Gytha/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex1

F, #10351, b. between 1050 and 1055, d. 7 May 1107
FatherHarold II Godwinson (?) King of England1,2,3,4,5 b. bt 1022 - 1025, d. 14 Oct 1066
MotherEadgyth Swanneshals "Swan-neck" (?)6,5 b. c 1025
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited22 Oct 2020
     Gytha/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex was born between 1050 and 1055; Genealogics says b. ca 1050; Genealogy.EU (Wessex) says b. 1055/60; Med Lands says b. 1050/55.1,2,3 She married Vladimir II Vsevolodich "Monomachus" (?) Grand Prince of Kiev, son of Vsevolod I Yaroslavich (?) Grand Duke of Kiev, Pr of Pereyaslavl, Pr of Chernigov and Maria/Anastasia Monomachina (?) of Byzantium, circa 1070;
His 1st wife. Rurik 8 page says m. 1072/74.7,8,9,1,2,3,10,11
Gytha/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex died on 7 May 1107 at Kyiv (Kiev), Ukraine (now); Wessex page says d. 7 May 1107 in Kiev; Rurik 8 page says d. 10.3.1098 in Palestine; Med Lands says d. 10 Mar 1098/99; Find A Grave and Wikipedia say she d. 7 May 1107.1,9,3,12,13
Gytha/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex was buried after 7 May 1107 at Saint Sophia's Cathedral, Kiev (Ky'iv), City of Kiev, Castilla-La Mancha, Ukraine,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     c.1053
     DEATH     7 May 1107 (aged 53–54)
     English and Russian Royalty. Born Gytha Haraldsdóttir of Wessex, the eldest daughter of Harald II, King of England and Eadgyth Swanneshals. Upon the death of her father at the Battle of Hastings, Gytha fled with her aunt and grandmother to the island of Flatholme in the Bristol Channel. When her brothers failed in their attempt to regain their kingdom, they all retreated the court of their uncle, King Swein Estrodsson of Denmark. Her uncle contracted her marriage with Vladimir Monomakh, Prince of Kiev, and the couple had at least five children, and possibly as many as eleven, including four future Grand Princes of Kiev, one of whom was Mstislav the Great. The time and place of her death is in dispute, some sources indicate her death occurring in Kiev, others relate that she took holy orders and died in the Holy Land after following Geoffrey de Bouillon on the First Crusade. Her name has also been recorded as Gyda or Gyða. Bio by: Iola
     Family Members
     Parents
          Harold Godwinson 1020–1066
     Spouse
          Vladimir II Monomakh 1054–1125
     BURIAL     Saint Sophia's Cathedral, Kiev, City of Kiev, Ukraine
     Maintained by: Find a Grave
     Originally Created by: girlofcelje
     Added: 19 Nov 2003
     Find a Grave Memorial 8104488.12
     ; Per Genealogy.EU (Rurik 8): “[1m.] Vladimir II "Monomachos", Pr of Rostov (1066-73), Pr of Smolensk (1073-93), Pr of Chernigov (1078-93), Pr of Pereyaslavl (1094-1113), Great Pr of Kiev (1113-25), he was the founder of Vladimir Town 1108, *1053, +nr Alta River 19.5.1125, bur St Sophia Cathedral, Kiev; 1m: 1072-74 Gytha of Wessex (+Palestine 10.3.(1098)); 2m: ca 1099 a Byzantine noblewoman (+7.5.1107); 3m: N, dau.of a khan of Kumans (+11.7.1127)”.14 EDV-26.

; Per Genealogics:
     “Gytha was the daughter of Harold II, king of England, and Eadgyth Swannesha. According to _Saxo Grammaticus,_ on her father's death she and two of her brothers escaped to the court of Svend IV Estridsen, king in Denmark. The two brothers were treated by Svend with hospitality, while their sister was married in 1070 to Vladimir II Monomakh, grand duke of Kiev, one of the most famous rulers of Kievan Rus, son of Vsevolod I, grand duke of Kiev, and 'Irene' Maria Monomacha.
     “They had at least five children including Mstislav the Great, the last ruler of united Kievan Rus, who would have progeny. In the Norse sagas, Mstislav is called Harald after his grandfather. Ancient records of St.Pantaleon Cloister in Cologne says that 'Gytha the Queen' died as a nun on 10 March. The year is uncertain but could have been around 1098. A year after her death Vladimir Monomakh married an unnamed second wife, believed to have been a Byzantine noblewoman, with whom he had at least six children.”.2

; This is the same person as ”Gytha of Wessex” at Wikipedia.13

Reference: Weis [1992:205] line 242-7.7 Gytha/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex was also known as Cytha of Wessex.15

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:135.
2. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald.
volume I 9.2


; Per Med Lands:
     "[GYTHA [Eadgyth] ([1050/55]-10 Mar [1098/99]). Gytha's estimated birth date range, based on the birth dates of her children and the estimated date of her husband's second marriage, suggests that she must have been King Harold’s daughter by his mistress Eadgyth Swanneshals, although this supposition is not based on any primary source data. The name "Gytha" suggests that in England she was originally called Eadgyth. Gytha’s existence, and her Russian marriage, are confirmed only by sources written in the late 12th/early 13th centuries, between 100 and 150 years after the estimated date of the marriage, although it is of course possible that these sources were based on earlier records which have since disappeared. None of the other earlier sources which name the sons of King Harold II, such as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and Florence of Worcester, mention any daughters. According to Saxo Grammaticus, after her father's death she and her two brothers "immediately emigrated to Denmark" where Svend II Estrithsen King of Denmark "received them in a spirit of family duty" and arranged her marriage to "Waldemarus King of the Russians"[2091]. Whether such a move can have been made "immediately" is open to doubt, considering the rebellions of her supposed brothers in England which are dated to 1068 and 1069 (see above). Gytha is named as King Harold's daughter in Fagrskinna, which also gives her marriage to "Valldimar Konongr sun Iarozlæifs konongs i Holmgarde" (which appears to skip a generation in the generally accepted family reconstruction of the Rurikid dynasty). More details are provided by Morkinskinna, which records that the mother of “Haraldr Valdimarsson”, father of Malmfrid who married Sigurd King of Norway, was “Edith the daughter of Harold Godwinson” and that her husband was “the son of King Yaroslav and Ingigerdr, the daughter of Óláfr the Swede” (also skipping a generation)[2092]. Morkinskinna appears to be the only source which attributes the additional name "Harald", indicative of his English ancestry, to her son Mstislav. The husband of Gytha has generally been identified as Grand Prince Vladimir Vsevolodich "Monomach"[2093], but Morkinskinna is the only source which provides enough detail to suggest that this identification is correct. Baumgarten, particularly thorough in his source citations, cites no Russian source which corroborates the marriage[2094]. The lateness of the sources in which Gytha and her marriage are recorded suggests that the information should be treated with some caution. In addition, it is surprising that no name from Gytha's supposed family (with the exception of "Harald" attributed to her son Mstislav in Morkinskinna) was used among the known descendants of Grand Prince Vladimir. While it is true that the Rurikid dynasty rarely imported foreign names for the male descendants, it was not unusual for females to bear names which are recognisable from the families of foreign princesses who married into the family, the obvious example being the Scandinavian name Ingeborg used by Vladimir's son Mstislav for his daughter by Christina of Sweden. The difficult question is to decide the likelihood of such a marriage in light of conditions at the time and contemporary attitudes: some arguments can be mustered for suggesting that a daughter of King Harold II may not have been considered a good marriage prospect. Gytha’s supposed mother was obscure and she herself was illegitimate, although it is recognised that Gytha was related to the Danish royal family through her paternal grandmother and that illegitimacy presented few barriers at the time in Scandinavian royal families. Her father’s death may have glorified him as a hero, or alternatively his defeat may have been viewed as ignominious, depending on the point of view. Her family lived in exile and were without influential connections, apart it seems from the king of Denmark, and her brothers fell into complete obscurity. If a Russian marriage was arranged for her, it is likely that her husband would have been one of the lesser princes of the dynasty: from this perspective, it is true that Vladimir Vsevolodich was at the time relatively obscure, as the son of the youngest surviving brother of the current Grand Prince without immediate prospects of succession. As noted above, the Scandinavian sources consistently propose a name similar to Vladimir for Gytha’s husband, although this should not be viewed as conclusive because difficult Russian names were frequently transcribed into contemporary western sources with more creativity than accuracy. The inevitable, if disappointing, conclusion is that doubts about Gytha’s existence and her Russian marriage cannot be dismissed entirely. Nazarenko reports that, according to a pateric formerly held by the cloister of St Pantaleon, Köln, Gytha died as a nun in Palestine 10 Mar [1098/99][2095]. The year is inconsistent with the estimated date of Vladimir’s supposed second marriage (see below), unless he repudiated his first wife. This reported source has not yet been seen: hopefully, the actual text may help resolve lingering doubts concerning Gytha and her origin.
     "m ([1070]) as his first wife, VLADIMIR Vsevolodich of Pereiaslavl and Suzdal, son of VSEVOLOD Iaroslavich Prince of Pereiaslavl and Suzdal [later VSEVOLOD I Grand Prince of Kiev] & his first wife Maria [Irina] of Byzantium (1053-19 May 1125). He succeeded 1077 as Prince of Smolensk, 1078 as Prince of Chernigov, and 1113 as VLADIMIR "Monomach" Grand Prince of Kiev.] "
Med Lands cites:
[2091] Christiansen, E. (1980) Saxo Grammaticus, Danorum Regum Heroumque Historia, Books X-XVI (B. A. R. International Series 84), XI, VI, p. 58.
[2092] Morkinskinna, 66, p. 328.
[2093] For example, in Baumgarten, N. de 'Généalogies et mariages occidentaux des Rurikides Russes du X au XIII siècles’, Orientalia Christiana Vol. IX - 1, No. 35, May 1927 (reprint, Pont. Institutum Orientalium Studiorum, Rome) (“Baumgarten (1927)”), Table V, after p. 27.
[2094] Baumgarten (1927), p. 24.
[2095] Nazarenko, A. V. (2001) ??????? ???? ?? ????????????? ????? [Dryobnya Rus’ ne Meyzhdunarodyech Lutyach/International Relations of Ancient Rus’] (Moscow). (not yet consulted, information provided by Jim Cyphers in a private email to the author dated 3 Dec 2010.)3


