 6 July 1189
FatherGeoffroi V "Le Bel" Plantagenet (?) Cte d'Anjou et du Maine, Touraine, Duc de Normandie2,3,4,5,1,6 b. 24 Aug 1113, d. 7 Sep 1151
MotherMatilda (Maud) (?) Queen of England, Empress of Almain2,4,5,1 b. 7 Feb 1102, d. 10 Sep 1167
ReferenceGAV21 EDV23
Last Edited10 Dec 2020
     Henry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England was born on 5 March 1133 at Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Lorraine, France (now).7,8,9,10,11,12,5 He married Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou, daughter of Guillaume VIII-X "The Pious" de Poitou Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou and Eleanor/Aénor de Châtellerault Duchesse d'Aquitaine, on 18 May 1152 at Cathedral de Saint-Pierre, Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France.13,8,14,10,2,11,15,4,5
Henry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England died on 6 July 1189 at Chinon Castle, Touraine, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France (now), at age 56.13,10,14,11,12,5
Henry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England was buried after 6 July 1189 at Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, Departement de la Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, France
     DEATH     6 Jul 1189 (aged 56), Chinon, Departement d'Indre-et-Loire, Centre, France
     English Monarch. The son of Geoffrey IV, Count of Anjou and Queen Matilda, Henry was born in LeMans France, and acceded the throne of England in 1154, where he was crowned on December 19. He was the first of the Angevin kings, and one of England's most effective monarchs. He refined the government and created a self-standing bureaucracy. Henry was ambitious, intelligent, and energetic, and it is said he spoke every language used in Europe, though it is unlikely he spoke English. He married Eleanor of Aquitaine on May 18, 1152. This marriage brought under his rule the French counties of Brittany, Maine, Poitou, Touraine, Gascony, Anjou, Aquitaine, and Normandy - meaning Henry had more land and more power than the King of France. In 1162, Henry's best friend and chancellor, Thomas Beckett, was named Archbishop of Canterbury. Beckett distanced himself from Henry and angered the king when he opposed the coronation of young Prince Henry. In a fit of frustration, Henry publicly conveyed his wish to be free of Beckett. Four knights took the king at his word and murdered the archbishop in his cathedral. Henry endured a limited storm of protest over the incident, but the controvery quickly passed. As a result of the treachery of his sons, often with the encouragement of their mother, Henry was defeated in 1189 and forced to accept humiliation and peace. He died at Chinon, France at the age of 56. Bio by: Kristen Conrad
     Family Members
     Parents
          Geoffrey Plantagenet IV 1113–1151
          Matilda of England 1102–1167
     Spouse
          Eleanor de Aquitaine 1123–1204 (m. 1152)
     Siblings
          Hamelin De Warenne 1135–1202
          William 'Count of Poitou' Longespee 1136–1164
     Children
          Geoffrey FitzRoy Plantagenet 1152–1212
          William De Poitiers 1153–1156
          Henry Plantagenet 1155–1183
          Mathilda Plantagenet 1156–1189
          Richard I 1157–1199
          Geoffrey II Plantagenet 1158–1186
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1162–1214
          Joan Plantagenet 1164–1199
          King John I 1166–1216
          King John I 1166–1216
          William Longespée 1176–1226
     BURIAL     Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Departement de Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 31 Dec 2000
     Find A Grave Memorial 1951.10,11
     ; This is the same person as ”Henry II of England” at The Henry Project.1

; See Wikipedia article.12 GAV-21 EDV-23 GKJ-22. He was Duke of Aquitaine.16

; Per Faris [1999:277-8]:
     "HENRY II OF ENGLAND Curtmantle [or HENRY FITZ EMPRESS], King of England, was born at Le Mans on 5 Mar. 1132/3. He became Duc de Normandie et du Maine, and Comte d'Anjou by inheritance from his mother and father. He was married at Bordeaux on 18 May 1152 to ÉLÉONORE D'AQUITAINE, the divorced wife, with two daughters, of Louis VII, Roi de France (descendant of Charlemagne), and daughter and heiress of Guillaume X, Duc d'Aquitaine et Comte de Poitou, by Éléonore, daughter of Aumary I, Vicomte de Châtellerault. She was born about 1122. Their children were born in Normandy in 1153, at Bermondsey in 1155, in London in 1156, at Oxford in 1157, at Damfront in 1162, at Angers in 1165, and at Oxford in 1167. By his marriage Henry acquired the duchy of Aquitaine together with Gascony, Poitou and Auvergne. By the Treaty of Winchester in 1153, Henry was recognised as King Stephen's heir. He reached England on 8 Dec. 1154, and was crowned King of England on 19 Dec. 1154, with direct rule over England and southern Wales and a claim to the overlordship of northern Wales. His domain of England, Wales, and the French lands acquired from inheritance and marriage (ruled as separate components) was termed the "Angevin empire" (as his father was Comte d'Anjou). The overlord of his French lands, the king of France, had direct control of a much smaller domain than Henry himself. In 1171 Henry annexed Ireland though controlling the eastern part only. He had little difficulty in curbing the disorder of Stephen's reign and restoring the royal authority. He encouraged the development of juries of presentment of local men in the investigation of crimes, and trial of those accused by royal justices. His writs to sheriffs improved the disposition of claims over possession of property and benefices, thereby discouraging local self-help of violent ejection and usurpation. By relying on financial and legal experts and a permanent court at Westminster, he fostered the establishment of those two professions and the replacement of Roman law by English common law. Henry's reassertion of the king's rights over the church, in particular that clerics were subject to his courts and not solely to ecclesiastical courts, led to the quarrel with his former chancellor Thomas Becket, who, as Archbishop of Canterbury, was murdered in his cathedral in 1170. Henry spent much of his reign in France, upholding his authority in his numerous lordships and attempting to extend his rule. There he encountered the hostility of the French kings, who encouraged the grievances of his quarrelsome sons. HENRY II OF ENGLAND, King of England, died at Chinon in Normandy on 8 July 1189 in the midst of a rebellion by his sons. His widow died at Fontévrault on 31 Mar. 1204. They were buried at Fontévrault Abbey in Anjou, where their tomb effigies may be seen. (Powicke (1961), pp. 32-33 (he died 6 July 11S9, she died 1 Apr. 1204). DNB 26:1; 17:175. Paget (1977). pp. 14-15.)
     "
Children & grandchildren of Henry II of England, by Éléonore d'Aquitaine:
i.     WILLIAM OF ENGLAND, born 17 Aug. 1153, died at Wallingford Castle 1156.
ii.     HENRY OF ENGLAND, born 28 Feb. 1155, Duc de Normandie, Comte d'Anjou et du Maine, crowned joint King of England 14 June 1170, died at Martel 11 June 1183 s.p., v.p; married 2 Nov. 1160 MARGUERITE DE FRANCE, daughter of Louis VII, Roi de France, by Constance, daughter of Alfonso VIII, Rey de Castilla. No children.
iii.     MAUD OF ENGLAND, born 1156, died 28 June 1189, buried Cathedral of St. Blasius, Brunswick; married 1168 HEINRICH VON SACHSEN, Herzog Von Bayern und Sachsen der Lowe [the Lion].
iii.     RICHARD OF ENGLAND Coeur de Lion, third but eldest surviving son, born 8 Sep. 1157, Duc d'Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou; succeeded father as King of England (and the French lands) and was crowned 3 Sep. 1189; immediately set about organising an army to join the French and Germans on the. Third Crusade, whose aim was to recover Jerusalem, captured from the westerners by the Muslins in 1187, to the shame of western Christendom. Richard left England on 12 Dec. 1189: secured Acre and Jaffa and defeated the Muslims in the battle of Arsuf, but his forces were not sufficiently strong to gain Jerusalem. He had to be content with making a truce with the Islamic leader Saladin, who much admired him. On Richard's journey home he was imprisoned in Germany; he was released in 1194 on payment of a huge ransom; returned to England on 13 Mar. 1194. His brother John had stirred up tensions in England by challenging the rule of his deputy (justiciar) there. His overlord in France, Philippe Augustus, encouraged dissidents there. But after his return Richard turned his formidable military talent to wage war against the French king. In 1199, during a minor siege at Chalus in Aquitaine, Richard was fatally injured by a crossbow bolt; died 6 Apr. 1199 s.p., buried with his parents at Fontévrault Abbey; married at Lemesos, Cyprus, 1 May 1191 BERENGARIA DE NAVARRE, born about 1163, died at Espans Abbey, near Le Mans, about 1230, buried there, daughter of Sancho VI, Roi de Navarre, by Sanchia, daughter of Alfonso VII, Rey de Castilla. Powicke (1961), p. 33. Pager (1977), p. 15.
iv.     GEOFFREY OF ENGLAND, fourth son, born 23 Sep. 1158, Duc de Bretagne and Earl of Richmond jure uxoris; killed in a tournament at Paris on 19 Aug. 1186, buried in the quire of Notre Dame Cathedral there; married July 1181 CONSTANCE DE BRETAGNE, daughter and heiress of Conan IV le Petit, Duc de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond, by Margaret, daughter of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Northumberland.
a.     ARTHUR OF ENGLAND, Duc de Bretagne, only son and heir, born 29 Mar. 1187 at Nantes, captured by King John in 1202, murdered, about 3 Apr. 1203, probably at Rouen, said to have been buried at Notre Dame des Pres.
b.     ALIANOR OF ENGLAND la Brette [the Damsel of Brittany], only sister of the whole blood and heiress, born 1184, imprisoned by King John, remained in prison under King Henry III, died 10 Aug. 1241, unmarried, probably in Corfe Castle, buried, eventually at the convent of Amesbury, co. Wiltshire.
vi.     ALIANOR OF ENGLAND, born 13 Oct. 1162, died at Burgos 31 Oct. 1214; married ALFONSO VIII, Rey de Castilla.
vii.     JOAN OF ENGLAND, born October 1165, died 4 Sep. 1199; married, first, 13 Feb. 1177, WILLIAM II. King of Sicily, second, October 1196, RAYMOND VI, Comte de Toulouse.
viii.     JOHN OF ENGLAND [see next]."17



; Per Med Lands:
     "HENRI d’Anjou, son of GEOFFROY "le Bel/Plantagenet" Comte d'Anjou et de Maine & his wife [Empress] Matilda [Maud] of England (Le Mans, Anjou 5 Mar 1133-Château de Chinon 6 Jul 1189, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault[369]). William of Tyre names him and records his parentage[370]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the birth "1133 III Non Mar" of "Henricus"[371]. Comte de Touraine et de Maine 1151. He succeeded his father in 1151 as HENRI Comte d’Anjou, Duke of Normandy. He became Duke of Aquitaine by right of his wife 18 May 1152. He landed in England in Jan 1153 and obliged King Stephen to recognise him as his heir, from which time Henry governed England as Justiciar. He was recognised as HENRY II King of England after the death of King Stephen 25 Oct 1154, crowned in Westminster Abbey 19 Dec 1154[372] and at Worcester end [1158][373]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1189 that “Henricus rex Anglorum” died “aput Chinun” and was buried “aput Fontem Ebraldi”[374]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "II Non Jul" in [1189] of "Heinricus rex filius imperatoris" and his burial "ad Fontem-Ebraldi"[375]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "apud castrum Kinonis versus Cenomannum Non Iul 1189" of "rex Henricus" and his burial "in abbatia Fontis Ebraldi"[376].
     "m (Poitiers or Bordeaux Cathedral 18 May 1152) as her second husband, ELEONORE Dss d'Aquitaine, divorced wife of LOUIS VII King of France, daughter of GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou] & his first wife Eléonore de Châtellerault (Nieul-sur-Autize, Vendée or Château de Belin, Guyenne or Palais d’Ombrière, Bordeaux 1122-Abbaye de Fontevrault 1 Apr 1204, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Alienor Guilielmi filia comits Pictavorum et Aquitanie ducis" as wife of "regi Francie Ludovico"[377]. She succeeded her father 9 Apr 1137 as Dss d’Aquitaine, Ctss de Poitou, Ctss de Saintonge, Angoumois, Limousin, Auvergne, Bordeaux et d'Agen. She was crowned Queen Consort of England with her husband 19 Dec 1154 at Westminster Abbey. She supported the revolt of her sons against their father in 1173, was captured and imprisoned in the château de Chinon, later at Salisbury until 1179. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "XII Kal Apr" [1204] of "regina Alienor" and her burial "ad Fontem Ebraldi"[378]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the burial of "uxor [regis Henrici] regina Alienordis" in the same abbey as her husband[379].
     "Mistress (1): ([1150/51]) IKENAI, daughter of ---. Walter Mapes names "Ykenai" as mother of Geoffrey Bishop of York[380]. She and her son arrived at King Henry's court soon after his accession[381].
     "Mistress (2): ([1168]) ALIX de Porhoët, daughter of EUDES de Porhoët ex-Duke of Brittany & his first wife --- . Given-Wilson & Curteis states that “Eudo de Porhoët, ex-count of Brittany” claimed in 1168 that the English king, while holding his daughter as a hostage for peace, had made her pregnant ‘treacherously, adulterously and incestuously; for the king and Eudo´s wife were the offspring of two sisters’” (referring to two daughters of King Henry I, one legitimate the other illegitimate, named Matilda)[382]. The primary source on which this information is based has not been identified.
     "Mistress (3): ([1173/76]) ROSAMOND Clifford, daughter of WALTER de Clifford & his wife Margaret --- (-[1175/76], bur Godstow nunnery). “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Dore abbey, Herefordshire, with the consent of "Margaretæ uxoris meæ", for the souls of "…filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et Osberti filii Hugonis", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Waltero de Clifford juvene et Rosamunda sorore sua…"[383]. The Chronicon Johannis Bromton abbatis Jornalensis (as cited by Eyton) records that Rosamond Clifford became "openly and avowedly the paramour of the king" after he imprisoned Queen Eleanor following the rebellion of his sons in 1173[384]. Eyton adds that "for an indefinite time previously she had been secretly domiciled at Woodstock" but he does not cite the primary source on which he bases this statement[385]. It is not known whether he draws the conclusion from the Chronicon Johannis Bromton (the original of which has not yet been consulted). Eyton also suggests that the start of the king´s relationship with Rosamond can be dated to [1154] and that the king´s known illegitimate children Geoffrey Archbishop of York and William Longespee, later Earl of Salisbury, were Rosamond´s sons[386]. However, as can be seen below, Geoffrey´s birth is estimated to [1151] and William´s to [1176], which is inconsistent with their being full brothers. In any case, as noted above, the name of Geoffrey´s mother is reported as Ikenai. The uncertain chronology of the family of Walter [I] de Clifford appears to be the key to resolving the question of when Rosamond´s relationship with the king started. As discussed in the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY A-C in relation to the possible parentage of Walter [I]´s wife Margaret, it appears likely that their children were born after [1140] and, in the case of their son Walter [II], probably considerably later than this date. Rosamond´s appearance, with her brother Walter, as witness to the undated Dore abbey charter quoted above suggests that she was the only remaining unmarried daughter with her parents at the time, which in turn suggests that she was younger than her sisters. If this is correct, her birth could be as late as [1150/60], which would render Eyton´s hypothesis untenable. Further discussion of this problem will have to wait until more indications about the family chronology come to light. The Chronicon Johannis Bromton abbatis Jornalensis states that Rosamond died ("sed illa cito obiit")[387], his wording implying that her death occurred soon after the king´s relationship with her started, suggesting the period [1174/76]. “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ de Clifford et filiæ nostræ Rosamundæ", by undated charter[388]. “Osbertus filius Hugonis” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, at the request of “domini Walteri de Clifford” for the souls of "uxoris suæ Margaretæ et…Rosamundæ filiæ suæ", specifying that they were buried at Godstow, with the consent of "Hugonis fratris mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Waltero de Clifford, Ricardo filio suo et Lucia filia sua…"[389]. Rosamond´s corpse was removed from its burial place on the orders of Hugh Bishop of Lincoln[390]. She was known as "Fair Rosamond", although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.
     "Mistress (4): IDA, daughter of ---. William Longespee refers to his mother as "comitissa Ida, mater mea" and "Ida comitissa, mater mea" in two charters[391]. She is identified as the wife of Roger Bigod Earl of Norfolk. This identification is based on a list of hostages captured at the battle of Bouvines in 1214 which includes "Rad[ulfus] Bigot frater comitis Salesbir[iensis]"[392].
     "Mistress (5): NESTA, wife of RALPH Bloet, daughter of ---. Robert de Graystane´s early 14th century History of the Church of Durham records the election as bishop of Durham in 1213 of “Morganus frater Regis Johannis et Galfridi archiepiscopi Eboracensis, præpositusque Beverlacensis”, that his appointment was blocked by Rome because he was born “spurius...Henricus pater eius” to “uxore...militis...Radulphi Bloeth”, and that the Pope offered to confirm the election if he declared that the king was not his father, which he refused to do[393].
     "Mistresses (6) - (9): ---. The names of these mistresses of King Henry are not known.
Med Lands cites:
[369] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1189, p. 344.
[370] William of Tyre XIV.I, p. 607.
[371] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 33.
[372] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1154, p. 204.
[373] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1158, p. 215, which specifies "in Dominicam Navitatis die", presumably the end of Dec 1157 or early Jan 1158.
[374] Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 519.
[375] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 157.
[376] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1189, MGH SS XXIII, p. 861.
[377] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152, MGH SS XXIII, p. 841.
[378] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 166.
[379] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1189, MGH SS XXIII, p. 861.
[380] Wright (1850), pp. 228 and 235.
[381] Given-Wilson & Curteis (1988), p. 103.
[382] Given-Wilson & Curteis (1988), p. 98.
[383] Dugdale Monasticon V, Dore Abbey, Herefordshire, VIII, p. 555.
[384] Eyton (1857), Vol. V, p. 150, citing Twysden, R. (ed.) (1652) Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X, Chronicon Johannis Bromton abbatis Jornalensis, col. 725-1283, 1151 (not yet consulted, it is not clear that Eyton’s phrase is taken directly from the Chronicon).
[385] Eyton (1857), Vol. V, p. 150.
[386] Eyton (1857), Vol. V, p. 148.
[387] Eyton (1857), Vol. V, p. 150, citing Twysden, R. (ed.) (1652) Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X, Chronicon Johannis Bromton abbatis Jornalensis, col. 725-1283, 1151.
[388] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Godestow Nunnery, Oxfordshire, XV, p. 366.
[389] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Godestow Nunnery, Oxfordshire, XIII, p. 366.
[390] Domesday Descendants, p. 402.
[391] Bradenstoke, 481, 646, p. 9.
[392] Bevan ‘The Durham Liber Vitæ’ (Jul 2005), p. 429, citing Phair, R. ‘William Longespée, Ralph Bigod, and Countess Ida’, The American Genealogist, 77 (2002), pp. 279-81, quoting Baldwin, J. W., Gasparri, F. & Nortier, M. (1992) Les registres de Philippe Auguste [not yet consulted].
[393] Raine (1839) Robert de Graystanes, p. 35.18