; Per Genealogy.EU (Wessex): “Gytha, *ca 1055/60, +Kiev 7.5.1107; m.ca 1070 Great Pr Vladimir II of Kiev (*ca 1053, +19.5.1125)”.1

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Wessex page - The House of Wessex: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/wessex.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gytha of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027739&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#GythaMVladimirKiev. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Harold II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027740&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#HaroldIIdied1066B.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eadgyth Swannesha: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027741&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 242-7, p. 205. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vladimir II Monomakh: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027049&tree=LEO
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#VladimirMonomachdied1125B.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vladimir II Monomakh: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027049&tree=LEO
  12. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 03 July 2020), memorial page for Gytha Of England (c.1053–7 May 1107), Find a Grave Memorial no. 8104488, citing Saint Sophia's Cathedral, Kiev, City of Kiev, Ukraine; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8104488. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gytha_of_Wessex. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  15. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I8102
  16. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 225. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik2.html
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mstislav I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027050&tree=LEO
  19. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 101: Russia - General survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isjaslav Vladimirovitch: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00321300&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Svjatoslav Vladimirovitch: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00321301&tree=LEO
  22. [S812] e-mail address, updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38915
  23. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marina Vladimirovna of Kiev: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00321303&tree=LEO

Mstislav I Vladimirovich (Harald) "the Great" (?) Grand Prince of Kiev1,2,3,4,5

M, #10352, b. 1 June 1076, d. 15 April 1132
FatherVladimir II Vsevolodich "Monomachus" (?) Grand Prince of Kiev1,2,3,6,4 b. 1053, d. 19 May 1125
MotherGytha/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex1,7,8,9,4 b. bt 1050 - 1055, d. 7 May 1107
ReferenceEDV25
Last Edited29 Oct 2020
     Mstislav I Vladimirovich (Harald) "the Great" (?) Grand Prince of Kiev was born on 1 June 1076.10,3,4,5,11 He married Kristina Ingesdotter (Christina) (?) of Sweden, daughter of Inge I "the Elder" Stenkilsson (?) of Sweden and Helena (?), between 1095 and 1096;
His 1st wife. Rurik 8 page says m. 1095/96; Sweden 2 page says m. ca 1101; GeneaLogics says m. 1095.3,12,4,5,13 Mstislav I Vladimirovich (Harald) "the Great" (?) Grand Prince of Kiev married Liubava Dmitrievna (?) of Novgorod, daughter of Dmitri I Zavidich Possednik (?) Bojar of Novgorod, in 1122;
His 2nd wife.11,3,4,5
Mstislav I Vladimirovich (Harald) "the Great" (?) Grand Prince of Kiev died on 15 April 1132 at age 55.10,3,4,11,5
     EDV-25.

; This is the same person as ”Mstislav I of Kiev” at Wikipedia and as ”Mstislav Ier” at Wikipédia (FR).14,15

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 93.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:135.-
.4

; Per Genealogics:
     “Mstislav was born on 1 June 1076, the eldest son of Vladimir Monomakh, grand duke of Kiev, and Gytha of Wessex. He figures prominently in the Norse Sagas under the name Harald, taken to allude to his grandfather, Harold II of England.
     “As his father's future successor, Mstislav reigned in Novgorod from 1088 to 1093 and (after a brief stint at Rostov) from 1095 to 1117. Hereafter he was Monomakh's co-ruler in Belgorod Kievsky, and inherited the Kievan throne after his death. He built numerous churches in Novgorod, of which St. Nicholas Cathedral (1113) and the St. Anthony Cloister (1117) survive to the present day. Later, he would also erect important churches in Kiev, notably his family sepulchre at Berestovo and the church of Our Lady at Podil. Mstislav's life was spent in constant warfare with Cumans, Estonians, Lithuanians, and the princedom of Polotsk. In 1096 he defeated his father's cousin and enemy Oleg of Chernigov on the Koloksha River, thereby continuing the feud between his father's and Oleg's descendants which was to last for several centuries. Mstislav was the last ruler of united Rus, and upon his death, as the chronicler wrote, 'the land of Rus was torn apart'.
     “In 1095 Mstislav married Christine of Sweden, daughter of Inge Stenkilsson, king of Sweden, and his wife Helena. They had at least nine children of whom two sons and three daughters would have progeny.
     “Christine died on 18 January 1122, and later that year Mstislav married Ljubawa Dimitriewna Sawiditsch, the daughter of Dimitri Sawiditsch, a nobleman of Novgorod. They had a son Vladimir II Mstislavich and a daughter Euphrosyne who would marry King Geisa II of Hungary and have progeny.
     “Mstislav died on 15 April 1132. Through Euphrosyne he is an ancestor of King Edward III of England and hence of all subsequent English and British monarchs. Through his mother Gytha, he is part of a link between Harold II of England and the modern line of English kings founded by William the Conqueror, who deposed him.”.4 Mstislav I Vladimirovich (Harald) "the Great" (?) Grand Prince of Kiev was also known as Harold of Kiev.16

; Per Weis: “Mstislav II, Grand Prince of Kiev, b. 1076, d. 15 Apr. 1132; m. (2) 1122, a dau. (d. 1168) of Dmitrii?? I, Prince of Novgotod.?? ”.11

; Per Med Lands:
     "MSTISLAV Vladimirovich, son of VLADIMIR Vsevolodich "Monomakh" Grand Prince of Kiev & his first wife [Gytha of England] (1076-Kiev 14 Apr 1132[411]). The Primary Chronicle records the birth of Mstislav, son of Vladimir, grandson of Vsevolod, in 1076[412]. Fagrskinna names “Harald konungr” as son of “Valdimars ok Gydu”[413]. Morkinskinna records that “Haraldr Valdimarsson” was the son of “Valdimarr” and “Edith the daughter of Harold Godwinsson”[414]. He was appointed Prince of Novgorod by his grandfather in 1088, Prince of Rostov 1093, and restored as Prince of Novgorod 1095[415]. He was transferred to Pereyaslavl 1117 by his father. He succeeded his father in 1125 as MSTISLAV I "the Great" Grand Prince of Kiev.
     "m firstly (1095) CHRISTINE of Sweden, daughter of INGE I Stenkilson King of Sweden & his first wife Helena --- (-18 Jan 1122). Fagrskinna records that “Harald konungr”, son of “Valdimars ok Gydu”, married “Kristinar, dóttur Inga konungs Steinkelssunar”[416]. Morkinskinna records that “Haraldr Valdimarsson” married “Kristin, the daughter of King Ingi Steinkelsson king of the Swedes”[417]. A genealogy written by Vilhelm Abbot of Æbelholt records that “Christina avia Waldemari regis filia fuit Ingonis Svevorum regis et Helene regine”[418]. Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1194/95 which names “Ingiburgh filia Rizlavi…Ruthenorum Regis et Cristinæ Reginæ…filia…Ingonis Suevorum Regis et Helena Reginæ”[419].
     "m secondly (Kiev 1122) [LIUBAVA] Dmitrievna, daughter of DMITRY Zavidich boyar [Passadnik] of Novgorod & his wife --- (-after 1168). The marriage of Mstislav to "Dmitrevna daughter of Zavidich of Novgorod" is referred to in the Novgorod Chronicle[420]."
Med Lands cites:
[411] Novgorod Chronicle 1132, p. 12.
[412] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 1076, p. 165.
[413] Fagrskinna (1847), 213, p. 144.
[414] Morkinskinna, 66, p. 328.
[415] Franklin & Shepard (1998), pp. 263-64, and 267.
[416] Fagrskinna (1847), 213, p. 144.
[417] Morkinskinna, 66, p. 329.
[418] Gertz, M. C. (1917-18) Scriptores Minores Historicæ Danicæ medii ævi (Copenhagen), Vol. I, Wilhelmi Abbatis Genealogia Regum Danorum, p. 182.
[419] Liljegren, J. G. (ed.) (1829) Diplomatarium Suecanum, Svensk Diplomatarium, Tome I 817-1285 (Stockholm) 101, p. 125.
[420].5 Novgorod Chronicle 1122, p. 10.:LIND]

; Per Genealogy.EU (Rurikids 8): “B1. [1m.] Mstislav II (Harald) "the Great", Pr of Novgorod (1088-1117), Pr of Pereyaslavl (1117-25), Great Pr of Kiev (1125-32), *1.6.1076, +15.4.1132; 1m: 1095/96 Christine of Sweden (+18.1.1122); 2m: 1122 Liubava (+after 1168), a dau.of Dmitriy Zavidich, Stadtholder of Novgorod”.17

; Per Genealogy.EU (Sweden 2): “B2. Christine, +1122; m.Great Pr Mstislaw II of Kiev (*1076 +15.4.1132)”.18 He was Prince of Novgorod between 1088 and 1117.3 He was Prince of Pereyaslavl between 1117 and 1125.3 He was Grand Duke/Prince of Kiev between 1125 and 1132.1,3,15

Family 1

Child

Citations

  1. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 225. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  2. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 101: Russia - General survey. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  3. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mstislav I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027050&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#MstislavVladimirovichdied1132B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vladimir II Monomakh: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027049&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik2.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gytha of Wessex: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027739&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#VladimirMonomachdied1125B.
  10. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 27: Sweden - Early Kings and House of Folkunga.
  11. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), line 242-8, p. 219. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Sweden 2 page - Stenkil family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/sweden2.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Christina Ingesdotter of Sweden: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027051&tree=LEO
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mstislav_I_of_Kiev. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Mstislav Ier: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mstislav_Ier. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  16. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I8102
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html#MG
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Stenkil Family (Sweden 2): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/sweden2.html#CI1
  19. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 489 (Chart 33), 738. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  20. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 16.
  21. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 498 (Chart 34).
  22. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession, Table 24.
  23. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Norway 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway3.html
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 5 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik5.html
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Byzant 1 page (The Komnenos family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/byzant/byzant1.html
  26. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart XII (Com.): The House of Comnenos. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  27. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN of Kiev: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330283&tree=LEO
  28. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik4.html
  29. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isjaslaw II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00079972&tree=LEO
  30. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#IziaslavIIMstislavichdied1154B.
  31. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Rostislav I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027054&tree=LEO
  32. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#RostislavMstislavichdied1168B.
  33. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page (Rurikids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  34. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jewfrosinija|Euphrosyne of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020686&tree=LEO
  35. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#IevfrosinaMstislavnadiedbefore1186.

Liubava Dmitrievna (?) of Novgorod1,2

F, #10353, d. after 1168
FatherDmitri I Zavidich Possednik (?) Bojar of Novgorod1,2,3
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Liubava Dmitrievna (?) of Novgorod married Mstislav I Vladimirovich (Harald) "the Great" (?) Grand Prince of Kiev, son of Vladimir II Vsevolodich "Monomachus" (?) Grand Prince of Kiev and Gytha/Eadgyth (?) of Wessex, in 1122;
His 2nd wife.4,5,6,3
Liubava Dmitrievna (?) of Novgorod died after 1168; Genealogy.EU and Med Lands say d. aft 1168; Genealogics says d. 1167.7,2,3
     ; Per Weis: “Mstislav II, Grand Prince of Kiev, b. 1076, d. 15 Apr. 1132; m. (2) 1122, a dau. (d. 1168) of Dmitrii?? I, Prince of Novgotod.?? ”.4
; Per Genealogy.EU (Rurikids 8): “B1. [1m.] Mstislav II (Harald) "the Great", Pr of Novgorod (1088-1117), Pr of Pereyaslavl (1117-25), Great Pr of Kiev (1125-32), *1.6.1076, +15.4.1132; 1m: 1095/96 Christine of Sweden (+18.1.1122); 2m: 1122 Liubava (+after 1168), a dau.of Dmitriy Zavidich, Stadtholder of Novgorod”.8
; Per Med Lands:
     "MSTISLAV Vladimirovich, son of VLADIMIR Vsevolodich "Monomakh" Grand Prince of Kiev & his first wife [Gytha of England] (1076-Kiev 14 Apr 1132[411]). The Primary Chronicle records the birth of Mstislav, son of Vladimir, grandson of Vsevolod, in 1076[412]. Fagrskinna names “Harald konungr” as son of “Valdimars ok Gydu”[413]. Morkinskinna records that “Haraldr Valdimarsson” was the son of “Valdimarr” and “Edith the daughter of Harold Godwinsson”[414]. He was appointed Prince of Novgorod by his grandfather in 1088, Prince of Rostov 1093, and restored as Prince of Novgorod 1095[415]. He was transferred to Pereyaslavl 1117 by his father. He succeeded his father in 1125 as MSTISLAV I "the Great" Grand Prince of Kiev.
     "m firstly (1095) CHRISTINE of Sweden, daughter of INGE I Stenkilson King of Sweden & his first wife Helena --- (-18 Jan 1122). Fagrskinna records that “Harald konungr”, son of “Valdimars ok Gydu”, married “Kristinar, dóttur Inga konungs Steinkelssunar”[416]. Morkinskinna records that “Haraldr Valdimarsson” married “Kristin, the daughter of King Ingi Steinkelsson king of the Swedes”[417]. A genealogy written by Vilhelm Abbot of Æbelholt records that “Christina avia Waldemari regis filia fuit Ingonis Svevorum regis et Helene regine”[418]. Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1194/95 which names “Ingiburgh filia Rizlavi…Ruthenorum Regis et Cristinæ Reginæ…filia…Ingonis Suevorum Regis et Helena Reginæ”[419].
     "m secondly (Kiev 1122) [LIUBAVA] Dmitrievna, daughter of DMITRY Zavidich boyar [Passadnik] of Novgorod & his wife --- (-after 1168). The marriage of Mstislav to "Dmitrevna daughter of Zavidich of Novgorod" is referred to in the Novgorod Chronicle[420]."
Med Lands cites:
[411] Novgorod Chronicle 1132, p. 12.
[412] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973), 1076, p. 165.
[413] Fagrskinna (1847), 213, p. 144.
[414] Morkinskinna, 66, p. 328.
[415] Franklin & Shepard (1998), pp. 263-64, and 267.
[416] Fagrskinna (1847), 213, p. 144.
[417] Morkinskinna, 66, p. 329.
[418] Gertz, M. C. (1917-18) Scriptores Minores Historicæ Danicæ medii ævi (Copenhagen), Vol. I, Wilhelmi Abbatis Genealogia Regum Danorum, p. 182.
[419] Liljegren, J. G. (ed.) (1829) Diplomatarium Suecanum, Svensk Diplomatarium, Tome I 817-1285 (Stockholm) 101, p. 125.
[420].3 Novgorod Chronicle 1122, p. 10.:LIND] EDV-25.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 93.2

; Per Genealogy.EU (Rurik 8): “B1. [1m.] Mstislav II (Harald) "the Great", Pr of Novgorod (1088-1117), Pr of Pereyaslavl (1117-25), Great Pr of Kiev (1125-32), *1.6.1076, +15.4.1132; 1m: 1095/96 Christine of Sweden (+18.1.1122); 2m: 1122 Liubava (+after 1168), a dau.of Dmitriy Zavidich, Stadtholder of Novgorod”.9

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page (Rurikids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ljubawa Dimitriewna Sawiditsch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027052&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#MstislavVladimirovichdied1132B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), line 242-8, p. 219. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  5. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mstislav I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027050&tree=LEO
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 2 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik2.html
  8. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html#MG
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jewfrosinija|Euphrosyne of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020686&tree=LEO
  11. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#IevfrosinaMstislavnadiedbefore1186.

Dmitri I Zavidich Possednik (?) Bojar of Novgorod1,2

M, #10354
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited22 Oct 2020
     Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 93.3 EDV-26. Dmitri I Zavidich Possednik (?) Bojar of Novgorod was also known as Dimitri Sawiditsch (?)3

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 8 page (Rurikids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik8.html
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#MstislavVladimirovichdied1132B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dimitri Sawiditsch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027053&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ljubawa Dimitriewna Sawiditsch: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027052&tree=LEO

Álmos (?) Prince of Hungary, Duke of Croatia1,2,3

M, #10355, b. circa 1068, d. 1 September 1129
FatherGeza I (?) King of Hungary1,4,5,3,6,7 b. bt 1044 - 1045, d. 25 Apr 1077
MotherNN Synadene of Byzantium, Queen Consort of Hungary8,1,2,5,3,9 d. a 1077
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited19 Oct 2020
     Álmos (?) Prince of Hungary, Duke of Croatia was born circa 1068.1,4,5 He married Predslava Sviatopolkovna (?) of Kiev, daughter of Sviatopolk II Mikhail Iziaslavich (?) Grand Prince of Kiev and unknown (?), on 21 August 1104.1,10,4,5
Álmos (?) Prince of Hungary, Duke of Croatia died on 1 September 1129 at Constantinople (Istanbul now), Byzantium, Turkey (now); Genealogics, Genealogy.EU (Rurik 4), and Med Lands says d. 1129; Genealogy.EU (Arpad), Wikipedia and Wikipédia (Fr.) say d. 1127. I have chosen to follow Med Lands and Genealogics. GA Vaut.1,2,5,11,12,13,14
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 104.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.4


; This is the same person as Prince Álmos at Wikipedia, and as https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%81lmos_de_Hongrie at Wikipédia (Fr.)12,13

; Per Genealogics:
     "Almos was the son of Geisa I, king of Hungary, and his second wife, Synadene. He held several government posts in the kingdom of Hungary. Between 1084 and 1091 he was the duke of Slavonia, appointed by his uncle Laszlo, king of Hungary; between 1091 and 1095 he was named King of Slavonia (eastern Croatia). In 1095 the new king of Hungary, Almos' elder brother Kálmán, dethroned Almos and made him duke of the appanage Nitrian duchy (Tercia pars regni) instead.
     "Almos, supported by Germany and Bohemia, came in conflict with Kálmán in 1098, after Kálmán had declared himself the king of the whole of Croatia in 1097 (crowned in 1102). On 21 August 1104 Almos married Predslava of Kiev, the daughter of Svjatopolk II, grand duke of Kiev. Of their three children, Béla and Adelheid would have progeny. Almos made several attempts to take over Kálmán's throne, but all were unsuccessful. After repeatedly forgiving his wayward brother, Kálmán was finally forced to bring justice against him in 1115, although even then he commuted the familial death sentence required by law to the sentence of blinding Almos and his young son Béla, in the expectation that neither of them could then succeed him.
     "Almos, who died in 1129, was the last duke of Nitra (in Hungarian Nyitra); his removal also marks the end of the Nitrian frontier duchy and thus a full integration of the complete territory of today's Slovakia into Hungary. After the death of Kálmán's son and successor Stephan II in 1131 without male progeny, he was succeeded by Almos' son Béla."4 Álmos (?) Prince of Hungary, Duke of Croatia was also known as Almus Prince of Hungary.3

Reference: Weis [1992:206] Line 242-10.15 EDV-26 GKJ-27.