; According to The Henry Project:
     "MALE Peter (falsely attributed), dean-elect of York (1193) [Rog. Hov. iii, 221], archdeacon of the West Riding (1194) [Rog. Hov. iii, 273], archdeacon of Lincoln (1195) [Rog. Hov. iii, 287]. Roger of Hoveden refers to Peter as a brother of archbishop Geoffrey in each of the above three references. Since Roger, a contemporary, makes no mention of Peter being a son of Henry II, we can be reasonably certain that Peter was a brother of Geoffrey through his mother only. (In the case of Morgan already mentioned above, when Roger called him the brother of Geoffrey, he also mentioned the alleged connection to Henry II.) The suggestion that he was a bastard of Henry was advanced in Sheppard (1964), 365-6, n. 9 (with clear indications of uncertainty), and again in Sheppard (1965), 97 (referring to the previous article, but without the indication of doubt), but no good reasons were advanced for making Peter a son of Henry."
The Henry Project cites:
** Rog. Hov. = William Stubbs, ed., Chronica Magistri Rogeri de Houedene, 5 vols. (Rolls Series 51, 1868). For an English translation, see Henry T. Riley, trans., The Annals of Roger de Hoveden, 2 vols. (London, 1853). Citations are from the edition of Stubbs.
** Sheppard (1964) = Walter Lee Sheppard, "The Bastards of Henry II", The Genealogists' Magazine 14 (1964), 361-8. [I would like to thank Chris Phillips for providing me with a copy of this article.]
** Sheppard (1965) = Walter Lee Sheppard, "Royal bye-blows - the illegitimate children of the English kings from William I to Edward III", The New England Historical and Genealogical Register 119 (1965), 94-102.1 He was Duc de Normandie et du Maine (by inheritance) in January 1151.8,19 He was Comte d'Anjou (by inheritance) between September 1151 and 1189.8,20,11 He was King of England: [Ashley, pp. 518-523] HENRY II, FITZEMPRESS or CURTMANTLE King of England 25 October 1154-6 July 1189. Crowned: Westminster, 19 December 1154. Titles: king of England, duke of Normandy (from 1151), duke of Aquitaine (from 1152), count of Anjou, Touraine and Maine (from 1151). Born: Le Mans, Maine, 5 March 1133; Died: Chinon Castle, Anjou, 6 July 1189, aged 56. Buried: Fontevrault Abbey, France. Married: 18 May 1152, at Bordeaux Cathedral, Gascony, Eleanor (c1122-1204), dau. of William X, duke of Aquitaine, and divorcée of Louis VII, king of France: 8 children. Henry had at least 12 illegitimate children by five or more other women. Henry was the eldest son of the empress MATILDA, who had briefly claimed the kingdom of England in 1141 during the extended civil war. His father was Geoffrey, count of Anjou, who became duke of Normandy in 1144. Geoffrey was frequently known as Plantagenet because of the sprig of broom he would wear in his cap, and this soubriquet subsequently became the surname of his descendants and the title of the royal house of England. Its official name, though, was the house of Anjou and it would dominate England for over three hundred and thirty years. It gave England some of its most powerful kings, including the first Angevin, Henry II.
Henry first attempted to continue his mother's war against STEPHEN after she had returned to Normandy in 1148, but Henry was a young squire of fifteen without sufficient resources to maintain such an effort. The next five years would see a significant change in him. When his father died in 1151 he inherited the duchy of Normandy as well as becoming count of Maine and Anjou. Eight months later he married Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was at least ten years his senior, the former wife of Louis VII of France whom Louis had divorced, ostensibly on grounds of consanguinity, but really because she had provided no male heir. This marriage infuriated Louis VII, especially when he had recognize the claim of Henry as duke of Aquitaine. Although Henry paid homage to Louis for his lands in France, he now effectively controlled more territory than the King himself. Louis sent forces against Henry as a show of power but Henry was able to contain them. In fact he felt sufficiently in control to accompany a small force to England in January 1153 in an effort to depose Stephen. In this he was unsuccessful, but Stephen was no longer disposed to fight, and most of the hostilities were between Henry and Stephen's son EUSTACE. In August 1153 Eustace died and this paved the way for Henry's succession which was sealed under the Treaty of Wallingford that November. By its terms Stephen continued to rule for as long as he lived but Henry was his undisputed successor. When Stephen died in October 1154, Henry succeeded to a considerable territory, subsequently called the Angevin Empire, though not known as that in Henry's day. At its peak it stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees, and would include overlordship of Ireland.
The energy with which Henry set about establishing his authority over his territories was awesome. This was helped by the papal bull issued in 1155 by the new Pope Adrian IV (the only English pope - Nicholas Breakspeare), which decreed that Henry had authority over the whole of Britain, including Scotland, Wales and Ireland. In the space of two years (1155-7) Henry had destroyed many of the castles established by barons during the civil war, and which he referred to as "dens of thieves"; he had negotiated terms with MALCOLM IV of Scotland, whereby Cumbria and Northumberland returned to English rule; and he had invaded Wales and brought the Welsh princes to heel. This last enterprise nearly cost him his life, however, when he was ambushed by the heir of Gwynedd, Cynan ab Owain. Henry's strength of character, his papal authority, and the immense resources upon which he could draw made him an impossible man to challenge, and by 1158 he had restored an order to England and its subservient kingdoms which it had not known to such a degree for many lifetimes. Wales would continue to be a thorn in his side for much of his reign, but he never considered it as much of a problem compared to other priorities. Subsequent campaigns of 1167 and 1177 served to remind successive Welsh rulers of his authority.
From 1158 to 1163 Henry was back in France. In July 1158 his brother, Geoffrey, had died. Geoffrey in 1150 had been made count of Nantes, one half of the duchy of Brittany, and on Geoffrey's death Henry sought to gain control. He was foiled by the speed with which the exiled duke, Conan IV, reclaimed his lands. Conan had been confirmed as earl of Richmond by Henry in 1156, and Conan was forced to acknowledge Henry's overlordship in Brittany. In 1166 Henry arranged a marriage between his son Geoffrey and Conan's daughter Constance, and thereafter Conan handed over the administration of Brittany to Henry to direct on behalf of the children. Henry's main thrust during 1159 and 1160 was against Toulouse, which he regarded as part of his wife's territory in Aquitaine. The French king, Louis VII, came to the defence of his brother-in- law, the count of Toulouse, and Henry had to withdraw rather than fight his French overlord. Toulouse and Aquitaine remained in dispute between Henry and Louis for the rest of their reigns.
The most notorious aspect of Henry's reign was his relationship with Thomas Becket. Becket was a personal friend of Henry's. Born in London, the son of a wealthy merchant, he was well educated and had trained as a knight before his father's misfortunes turned him to become a clerk, entering the household of Theobald, the archbishop of Canterbury, in 1142. He became an expert at canonical jurisprudence, and was appointed archdeacon of Canterbury in 1154 and chancellor of England in 1155. He fought alongside Henry in Toulouse and became wealthy. His election as the next archbishop of Canterbury in May 1162 came as a surprise to many, and was not universally accepted amongst other churchmen because of Becket's background and worldliness. It was probably this that caused Becket to change so radically in character in order to prove his devotion to the church. Henry, who thought he had an ally within the church who would help him in ecclesiastical disputes which had so plagued past kings, found he had an unpredictable opponent. Henry's short temper did not allow this to last for long and matters came to a head over the issue of clergy who broke the law. Henry maintained at a council held in October 1163 that these "criminous clerks" should be unfrocked and tried in a lay court. Becket maintained that they would be tried by ecclesiastical courts. Henry appealed to the new pope (Alexander III), who requested that Becket be more conciliatory. Henry now presented Becket with a series of terms, known as the Constitutions of Clarendon, which was where the council was held in January 1164. Becket argued tenaciously but eventually submitted. Henry believed he had succeeded but, soon after, Becket repented his change of heart and began lobbying the bishops. Henry was furious. He summoned him on various charges, including a debt of 44,000 marks (about £30,000) as owing since his days as chancellor. Becket was found guilty and his estates forfeited. He fled to France where he spent two years at the Cistercian abbey of Pontigny in Burgundy before the pope gave due attention to his cause. Becket pleaded personally before him in Rome, and Alexander restored him to the see of Canterbury. But Becket could still not return to England. He remained in France where he wrote letters of exhortation to the bishops, threatening excommunication unless they heeded his words.
In the meantime Henry had more pressing matters in hand. The pope's support and the Clarendon verdict had allowed Henry to start breaking down the old feudal system in England by ensuring that local baronial courts were subordinate to a strong central court. He re-established the jury system and introduced a new code of laws.
By a series of dynastic marriages Henry was establishing himself as one of the most powerful men in Europe. Already in 1160 he had arranged a marriage between his eldest surviving son, Henry, and Margaret, the daughter of Louis VII of France. Margaret was only two and Henry five, and Louis had not expected a confirmed marriage for many years after the betrothal agreement. But Henry had offered his support to the new pope, Alexander III, in 1160, whose succession was disputed, and in repayment, Alexander carried out the marriage. In February 1168 his eldest daughter Matilda was married to Heinrich the Lion, Duke of Saxony and Bavaria, whilst his youngest daughters were betrothed to the kings of Castile and Sicily.
Henry's dispute with Becket returned to haunt him in 1170. In that year Henry determined to have his eldest son formally crowned as king of England, which effectively elevated Henry himself into an imperial role. He needed the support of Becket and the pope in this, and begrudgingly accepted a reconciliation with Becket. However before this was fully resolved, Henry went ahead and had his son crowned (see HENRY - THE YOUNG KING) by the archbishop of York. Becket condemned this when he returned to England later that year. Becket was welcomed by the general populace as a hero: their champion against baronial oppression. Henry could not understand why Becket was always so quarrelsome. It was during one such moment of frustration that Henry uttered his notorious words: "Is there none will rid me of this turbulent priest?" Four knights, hearing these words and determined to prove themselves, immediately left Henry's court in Normandy, arriving at Canterbury on 29 December 1170 where they slew Becket within the cathedral. Although the murder shocked Christendom, it had not been at Henry's direct bidding. The knights each did their penance. Henry donned sackcloth, and apologised to the pope, but he soon weathered the storm. Everyone realised that Becket was best out of the way, though he was rapidly canonized in 1173.
Henry's attention turned to Ireland. He already believed he had ostensible authority over the country but plans for an earlier invasion in 1155 had been shelved. However in 1170 Richard Fitzgilbert, the earl of Pembroke, known as Richard Strongbow, had invaded Ireland at the request of the dispossessed king of Leinster, Diarmaid MacMurchada. Diarmaid had earlier appealed to Henry who had offered him his support, but gave him no direct help. Strongbow's forces however soon captured Waterford and Dublin. Strongbow married Diarmaid's daughter. Henry II became suspicious of Strongbow's intentions and brought his own army into Ireland in 1171. Henry's forces were too powerful for the Irish. They nicknamed them the gaill glassa, or "grey foreigners", from their armour which had not been seen before in Ireland. Henry soon established authority over eastern Ireland, especially the kingdoms of Leinster and Meath, whose rulers acknowledged his overlordship in the Treaty of Windsor in October 1175. Hugh de Lacy was made the first lord of Meath and remained as Henry's viceroy in Ireland, though his later aspirations to the kingship led to his assassination. Henry's youngest son, JOHN, was styled king of Ireland from 1177, though this was no more than an honorific as the hereditary kings of Ireland still ruled. John later adopted the more appropriate title lord of Ireland.
John's title was part of a settlement in a dispute between Henry and his children that rocked his final years. The "Young King" Henry was not satisfied with his authority in name only and wanted more. Although he was crowned a second time in August 1172, when he was created not only king of England but duke of Normandy and count of Anjou, he was still unsatisfied. His actions stirred Richard and Geoffrey into rebellion in 1173, which brought with it opportunists from elsewhere in the realm, including WILLIAM THE LYON of Scotland. William had long had designs on Northumberland and Cumbria which he believed were his inheritance. He invaded northern England in 1173 but was captured and taken prisoner to Henry in Normandy and forced to pay homage. The sons were supported by their mother Eleanor of Aquitaine, from whom Henry had drifted apart by the late 1 160s. The problem intensified after 1180 when Louis VII was succeeded by Philippe II, a far less scrupulous monarch who was keen to shatter the Angevin Empire and agreed to help Henry's sons against their father. Henry's world which he had so painstakingly created was now in danger of collapsing. In June 1183 the "Young King" Henry died. Henry's third son, Geoffrey, was killed in an accident at a tournament in Paris in August 1186. Although this might have simplified the battle between Henry and his sons, it focused the attention on the rivalry between RICHARD, the eldest surviving heir and Eleanor's favourite, and John, the youngest and Henry's favourite. Henry had spent most of these latter years in France, visiting England only for official duties. It was in France that he faced the army of Richard and King Philippe, with whom was also his favourite son John. This broke Henry's spirit. He was already ill and prematurely aged. He no longer had the energy to fight and agreed terms with Philippe at Colombières on 4 July 1189. Two days later he died as the result of a massive hemorrhage, cursing his sons to the last. He was only 56 years of age. His widow, Eleanor, would live for a further fifteen years, dying at the remarkable age of 82, the oldest of any English queen consort until the twentieth century. She still continued to exert an influence over her scheming children, of whom Richard now inherited the throne of England. between 19 December 1154 and 6 July 1189.21,8,10,5,12