; Per Med Lands:
     "ÁLMOS ([1068]-Constantinople [1 Sep] 1129, bur Constantinople, transferred 1137 back to Hungary). After his uncle King László I conquered Pannonian Croatia in 1091, he created a special Croatian banovina between the Drava River and Gvozd Mountains, which was ruled by Álmos but recaptured by Peter King of Croatia in 1095[607]. His uncle designated Álmos as his successor, but Álmos's older brother Kálmán seized the throne in 1095 when King László died[608]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Colomannus et frater eius Almus" succeeded after the death of "Ladislaus rex" in 1097, "Colomannus rex" being crowned and "frater eius Almus" receiving "diadema" in 1098[609]. Álmos rebelled against his brother, declaring himself king of Hungary 1102-1109, but received little support. He was blinded, together with his son, on the orders of his brother King Kálmán and fled to Constantinople[610]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Almus dux et Bela filius eius" were blinded in 1117[611]. The necrology of Admunt records the death "Kal Sep" of "Almus dux"[612]. The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ records that "Almum" was reburied in Hungary in 1137[613]. His body was returned to Hungary during a period of thaw in Hungarian/Byzantine relations[614].
     "m (21 Aug 1104) PREDSLAVA Sviatopolkovna of Kiev, daughter of SVIATOPOLK II MIKHAIL Iziaslavich Grand Prince of Kiev & his first wife ---. The Primary Chronicle names Predslava daughter of Svyatopolk when recording that she was taken to Hungary 21 Aug 1104 to marry the king's son[615]. Baumgarten names her husband as Álmos but only cites one secondary source in support[616]."
Med Lands cites:
[607] Fine (1991), p. 284.
[608] Macartney (1962), Chapter 2.
[609] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[610] Fine (1991), p. 234.
[611] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[612] Necrologium Admuntense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 287.
[613] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ MGH SS IX, p. 143.
[614] Kerbl (1979), p. 77.
[615] Russian Primary Chronicle 1104, p. 202.
[616] Baumgarten (1927), p. 11, citing Wertner Az Arpadól czáládi törtenété, p. 251.5


; Per Genealogy.EU (Arpad): "Álmos, King of Croatia (1091-95), which his father had seized from his brother-in-law King Zwonimir, *ca 1068, +1.9.1127; m. 21.8.1104 Predslava of Kiev"

Per Genealogy.EU (Rurik 4): "B3. [1m.] Predslava; m. 21.8.1104 King Almos of Croatia (+1129.)1,11"

; In 1090, Laszlo, King of Hungary, created him Duke of Croatia and then merged Croatia with Hungary.2

Family

Predslava Sviatopolkovna (?) of Kiev
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almos of Hungary: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020701&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 72: Austria - House of Babenberg and accession of the Hapsburgs. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almos of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020701&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#Almosdied1129. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gevitza I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020698&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_I_1074-1077,.
  8. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I25128
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Synadene: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020699&tree=LEO
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik4.html
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik4.html
  12. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_%C3%81lmos. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  13. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Álmos de Hongrie: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%81lmos_de_Hongrie. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  14. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 27 May 2020; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 242-10, p. 206. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béla II 'the Blind': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020679&tree=LEO
  17. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_II_1131-1141,.

Béla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary1

M, #10356, b. between 1108 and 1110, d. 13 February 1141
FatherÁlmos (?) Prince of Hungary, Duke of Croatia1,2,3,4,5 b. c 1068, d. 1 Sep 1129
MotherPredslava Sviatopolkovna (?) of Kiev1,4,5
ReferenceEDV26
Last Edited20 Oct 2020
     Béla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary was rebaptized; Genealogics cites:
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. 104.
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 2:154.
3. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.4
He was born between 1108 and 1110 at Esztergom, Esztergomi járás, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary; Genealogics says b. 1108; Genealogy.EU says b. 1108/1110; Med Lands says b. 1109.1,4,5 He married Jelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary, daughter of Uros I Nemanjic (?) Zupan of Serbia and Anne Diogenissa (?) of Byzantium, on 28 April 1127.1,4,5,6,7
Béla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary died on 13 February 1141.1,4,5
Béla II "Vak/the Blind" (?) King of Hungary was buried after 13 February 1141 at Saint Stephen Basilica (ruins), Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1108
     DEATH     13 Feb 1141 (aged 32–33)
     Béla II the Blind was King of Hungary and Croatia. Béla was the only son of Duke Álmos, the younger brother of King Coloman of Hungary. His mother was Predslava of Kiev. Duke Álmos led several rebellions against his brother, but finally, he and Béla were blinded in 1113. Father and son were living together in the Premonstratensian Monastery of Dömös till 1126, when Duke Álmos tried to organise a conspiracy against King Stephen II, King Coloman's son and heir, but he failed and had to escape to the Byzantine Empire. Following his father's escape, Béla was taken secretly to the Monastery of Pécsvárad by his father's partisans.
     In 1129, after the death of Duke Álmos, King Stephen was informed that his blind cousin was still living in Hungary, and he invited Béla to his court. Upon the king's request, Béla married Helena, a daughter of Serbian Duke Uroš I of Raška, and the king granted the couple estates near Tolna.
     On 1 March 1131, the childless king died, and on 28 April, Béla was crowned in Székesfehérvár. As Béla was blind, his wife played a decisive role in governing his kingdom. Shortly after ascending the throne, Queen Helena ordered the massacre of the people she considered responsible for her husband's blinding at an assembly in Arad. She implaced her brother, Beloš, as the count palatine, giving him supreme command over the Hungarian Army and a commendable place in the Hungarian Royal Court.
     Children of Béla and Helena were:
** Elisabeth (c. 1129 – before 1155), wife of duke Mieszko III of Poland
** King Géza II of Hungary (c. 1130 – 3 May 1162)
** King Ladislaus II of Hungary (1131 – 14 January 1163)
** King Stephen IV of Hungary (c. 1133 – 11 April 1165)
** Sophia (c. 1136 – ?), nun at Admont

     Béla died from the effects of an overindulgence of alcohol.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Helena Of Rascia 1109–1146
     Children
          Elizabeth Of Hungary 1128–1154
          Géza II of Hungary 1130–1162
     BURIAL     
Saint Stephen Basilica (ruins)
Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary
     Created by: Kat
     Added: 25 Aug 2012
     Find a Grave Memorial 95941071
     SPONSORED BY Blaine Barham.1,8
     EDV-26 GKJ-26.

; This is the same person as:
”Béla II of Hungary” at Wikipedia, as
”Béla II de Hongrie” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”II. Béla magyar király” at Wikipedia (Hu.)9,10,11

; Per Genealogics:
     “Béla was born about 1108, the son of Almos of Hungary, duke of Croatia, and Predslava of Kiev. Almos had led a rebellion against his half-brother Kálmán, king of Hungary, as a result of which he and Béla were blinded and forced to flee to Constantinople. Béla was recalled by the Hungarian magnates on the death of Kálmáns son and successor Stephan II in 1131. Kálmán had refused to acknowledge the legitimacy of Boris, the son born to his adulterous second wife Jevfemija Vladimirovna of Kiev. Because Béla was blind, his wife Jelena of Serbia and brother-in-law Belos of Rascia played a large role in governing his kingdom. Shortly after taking the throne, Jelena ordered the massacre of the men she considered responsible for her husband's blinding. She appointed her brother Belos as duke of Hungary, giving him supreme command over the Hungarian army and a prestigious place at the Hungarian Court.
     “Béla's reign was notable for his foreign policy - his sister Hedwig was married to Adalbert of Austria, a son of Leopold III of Austria, and another sister Adelheid to Sobjeslaw I, duke of Bohemia, thereby allying Hungary with two previously inimical states. In 1136 Béla managed to recover part of Dalmatia from the control of the Republic of Venice, and sent an expedition into Bosnia. In 1137, he gave the title of Duke of Bosnia, with acceptance from the entire country, to his son Laszlo II.
     “Béla's entire reign was overshadowed by a conflict with Boris, whom Kálmán had refused to acknowledge, in which Boris was supported by Poland and Rus'. In 1132 Boleslaw III Krzywousty, king of Poland, led a campaign with Rus' and Polish troops on behalf of Boris. Boleslaw and Boris were defeated near de Dajó River, but Boris was to prove a persistent claimant for a number of years to come, defeated finally in 1146.
     “Béla died from the effects of an overindulgence of alcohol on 13 February 1141. His successor was his eldest son Geisa II, but he was too young to rule, so Queen Jelena and her brother Belos continued as co-regents.”.4

Reference: Weis [1992:206] Line 242-10.12

; Per Med Lands:
     "BÉLA, son of ÁLMOS Prince of Hungary & his wife Predslava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev ([1109-13 Feb 1141, bur Székesfehérvár). He was blinded, together with his father, on the orders of his uncle King Kálmán and took refuge in the monastery of Pécsvárad[637]. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Almus dux et Bela filius eius" were blinded in 1117[638]. He was appointed heir to the throne by his first cousin King István II in [1129][639]. He succeeded in 1131 as BÉLA II "Vak/the Blind" King of Hungary, crowned 28 Apr 1131, one of the rare exceptions of succession to a throne by a blind person in the Balkan region. The Chronicle of Otto of Freising records that the succession of "Bela Almi filio" was challenged by his cousin Boris[640]. King Béla was under the influence of his domineering wife who took an active part in the government of the country. A charter dated 3 Sep 1138 records the confirmation of his father´s donation by "Rege Bela secundo, bonæ memoriæ Almi ducis filio, cum Helena regina" to "ecclesiam…Martyris Margarethæ…Demesiensi"[641]. The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1141 of "Bela rex Ungarorum" and the accession of his son[642]. The Chronicon Dubnicense records the death "Id Feb" in 1141 of "Bela cecus" and his burial "Albe"[643]. The necrology of Admunt records the death "Id Feb" of "Bela rex"[644]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King Béla reigned for nine years and two months and was buried at Székesfehérvár[645]. The Chronica Ungarorum records the death in 1140 of "rex Bela" and his burial "in Alba"[646]. The Chronicon Varadiense records the death "Id Feb" in 1141 of "rex Bela cæcus filius ducis Almus" and his burial "Albæ"[647].
     "m (28 Aug 1127) JELENA of Serbia, daughter of UROŠ I Grand Župan of Serbia & his wife Anna [Diogenissa] (after 1109-after 1146). A charter dated 3 Sep 1138 records the confirmation of his father´s donation by "Rege Bela secundo, bonæ memoriæ Almi ducis filio, cum Helena regina" to "ecclesiam…Martyris Margarethæ…Demesiensi"[648]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. She brought part of northern Serbia, probably north-eastern Bosnia and Ma?va/Macsói, to Hungary as her dowry[649]. She led a campaign of revenge against the magnates alleged to have permitted the blinding of her husband, including the execution of 68 magnates at a meeting in Arad in [1131/32][650]. "
Med Lands cites:
[637] Lázár (1993), Chapter 5. .
[638] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[639] Fine (1991), p. 236.
[640] Chronicon Ottonis Frisingensis VII. 21, MGH SS XX, p. 259.
[641] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome II, p. 94.
[642] Annales Gradicenses 1141, MGH SS XVII, p. 651.
[643] Chronicon Dubnicense, p. 99.
[644] Necrologium Admuntense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 287.
[645] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 65, p. 143.
[646] Chronica Ungarorum, 50, p. 243.
[647] Chronicon Varadiense, 13, p. 255.
[648] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome II, p. 94.
[649] Fine (1991), p. 236.
[650] Hungarian Chronicle, c. 160, quoted in Bak, 'Queens as Scapegoats', p. 226 footnote 17.5


; Per Genealogy.EU (): “King Béla II "Vak=the Blind" of Hungary (1131-41) -cr 28.4.1131, *1108/10, +13.2.1141, bur Székesfehérvár; m.28.4.1127 Jelena of Serbia (+after 1146)"


Per Genealogy.EU (BAlkan 4): “A4. Jelena, *after 1109, +after 1146; m.28.4.1127 King Béla II of Hungary (+13.2.1141)”.1,13 He was King of Hungary between 1131 and 1141 at Hungary.14,4

Family

Jelena/Helena (?) of Serbia, Queen Consort of Hungary b. a 1109, d. a 1146
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 2 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad2.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Almos of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020701&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#Almosdied1129. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Béla II 'the Blind': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020679&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_B%C3%89LA_II_1131-1141,.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jelena of Serbia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020680&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SERBIA.htm#Jelenadiedafter1146
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 16 June 2020), memorial page for Béla II Of “the Blind” of Hungary (1108–13 Feb 1141), Find a Grave Memorial no. 95941071, citing Saint Stephen Basilica (ruins), Székesfehérvár, Székesfehérvári járás, Fejér, Hungary; Maintained by Kat (contributor 47496397), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/95941071. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9la_II_of_Hungary. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9la_II_de_Hongrie. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  11. [S4770] Wikipédia - A szabad Enciklopédia, online https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/II._B%C3%A9la_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly, II. Béla magyar király: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/II._B%C3%A9la_magyar_kir%C3%A1ly. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (HU).
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 242-10, p. 206. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Vukanivich family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/balkan/balkan4.html#J
  14. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gevitza II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020685&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#_G%C3%89ZA_II_1141-1162,.
  17. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I38763
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stefan IV: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020758&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#IstvanIV

András/Andrew I "the Catholic" (?) King of Hungary1,2

M, #10357, b. between 1014 and 1015, d. before 6 December 1060
FatherVazul/Vasul/Basil (?)1,2,3 b. bt 976 - 978, d. 1038
MotherKatun Comitopuli of Bulgaria4
ReferenceGAV28 EDV29
Last Edited17 Apr 2020
     András/Andrew I "the Catholic" (?) King of Hungary was born between 1014 and 1015; Genealogics says b. ca 1015; Med Lands says b. 1014.1,2,5 He married Unknown (?) before 1039; Per Med Lands: "m firstly --- (-before [1039]). According to Europäische Stammtafeln, the first wife of András was a pagan in Hungary[399], although the primary source on which this is based has not been identified."
Med Lands cites: [399] ES II 154.5 András/Andrew I "the Catholic" (?) King of Hungary married Anastasia/Agmund Yaroslavna (?) of Kiev, Queen of Hungary, daughter of Yaroslav I Vladimirovich "Mudriy/The Wise" (?) Grand Duke of Kiev and Ingegarde (Ingeborg) Olafsdottir (?) Princess of Sweden, in 1039;
Probably his 2nd wife.
     Weis AR7 line 224-6 (p. 207) says m. ca 1046; Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1) says m. 1038; Genealogy.EU (Rurikids 1) says m. 1037/38;
Genealogics says m. bef 1046; Med Lands says m. 1039.6,1,7,8,2,5,9
András/Andrew I "the Catholic" (?) King of Hungary died before 6 December 1060 at Zirc, Hungary.6,1,2,10,5
András/Andrew I "the Catholic" (?) King of Hungary was buried after 6 December 1060 at Tihany Abbey, Tihany, Balatonfüredi járás, Veszprém, Hungary,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1013, Hungary
     DEATH     6 Dec 1060 (aged 46–47), Hungary
     Andrew I the White (or the Catholic) was King of Hungary from 1046/1047 until his death. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty. After spending fifteen years in exile, he ascended the throne during an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians. He strengthened the position of Christianity in his kingdom, while preserving the independence of the Kingdom of Hungary from the Holy Roman Empire. He tried to ensure the succession of his son, Solomon which resulted in the open revolt of his brother who dethroned him by force. When Andrew heard of his brother's open rebellion, he sent his family to Austria, and prepared for the struggle, although he had been so ill that he was not even able to walk. Shortly afterwards, Duke Béla returned to Hungary with Polish troops and won a decisive victory over the king. Following his defeat, Andrew fled towards Austria, but he fell off his horse at the Theben Pass. Andrew was arrested by Duke Béla's men and taken to Zirc where he died. Andrew was buried in the Tihany Abbey.
     Wife and children
     Anastasia of Kiev (c. 1023 – c. 1074/1096), daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife, Ingigerd of Sweden
          Adelaide (c. 1040 – 27 January 1062), wife of king Vratislaus II of Bohemia
          King Solomon of Hungary (1053 – 1087 or after)
          David (after 1053 – after 1094)
          György
     Andrew was the second son of Duke Vazul, who was a cousin of Stephen I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father.
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Anastasia of Kiev 1023–1096
     Children
          Adelaide Of Hungary unknown–1062
          Salomon Of Hungary 1039–1087
     BURIAL     Tihany Abbey, Tihany, Balatonfüredi járás, Veszprém, Hungary
     Created by: Mad
     Added: 13 Sep 2010
     Find A Grave Memorial 58614151.11
     ; NB: There is disagreement about the mother of Bela I and Andras I. Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1 page) says their father, Vazul/Basil m. "N, from Tátony family /OR/ a woman who may (or may not) have been dau.of Tsar Samuel of the Bulgarians ". GA Vaut.1,12



Reference: Genealogics Cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 104.2

; Per Genealogics:
     "András was born about 1015, a son of Vazul (Basil) 'the Blind' of Hungary, lord of Gran and regions roughly corresponding with today's Slovakia. His mother was said to be a daughter of the Tsar of Bulgaria. She has been identified as either Katun Comitopuli of Bulgaria or Katalin of Bulgaria. András was from a younger branch of the Arpád dynasty. Hungarian tribal society favoured patrilineal seniority, not primogeniture, to determine the order of succession, which made other males of the Arpád dynasty in cadet lines dangerous to the incumbent king. András' branch of the dynasty had long been rivals of the older branch, to which Stephan I of Hungary and his father belonged. For the preceding half century the rivalry had centred much on the conflict between paganism and Christianity, representing (and used), respectively, by the younger and older branches. The older branch went extinct in the male line with Stephan's death in 1038, which opened up new opportunities for the younger, surviving male line. Stephan's female-line successors Aba Samuel and Peter Orseolo felt it necessary to suppress the rival family.
     "A period of dynastic struggle following Stephan's death was concluded after the death of Stephan's brother-in-law Peter Orseolo, when András took the Hungarian throne for his branch of the Arpád dynasty.
     "Under the rule of Stephan's other brother-in-law Sámuel Aba, András and his brothers Levente and Béla had been exiled from Hungary, fearing for their lives. First fleeing to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla married into that royal family. András and Levente, possibly feeling overshadowed by their brother, continued on, settling in Kiev, and András married Anastasia, a daughter of Jaroslav I Vladimirovitch, grand duke of Kiev.
     "Their return to Hungary in 1046 sparked the Vatha pagan rising, in which András through pagan support managed to wrest the crown from Peter Orseolo. András was crowned in 1047 and strengthened his rule by military success, in part thanks to pagan support. Nevertheless, he continued the policies of Christianisation that had previously been in place. As Hungarian king, András remained an ally of his former hosts in exile, the Kievan Rus'.
     "The relationship with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense. The previous king, Peter Orseolo, had been a close ally of Emperor Heinrich III, and during his second reign, after the interlude of the reign of Sámuel Aba, Hungary had been part of the Holy Roman Empire. Heinrich now undertook two largely unsuccessful campaigns against Hungary, in 1051 and again in 1052. András then formed an alliance in 1053 with Konrad II, duke of Bavaria, thereby supporting the opposition to the emperor.
     "In 1057 András tried to ensure his succession by having his five-year-old son Salomon crowned as king. This proved unsuccessful, as in 1060 András' brother Béla I managed to unseat András and gain the throne, if only for a short time.
     "András, who was wounded in the battle against Béla, sent Salomon to Germany for safekeeping, and died in 1061. He and his family are buried in the Tihany abbey, founded by him on the shores of Lake Balaton.
     "His son Salomon followed his uncle Béla I as king of Hungary from 1063 to 1071, but neither of Salomon's sons (Salomon and David) left surviving male descendants, and the younger line of Béla prevailed after Salomon's death, with first Béla's son Geisa then Geisa's brother Laszlo; Laszlo was followed by Geisa's son Kalman. András' daughter Adelheid married Wratislaw II, king of Bohemia; however the descent continued only through her daughter Judith, who married Wladyslaw I Herman, king of Poland and became the mother of Boleslaw III Krzywousty, king of Poland, the great-grandson of András. And so the line from András continued not in Hungary, but in the Piast dynasty of Poland."2