Family 3

Children

Family 4

Nest ferch Iorwerth b. c 1148, d. WFT Est. 1172-1242
Child

Family 5

Ida (Isabella) de Toeni b. c 1152
Child

Citations

  1. [S1702] The Henry Project: The ancestors of king Henry II of England, An experiment in cooperative medieval genealogy on the internet (now hosted by the American Society of Genealogists, ASG), online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Henry II of England: https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/henry002.htm. Hereinafter cited as The Henry Project.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 2: England - Normans and early Plantagenets. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffrey V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002951&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.3. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000236&tree=LEO
  6. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, Geoffrey V "le Bel" or "Plantagenet": https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/data/geoff005.htm
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 1-25, p. 3. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 277. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  9. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 198, PLANTAGENET 6. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  10. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 504 (Chart 36), 518-523. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 2 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou2.html#Is
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_England. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 1-26, p. 3.
  14. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, pp. 198-199, PLANTAGENET 6.
  15. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Poitou 1 page ("The House of Poitou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/poitou/poitou1.html#G5
  16. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  17. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, pp. 277-278.
  18. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenriIIdied1189B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  19. [S742] Ed. Antonia Fraser, The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England (revised and updated) (n.p.: University of California Press, Berkely, 1998, unknown publish date), p. 42.
  20. [S739] David Faris and Souglas Richardson, "The Parents of Agatha, Wife of Edward the Exile", The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, April 1998, 152:224-235 (n.p.: The New England Historic Genealogical Society
    Boston, April 1998, unknown publish date), p. 42.
  21. [S634] Robert Bartlett, The New Oxford History of England: England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225 (n.p.: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2000, unknown publish date), p. 5.
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  23. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.4.
  24. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.5.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Matilda of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005975&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Matildadied1189.
  27. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.6.
  28. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Anjou-Gatinais.pdf, p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  29. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.7.
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000235&tree=LEO
  31. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Castile 3: p. 190.
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Eleanordied1214.
  33. [S1979] Douglas Richardson, "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005: "Grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005."
  34. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 139-24, p. 122.
  35. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000807&tree=LEO
  36. [S1702] The Henry Project, online https://fasg.org/projects/henryproject/, http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/henry002.htm
  37. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.8.
  38. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, William Longespee: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028335&tree=LEO
  39. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Longespee 3: pp. 456457.
  40. [S2367] Gary Boyd Roberts, Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Col., Inc., 2004), p. 448. Hereinafter cited as Roberts Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants.

Saint Ferdinand III (?) King of Castile & Leon1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #4435, b. August 1201, d. 30 May 1252
FatherAlfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia7,3,4,5,8 b. 15 Aug 1171, d. 24 Sep 1230
MotherBerenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile7,3,9,4,5,8 b. b Aug 1180, d. 8 Nov 1246
ReferenceGAV20 EDV20
Last Edited12 Jul 2020
     Saint Ferdinand III (?) King of Castile & Leon was born in August 1201 at Salamanca, Provincia de León, Castilla y León, Spain (now); Weis [AR7] says b. 1191; Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 6 page) says b. Aug 1201; Leo van de Pas says b. Aug 1201; Louda & Maclagan (Table 47) says b. 1200; Catholic Encyclopedia says born 1198.10,4,5,7,8 He married Elizabeth von Hohenstaufen, daughter of Philip II (?) Duke of Swabia, Holy Roman Emperor and Irini Maria Angelina Queen of Sicily, on 30 November 1219 at Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now); Louda & Macalagan says m. 1219.1,7,11,12,4,5,13 Saint Ferdinand III (?) King of Castile & Leon married JoanJeanne de Dammartin Countess of Ponthieu, Montreuil, and Aumale, daughter of Simon II de Dammartin Comte d'Aumale et de Ponthieu and Marie/Jeanne de Ponthieu Countess de Ponthieu, in 1237 at Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now).4,10,7,14
Saint Ferdinand III (?) King of Castile & Leon died on 30 May 1252 at Sevills, Provincia de Sevilla, Andalucia, Spain, at age 50.1,4,7,5
     GAV-20 EDV-20 GKJ-21.

Reference: Leo van de Pas cites: 1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1968 195
2. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: vol II page 47.
3. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II 63.5

Reference: St. Ferdinand III - King of Leon and Castile, member of the Third Order of St. Francis, born in 1198 near Salamanca; died at Seville, 30 May, 1252. He was the son of Alfonso IX, King of Leon, and of Berengeria, the daughter of Alfonso III, King of Castile, and sister of Blanche, the mother of St. Louis IX.

In 1217 Ferdinand became King of Castile, which crown his mother renounced in his favour, and in 1230 he succeeded to the crown of Leon, though not without civil strife, since many were opposed to the union of the two kingdoms. He took as his counsellors the wisest men in the State, saw to the strict administration of justice, and took the greatest care not to overburden his subjects with taxation, fearing, as he said, the curse of one poor woman more than a whole army of Saracens. Following his mother's advice, Ferdinand, in 1219, married Beatrice, the daughter of Philip of Swabia, King of Germany, one of the most virtuous princesses of her time. God blessed this union with seven children: six princes and one princess. The highest aims of Ferdinand's life were the propagation of the Faith and the liberation of Spain from the Saracen yoke. Hence his continual wars against the Saracens. He took from them vast territories, Granada and Alicante alone remaining in their power at the time of his death. In the most important towns he founded bishoprics, reestablished Catholic worship everywhere, built churches, founded monasteries, and endowed hospitals. The greatest joys of his life were the conquests of Cordova (1236) and Seville (1248). He turned the great mosques of these places into cathedrals, dedicating them to the Blessed Virgin. He watched over the conduct of his soldiers, confiding more in their virtue than in their valour, fasted strictly himself, wore a rough hairshirt, and often spent his nights in prayer, especially before battles. Amid the tumult of the camp he lived like a religious in the cloister. The glory of the Church and the happiness of his people were the two guiding motives of his life. He founded the University of Salamanca, the Athens of Spain. Ferdinand was buried in the great cathedral of Seville before the image of the Blessed Virgin, clothed, at his own request, in the habit of the Third Order of St. Francis. His body, it is said, remains incorrupt. Many miracles took place at his tomb, and Clement X canonized him in 1671. His feast is kept by the Minorites on the 30th of May.15

Reference: He became king of Castile in 1217 and of Leon in 1230, a union of kingdoms that was henceforth unbroken. His reign was of the greatest importance in Spanish history, for he undertook the campaigns which wrested the greater part of Andalusia from the Moors and incorporated it in the Christian state. Ferdinand founded the university of Salamanca,and he perhaps had a part in the beginning of that of Valladolid. At his death he was popularly acclaimed a saint, but he was not formally recognised as such until 1671 by Pope Clement X.5

Reference: King FERNANDO III of Castile and Leon (1217-52), and of Cordoba, Jaen and Seville, etc, *VIII.1201, +Seville 30.5.1252; 1m: Burgos 30.11.1219 Elisabeth von Hohenstaufen (*1205 +30.11.1235); 2m: Burgos 1237 Jeanne, Cts de Ponthieu (+Abbeville 1279) dau.of Simon de Dammartin, Cte de Ponthieu.4

Reference: weis 110-30.2

Reference: Stone (2000) chart 20-7: "He fought his father in order to obtain the Castilian throne, and later he united Castile and Leon. He captured Cordoba, Jaen, and Seville from the Muslims, largely completing the Christian reconquest of Spain, for which he was canonized 1671."16,17,18 He was King of Castile
See atached map of Castile and Leon ca 1200 between 1217 and 1252.19,7 He was King of Leon
See atached map of Castile and Leon ca 1200 between 1230 and 1252.19,7

Citations

  1. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 265. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 109-30, p. 102. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 7: Kings of León-Castile, 1214-1504. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Fernando III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005051&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2381] Graham Milne, "Milne email 20 Nov 2010: "Alphonso the Slobberer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 20 Nov 2010. Hereinafter cited as "Milne email 20 Nov 2010:."
  7. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  8. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Ferdinand III: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06042a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020552&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 110-29, p. 102.
  11. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III).
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elisabeth von Hohenstaufen: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00057090&tree=LEO
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Nesle-Falvy.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  15. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Ferdinand III at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06042a.htm
  16. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  17. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  18. [S616] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 26 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 18, Ed. 1, Family #18-0770 (n.p.: Release date: March 27, 1998, unknown publish date).
  19. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 220. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso X: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005041&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Infante Enrique de Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00319388&tree=LEO
  22. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 24.
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00319389&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Infant Fernando of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046804&tree=LEO
  25. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 3: England - Plantagenets and the Hundred Year's War.
  26. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.16. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001694&tree=LEO
  28. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Leonordied1290MEdwardIEngland. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

JoanJeanne de Dammartin Countess of Ponthieu, Montreuil, and Aumale1,2,3

F, #4436, b. circa 1216, d. 16 March 1279
FatherSimon II de Dammartin Comte d'Aumale et de Ponthieu1,4,5,2,3,6 b. c 1190, d. 21 Sep 1239
MotherMarie/Jeanne de Ponthieu Countess de Ponthieu3,7,8 b. b 17 Apr 1199, d. Sep 1250
ReferenceGAV20 EDV20
Last Edited17 Dec 2020
     JoanJeanne de Dammartin Countess of Ponthieu, Montreuil, and Aumale was born circa 1216 at Dammartin, Seine-Et-Marne, France; Racines et Histoire says b. ca 1220.9,3 She married Saint Ferdinand III (?) King of Castile & Leon, son of Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia and Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile, in 1237 at Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now).5,10,4,3 JoanJeanne de Dammartin Countess of Ponthieu, Montreuil, and Aumale married Jean III de Nesle-Falvy seigneur de Falvy et de la Hérelle in 1260; her 2nd husband, his 2nd wife.3
JoanJeanne de Dammartin Countess of Ponthieu, Montreuil, and Aumale died on 15 March 1278/79 at Abbeville, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France; Racines et Histoire says d. 1278.9,3
JoanJeanne de Dammartin Countess of Ponthieu, Montreuil, and Aumale died on 16 March 1279 at Abbeville, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France; Louda & Macalagan says d. 1278.5,4
     ; weis 109-30.1 GAV-20 EDV-20 GKJ-21.

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 109-30, p. 102. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.16. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Nesle-Falvy.pdf, p. 5. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Simon de Dammartin: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013717&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie (Jeanne): https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013719&tree=LEO
  8. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 109-29, p. 110.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  9. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 110-29, p. 102.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Infant Fernando of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046804&tree=LEO
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00001694&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Leonordied1290MEdwardIEngland. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Bethune.pdf, p. 4.

Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #4437, b. 15 August 1171, d. 24 September 1230
FatherFernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon1,7,2,8,9,3,4,10 b. 1137, d. 21 Jan 1188
MotherInfante dona Urraca (?) de Portugal1,7,2,11,3,4 b. c 1151, d. 21 Jan 1188
ReferenceGAV21 EDV21
Last Edited17 Jun 2020
     Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia was born on 15 August 1171 at Zamora, Spain (now); Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 6 page) says b. 1171; Leo van de Pas says b. 1171.12,7,3,4,13 He married Infante dona Theresa (?) of Portugal, daughter of Sancho I Martino "the Popular" (?) King of Portugal and Dulce/Dulcia (?) of Aragon, on 15 February 1191 at Guimarães, Guimarães Municipality, Braga, Portugal (now);
His 1st wife. Genealgoy.EU (Capet 47 page) says m. 1191; Leo van de Pas says m. 1191; Louda & Maclagan (Table 47) says m. 1190.7,14,3,4,13 Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia married Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile, daughter of Alfonso VIII "El Noble" Sanchez (?) King of Castile & Leon and Leonor (Eleanor) Pantagenet of England, Queen of Castile, in October 1197 at Valladolid, Spain;
His 2nd wife. Louda & Macalagan says m. 1198; Leo van de Pas says m. 1198.7,9,3,15,4,13 Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia and Infante dona Theresa (?) of Portugal were divorced in 1198; annulled for consanguinity.2,14,13 Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia and Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile were divorced before 12 June 1204; Leo van de Pas says div. 1209.3,15,13
Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia died in 1229; Louda & Macalagan says d. 1230.12,7
Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia died on 24 September 1230 at Villaneuva de Soria, Castilla y León, Spain, at age 59; Wikiepedia, Med Lands and Genealogics say d. 24 Sep 1230; Weis says d. 1229; Louda & Maclagan and Genealogy.EU say d. 1230.3,4,12,7,6,13
Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia was buried after 24 September 1230

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     15 Aug 1171, Zamora, Provincia de Zamora, Castilla y León, Spain
     DEATH     23 Sep 1230 (aged 59), Spain
     King of Leon and Galicia. Son of Ferdinand II and Urraca of Portugal. Husband of Theresa of Portugal and father of:
* Ferdinand
* Sancha
* Dulce

     Secondly, husband of Berengaria of Castile and father of:
* Ferdinand III
* Alfonso de Molina
* Leonor
* Berengia
* Constanza

     He had many mistresses and 15 illegitimate children accounted for.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Fernando II King Of Leon 1137–1188
          Urraca Of Portugal 1151–1188
     Spouses
          Teresa of Portugal 1176–1250 (m. 1191)
          Berenguela de Castilla y Plantagenet de León 1180–1246
     Children
          Fernando Of Leon 1192–1214
          Constance de León 1200–1242
          Ferdinand of Castile III 1201–1252
          Berengaria of León 1204–1237
     BURIAL     Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain
     Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Added: 27 Nov 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 101385377.16
     GAV-21 EDV-21 GKJ-22.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Alfonso was born 15 August 1171, only son of Fernando II, king of León, and Urraca of Portugal, daughter of Afonso I 'o Conquistador', king of Portugal and Mathilde de Savoie. Alfonso was also first cousin of Alfonso VIII of Castile and numbered next to him as being a junior member of the family. He was said by Ibn Khaldun (the famous Arab historiographer and historian, 1332-1406) to have been called the 'Baboso' (Slobberer) because he was subject to fits of rage during which he foamed at the mouth. He was king of León from the death of his father Fernando II in 1188 until his own death.
     "Though Alfonso took part in the _Reconquista,_ the reconquest of Spain from the Moors, he is chiefly remembered by the difficulties into which his successive marriages led him with the pope. He was first married in 1191 to his cousin Teresa of Portugal, who bore him two daughters, and a son who died young.
     "The marriage was declared null by the pope, to whom Alfonso paid no attention until he was presumably tired of his wife. It cannot have been his conscience which constrained him to leave Teresa, for his next step was to marry Berenguela of Castile in 1197, who was his second cousin. For this act of contumacy the king and kingdom were placed under interdict.
     "The pope was, however, compelled to modify his measures by the threat that if the people could not obtain the services of religion they would not support the clergy, and that heresy would spread. The king was left under interdict personally, but to that he showed himself indifferent, and he had the support of his clergy. Berenguela left him after the birth of five children, and the king then returned to Teresa, to whose daughters he left his kingdom by will.
     "Alfonso's eldest daughter Sancha was engaged to her cousin King Enrique I of Castile, but he died in 1217 before the marriage could be solemnised. Wanting to disinherit his son Fernando, Alfonso invited Jean de Brienne to marry his daughter Sancha and thereby inherit the Leonese throne. However, Queen Berenguela convinced Jean de Brienne to marry one of her daughters instead. Though she was the nominal heiress on her father's death in 1230, Sancha was easily set aside by Berenguela and Fernando. Sancha became a nun at Cozollos, where she died in 1270; she was later beatified. Her sister Dulce-Aldonza spent her life with their mother in Portugal.
     "Alfonso's had five children by Berenguela of Castile of whom Fernando, Alfonso and Berenguela would have progeny.
     "Alfonso died 24 September 1230 and was buried at Santiago de Compostela."17