; Per Med Lands:
     "ANDRÁS ([1014]-Zirc Autumn 1060, bur Tihany, Benedictine Abbey of St Anian). The Chronicon Varadiense names "dux Andreas postea rex, secundus…dux Bella demum rex, tertius dux Levente" as the three sons of "dux Vazul"[386]. The Gesta Hungarorum names (in order) "Andrea, Bela et Luenta, filiis Zarladislai" when recording that King István advised them to flee to Bohemia after the mutilation of Vazúl, the commentary suggesting that their father's name was changed by the compiler of the Gesta to disguise the fact that later Hungarian kings were descended from the blinded Vazúl. The Gesta clarifies in a later passage that András was the oldest son[387]. In another passage, the Gesta reports claims that the three brothers were "ex duce Wazul progenitos ex quadam virgine de genere Tatun" rather than legitimate[388]. The Gesta records that the three brothers moved from Bohemia to Poland during the second reign of King Péter, but that "Andreas et Luenta" were embittered by the success of their brother Béla in Poland and moved to Ruthenia, where "duce Lodomeriæ" refused to receive them out of regard for King Péter, and that from there they moved "ad terram…Comanorum"[389]. The estimated birth date of his daughter Adelaida suggests that András must have arrived in Kiev before [1039], assuming that she was born from his second marriage. The Hungarian nobles sent envoys to Kiev in Spring 1046 inviting the brothers Levente and András to return, which they did in Autumn 1046[390]. After the popular uprising which deposed King Peter in 1046, he succeeded as ANDRÁS I "the Catholic" King of Hungary, crowned at Székesfehérvár. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Petrus rex" was blinded in 1047 and succeeded by "Andreas rex"[391]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced payment of tribute for three years from Austria, Bohemia and Poland, which provoked an attack on Hungary by Emperor Heinrich III[392]. "Andreas…Pannoniorum…Rex" founded Tihan abbey, Balatin by charter dated 1055, signed by "Gilconi comitis, Zache C. Palatii, Wotteh comitis, Ludouici comitis, Ernei comitis, Viti comitis, Martini comitis, Heliæ comitis, Andreæ comitis, Fancel comitis…"[393]. When King András crowned his infant son Salamon as associate king in 1057, his brother Béla was provoked into taking action to secure his own rights of succession. The Chronicon Posoniense records that "Andreas rex" crowned "Salamonem filium suum" during his illness[394]. Hungarian forces invaded Byzantine territory in 1059 in reprisal for Byzantium's failure to curb Pecheneg raids in Hungary, but quickly made peace after Emperor Isaakios Komnenos mobilised forces[395]. In 1060, Béla invaded Hungary with a large force, with Polish support, captured King András who died a few days later, and assumed power. The Gesta Hungarorum records the death of King András in the fifteenth year of his reign and his burial in "Tyhon monasterio"[396]. The Chronicon Varadiense records the death in 1060 of "Andreas" and his burial "in suo monasterio Thyan iuxta lacum Balaton"[397]. The Chronicon Posoniense records bitter disputes in 1060 between "Andream et fratrem eius Bela" and that "Andreas rex" died[398], which suggests that the death may have been violent.
     "m firstly --- (-before [1039]). According to Europäische Stammtafeln, the first wife of András was a pagan in Hungary[399], although the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.
     "m secondly ([1039]) ANASTASIA Iaroslavna of Kiev, daughter of IAROSLAV I Vladimirovich Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife Ingigerd Olafsdottir of Sweden ([1023]-[1074/1096], bur Admont Abbey). Baumgarten names the second wife of King András and gives her origin but only cites one secondary source in support[400]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. After her husband's death in 1060, she and her sons took refuge at the court of Heinrich IV King of Germany but, leaving her elder son there, she and her younger son then went to Austria[401]. The Annals of Lambert record that "regina Ungariorum, mater Salomonis regis" presented the sword of "rex Hunnorum Attila" to "duci Baioriorum Ottoni" after her son was restored as king of Hungary[402]. She became a nun at Admont in 1074 as AGMUNDA."
Med Lands cites:
[386] Chronicon Varadiense, 2, p. 251.
[387] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 44, p. 107, and footnote 1, and 54, p. 125.
[388] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 55, p. 125.
[389] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 52, p. 121.
[390] Kosztolnyik (2002), p. 397.
[391] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 55.
[392] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 57, p. 127.
[393] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariæ, Tome I, p. 388.
[394] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[395] Fine (1991), p. 210.
[396] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 58, p. 131, footnote 3 specifying that his gravestone still survives in the crypt of the monastery.
[397] Chronicon Varadiense, 6, p. 253.
[398] Chronicon Posoniense, p. 56.
[399] ES II 154.
[400] Baumgarten (1927), p. 9, citing Wertner, M. Az Arpadól czáládi törtenété, pp. 117-23.
[401] Hóman, B. (1940) Geschichte des ungarischen Mittelalters (Berlin), p. 269, cited in Kerbl, R. (1979) Byzantinische Prinzessinnen in Ungarn zwischen 1050-1200 und ihr Einfluß auf das Arpadenkönigreich (VWGÖ, Vienna), p. 14.
[402] Lamberti Annales 1071, MGH SS V, p. 185.5


; Per Wikipedia:
     "Andrew I the White or the Catholic (Hungarian: I. Fehér or Katolikus András or Endre; c. 1015 – Zirc, before 6 December 1060) was King of Hungary from 1046 to 1060. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty. After spending fifteen years in exile, he ascended the throne during an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians. He strengthened the position of Christianity in the Kingdom of Hungary and successfully defended its independence against the Holy Roman Empire.
     "His efforts to ensure the succession of his son, Solomon, resulted in the open revolt of his brother, Béla. Béla dethroned Andrew by force in 1060. Andrew suffered severe injuries during the fighting and died before his brother was crowned king.
Early life
Childhood (c. 1015–1031)
     "Medieval sources provide two contradictory reports of the parents of Andrew, and his two brothers, Levente and Béla.[1] For instance, the Chronicle of Zagreb and Saint Gerard's Life[1] write that their father was Vazul, a grandson of Taksony, Grand Prince of the Hungarians (r. c. 955–c. 970).[2] The Illuminated Chronicle and other medieval sources write of Vazul's relationship with "some girl" from the Tátony clan who bore his sons, who thus "were not born of a true marriage-bed".[3][4] According to a concurrent tradition, which has been preserved by most chronicles, the three princes were the sons of Vazul's brother, Ladislas the Bald.[1] Modern historians, who reject the latter report, agree that Andrew and his brothers were the sons of Vazul and his concubine from the Tátony clan.[1][5][6][7] According to the historian Gyula Kristó, Andrew was the second among Vazul's three sons. He writes that Andrew was born around 1015.[5]
In exile (1031–1046)
     "According to medieval chronicles, Vazul was blinded during the reign of his cousin, King Stephen I, the first Christian monarch of Hungary (r. 997–1038).[8] The king ordered Vazul's mutilation after the death, in 1031, of Emeric, his only son surviving infancy.[8][9] The contemporary Annals of Altaich writes that the king himself ordered the mutilation of one of his kinsmen, who had strong claim to the throne, in an attempt to ensure a peaceful succession to his own sister's son, Peter Orseolo.[10][6] The same source adds that the king expelled his blinded cousin's three sons from Hungary.[1] According to the contrasting report of the Hungarian chronicles, King Stephen wanted to save the young princes' lives from their enemies in the royal court and "counselled them with all speed"[11] to depart from Hungary.[5]
     "Having his own son died in his father's life, and having no other sons, Stephen, the king of good memory, who was the maternal uncle of [Peter Orseolo], adopted and appointed him as heir to his kingdom. For his kinsman's son disagreed with him on this, [Stephen] had him blinded, even if he was worthier of the kingdom, and sent his little sons into exile.

     —?Annals of Altaich[12]
     "Exiled from Hungary, Andrew and his brothers settled in the court of Duke Old?ich of Bohemia (r. 1012–1033).[7] Here they came across King Mieszko II of Poland (r. 1025–1031, 1032–1034)[7] who likewise took refuge in Bohemia after his opponents had expelled him from his kingdom.[13] The Polish monarch regained his crown and returned to Poland in 1032.[14] Andrew, Béla and Levente, whose "condition of life was poor and mean"[15] in Bohemia, followed Mieszko II who received them "kindly and honourably"[15] in Poland.[5][7] After the youngest among them, Béla, married a daughter of Mieszko II, Andrew and Levente decided to depart from Poland, because they "felt that they would be living in Poland under their brother's shadow",[16] according to Simon of Kéza.[17]
     "Hungarian chronicles have preserved a story full of fabulous or anachronistic details of the two brothers' ensuing wanderings.[17] For instance, they narrate that Andrew and Levente were captured by Cumans,[17] but the latter only arrived in Europe in the 1050s.[18] Having faced many hardships, Andrew and Levente established themselves in the court of Yaroslav the Wise, Grand Prince of Kiev (r. 1019–1054) in the late 1030s. The grand prince gave his daughter, Anastasia in marriage to Andrew.[17] Kristó writes that Andrew, who had up to that time remained pagan, was baptized on this occasion.[19]
     "Having received permission from [the Polish monarch, Andrew and Levente] left their brother [Béla] behind and made their way to the King of Lodomeria, who did not receive them. Since they had nowhere to lay their head, they went from there to the [Cumans]. Seeing that they were persons of excellent bearing, the [Cumans] thought that they had come to spy out the land, and unless a captive Hungarian had recognized them, they should certainly have killed them; but they kept them with them for some time. Then they departed thence to Russia.
—?The Hungarian Illuminated Chronicle[20]

Return to Hungary (1046)
     "In the meantime, King Peter Orseolo, who had succeeded King Stephen in Hungary in 1038, alienated many lords and prelates from himself, especially when he solemnly recognized the suzerainty of the Holy Roman Emperor, Henry III in 1045.[6][21] According to the Illuminated Chronicle, the discontented lords, "seeing the sufferings of their people",[22] assembled in Csanád (Cenad, Romania).[23] They agreed to send envoys to Andrew and Levente to Kiev in order to persuade them to return to Hungary.[19] Fearing "some treacherous ambush",[24] the two brothers only set out after the agents they had sent to Hungary confirmed that the Hungarians were ripe for an uprising against the king.[19]
     "By the time the two brothers decided to return, a revolt had broken out in Hungary.[25] It was dominated by pagans who captured many clergymen and mercilessly slaughtered them.[6] Andrew and Levente met the rebels at Abaújvár.[19] The Illuminated Chronicle narrates how the pagans urged the dukes "to allow the whole people to live according to the rites of the pagans, to kill the bishops and the clergy, to destroy the churches, to throw off the Christian faith and to worship idols".[24][19] The same source adds that Andrew and Levente gave in to all their demands, "for otherwise they would not fight"[24] for them against King Peter.[19][26]
     "The Annals of Altaich states that Andrew "savagely raged against the flock of the Holy Church".[26][27] Even so, Bishop Gerard of Csanád and four other prelates were ready to join Andrew, but the pagans captured and slaughtered three of them (including Gerard) at Buda.[23][28] King Peter decided to flee from Hungary and take refugee in Austria.[23] However, Andrew's envoys tricked the king to return before he reached the frontier, and they captured and blinded him.[23][29]
Reign
Coronation (1046–1047)
     "Most Hungarian lords and the prelates opposed the restoration of paganism.[21][30] They preferred the devout Christian Andrew to his pagan brother Levente,[21] even if, at least according to Kristó and Steinhübel, the latter was the eldest among Vazul's three sons.[31][32] The Hungarian chronicles write that Levente, who died in short time, did not oppose his brother's ascension to the throne.[32][23] The three bishops who had survived the pagan uprising crowned Andrew in Székesfehérvár in the last quarter of 1046 or in the spring of 1047.[23][33] Historian Ferenc Makk writes that Andrew was crowned with a crown that the Byzantine Emperor Constantine IX Monomachos had sent to him.[33] Nine enamelled plaques from this golden crown were unearthed in Nyitraivánka (Ivanka pri Nitre, Slovakia) in the 19th century.[34] Andrew soon broke with his pagan supporters, restored Christianity and declared pagan rites illegal.[26][30] According to Kosztolnyik, Andrew's epithets (the White or the Catholic) are connected to these events.[35]
          "Having now been made secure against all disturbances from enemies, Duke Andreas received the crown of kingship in the royal city of Alba. No more than three bishops who had escaped that great slaughter of the Christians performed the ceremony of coronation in the year of our Lord 1047. He made proclamation to all his people that under pain of death they should lay aside the pagan rites which had formerly been permitted to them, and that they should return to the true faith of Christ and live in all things according to the law which King St Stephen had taught them.
—?The Hungarian Illuminated Chronicle[36]
Wars with the Holy Roman Empire (1047–1053)
     "The contemporaneous Hermann of Reichenau narrates that Andrew "sent frequent envoys with humble entreaties" to Emperor Henry III, proposing "an annual tribute and faithful service"[37] if the emperor recognized his reign.[38] Andrew persuaded his brother, Béla, to return from Poland to Hungary in 1048.[39] He also granted his brother one third of the kingdom[39][40] with the title of duke.[30] Béla's duchy comprised two regions which were centered on Nyitra (Nitra, Slovakia) and Bihar (Biharia, Romania).[39][30]
     "Skirmishes on the frontier between Hungary and the Holy Roman Empire first occurred in 1050.[41] Emperor Henry invaded Hungary in August[29] 1051, but Andrew and Béla successfully applied scorched earth tactics against the imperial troops and forced them to withdraw.[41][30] Legend says that the Vértes Hills near Székesfehérvár were named after the armours – vért in Hungarian – which were discarded by the retreating German soldiers.[30]
     "Andrew initiated new peace negotiations with the emperor and promised to pay an annual tribute, but his offers were refused.[41] Next summer, the emperor returned to Hungary and laid siege to Pressburg (Bratislava, Slovakia).[29] Zotmund, "a most skilful swimmer"[42] scuttled the emperor's ships.[29][41] After Pope Leo IX mediated a peace treaty, the emperor lifted the siege and withdrew from Hungary.[29][41] Andrew soon refused to fulfill his promises made under duress,[41] and even allied with Conrad I, Duke of Bavaria, a prominent opponent of Emperor Henry III.[43]
     "Because Andreas, the king of the Hungarians was less and less inclined to send envoys and to make promises concerning a peace treaty, [the emperor] laid siege to the fortress of Pressburg and for a long time attacked it with various machines of war. Since, however, God aided the besieged, who anxiously called on Him, his efforts were always frustrated and he could by no means capture it. Meanwhile the lord Pope Leo had intervened at the request of Andreas to make peace and he called on the emperor to end the siege. Since [the pope] found [the emperor] in all respects in agreement with him, while discovering that Andreas on the contrary was less obedient to his advice, he was angry and threatened the latter with excommunincation for mocking the apostolic see.
—Herman of Reichenau: Chronicle[44]

Succession crisis and death (1053–1060)
     "Andrew's queen, Anastasia, gave birth to a son, named Solomon in 1053.[45] Andrew attempted to make his son's succession secure, even against his brother, Béla, who had strong claim to succeed Andrew according to the traditional principle of seniority.[46]
The brothers' relationship did not deteriorate immediately after Solomon's birth.[47] In the deed of the foundation of the Tihany Abbey, a Benedictine monastery established in 1055 by Andrew, Duke Béla was listed among the lords witnessing the act.[47] This charter, although primarily written in Latin, contains the earliest extant text – Feheruuaru rea meneh hodu utu rea ("on the military road which leads to Fehérvár") – written in Hungarian.[48] Andrew also established a lavra for Orthodox hermits in Tihany and an Orthodox monastery near Visegrád.[49] The Third Book of Law of King Ladislaus I of Hungary (r. 1077–1095) refers to an "estate survey of the judge Sarkas" under "King Andrew and Duke Béla".[50][51] According to György Györffy, the serfs of the royal domains were registered during this survey which took place around 1056.[51]
     "Andrew suffered a stroke which paralyzed him.[45] In an attempt to strengthen his son's claim to the throne, he had the child Solomon crowned in the one-year-long period beginning in the autumn of 1057.[45] For the same purpose, Andrew also arranged the engagement of his son with Judith – a daughter of the late Emperor Henry III, and sister of the new German monarch, Henry IV (r. 1056–1105) – in September 1058.[52] Thereafter, according to an episode narrated by most Hungarian chronicles, the king invited Duke Béla to a meeting at Tiszavárkony.[53] At their meeting, Andrew seemingly offered his brother to freely choose between a crown and a sword, which were the symbols of the kingdom and the ducatus, respectively.[54] Duke Béla, who had previously been informed by his partisans in Andrew's court that he would be murdered on the king's order if he opted for the crown, chose the sword.[54]
     "However, Béla, who actually had no intention of renouncing his claim to succeed his brother in favor of his nephew, fled to Poland and sought military assistance from Duke Boleslaus II of Poland (r. 1058–1079).[54][55] With Duke Boleslaus's support, Béla returned to Hungary at the head of Polish troops.[56] On the other hand, the Dowager Empress Agnes – who governed the Holy Roman Empire in the name of her minor son, Henry IV – sent Bavarian, Bohemian and Saxon troops to assist Andrew.[56]
     "The decisive battle was fought in the regions east of the river Tisza.[45] Andrew suffered injuries and lost the battle.[45][54] He attempted to flee to the Holy Roman Empire, but his brother's partisans routed his retinue at Moson.[45] The Annals of Niederaltaich narrates that wagons and horses trampled him in the battlefield.[57] Deadly wounded in the battlefield, Andrew was seized and taken by his brother's partisans to Zirc[45] where "he was treated with neglect",[58] according to the Illuminated Chronicle.[57] Andrew died in the royal manor there before his brother was crowned king on 6 December 1060.[59] Andrew was buried in the crypt of the church of the Tihany Abbey.[60]
Family
     "Andrew's wife, Anastasia, was the daughter of Grand Duke Yaroslav I the Wise of Kiev by his wife, Ingegerd, who herself was the daughter of King Olof Skötkonung of Sweden.[61] Andrew married Anastasia, who was born in about 1020, around 1038.[17] Their first child, Adelaide was born around 1040.[62] She became the wife of Vratislaus II of Bohemia, who was initially Duke and, from 1085, King of Bohemia.[63][64] Andrew and Anastasia's first son, Solomon, was born in 1053, their second son, David, some years later.[63] Neither Solomon nor David fathered sons; the male line of Andrew's family died out with their death by the end of the 11th century.[45]
     "King Salomon and David, his brother, never had children, and the seed of King Andreas perished with them. We believe that this was by an act of God; for on his first return with Levente, his brother, to Hungary, Andreas with the purpose of gaining the kingdom permitted the ungodly Vatha and other most evil men to kill the saintly Gerard and many Christians.
—?The Hungarian Illuminated Chronicle[65]