; Per Genealogy.EU: "King ALFONSO IX of Leon (1188-1230), *Zamora 1171, +Villanueva de Sarria 1230; 1m: Guimaraes 1191 (annulled 1198) Teresa of Portugal (*ca 1176 +1250); 2m: 1197 Queen Berenguela I of Castile (*1180 +1246.)3"



Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1968.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.17


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Alfonso IX (15 August 1171 – 23 or 24 September 1230) was king of León and Galicia from the death of his father Ferdinand II in 1188 until his own death.
     "He took steps towards modernizing and democratizing his dominion and founded the University of Salamanca in 1212. In 1188 he summoned the first parliament reflecting the fullest representation of the citizenry ever seen in Western Europe, the Cortes of León.[1]
     "He took part in the work of the Reconquest, conquering the area of Extremadura (including the cities of Cáceres and Badajoz).[citation needed]
Family
     "Alfonso was born in Zamora. He was the only son of King Ferdinand II of León and Urraca of Portugal.[1] His father was the younger son of Alfonso VII of León and Castile, who divided his kingdoms between his sons, which set the stage for conflict in the family until the kingdoms were re-united by Alfonso IX's son Ferdinand III of Castile.[2]
Reign
     "Alfonso IX had great difficulty in obtaining the throne through his given birthright. In July 1188 his cousin Alfonso VIII of Castile required the younger Alfonso to recognize the elder as overlord in exchange for recognizing the younger's authority in León.[3]
     "The convening of the Cortes de León in the cloisters of the Basilica of San Isidoro would be one of the most important events of Alfonso's reign. The difficult economic situation at the beginning of his reign compelled Alfonso to raise taxes on the underprivileged classes, leading to protests and a few towns revolts. In response the king summoned the Cortes, an assembly of nobles, clergy and representatives of cities, and subsequently faced demands for compensatory spending and greater external control and oversight of royal expenditures. Alfonso's convening of the Cortes is considered by many historians, including Australia's John Keane,[4] to be instrumental to the formation of democratic parliaments across Europe. Note that Iceland had already held what may have been what is Europe's first parliament, the Þingvellir, in 930 CE. However, the Cortes' 1188 session predates the first session of the Parliament of England, which occurred in the thirteenth century.
     "In spite of the democratic precedent represented by the Cortes and the founding of the University of Salamanca, Alfonso is often chiefly remembered for the difficulties his successive marriages caused between him with Pope Celestine III. He was first married in 1191 to his first cousin, Theresa of Portugal,[1] who bore him two daughters, and a son who died young. The marriage was declared null by the papal legate Cardinal Gregory for consanguinity.[5]
     "After Alfonso VIII of Castile was defeated at the Battle of Alarcos, Alfonso IX invaded Castile with the aid of Muslim troops.[1] He was summarily excommunicated by Pope Celestine III.[6] In 1197, Alfonso IX married his first cousin once removed, Berengaria of Castile, to cement peace between León and Castile.[7] For this second act of consanguinity, the king and the kingdom were placed under interdict by representatives of the Pope.[8] In 1198, Pope Innocent III declared Alfonso and Berengaria's marriage invalid, but they stayed together until 1204.[9] The annulment of this marriage by the pope drove the younger Alfonso to again attack his cousin in 1204, but treaties made in 1205, 1207, and 1209 each forced him to concede further territories and rights.[10][11] The treaty in 1207 is the first existing public document in the Castilian dialect.[12]
     "The Pope was, however, compelled to modify his measures by the threat that, if the people could not obtain the services of religion, they would not support the clergy, and that heresy would spread. The king was left under interdict personally, but to that he showed himself indifferent, and he had the support of his clergy.[5]
     "In 1211 Alfonso IX of León gave the castle of Alcañices to the Templar Order,[13] where inhabitants celebrated the great victories of the order.[14]
Children
     "In 1191, he married Theresa of Portugal,[15] daughter of King Sancho I of Portugal and Queen Dulce of Aragon.[16] Between 1191 and 1196, the year in which their marriage was annulled, three children were born:
** Sancha (1191 – before 1243)[17] unmarried and without issue. She and her sister Dulce became nuns or retired at the Monastery of San Guillermo Villabuena (León) where she died before 1243.
** Ferdinand (1192/1193 – 1214),[18] unmarried and without issue.
** Dulce (1193/1194 – 1248).[19]

     "On 17 November 1197 he married infanta Berengaria of Castile, daughter of King Alfonso VIII of Castile and Leonor of England. Five children were born of this marriage:
** Eleanor[20] (1198[21] – 11 November 1202[21]).
** Constance (died in 1242),[22] became a nun at the Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas, Burgos, where she died.[20]
** Ferdinand III of Castile (1199/1201 at an unknown age – 1252). King of Castile in 1217 after the death of Henry I of Castile and of León in 1230 after the death of his father.[20]
** Alfonso (died in 1272), Lord of Molina due to his first marriage to Mafalda González de Lara.[20]
** Berengaria of León (died in 1237), in 1224 married John of Brienne,[20]

     "Alfonso also fathered many illegitimate children. After the annulment of his first marriage and before wedding Berengaria, he had a relationship which lasted about two years with Inés Íñiguez de Mendoza, daughter of Iñigo López de Mendoza and María García,[25] with whom he had a daughter born around 1197:
** Urraca Alfonso, the wife of Lope Díaz II de Haro, Lord of Biscay.[26]

     "He had another relationship afterwards with a noblewoman from Galicia, Estefanía Pérez de Faiam. In 1211, King Alfonso gave her lands in Orense where her family, as can be inferred from her last will dated 1250, owned many estates, as well as in the north of Portugal. She was the daughter of Pedro Menéndez Faiam, who confirmed several royal charters of King Alfonso IX, and granddaughter of Menendo Faiam, who also confirmed several diplomas issued in Galicia as of 1155 by King Ferdinand II of León. After the relationship ended, Estefanía married Rodrigo Suárez with whom she had issue. In her will, she asked to be buried in the Monastery of Fiães in northern Portugal.[27]
     "Alfonso IX and Estefanía were the parents of:[b]
** Ferdinand Alfonso of León (born in 1211),[27] died young.

According to Spanish historian, Julio González, after his relationship with Estefanía, the king had a lover from Salamanca, of unknown origin, whose name was Maura and with whom he had: [29]
** Fernando Alfonso de León (c.?1214/1218 – Salamanca, 10 January 1278), archdeacon of the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela,[29] who had issue with Aldara de Ulloa.

     "Of his relationship with the noblewoman from Portugal, Aldonza Martínez de Silva, daughter of Martim Gomes da Silva and his wife Urraca Rodrigues,[30] which lasted from 1214 to 1218, three children were born:
** Rodrigo (c.?1214 – c.?1268), lord of Aliger and Castro del Río, and Adelantado of the March of Andalusia, he married Inés Rodríguez, daughter of Rodrigo Fernández de Valduerna,[31] Lord of Cabrera and alférez of King Alfonso IX.
** Aldonza (died after 1267). Married count Pedro Ponce de Cabrera,[32] and had issue. They are the ancestors of the Ponce de León family.
** Teresa Alfonso of León, the wife of Nuño González de Lara el Bueno.[c]

     "King Alfonso's most long-lasting relationship, which began in 1218 and lasted until his death in 1230,[36] was with Teresa Gil de Soverosa.[37] A member of the Portuguese nobility, Teresa was the daughter of Gil Vasques de Soverosa and his first wife María Aires de Fornelos. They had four children, all of them born between 1218 and 1230:[38]
** Sancha (d. 1270). Married Simon Ruiz, Lord of Los Cameros.[39] She later became a nun at the convent of Santa Eufemia de Cozuelos which she had founded.[39]
** María (died after July 1275). an unknown date Her first marriage was with Álvaro Fernández de Lara. She was then the concubine of her nephew King Alfonso X of Castile and, according to the Count of Barcelos, her second husband was Suero Arias de Valladares.[39]
** Martín (died 1268/1272), married to Maria Mendes de Sousa, founders of the Monastery of Sancti-Spíritus, Salamanca. There was no issue from this marriage.[40]
** Urraca (d. after 1252). First married García Romeu,[39] and then Pedro Núñez de Guzmán.[39]

     "Although Alfonso IX is supposed to have had another son, Pedro Alfonso de León, there is no documentary proof that he was the king's son or that he was the Grand Master of the Order of Santiago.[e]
Death
     "Alfonso IX of León died on 24 September 1230. His death was particularly significant in that his son, Ferdinand III of Castile, who was already the King of Castile also inherited the throne of León from his father. This was thanks to the negotiations of his mother, Berengaria, who convinced her stepdaughters to renounce their claim on the throne.[42] In an effort to quickly consolidate his power over León, Ferdinand III abandoned a military campaign to capture the city of Jaén immediately upon hearing news of his father's death and traveled to León to be crowned king. This coronation united the Kingdoms of León and Castile which would go on to dominate the Iberian Peninsula.
Notes
a. King Fernando's year of birth is not recorded. According to the Chrónica latina de los reyes de Castilla, he was 16 years old when he became king of Castile in 1217 which would mean that he was born in 1201. Rodrigo Jiménez de Rada, a contemporary of Fernando, said that he was 18 years old in 1217 which would indicate that his birth was in 1199, two years after his parent's marriage.[23][24]
b. It is possible that, besides Ferdinand Alfonso, they also had another son, John Alfonso, who appears in several documents with the children that Estefanía had with her husband Rodrigo Suárez.[28]
c. There is controversy among historians and genealogists on her marriage to Nuño González de Lara. According to Pedro Afonso, Count of Barcelos, followed by other historians,[33] Nuño's wife was this Teresa, daughter of King Alfonso IX and Aldonza Martínez de Silva. Luis de Salazar y Castro believed that her father was Pedro Alfonso de León, supposedly an illegitimate son of Alfonso IX. Spanish historian Julio González González argued that Nuño's wife could have been the daughter of Urraca Alfonso, illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso IX, and her husband Lope Díaz II de Haro.[34] Szabolcs de Vajay rules out these last two filiations since her patronymic would have been Pérez or López rather than Alfonso and suggests that she could have been an illegitimate daughter of Alfonso of Molina. Nevertheless, Teresa confirms her filiation and marriage in a sale that she made in November 1254 in which she declares that she is the daughter of King Alfonso, granddaughter of King Fernando II of León, and wife of Nuño González de Lara.[35]
d. On 4 July 1275, María donated a fourth part of Lougares to the Monastery of Santa María de Melón (document published by the Real Academia Gallega).
e. "...for Rades [Francisco de Rades y Andrada], in the space of time corresponding to the government of Fernando Pérez Chacín, there were really two Grand Masters: Fernando Pérez Chacín, who died or was removed a year after his election, and Pedro Alfonso, elected in 1225 who died a year later. For [Derek William] Lomax, there was only one Grand Master in this short period of time: Fernando Pérez Chacín. In fact, documentation proves that this historian is right, rather than the chronicler who mentioned a non-existent Grand Master, supposedly an illegitimate son of King Alfonso IX" (loose translation)[41]
References
1. Gerli 2003, p. 54.
2. Shadis 2010, p. xix.
3. Shadis 2010, p. 53.
4. "Un anglosajón prueba que en León y no en Inglaterra nació la democracia". Diario de León (in Spanish). Londres. June 19, 2006. Archived from the original on 2009-06-23. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
5. One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Alphonso s.v. Alphonso IX.". Encyclopædia Britannica. 1 (11th ed.) Cambridge University Press. p. 735.
6. Lower 2014, p. 605.
7. Shadis 2010, p. 61-62.
8. Moore 2003, pp. 70-71.
9. Reilly 1993, p. 133.
10. Shadis 2010, pp. 78-84.
11. Túy 2003, p. 324, 4.84.
12. Wright 2000.
13. Martínez Díez, Gonzalo. Los Templarios en la Corona de Castilla (1st ed.) Burgos: La Olmeda, D.L. p. 103. ISBN 9788460462774.
14. Historia (October 22, 2015). "Apéndice I. Los lugares del Temple". In Martínez, Gemma; Mínguez, Nines (eds.) Templarios. Del origen de las cruzadas al final de la Orden del Temple (1st ed.) Madrid: Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial, S. A. U. p. 417. ISBN 9788401015731.
15. Echols 1992, pp. 400-401.
16. Fernandes Marques 2008, pp. 62, 87.
17. Fernandes Marques 2008, pp. 89, 140.
18. Fernandes Marques 2008, p. 140.
19. Fernandes Marques 2008, p. 140 y 143.
20. Martínez Díez 2007, p. 47.
21. Flórez 1761, p. 348.
22. Flórez 1761, p. 355.
23. Rodríguez López 2004, p. 30.
24. Flórez 1761, pp. 347-348.
25. Calderón Medina 2011, p. 262.
26. Calderón Medina 2011, pp. 262–263.
27. Calderón Medina 2011, pp. 264–265.
28. Calderón Medina 2011, p. 264 n.31.
29. Calderón Medina 2011, p. 265.
30. Calderón Medina 2011, pp. 266–267.
31. Calderón Medina 2011, pp. 267–268.
32. Calderón Medina 2011, pp. 268–270.
33. Calderón Medina 2011, pp. 269.
34. Sánchez de Mora 2004, p. 633 and n. 8.
34. Martínez Martínez 1997, Doc. 495, pp. 359–360.
36. Calderón Medina 2011, p. 275.
37. Calderón Medina 2011, p. 270.
38. Calderón Medina 2011, pp. 268, 270 and 275.
39. Calderón Medina 2011, p. 276.
40. Calderón Medina 2011, pp. 275–276.
41. Ayala Martínez 1997, p. 245 n.14.
42. Shadis 2010, p. 3.
Bibliography
** Alonso, Isabel (2002). "Desheredamiento y desafuero, o la pretendida justificación de una revuelta nobiliaria". Cahiers d'Études Hispaniques Médiévales (in Spanish) (25). pp. 99–129. ISSN 2108-7083.
** Ayala Martínez, Carlos de (1997). "Las órdenes militares en el siglo XII castellano. La consolidación de los maestrazgos". Anuario de Estudios Medievales (in Spanish) (27). Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC: Institución Milá y Fontanals. ISSN 0066-5061.
** Calderón Medina, Inés (2011). "Las otras mujeres del rey: El concubinato regio en el reino de León (1157- 1230)" (PDF). Seminário Medieval 2009–2011 (in Spanish). Coordinators:Ferreira, María do Rosário; Laranjinha, Ana Sofia; Ribeiro Miranda, José Carlos. Oporto: Instituto de Filosofía da Faculdade de Letras da Universidade do Porto. pp. 255–289. ISBN 9789898459145.
** Doubleday, Simon R. (2001). The Lara family: crown and nobility in medieval Spain. Harvard University Press. ISBN 9780674034297.
** Echols, Anne; Williams, Marty (1992). An Annotated index of Medieval Women. Markus Weiner Publishing Inc. ISBN 9780910129275.
** Fernandes Marques, Maria Alegría (2008). Estudos sobre a Ordem de Cister em Portugal (in Portuguese). Coímbra: Estudos da Faculdade de Letras da Universidade de Coimbra. ISBN 978-972-772-019-4.
** Flórez, Enrique (1761). Antonio Marín (ed.) Memorias de las Reynas Catholicas, historia genealógica de la Casa Real de Castilla, y de León, todos los infantes: Trages de las Reynas en estampas: y nuevo aspecto de la historia de España. Vol. I. Madrid. OCLC 220697158.
** Gerli, E. Michael; Armistead, Samuel G., eds. (2003). Medieval Iberia: an encyclopedia. Routledge. ISBN 9780415939188.
** Lower, Michael (2014). "The Papacy and Christian Mercenaries of Thirteenth-Century North Africa". Speculum. The University of Chicago Press. Vol. 89, No. 3 JULY.
** Martínez Díez, Gonzalo (2007). Alfonso VIII, rey de Castilla y Toledo (1158-1214) (in Spanish). Gijón: Ediciones Trea, S.L. ISBN 978-84-9704-327-4.
** Martínez Martínez, Martín (1997). Cartulario de Santa María de Carracedo 992-1500 (in Spanish). Vol. I: 992-974. Ponferrada: Instituto de Estudios Bercianos. ISBN 84-88635-07-9.
** Moore, John Clare (2003). Pope Innocent III (1160/61-1216): To root up and to plant. Brill. ISBN 9781423712138.
** Reilly, Bernard F. (1993). The Medieval Spains. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521394369.
** Rodríguez López, Ana (2004). "Sucesión regia y legitimidad política en Castilla en los siglos XII y XIII. Algunas consideraciones sobre el relato de las crónicas latinas castellano-leonesas". Annexes des Cahiers de linguistique et de civilisation hispaniques médiévales (in Spanish). Vol. 16 (1). doi:10.3406/cehm.2004.1312.
** Sánchez de Mora, Antonio (2004). "Nuño González de Lara: "El más poderoso omne que sennor ouiese e más honrado de Espanna"". Historia, instituciones, documentos (in Spanish) (31). Seville: University of Seville. ISSN 0210-7716.[permanent dead link]
** Shadis, Miriam (2010). Berenguela of Castile (1180–1246) and Political Women in the High Middle Ages. Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-312-23473-7.
** Túy, Lucas (2003). Rey, Emma Falque (ed.) Chronicon mundi. Turnhout: Brepols. ISBN 9782503037417.
** Wright, Roger (2000). El tratado de Cabreros (1206): estudio sociofilológico de una reforma ortográfica. London: Queen Mary and Westfield College. ISBN 9780904188592.
Further reading
** Sánchez Rivera, Jesús Ángel, "Configuración de una iconografía singular: la venerable doña Sancha Alfonso, comendadora de Santiago", Anales de Historia del Arte, nº 18 (2008), Madrid, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, pp. 167–209.
** Szabolcs de Vajay, "From Alfonso VIII to Alfonso X" in Studies in Genealogy and Family History in Tribute to Charles Evans on the Occasion of his Eightieth Birthday, 1989, pp. 366–417."6



; Per Med Lands:
     "Infante don ALFONSO de León, son of FERNANDO II King of León & his first wife Infanta dona Urraca de Portugal (Zamora 15 Aug 1171-Villanueva de Sarría 24 Sep 1230, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor). The Chronicon Conimbricensi records the birth “mense Februario…in die Ascensionis Domini” (presumably an error) in 1171 of “Rex Alfonsus filius Regis Fernandi et Dñæ Orace Reginæ”[857]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Aldefonsus rex Legionis" as son of "Fernando [frater regis Sanctii]"[858]. He succeeded his father in 1188 as ALFONSO IX King of León and Galicia. He held the first documented Cortes in León in 1188, attended by duly elected representatives of towns as well as nobles and ecclesiasts. The Pope excommunicated him because of his first marriage, between cousins without papal dispensation, and placed León under an interdict until Alfonso agreed to a separation. Another dispute broke out with the church after he married his second wife, also his first cousin, from whom he was also obliged to separate. He succeeded in 1217 as ALFONSO IX King of Castile, by right of his second wife and son. He successfully campaigned against the Moors, capturing Lazeres, Merida, Elvas, Badajoz and several towns in Extremadura in 1228. The Anales Toledanos record the death in 1230 “en Villanneva de Saria” of “el Rey Don Alfonso de Leon, Padre del Rey D. Fernando”[859].
     "m firstly (Guimarães 15 Feb 1191, separated 1195, annulled for consanguinity 1198) his first cousin, Infanta dona TERESA de Portugal, daughter of SANCHO I “o Pobledor” King of Portugal & his wife Dulce de Barcelona ([1176]-Lorvano 17/18 Jun 1250, bur Lorvano, Cistercian monastery of Nuestra Señora de la Expectación). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes records the marriage of "Tarasiam", other daughter of "Rex…Sancius", and "Aldefonso Regi Legionensi", specifying that the union was incestuous[860]. Nun at Lorvano 1200. Co-founder of the Dominican convent at Coimbra. The testament of “Sancius...Portugaliæ Rex”, dated Oct 1209, bequeathed property to “...nepos meus Infans Donnus Fernandus...filiæ meæ Reginæ Donnæ Tharasiæ...Reginæ Donnæ Sanciæ...Reginæ Donna Maphalda...Reginæ Donnæ Blancæ...Reginæ Donnæ Bereng...Infanti Donnæ Dulciæ nepti meæ...Infanti D. S. nepti meæ...”[861]. Beatified 23 Dec 1705 by Pope Clement XI[862].
     "m secondly (Valladolid Dec, before 17, 1197, separated 1204 before 19 Jun) as her second husband, his first cousin, Infanta doña BERENGUELA de Castilla, daughter of ALFONSO VIII King of Castile & his wife Eleanor of England (Jan/Jun 1180-Las Huelgas 8 Nov 1246). The Chronicon de Cardeña records that “Rey D. Alfonso de Leon” married “D. Alfonso…so fija Doña Berenguela”[863]. The Crónica Latina records that “doña Berenguela, hija del rey de Castilla” was married to “el rey de León”, when peace was established being Castile and León following the defeat at the battle of Alarcos, despite being related in the second degree of consanguinity[864]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Henricum qui iuvenis obiit et quinque sorores, prima Berengaria…secunda Urraca, tertia regina Francie, quarta Alienor, quinta Constantia monialis" as children of "sorore regis Anglie Richardi…Alienor…soror ex alio patre comitisse Marie Campaniensis", specifying that Berengaria was wife of "regi Legionensi id est regi Galicie…Alfunsus" and mother of "Fernandum successorem regis parvi in Castella et Toledo" and recording their marriage was initially permitted by Pope Innocent III despite consanguinity but subsequently prohibited, after which Berengaria became a Cistercian nun at Burgos[865]. Her second marriage, arranged by her father as part of the peace process with León, caused religious fury because of the close relationship of the parties. Pope Innocent III excommunicated the couple, placed Castile and León under an interdict, and eventually annulled the marriage though agreed that their Children remained legitimate. Infanta Berenguela became a nun at Las Huelgas 1204, after separating from her husband. Regent for her brother Enrique I 1214, she became heiress in her own right to Castile, Toledo and Extremadura on his death but immediately ceded her rights to her son Infante don Fernando. She retired from public life in 1230, after transferring full power to her son. The Chronicon de Cardeña records the death in 1240 of “la Reyna Doña Berenguela, madre del Rey D. Fernando”[866]. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "31 Oct" of "domina Berengeria, regina Castille et Toleti, soror domine Blanche Francorum regine"[867].
     "Mistress (1): [1195] ---. The name of the first mistress of King Alfonso IX is not known. Szabolcs de Vajay says that she was "of modest antecedents"[868], but the basis for this statement is not known.
     "Mistress (2): [1195] INÉS Íñiguez de Mendoza, daughter of ÍÑIGO López de Mendoza Señor de Llodio [Governor in Soria and Burgos] & his wife María García Salvadórez. The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Ines Íñiguez de Mendoca" as the mother of King Alfonso IX´s children Urraca and Fernando[869].
     "Mistress (3): [1206-1210] ALDONZA Martínez de Silva, daughter of MARTÍN Gómez Señor de Silva & his wife Urraca Ruiz de Cabrera (-after 1232). The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Aldonça Martinez de Silva" as the mother of King Alfonso´s three children who are named below[870]. She married (after 1210) Diego Froilaz. The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos records that "D. Diego Frojas" married "D. Aldonça Martinez de Silva, que avia sido amiga del Rey D. Alonso de Leon"[871].
     "Mistress (4): [1210-1215] ESTEFANÍA Pérez, daughter of PEDRO Arias de Limia [Mayordomo Mayor of King Fernando II of León] & his second wife Constanza Osorio (-1249 or after). Estefanía Pérez was given the realengo of Villamayor in 1215, but in 1249 granted it to the monastery of Melón with the consent of her husband Rodrigo Suarez, for the souls of “Alfonso IX y de su hijo Fernando”[872]. She married Rodrigo Suárez.
     "Mistress (5): [1215-1220] MAURA, daughter of --- (-bur Salamanca Cathedral). Florez says that “Maura” mother of Fernando Dean of Santiago was buried “en la Catedral antigua de Salamanca”[873]. Szabolcs de Vajay says that she was "probably of modest origins"[874].
     "Mistress (6): [1220-1230] TERESA Gil de Soverosa, daughter of GIL Vázquez de Soverosa & his wife María Arias Fornelos[875] (-after 1251). The Livro Velho names "D. Sueiro Ayres de Fornelos e D. Pedro Ayres e D. Maria Ayres" as the children of "Ayres Nunes de Fornelos" and his wife "D. Mor Peres a Prove", adding that Maria was the mistress of Sancho I King of Portugal and later married "D. Gil Vasques de Sovorosa" by whom she was mother of "D. Martim Gil o bom e D. Fernão Gil…e…D. Tereja Gil", specifying that Teresa was mistress "d´elrey de Leão"[876]. The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Gil Vazquez, D. Martin Gil, D. Teresa Gil" as the children of "D. Gil Vazquez de Soverosa" and his first wife "D. Maria Ayras de Fornelo", in another passage naming "D. Teresa Gil de Soverosa" as the mother of four of King Alfonso´s children[877]."
Med Lands cites:
[857] Chronicon Conimbricensi, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 333.
[858] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1143, MGH SS XXIII, p. 837.
[859] Anales Toledanos II, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 412.
[860] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 5, RHGF XII, p. 383.
[861] Sousa (1739) Provas, Tomo I, 10, p. 17.
[862] Szabolcs de Vajay (1989), p. 376.
[863] Chronicon de Cardeña, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 378.
[864] Crónica Latina de los reyes de Castilla, II, 15.
[865] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1212, MGH SS XXIII, p. 895.
[866] Chronicon de Cardeña, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 373.
[867] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 193.
[868] Szabolcs de Vajay (1989), p. 377.
[869] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. IV, Reyes de Castilla, 14 p. 10.
[870] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. IV, Reyes de Castilla, 12 p. 9, and 11, p. 327.
[871] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. XIX, Del Conde D. Ramiro de Campos, 3, p. 109, and 11 p. 327.
[872] Szabolcs de Vajay (1989), pp. 383 and 408 note 105, citing González, J. (1983) Reinado y diplomas de Fernando III (Córdoba), Vol. I, p. 94.
[873] Florez (1770), Tomo I, p. 392, no citation reference.
[874] Szabolcs de Vajay (1989), p. 377.
[875] Who had been mistress of Sancho I King of Portugal.
[876] Os Livro de Linhagens, I, Livro Velho, Portugaliæ Monumenta Historica, Scriptores, Vol. I, Fasc. II, p. 167.
[877] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. XXV, Soverosas, 4 p. 147, and Tit. IV, Reyes de Castilla, 12 p. 9.13


; Stone (2000) chart 20-6: "He tried to recover Leonese lands lost to Castile, allying himself with the Almohads for that purpose. As a consequence, the Pope forced him to marry the eldest daughter of the Castilian king. He later defeated the Almohads at Caceres, Merida, and Badajoz.18,19



Reference: Weis [1992:104] Line 114-27.1 He was 6th King of Leon and Galicia between 1188 and 1230.7,8,9,3,5,6

Family 3

Child

Family 4

Infante dona Theresa (?) of Portugal b. c 1176, d. bt 18 Jun 1250 - 1250
Children

Family 6

Ines Iniguez de Mendoza
Child

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 114-27, p. 104. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 92: Portugal - Early Kings (House of Burgundy). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso IX: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020550&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2381] Graham Milne, "Milne email 20 Nov 2010: "Alphonso the Slobberer"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 20 Nov 2010. Hereinafter cited as "Milne email 20 Nov 2010:."
  6. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfonso_IX_of_Le%C3%B3n. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  7. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century.
  8. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 4: Rulers of Portugal, León, and Castile, 1035-1214. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  9. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, History of Medieval Spain, Appendix, Chart 7: Kings of León-Castile, 1214-1504.
  10. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#FernandoIILeondied1188B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Urraca of Portugal: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020549&tree=LEO
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 120-28, p. 107.
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#_King_of_Le%C3%B3n:_1
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Capet 47 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/capet/capet47.html
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020552&tree=LEO
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 December 2019), memorial page for Alfonso IX de Leon (15 Aug 1171–23 Sep 1230), Find A Grave Memorial no. 101385377, citing Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Provincia da La Coruña, Galicia, Spain ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/101385377/alfonso_ix-de-leon. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso IX: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020550&tree=LEO
  18. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  19. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria Alfonso: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00033513&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando of Leon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392474&tree=LEO
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancha of Leon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392475&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dulce of Leon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392476&tree=LEO
  24. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 114-28, pp. 104-105.
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of León and Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026634&tree=LEO
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#BerenguelaLeondied1237
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constanza of Leon and Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392477&tree=LEO
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Fernando III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005051&tree=LEO
  29. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Ferdinand III: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06042a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  30. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Leonor of Leon and Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392478&tree=LEO
  31. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 265. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00110950&tree=LEO
  33. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#AlfonsoLeonMolinadied1272B
  34. [S1497] Esteban Trento, "Trento email "Re: Diego Lopez de Haro, de Vizcaya/Biscay"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 5 November 2003. Hereinafter cited as "Trento email 5 November 2003."
  35. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Urraca Alfonso bâtarde de Leon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00417962&tree=LEO

Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile1,2,3,4

F, #4438, b. before August 1180, d. 8 November 1246
FatherAlfonso VIII "El Noble" Sanchez (?) King of Castile & Leon2,5,6,3,4,7,8 b. 11 Nov 1155, d. 6 Oct 1214
MotherLeonor (Eleanor) Pantagenet of England, Queen of Castile2,5,3,4,9,8,10 b. 13 Oct 1162, d. 31 Oct 1214
ReferenceGAV21 EDV21
Last Edited17 Jun 2020
     Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile was born before August 1180 at Segovia, Provincia de Segovia, Castilla y León, Spain (now); Louda & Maclagan (Table 47) says b. 1181.3,5,4 She and Konrad von Hohenstaufen Duke of Swabia, Duke of Rothenburg were engaged in 1188.3,11,12 Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile married Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia, son of Fernando II Alfonsez (?) King of Leon and Infante dona Urraca (?) de Portugal, in October 1197 at Valladolid, Spain;
His 2nd wife. Louda & Macalagan says m. 1198; Leo van de Pas says m. 1198.5,6,3,4,13,14 Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile and Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia were divorced before 12 June 1204; Leo van de Pas says div. 1209.3,4,14
Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile died on 8 November 1246 at Las Huelgas, Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now); Louda & Macalagan says d. 1244; Genealogy.eU (Ivrea 6 page) says d. 1246; Farmerie says d. 8 Nov 1246.3,5,4
Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile was buried after 8 November 1246 at Monasterio de Santa María la Real de las Huelgas, Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1 Jan 1180, Segovia, Provincia de Segovia, Castilla y León, Spain
     DEATH     8 Nov 1246 (aged 66), Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain
     Family Members
     Parents
          Alfonso VIII Borgoña de Castilla 1155–1214
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1162–1214
     Spouse
          Alfonso IX de Leon 1171–1230
     Siblings
          Sancho de Castilla y Plantagenet 1181–1181
          Sancha de Castilla y Plantagenet 1182–1184
          Urraca Of Castile 1187–1220
          Blanche de Castile 1188–1252
          Fernando de Castilla y Plantagenet 1189–1211
          Mafalda de Castilla y Plantagenet 1191–1211
          Leonor de Castilla y Plantagenet de Aragona 1202–1244
          Enrique I de Castilla y Plantagenet 1204–1217
     Children
          Constance de León 1200–1242
          Ferdinand of Castile III 1201–1252
          Berengaria of León 1204–1237
     BURIAL     Monasterio de Santa María la Real de las Huelgas, Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain
     Created by: A. I. Zimmer
     Added: 4 Dec 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 62558130
     SPONSORED BY MystikNZ.15
     ; Per Genealogics:
     "Berenguela was born before August in 1180, the daughter of Alfonso VIII, king of Castile, and Eleanor of England, daughter of Henry II, king of England. She was briefly queen of Castile and León.
     "Berenguela was briefly betrothed to Konrad von Hohenstaufen, Herzog von Rothenburg, Herzog von Schwaben, but he was murdered in 1196 before they could be married. In 1198 she married Alfonso IX, king of León, son of Fernando II, king of León, and Urraca of Portugal. Of their five children Fernando, Alfonso and Berenguela would have progeny. The marriage of Berenguela and Alfonso was annulled in 1204 by Pope Innocent III because Alfonso was a first cousin of Berenguela's father. She returned to her father's court in Castile, bringing her children with her.
     "When her brother Enrique I, king of Castile, died in an accident in 1217, Berenguela renounced her rights to the throne in favour of her son Fernando. Thereafter she served as the king's motherly advisor; according to the _Cronica Latina,_ her 'total intent and desire being to procure honour for her son in every way possible'. Berenguela helped quell the rebellious nobles, and then arranged for Fernando to marry a high-born wife, Elisabeth von Hohenstaufen, daughter of Philipp von Hohenstaufen, the emperor-elect.
     "Berenguela often found herself politically at odds with her former husband. Alfonso had two daughters, Sancha and Dulce, by his first wife Teresa, infanta of Portugal, and wished to disinherit Berenguela's children in favour of these daughters. To this end he invited Jean de Brienne, king of Jerusalem, to marry his eldest daughter Sancha, and thus inherit Alfonso's kingdom. Berenguela sabotaged this plan by convincing Jean de Brienne to marry her own daughter Berenguela of León and Castile instead. Later, on 24 September 1230 when Alfonso died, Berenguela and her son Fernando acted to set aside the rights of Sancha and Dulce by offering them a lifetime appanage, which they accepted. This was done so that, with Berenguela's aid, Fernando could assume the throne of León.
     "Berenguela maintained strong connections with her sister Blanche of Castile, the queen of France. It was Blanche who suggested sending Jeanne de Dammartin, comtesse de Ponthieu, as a bride for Fernando after his first wife's death.
     "Berenguela died at Las Huelgas near Burgos on 8 November 1246."16



; Per Genealogy.EU: "Queen BERENGUELA I of Castile (1217), *1180, +Las Huelgas 1246; 1m: 1188 (later annulled) Konrad von Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia (*ca 1173 +1196); 2m: Valladolid 1197 (annulled 1204) King Alfonso IX of Leon (*1171 +1230.)3"

GAV-21 EDV-21 GKJ-22.

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. From Alfonso VII to Alfonso X 1989 , Szabolcs de Vajay, Reference: page 375.
2. Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels Fürstliche Häuser , Reference: 1968.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.16


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Berengaria (Castilian: Berenguela; nicknamed the Great (Castilian: la Grande); 1179 or 1180 – 8 November 1246) was queen regnant of Castile[1] in 1217 and queen consort of León from 1197 to 1204. As the eldest child and heir presumptive of Alfonso VIII of Castile, she was a sought after bride, and was engaged to Conrad, the son of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa. After his death, she married her cousin, Alfonso IX of León, to secure the peace between him and her father. She had five children with him before their marriage was voided by Pope Innocent III.
     "When her father died, she served as regent for her younger brother Henry I in Castile until she succeeded him on his untimely death. Within months, she turned Castile over to her son, Ferdinand III, concerned that as a woman she would not be able to lead Castile's forces. However, she remained one of his closest advisors, guiding policy, negotiating, and ruling on his behalf for the rest of her life. She was responsible for the re-unification of Castile and León under her son's authority, and supported his efforts in the Reconquista. She was a patron of religious institutions and supported the writing of a history of the two countries.
Early life
     "Berengaria was born either in 1179[2][3] or 1180,[3][4] in Burgos.[3] She was the eldest daughter of King Alfonso VIII of Castile and Eleanor of England and sister of Mafalda and Henry I of Castile.[5] Those who cared for the young infanta were generously rewarded.[6] Her nurse, Estefanía, received land from Alfonso and Eleanor on her retirement in May 1181.[6] Another nurse, Elvira, received a similar retirement gift in 1189 at Berengaria's request.[6]
     "As the eldest child of king Alfonso and Eleanor, she was the heiress presumptive of the throne of Castile for several years,[7] because many of her siblings who were born after her died shortly after birth or in early infancy, so Berengaria became a greatly desired partner throughout Europe.[7]
     "Berengaria's first engagement was agreed in 1187 when her hand was sought by Conrad, Duke of Rothenburg and fifth child of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa.[8] The next year, the marriage contract was signed in Seligenstadt, including a dowry of 42000 Maravedí.[8] Conrad then marched to Castile, where in Carrión the engagement was celebrated and Conrad was knighted.[9] Berengaria's status as heir of Castile when she inherited the throne was based in part on documentation in the treaty and marriage contract,[10][11] which specified that she would inherit the kingdom after her father or any childless brothers who may come along.[10] Conrad would only be allowed to co-rule as her spouse, and Castile would not become part of the Empire.[8] The treaty also documented traditional rights and obligations between the future sovereign and the nobility.[12]
     "The marriage was not consummated, due to Berengaria's young age, as she was less than 10 years old.[13] Conrad and Berengaria never saw each other again.[14] By 1191, Berengaria requested an annulment of the engagement from the Pope, influenced, no doubt, by third parties such as her grandmother Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was not interested in having a Hohenstaufen as a neighbor to her French fiefdoms.[14] Those fears were neutralized when the duke was assassinated in 1196.[14]
Queen consort of León
     "In order to help secure peace between Castile and León, Berengaria married Alfonso IX of León, her first cousin once removed, in Valladolid in 1197.[15] As part of the marriage, and in accordance with Spanish customs of the time, she received direct control over a number of castles and lands within León.[15] Most of these were along the border with Castile, and the nobles who ran them in her name were allowed to seek justice from either king in the event of being wronged by the other.[15] In turn, these knights were charged with maintaining the peace along the border in the queen's name.[16]
     "Starting in 1198, Pope Innocent III objected to the marriage on the grounds of consanguinity, though the couple stayed together until 1204.[17] They vehemently sought a dispensation in order to stay together, including offering large sums of money.[18] However, the pope denied their request, although they succeeded in having their children considered legitimate.[19] Her marriage dissolved, Berengaria returned to Castile and to her parents in May 1204, where she dedicated herself to the care of her children.[19]
Between queenships
     "Though she had left her role as queen of León, she retained authority over and taxing rights in many of the lands she had received there, including Salamanca and Castroverde,[20] which she gave to her son Ferdinand in 1206.[21] Some of the nobles who had served her as queen followed her back to the court in Castille.[22] The peace which had prevailed since her marriage was lost, and there was war again between León and Castille, in part over her control of these lands.[23] In 1205, 1207, and 1209, treaties were made again between the two countries, each expanding her control.[24] In the treaties of 1207 and 1209, Berengaria and her son were given again significant properties along the border, including many key castles, including Villalpando.[25] The treaty in 1207 is the first existing public document in the Castilian dialect.[26]
     "In 1214, on the death of her father, Alfonso VIII of Castile, the crown passed to his only surviving son, Berengaria's 10-year-old brother, Henry I.[27] Their mother Eleanor assumed the regency, but died 24 days after her husband.[27] Berengaria, now heir presumptive again, replaced her as regent.[27] At this point internal strife began, instigated by the nobility, primarily the House of Lara.[28] They forced Berengaria to cede regency and guardianship of her brother to Count Álvaro Núñez de Lara.[28]
     "In 1216, an extraordinary parliamentary session was held in Valladolid, attended by such Castilian magnates as Lope Díaz II de Haro, Gonzalo Rodríguez Girón, Álvaro Díaz de Cameros, Alfonso Téllez de Meneses and others, who agreed, with the support of Berengaria, to make common cause against Álvaro Núñez de Lara.[29] At the end of May the situation in Castile had grown perilous for Berengaria, so she decided to take refuge in the castle of Autillo de Campos, which was held by Gonzalo Rodríguez Girón (one of her allies) and sent her son Ferdinand to the court of his father.[29] On 15 August 1216, an assembly of all the magnates of Castile was held to attempt to reach an accord that would prevent civil war, but disagreements led the families of Girón, Téllez de Meneses, and Haro to break definitively with Álvaro de Lara.[29]
Queen of Castile
     "Circumstances changed suddenly when Henry died on 6 June 1217 after receiving a head wound from a tile which came loose while he was playing with other children at the palace of the Bishop of Palencia.[30] His guardian, Count Álvaro Núñez de Lara, tried to hide the fact, taking the king's body to the castle of Tariego, although it was inevitable that the news would reach Berengaria.[31]
     "The new sovereign was well aware of the danger her former husband posed to her reign; being her brother's closest agnate, it was feared that he would claim the crown for himself.[30] Therefore, she kept her brother's death and her own accession secret from Alfonso.[30] She wrote to Alfonso asking that Ferdinand be sent to visit her, and then abdicated in their son's favour on 31 August.[30] In part, she abdicated as she would be unable to be the military leader Castile needed its king to be in that time.[32]
Royal advisor
     "Although she did not reign for long, Berengaria continued to be her son's closest advisor, intervening in state policy, albeit in an indirect manner.[33] Well into her son's reign, contemporary authors wrote that she still wielded authority over him.[33] One example was how she arranged the marriage of her son with princess Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen (known as Beatriz in Castile), daughter of Duke Philip of Swabia and granddaughter of two emperors: Frederick Barbarossa and Isaac II Angelos of Byzantium.[34] The wedding took place on 30 November 1219 at Burgos.[34] Another instance in which Berengaria's mediation stood out developed in 1218 when the scheming Lara family, still headed by former regent Álvaro Núñez de Lara, conspired to have Alfonso IX, King of León and King Ferdinand's father, invade Castile to seize his son's throne.[34] However, the capture of Count Lara facilitated the intervention of Berengaria, who got father and son to sign the Pact of Toro on 26 August 1218, putting an end to confrontations between Castile and León.[34]
     "In 1222, Berengaria intervened anew in favor of her son, achieving the ratification of the Convention of Zafra, thereby making peace with the Laras by arranging the marriage of Mafalda, daughter and heiress of the Lord of Molina, Gonzalo Pérez de Lara, to her own son and King Ferdinand's brother, Alfonso.[35] In 1224 she arranged the marriage of her daughter Berengaria to John of Brienne, a maneuver which brought Ferdinand III closer to the throne of León, since John was the candidate Alfonso IX had in mind to marry his eldest daughter Sancha.[36] By proceeding more quickly, Berengaria prevented the daughters of her former husband from marrying a man who could claim the throne of León.[36]
     "Perhaps her most decisive intervention on Ferdinand's behalf took place in 1230, when Alfonso IX died and designated as heirs to the throne his daughters Sancha and Dulce from his first marriage to Theresa of Portugal, superseding the rights of Ferdinand III.[37] Berengaria met with the princesses’ mother and succeeded in the ratification of the Treaty of las Tercerías, by which they renounced the throne in favor of their half-brother in exchange for a substantial sum of money and other benefits.[37][38] Thus were the thrones of León and Castile re-united in the person of Ferdinand III,[37] which had been divided by Alfonso VII in 1157.[10] She intervened again by arranging the second marriage of Ferdinand after the death of Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen.[39] Although he already had plenty of children, Berengaria was concerned that the king's virtue not be diminished with illicit relations.[39] This time, she chose a French noblewoman, Joan of Dammartin, a candidate put forth by the king's aunt and Berengaria's sister Blanche, widow of King Louis VIII of France.[39] Berengaria served again as regent, ruling while her son Ferdinand was in the south on his long campaigns of the Reconquista.[40] She governed Castile and León with her characteristic skill, relieving him of the need to divide his attention during this time.[40]
Patronage and legacy
     "She met with her son a final time in Pozuelo de Calatrava in 1245, afterwards returning to Toledo.[41] She died 8 November 1246,[42] and was buried at Las Huelgas near Burgos.[43]
     "Much like her mother, she was a strong patron of religious institutions.[44] She worked with her mother to support the Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas.[44] As queen of León, she supported the Order of Santiago and supported the Basilica of San Isidoro, not only donating to it, but also exempting it from any taxes.[44] She re-established the tradition of Leónese royal women supporting the Monastery of San Pedro de Eslonza, last performed by her great-grand aunt, Sancha Raimúndez.[44]
     "She is portrayed as a wise and virtuous woman by the chroniclers of the time.[45][46][47] She was also concerned with literature and history, charging Lucas de Tuy to compose a chronicle on the Kings of Castile and León to aid and instruct future rulers of the joint kingdom.[45] She herself was discussed in the works of Rodrigo Jiménez de Rada, whose work was sponsored by her son Ferdinand, and Juan of Osma,[46] who was chancellor of Castile under Ferdinand.[47]
Issue
     "Berengaria and Alfonso IX had five children:
1. Eleanor (1198/1199 – 1202).
2. Constance (1200 – 1242), a nun in the Abbey of las Huelgas.
3. Ferdinand III (1201 – 1252), King of Castile and León.
4. Alfonso (1203 – 1272), Lord of Molina and Mesa by his first marriage. He married, first, Mafalda de Lara, heiress of Molina and Mesa, second, Teresa Núñez, and third, Mayor Téllez de Meneses, Lady of Montealegre and Tiedra, by whom he was the father of María of Molina, wife of King Sancho IV of León and Castile.
5. Berengaria (1204 – 1237), married John of Brienne, King of Jerusalem.

Notes
1. The full title was Regina Castelle et Toleti (Queen of Castille and Toledo).
2. de la Cruz 2006, p. 9.
3. Martínez Diez 2007, p. 46.
4. González 1960, pp. 196–200.
5. Martínez Díez, Gonzalo (2007). Alfonso VIII, rey de Castilla y Toledo (1158-1214). Gijón: Ediciones Trea, S.L. p. 46-53. ISBN 978-84-9704-327-4.
6. Shadis 2010, pp. 33–34.
7. Shadis 2010, p. 33.
8. Shadis 2010, pp. 55–56.
9. Flórez 1761, p. 340.
10. Shadis 2010, p. 2.
11. Osma 1997, p. 76.
12. Shadis 2010, p. 56.
13. Shadis 2010, p. 54.
14. Shadis 2010, pp. 58–59.
15. Shadis 2010, pp. 61–66.
16. González 1960, vol. 2, no. 681.
17. Reilly 1993, p. 133.
18. Howden 1964, p. 79, vol. 4.
19. Shadis 2010, p. 70.
20. Shadis 2010, pp. 78–80.
21. Shadis 2010, pp. 80,83–84.
22. Shadis 2010, p. 80.
23. Shadis 2010, pp. 83–84.
24. Shadis 2010, pp. 78–84.
25. Túy 2003, p. 324, 4.84.
26. Wright 2000.
27. de la Cruz 2006, p. 112.
28. Shadis 2010, pp. 86–91.
29. Shadis 2010, pp. 93–95.
30. Burke 1895, p. 236.
31. Shadis 2010, p. 95.
32. Shadis 2010, pp. 11,15.
33. Shadis 2010, pp. 15–19.
34. Burke 1895, p. 237.
35. Shadis 2010, p. 109.
36. Shadis 2010, pp. 111–112.
37. Burke 1895, p. 238.
38. Shadis 1999, p. 348.
39. Shadis 2010, p. 108.
40. Shadis 2010, p. 125.
41. Shadis 2010, p. 165.
42. Burke 1895, p. 239.
43. Shadis 2010, p. 164.
44. Shadis 2010, pp. 63,74–76.
45. Túy 2003.
46. Osma 1997.
47. Shadis 2010, pp. 7–16.
References
** Burke, Ulick Ralph (1895). A History of Spain from the Earliest Times to the Death of Ferdinand the Catholic. Vol. 1. London: Longmans, Green, and Co.
** de la Cruz, Valentín (2006). Berenguela la Grande, Enrique I el Chico (1179–1246). Gijón: Ediciones Trea. ISBN 978-84-9704-208-6.
** Flórez, Enrique (1761). Memorias de las reynas catholicas, historia genealogica de la casa real de Castilla, y de Leon... Vol. 1. Madrid: Marin.
** González, Julio (1960). El reino de Castilla en la época de Alfonso VIII. 3 vol. Madrid: CSIC.
** Howden, Roger (1964). Stubbs, William (ed.) Chronica Magistri Rogeri de Houedene. Wiesbaden: Kraus Reprint.
** Martínez Diez, Gonzalo (2007). Alfonso VIII, rey de Castilla y Toledo (1158-1214). Gijón: Ediciones Trea. ISBN 978-84-9704-327-4.
** Osma, Juan (1997). "Chronica latina regum Castellae". In Brea, Luis Charlo (ed.) Chronica Hispana Saeculi XIII. Turnhout: Brepols.
** Reilly, Bernard F. (1993). The Medieval Spains. Cambridge University Press.
** Shadis, Miriam (1999), "Berenguela of Castile's Political Motherhood", in Parsons, John Carmi; Wheeler, Bonnie (eds.), Medieval Mothering, New York: Taylor & Francis, ISBN 978-0-8153-3665-5
** Shadis, Miriam (2010). Berenguela of Castile (1180–1246) and Political Women in the High Middle Ages. Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-312-23473-7.
** Túy, Lucas (2003). Rey, Emma Falque (ed.) Chronicon mundi. Turnhout: Brepols.
** Wright, Roger (2000). El tratado de Cabreros (1206): estudio sociofilológico de una reforma ortográfica. London: Queen Mary and Westfield College.
Further reading
** Shadis, Miriam (2010). Berenguela of Castile (1180–1246) and Political Women in the High Middle Ages. Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-312-23473-7. Explores Berenguela's use of authority as both queen and regent, at varied times, for the Spanish thrones of Castile and León.
** Martin, Georges (2005), "Berenguela de Castilla (1214–1246): en el espejo de la historiografía de su época", in Morant Deusa, Isabel (ed.), Historia de las mujeres en España y América Latina, 1, Grupo Anaya Comercial, ISBN 978-84-376-2259-0.12 "

Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile was also known as Berenguela (?) of Castile.1 Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile was also known as Berengeria (?) Queen of Castile.17

Reference: Weis [1992:102] Line 110-28.2

; Per Med Lands: "Infanta doña BERENGUELA de Castilla (Burgos Jan/Jun 1180-Las Huelgas, near Burgos 8 Nov 1246, bur Las Huelgas, Cistercian monastery of Santa María la Real). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Henricum qui iuvenis obiit et quinque sorores, prima Berengaria…secunda Urraca, tertia regina Francie, quarta Alienor, quinta Constantia monialis" as children of "sorore regis Anglie Richardi…Alienor…soror ex alio patre comitisse Marie Campaniensis", specifying that Berengaria was wife of "regi Legionensi id est regi Galicie…Alfunsus" and mother of "Fernandum successorem regis parvi in Castella et Toledo" and recording their marriage was initially permitted by Pope Innocent III despite consanguinity but subsequently prohibited, after which Berengaria became a Cistercian nun at Burgos[743]. Her date of birth is calculated from Robert of Torigny recording the birth "circa Pascha" in 1181 of "filium Sancius" to "Alienor filia regis Anglorum uxor Anfulsi regis de Castella", stating that she had previously had one daughter[744]. Alfonso VIII King of Castile "cum uxore mea Alionor regina et cum filiabus meis Berengaria et Sancia Infantissis" exchanged property with the Templars by charter dated 26 Jan 1183[745]. The Annales Compostellani record that “Rex Aldef.” betrothed “filias suas” in 1188[746]. The identity of Berenguela´s first husband is confirmed by the charter dated 14 Oct 1190 under which "Aldefonsus…rex Castelle et Toleti…cum uxore mea Alienor regina et cum filio meo Ferrando" donated property to the abbey of Silos, which also refers to the marriage between "romani imperatoris filium Conradum" and "filiam suam Berengariam"[747]. The Crónica Latina records that “Conrado, hijo de Federico, emperador de los romanos” was betrothed to “el rey de Castilla…su hija doña Berenguela”, adding that she was barely eight years old at the time[748]. Her second marriage, arranged by her father as part of the peace process with León, caused religious fury because of the close relationship of the parties. The Chronicon de Cardeña records that “Rey D. Alfonso de Leon” married “D. Alfonso…so fija Doña Berenguela”[749]. The Crónica Latina records that “doña Berenguela, hija del rey de Castilla” was married to “el rey de León”, when peace was established being Castile and León following the defeat at the battle of Alarcos, despite being related in the second degree of consanguinity[750]. Pope Innocent III excommunicated the couple, placed Castile and León under an interdict, and eventually annulled the marriage though agreed that their children remained legitimate. Infanta Berenguela became a nun at Las Huelgas in 1204, after separating from her husband. Regent for her brother Enrique I 1214, she became heiress in her own right to Castile, Toledo and Extremadura on his death but immediately ceded her rights to her son Infante don Fernando. She retired from public life in 1230, after transferring full power to her son. The Chronicon de Cardeña records the death in 1240 of “la Reyna Doña Berenguela, madre del Rey D. Fernando”[751]. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "31 Oct" of "domina Berengeria, regina Castille et Toleti, soror domine Blanche Francorum regine"[752]. m firstly (contract Seligenstadt 23 Apr 1188, marriage not consummated) KONRAD von Staufen Herzog von Rothenburg, son of Emperor FRIEDRICH I “Barbarossa” & his second wife Béatrice Ctss de Bourgogne (Feb/Mar 1172-murdered Durlach 15 Aug 1196, bur Kloster Lorsch). He succeeded his brother in 1191 as KONRAD Duke of Swabia. m secondly (Valladolid [1/16] Dec 1197, annulled 1204) as his second wife, her first cousin, ALFONSO IX King of León, son of FERNANDO II King of León & his first wife Infanta dona Urraca de Portugal (Zamora 15 Aug 1171-Villanueva de Sarría 24 Sep 1230, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor)."
Med Lands cites:
[743] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1212, MGH SS XXIII, p. 895.
[744] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, pp. 103-4.
[745] San Nicolás del Real Camino, 2, p. 136.
[746] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 322.
[747] Silos 75, p. 114.
[748] Crónica Latina de los reyes de Castilla, II, 11.
[749] Chronicon de Cardeña, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 378.
[750] Crónica Latina de los reyes de Castilla, II, 15.
[751] Chronicon de Cardeña, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 373.
[752] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 193.18
She was Queen consort of León (See attached map of Castile & Leon ca 1200) between 1197 and 1204.12 She was Queen of Castile in 1217 at Castile, Spain.3,12

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 220. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 110-28, p. 102. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020552&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 7: Kings of León-Castile, 1214-1504. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VIII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000234&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#AlfonsoVIIIdied1214B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  9. [S1979] Douglas Richardson, "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005: "Grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005."
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000235&tree=LEO
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Hohenstaufen page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/hohst/hohenstauf.html
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berengaria_of_Castile. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso IX: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020550&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#_King_of_Le%C3%B3n:_1
  15. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 December 2019), memorial page for Berenguela de Castilla y Plantagenet de León (1 Jan 1180–8 Nov 1246), Find A Grave Memorial no. 62558130, citing Monasterio de Santa María la Real de las Huelgas, Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain ; Maintained by A. I. Zimmer (contributor 46947938), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62558130/berenguela-de_le_n. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020552&tree=LEO
  17. [S1454] Catholic Encyclopedia on the New Advent Website of Catholic Resources, online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/, St. Ferdinand III: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06042a.htm. Hereinafter cited as Catholic Encyclopedia.
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Berengueladied1246
  19. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 114-28, pp. 104-105.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of León and Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026634&tree=LEO
  21. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#BerenguelaLeondied1237
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Constanza of Leon and Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392477&tree=LEO
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, St. Fernando III: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00005051&tree=LEO
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Leonor of Leon and Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00392478&tree=LEO
  25. [S752] Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, compiler, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1941 (1988 reprint)), p. 265. Hereinafter cited as von Redlich [1941] Charlemagne Desc. vol I.
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00110950&tree=LEO
  27. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#AlfonsoLeonMolinadied1272B

Alfonso VIII "El Noble" Sanchez (?) King of Castile & Leon1,2,3,4

M, #4439, b. 11 November 1155, d. 6 October 1214
FatherSancho III "el Deseado" (?) King of Castile2,5,6,3,4,7,8,9 b. 1134, d. 31 Aug 1158
MotherDoña Blanca (Sancha) Garcés (?) Infanta de Navarra, Queen of Castile2,5,3,4,7,10,9 b. c 1137, d. 24 Jun 1156
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     Alfonso VIII "El Noble" Sanchez (?) King of Castile & Leon was born on 11 November 1155 at Soria, Castile, Spain.3,5,4 He married Leonor (Eleanor) Pantagenet of England, Queen of Castile, daughter of Henry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England and Eleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou, on 22 September 1177 at Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now); Louda & Macalagan says m. 1176; Med Lands says m. bef 17 Sep 1177.3,5,11,12,4,7,13
Alfonso VIII "El Noble" Sanchez (?) King of Castile & Leon died on 5 October 1214 at Gutierre Munoz, Spain (now), at age 58.3,5,4
Alfonso VIII "El Noble" Sanchez (?) King of Castile & Leon died on 6 October 1214 at Las Huelgas, Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now), at age 58.14,15
Alfonso VIII "El Noble" Sanchez (?) King of Castile & Leon was buried after 6 October 1214 at Monasterio de Santa María la Real de las Huelgas, Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     11 Nov 1155, Soria, Provincia de Soria, Castilla y León, Spain
     DEATH     5 Oct 1214 (aged 58), Gutierre-Munoz, Provincia de Ávila, Castilla y León, Spain
     King of Castile, King of Toledo. Son of King Sancho III of Castile and Blanca Ramírez of Navarre, he succeeded to his father's crown at the age of three. He began ruling in his own right at the age of fifteen, and during his reign, allied all the major Christian kingdoms on the Iberian Peninsula. Alfonso married in 1177, to Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Their union produced eleven children, and together they founded the Monastery de Santa Maria la Real de las Huelgas. When Alfonso died at Gutierre-Muñoz, his wife, in her grief, only survived him by a few weeks. They are buried together, and Alfonso was succeeded by his only surviving son, Enrique I.
     Family Members
     Parents
          Sancho III King Of Castile 1134–1158
          Blanca of Navarre 1133–1156
     Spouse
          Eleanor Plantagenet 1162–1214
     Children
          Berenguela de Castilla y Plantagenet de León 1180–1246
          Sancho de Castilla y Plantagenet 1181–1181
          Sancha de Castilla y Plantagenet 1182–1184
          Urraca Of Castile 1187–1220
          Blanche de Castile 1188–1252
          Fernando de Castilla y Plantagenet 1189–1211
          Mafalda de Castilla y Plantagenet 1191–1211
          Leonor de Castilla y Plantagenet de Aragona 1202–1244
          Enrique I de Castilla y Plantagenet 1204–1217
     BURIAL     Monasterio de Santa María la Real de las Huelgas, Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain
     PLOT     Tomb is Inside Church
     Created by: A. I. Zimmer
     Added: 4 Dec 2010
     Find a Grave Memorial 62553726
     SPONSORED BY Blaine Barham.16
     GAV-22 EDV-22 GKJ-23.

; This is the same person as Alfonso VIII of Castile at Wikipedia, Alphonse VIII de Castille at Wikipédia (Fr.), and Alfonso VIII de Castilla at Wikipedia (Es.)17,18,19

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln Band II Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven 1975, W. K. Prinz von Isenburg.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: II.
3. El reino de Castilia en la Epoca de Alfonso VIII, 3 volumes, Madrid, 1960, Gonzalez, Julio.4


; Per Genealogics:
     "Alfonso was born on 11 November 1155, the son of Sancho III, king of Castile and Blanca de Navarre. As a three-year-old Alfonso became king, and after a chaotic period he assumed control of his kingdom in 1166 when he was still only eleven. In Burgos, in September 1177, he married the fifteen-year-old Eleanor, daughter of Henry II of England. Gascony was to be her dowry, but when he claimed this territory in 1204, he lost it to his brother-in-law John, king of England.
     "The Moors defeated Alfonso at Alarcos in 1195, but after their initial incursion into León and Navarre he forced them back and made peace. With the kings of Leon and Navarre, he soundly defeated the Moors in 1212 at Las Navas de Tolosa.
     "Alfonso died in Burgos on 6 October 1214, followed by his queen on the 24th, and they found their last resting place together in the abbey of Las Huelgas, which on Eleanor's request he had enriched in 1187. He was succeeded by his son Enrique I.
     "How many children he fathered by his queen is not certain. In addition to the ten securely documented children they may also have had three more: an earlier Enrique, who died young about 1184, Fernando, born about 1183 and died before 1187, and Leonor who died young and is buried at Las Huelgas where there still exists a sarcophagus said to be hers. Four of his daughters, but no sons, had progeny."4

Reference: Weis [1992:102] Line 113-27.20

; Per Med Lands:
     "Infante don ALFONSO de Castilla, son of SANCHO III "el Deseado" King of Castile & his wife Infanta doña Blanca de Navarra (Soria 11 Nov 1155-Gutiérre Múñoz near Arévalo 6 Oct 1214, bur Cistercian monastery Santa María la Real “de las Huelgas” near Burgos). The Anales Toledanos record the birth “noche de S. Martin…Viernes” in 1155 of “el Rey D. Alfonso”[729]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Aldefonsus rex Castelle et Toliti" as son of "rex Sanctius"[730]. He succeeded his father 1158 as ALFONSO VIII “el Noble/él de las Navas” King of Castile, Toledo and Extremadura. His father's choice of Gutierre Fernández de Castro as tutor of Infante don Alfonso was challenged by the Lara family after the infant's accession, which triggered a war of rivalry in Castile between the Castro and Lara families[731]. He ruled through the regency of his uncle Fernando II King of León until 1169, disputed by the Castro and Lara families. "Aldefonsus…Toleti, Castella et extremature rex et dominus" granted holiday days to "monasterio Sancti Zoyli de Carrione" to Cluny by charter dated [11 Nov] 1169[732]. Recaptured Álava, Vizcaya and Guipúzcoa from the Moors. Defeated at Alarcón 18 Jul 1195 by the King of Morocco who helped the Almohades defend Seville. Taking advantage of his weakness, the Kings of Navarre and León invaded Castile, all parties being reconciled 1199 and agreeing to fight the Moors as a common cause. Alfonso VIII successfully led another crusade against the Almohades, culminating in victory at the battle of Las Navas de Tolosa 1212. King Alfonso VIII was the first king to bear the arms of Castile. The Annales Compostellani record the death “III Non Oct” in 1214 of “Aldefonsus Rex Castellæ”[733]. The Chronicon Bernardi Iterii records the death 15 Oct 1214 of "Ildefonsus rex de Castella"[734]. The Anales Toledanos record the death 5 Oct 1214 “en una aldea de Avila” of “el Rey D. Alfonso”[735].
     "m (Betrothed [1168/69], Burgos Sep, before 17, 1177) ELEANOR of England, daughter of HENRY II King of England & his wife Eléonore Dss d’Aquitaine (Domfront, Normandy 13 Oct 1162-Burgos 25 Oct 1214, bur Cistercian monastery Santa María la Real “de las Huelgas” near Burgos). Her betrothal to "Aldefonso regi Castellæ" is recorded by Matthew of Paris in 1168[736]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1169 that “Alienor filia regis” married “Adelfunso regi Castellæ”[737]. Robert of Torigny records the marriage in 1170 of "Alienor filia Henrici regis Anglorum" and "Amfurso imperatore", commenting that he was not yet fifteen years old[738]. Alfonso VIII King of Castile "cum uxore mea Alionor regina et cum filiabus meis Berengaria et Sancia Infantissis" exchanged property with the Templars by charter dated 26 Jan 1183[739]. The Crónica Latina records that “el rey de Castilla” married “la hija del…rey Enrique, doña Leonor” and that his father-in-law had promised him Gascony[740]. The Annales Compostellani record the death “II Kal Nov” in 1214 of “Regina Alienor uxor Aldefonsi Regis Castellæ”[741]. The Anales Toledanos record the death “viernes el postrimo dia de Octubre” in 1214 of “la Reyna Doña Lionor, muggier del Rey D. Alfonso”[742]."
Med Lands cites:
[729] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 390.
[730] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1143, MGH SS XXIII, p. 837.
[731] Torres (1999), p. 88.
[732] Cluny, Tome V, 4230, p. 580.
[733] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 323.
[734] Chronicon Bernardi Iterii, p. 92.
[735] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 399.
[736] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1168, p. 246.
[737] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 513.
[738] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 22.
[739] Castan Lanaspa, G. ´San Nicolás del Real Camino, un Hospital de Leprosos Castellano-Leones en la Edad Media (Siglos XII-XIV)´, Publicaciones de la Institución Tello Téllez de Meneses, no. 51 (1984) ("San Nicolás del Real Camino"), 2, p. 136.
[740] Crónica Latina de los reyes de Castilla, II, 17.
[741] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 323.
[742] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 399.7


; Per Stone (2000) chart 20-5: "He succeeded his father at the age of three and reigned for 56 years. He was a close ally of Aragon. In 1212 he won a major victory against the Almohad sultan at the Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa."21,22,23

; Per Genealogy.EU:
(Ivrea): "C1. ALFONSO VIII "el Noble" King of Castile (1158-1214), *Soria 1155, +Gutierre Munoz 1214; m.Burgos 1177 Eleanor of England (*1162 +1214)"
(Anjou): "A7. Eleanor, *Domfront, Normandy 13.10.1162, +Burgos/Las Huelgas 31.10.1214; m.Burgos 22.9.1177 King Alfonso VIII of Castile (*1155 +1214.)24,25" He was King of Castile and Leon
(See attached map of Castile and Leon ca 1200 AD) between 1158 and 1214.1,6

Family

Leonor (Eleanor) Pantagenet of England, Queen of Castile b. 13 Oct 1162, d. 31 Oct 1214
Children

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 220. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 113-27, p. 104. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VIII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000234&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  6. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, A History of Medieval Spain (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), Appendix, Chart 4: Rulers of Portugal, León, and Castile, 1035-1214. Hereinafter cited as History of Medieval Spain.
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#AlfonsoVIIIdied1214B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sancho III 'el Deseado': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020545&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#SanchoIIIdied1158B
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanca de Navarre: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020546&tree=LEO
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  12. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), p.7. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000235&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VIII: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000234&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VIII, King of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000234&tree=LEO
  16. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 May 2020), memorial page for Alfonso VIII “El De Las Navas” Borgoña de Castilla (11 Nov 1155–5 Oct 1214), Find a Grave Memorial no. 62553726, citing Monasterio de Santa María la Real de las Huelgas, Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain ; Maintained by A. I. Zimmer (contributor 46947938), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62553726/alfonso_viii-borgo_a_de_castilla. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  17. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, Alfonso VIII of Castile: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfonso_VIII_of_Castile. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  18. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Alphonse VIII de Castille: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alphonse_VIII_de_Castille. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  19. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Alfonso VIII de Castilla: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfonso_VIII_de_Castilla. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  20. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 110-27, p. 102.
  21. [S586] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 24 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Family #3809 (n.p.: Release date: July 1, 1997, unknown publish date).
  22. [S599] Inc. Brøderbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 28 Oct 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 14, Ed. 1, family # 1829 (n.p.: Release date: October 20, 1997, unknown publish date).
  23. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html#SA7
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html#EH2
  26. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 110-28, p. 102.
  27. [S1433] Jozeph F. O'Callaghan, History of Medieval Spain, Appendix, Chart 7: Kings of León-Castile, 1214-1504.
  28. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020552&tree=LEO
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Urraca of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020561&tree=LEO
  30. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Portugal 4: p. 588.
  31. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Urracadied1220MAffonsoIIPortugal
  32. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 113-28, p. 104.
  33. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, France 4: p. 339.
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000163&tree=LEO
  35. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Blancadied1252MLouisVIIIFrance
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020562&tree=LEO
  37. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 46: Aragon: End of the original dynasty.
  38. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleonore of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008728&tree=LEO
  39. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enrique I of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020553&tree=LEO

Leonor (Eleanor) Pantagenet of England, Queen of Castile1,2,3,4,5

F, #4440, b. 13 October 1162, d. 31 October 1214
FatherHenry II "Curtmantle" (?) King of England2,6,7,3,8,9 b. 5 Mar 1133, d. 6 Jul 1189
MotherEleanor (Eleonore) (?) Duchess of Aquitaine, Countess of Poitou2,6,3,7,9 b. c 1124, d. 31 Mar 1204
ReferenceGAV22 EDV22
Last Edited22 Jun 2020
     Leonor (Eleanor) Pantagenet of England, Queen of Castile was born on 13 October 1162 at Château de Domfront, Domfront, Departement de l'Orne, Basse-Normandie, France (now).2,1,7 She and Frederick V von Hohenstaufen Herzog von Schwaben were engaged in 1165.9,10 Leonor (Eleanor) Pantagenet of England, Queen of Castile married Alfonso VIII "El Noble" Sanchez (?) King of Castile & Leon, son of Sancho III "el Deseado" (?) King of Castile and Doña Blanca (Sancha) Garcés (?) Infanta de Navarra, Queen of Castile, on 22 September 1177 at Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now); Louda & Macalagan says m. 1176; Med Lands says m. bef 17 Sep 1177.11,12,2,6,13,14,7
Leonor (Eleanor) Pantagenet of England, Queen of Castile died on 31 October 1214 at Monastère royal de las Huelgas de Burgos, Burgos, Provincia de Burgos, Castilla y León, Spain (now), at age 52.1,15,2,7,16
     ; Per Genealogy.EU:
(Ivrea): "C1. ALFONSO VIII "el Noble" King of Castile (1158-1214), *Soria 1155, +Gutierre Munoz 1214; m.Burgos 1177 Eleanor of England (*1162 +1214)"
(Anjou): "A7. Eleanor, *Domfront, Normandy 13.10.1162, +Burgos/Las Huelgas 31.10.1214; m.Burgos 22.9.1177 King Alfonso VIII of Castile (*1155 +1214.)17,18" GAV-22 EDV-22 GKJ-23.

; Per Genealogics:
     "Eleanor was born in the castle at Domfront, Normandy, on 13 October 1162, the sixth child, second daughter of Henry II, king of England, and Eleanor de Poitou, duchesse d'Aquitaine. She was baptised by Henri de Marcy, then Cistercian abbot of Hautecombe, who later became an important figure in the fight against the late twelfth-century movements of Catharism and Waldensianism and took a leading part at the Third Lateran Council. Her godfather was the chronicler Robert de Torigny, who had a special interest in her and recorded her life as best he could. She received her first name as a namesake of her mother.
     "When she was 14 years old, in September 1177, Eleanor was married to Alfonso VIII, king of Castile, son of Sancho III, king of Castile, and Blanca de Navarre. The marriage was arranged to secure the Pyrennean border, with Gascony offered as her dowry. Of their ten children, four daughters would have progeny.
     "Of all Eleanor of Aquitaine's daughters, her namesake Eleanor best inherited her mother's political influence. She was almost as powerful as her husband, who specified in his will that she was to rule alongside their son in the event of his death. It was she who persuaded him to marry their daughter Berenguela to Alfonso IX, king of León, in the interest of peace.
     "When Alfonso died, Eleanor was reportedly so devastated with grief that she was unable to preside over the burial. Their eldest daughter Berenguela instead performed these honours. Eleanor then became ill and died at Burgos on 31 October 1214, only twenty-eight days after her husband, and was buried at the abbey of Las Huelgas in Burgos."7

; Per Med Lands:
     "ELEANOR (Domfront, Normandy 13 Oct 1162-Burgos 25 Oct 1214, bur Cistercian monastery Santa María la Real “de las Huelgas” near Burgos). Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1162 that “Alienor regina” gave birth to “filiam...Alienor”[507]. Her birth is recorded by Matthew Paris “apud Rothomagum”[508]. Her first betrothal was arranged as part of the treaty of alliance between Emperor Friedrich I "Barbarossa" and her father in 1165[509], but was broken off in [1169] when the emperor formed an alliance with the king of France[510]. Her betrothal to "Aldefonso regi Castellæ" is recorded by Matthew Paris in 1168[511]. Ralph de Diceto´s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1169 that “Alienor filia regis” married “Adelfunso regi Castellæ”[512]. Robert of Torigny records the marriage in 1170 of "Alienor filia Henrici regis Anglorum" and "Amfurso imperatore", commenting that he was not yet fifteen years old[513]. Alfonso VIII King of Castile "cum uxore mea Alionor regina et cum filiabus meis Berengaria et Sancia Infantissis" exchanged property with the Templars by charter dated 26 Jan 1183[514]. The Crónica Latina records that “el rey de Castilla” married “la hija del…rey Enrique, doña Leonor” and that his father-in-law had promised him Gascony[515]. The Annales Compostellani record the death “II Kal Nov” in 1214 of “Regina Alienor uxor Aldefonsi Regis Castellæ”[516]. The Anales Toledanos record the death “viernes el postrimo dia de Octubre” in 1214 of “la Reyna Doña Lionor, muggier del Rey D. Alfonso”[517].
     "Betrothed (1165) to FRIEDRICH von Staufen, son of Emperor FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" & his second wife Béatrice Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne (Pavia 16 Jul 1164-[28 Nov 1168/1170]), bur Lorch). He was installed as Duke of Swabia in 1167.
     "m (Betrothed [1168/69], Burgos Sep, before 17, 1177) ALFONSO VIII King of Castile, son of SANCHO III King of Castile & his wife Infanta doña Blanca de Navarra (Soria 11 Nov 1155-Gutiérre Múñoz near Arévalo 6 Oct 1214, bur Cistercian monastery Santa María la Real “de las Huelgas” near Burgos)."
Med Lands cites:
[507] Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511.
[508] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1162, p. 218.
[509] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 159.
[510] Jordan trans. Falla (1986), pp. 148-9.
[511] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1168, p. 246.
[512] Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 513.
[513] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 22.
[514] San Nicolás del Real Camino, 2, p. 136.
[515] Crónica Latina de los reyes de Castilla, II, 17, consulted at (12 Apr 2008).
[516] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 323.
[517] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 399.9


Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973. 195.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.7


Reference: Weis [1992:102] Line 110-27.19

; This is the same person as Eleanor of England, Queen of Castile at Wikipedia, Aliénor d'Angleterre (1162-1214) at Wikipédia (Fr.), and Leonor Plantagenet at Wikipedia (Es.)20,16,5

Family 1

Frederick V von Hohenstaufen Herzog von Schwaben b. 16 Jul 1164, d. bt 1168 - 1170

Family 2

Alfonso VIII "El Noble" Sanchez (?) King of Castile & Leon b. 11 Nov 1155, d. 6 Oct 1214
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 198-199, PLANTAGENET 6:vi. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3 page (The House of Anjou): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Castile 3: p. 190. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of England: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000235&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Leonor Plantagenet: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonor_Plantagenet. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, p.7.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor of England: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000235&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Henry II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000236&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#Eleanordied1214. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#Friedrichdied11681170.
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 Page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  12. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 47: Castile: Union with Leon until the beginning of the fourteenth century. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfonso VIII: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000234&tree=LEO
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#AlfonsoVIIIdied1214B
  15. [S619] Inc. Br²derbund Software, GEDCOM file imported on 27 Dec 1999 from World Family Tree Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Family #6-1556 (n.p.: Release date: August 22, 1996, unknown publish date).
  16. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Aliénor d'Angleterre (1162-1214): https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ali%C3%A9nor_d%27Angleterre_(1162-1214). Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html#SA7
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Anjou 3: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/anjou/anjou3.html#EH2
  19. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 110-27, p. 102. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_of_England,_Queen_of_Castile. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  21. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 110-28, p. 102.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020552&tree=LEO
  23. [S1979] Douglas Richardson, "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005: "Grandchildren of Eleanor of Aquitaine"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 18 Oct 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Mississippienne email 18 Oct 2005."
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Urraca of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020561&tree=LEO
  25. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Portugal 4: p. 588.
  26. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Urracadied1220MAffonsoIIPortugal
  27. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 113-28, p. 104.
  28. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, France 4: p. 339.
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche of Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000163&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#Blancadied1252MLouisVIIIFrance
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Fernando of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020562&tree=LEO
  32. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleonore of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00008728&tree=LEO
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Enrique I of Castile: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020553&tree=LEO