     "Medieval chronicles write that Andrew had a natural son, named George, "by a concubine"[66] from the village of Pilismarót.[67] Since his name was popular among Orthodox believers, Gyula Kristó says that his mother may have been a Russian lady-in-waiting of Andrew's queen.[67] The story that the Clan Drummond in Scotland are descended from George[68] and his son Maurice[69][70][71] is not accepted by some scholars.[72]
References (For Reference notes, See Wikipedia article online at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_I_of_Hungary)
Sources
Primary sources
** "Herman of Reichenau, Chronicle" (2008). In Robinson, I. S. Eleventh-Century Germany: The Swabian Chronicles. Manchester University Press. pp. 58–98. ISBN 978-0-7190-7734-0.
** Simon of Kéza: The Deeds of the Hungarians (Edited and translated by László Veszprémy and Frank Schaer with a study by Jen? Sz?cs) (1999). CEU Press. ISBN 963-9116-31-9.
** The Hungarian Illuminated Chronicle: Chronica de Gestis Hungarorum (Edited by Dezs? Dercsényi) (1970). Corvina, Taplinger Publishing. ISBN 0-8008-4015-1.
** "The Laws of King Ladislas I (1077–1095): Book Three". In The Laws of the Medieval Kingdom of Hungary, 1000–1301 (Translated and Edited by János M. Bak, György Bónis, James Ross Sweeney with an essay on previous editions by Andor Czizmadia, Second revised edition, In collaboration with Leslie S. Domonkos) (1999). Charles Schlacks, Jr. Publishers. pp. 15–22. ISBN 1-884445-29-2. OCLC 495379882. OCLC 248424393. LCCN 89-10492. OL 12153527M. (ISBN may be misprinted in the book as 88445-29-2).
Secondary sources
** Bartl, Július; ?i?aj, Viliam; Kohútova, Mária; Letz, Róbert; Segeš, Vladimír; Škvarna, Dušan (2002). Slovak History: Chronology & Lexicon. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Slovenské Pedegogické Nakladatel'stvo. ISBN 0-86516-444-4.
** Berend, Nora; Laszlovszky, József; Szakács, Béla Zsolt (2007). "The kingdom of Hungary". In Berend, Nora (ed.) Christianization and the Rise of Christian Monarchy: Scandinavia, Central Europe and Rus', c.900-1200. Cambridge University Press. pp. 319–368. ISBN 978-0-521-87616-2.
** Buckton, David (1984). The Treasury of San Marco, Venice. Metropolitan Museum of Art.
** Curta, Florin (2006). Southeastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 500-1250. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-89452-4.
** Engel, Pál (2001). The Realm of St Stephen: A History of Medieval Hungary, 895–1526. I.B. Tauris Publishers. ISBN 1-86064-061-3.
** Györffy, György (1994). King Saint Stephen of Hungary. Atlantic Research and Publications. ISBN 0-88033-300-6.
** Györffy, György (2000). István király és m?ve [=King Stephen and his Work] (in Hungarian). Balassi Kiadó.
** Kontler, László (1999). Millennium in Central Europe: A History of Hungary. Atlantisz Publishing House. ISBN 963-9165-37-9.
** Kosztolnyik, Z. J. (1981). Five Eleventh Century Hungarian Kings: Their Policies and their Relations with Rome. Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-914710-73-7.
** Kristó, Gyula; Makk, Ferenc (1996). Az Árpád-ház uralkodói [=Rulers of the House of Árpád] (in Hungarian). I.P.C. Könyvek. ISBN 963-7930-97-3.
** Kristó, Gyula (1999). Az államalapítás korának írott forrásai [=Written Sources of the Ages of the Foundation of the State] (in Hungarian). Szegedi Középkorász M?hely. ISBN 963-482-393-9.
** Makk, Ferenc (1993). Magyar külpolitika (896-1196) [Hungarian External Politics (896–1196)] (in Hungarian). Szegedi Középkorász M?hely. ISBN 963-04-2913-6.
** Manteuffel, Tadeusz (1982). The Formation of the Polish State: The Period of Ducal Rule, 963–1194 (Translated and with an Introduction by Andrew Gorski). Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-1682-4.
** Robinson, I. S. (1999). Henry IV of Germany, 1056–1106. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-54590-0.
** Steinhübel, Ján (2011). "The Duchy of Nitra". In Teich, Mikuláš; Ková?, Dušan; Brown, Martin D. (eds.) Slovakia in History. Cambridge University Press. pp. 15–29. ISBN 978-0-521-80253-6.
** Wertner, Mór (1892). Az Árpádok családi története [=Family History of the Árpáds] (in Hungarian). Szabó Ferencz N.-eleméri plébános & Pleitz Fer. Pál Könyvnyomdája."10



; Per Genealogy.EU: "András I "the Catholic", King of Hungary (1046-60) -cr 1046, *ca 1014, +Zirc 1060, bur Tihany; 1m: a non-Christian Hungarian woman; 2m: 1038 Anastasia Yaroslavna of Kiev (*ca 1021/22, +?)1"

GAV-28 EDV-29 GKJ-29. He was King of Hungary between 1046 and 1060 at Hungary (now).10 He was King of Hungary, Andrew I managed to restore the royal power. The three campaigns of Emperor Henry III against the Hungarians. Andrew managed to hold his own, and in 1058 the emperor recognized Hungary's independence from the empire. between 1047 and 1060 at Hungary.13

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Unknown (?)

Family 3

Anastasia/Agmund Yaroslavna (?) of Kiev, Queen of Hungary b. c 1023, d. a 1074
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, András I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020694&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Vazul 'the Blind' of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020693&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Katun Comitopuli or Katalin of Bulgaria: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00526203&tree=LEO
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#AdelaidaMVratislavIIBohemia. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 244-6, p. 207. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurikid 1 page (Rurikids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik1.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anastasia of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020695&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#AnastasiaIaroslavnadied10741096.
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_I_of_Hungary. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 28 October 2019), memorial page for Andrew I of Hungary (1013–6 Dec 1060), Find A Grave Memorial no. 58614151, citing Tihany Abbey, Tihany, Balatonfüredi járás, Veszprém, Hungary ; Maintained by Mad (contributor 47329061), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/58614151/andrew_i-of_hungary. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  12. [S1549] "Author's comment", various, Gregory A. Vaut (e-mail address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address), 3 July 2003; unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "GA Vaut Comment."
  13. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), pp. 227. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020273&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Salomon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020755&tree=LEO

Adelaide (?) of Hungary1

F, #10358, b. circa 1040, d. 27 January 1061/62
FatherAndrás/Andrew I "the Catholic" (?) King of Hungary1,2,3,4 b. bt 1014 - 1015, d. b 6 Dec 1060
MotherAnastasia/Agmund Yaroslavna (?) of Kiev, Queen of Hungary1,5,3,4,6 b. c 1023, d. a 1074
ReferenceGAV27 EDV27
Last Edited16 Apr 2020
     Adelaide (?) of Hungary was born circa 1040.1,3 She married Vratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia, son of Bretislav I "the Warrior" (?) Duke of Bohemia, Duke of Moravia and Jutha/Judith (?) von Schweinfurt, between 1057 and 1058;
His 2nd wife
Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1) says m. 1057.7,1,8,9,10,3
Adelaide (?) of Hungary died on 27 January 1061/62.7,1,3
     GAV-27 EDV-27 GKJ-28.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 104.3

; Per Genealogics: "Adelheid was born about 1040, the only daughter of András I, king of Hungary, and Anastasia of Kiev. In 1058 she became the second wife of Wratislaw II of Bohemia, son of Bretislaw I 'the Warrior', duke of Bohemia and Moravia, and Judith von Schweinfurt. She was a good dynastic match for Wratislaw, as he profited from the alliance with her father. They may have had four children, of whom Bretislaw II and Judith would have progeny, whereas Wratislaw and Ludmilla may have been children of Wratislaw's third wife. Wratislaw became duke in 1061 after the death of his brother, and so Adelheid was duchess for only a short time before her death on 27 January 1062. Shortly after Adelheid's death her husband married Swatawa/Swatislawa of Poland. He was crowned the first king of Bohemia in 1085."3

Adelaide (?) of Hungary was also known as Adelheid (?) of Hungary.4

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Adelaide of Hungary (c.?1040 – 27 January 1062)[1] was the only daughter of King Andrew I of Hungary of the Árpád dynasty and Anastasia of Kiev.[2] She was the second wife of Vratislav II of Bohemia, whom she married in 1058.[3] She was a good dynastic match for Vratislav, as he profited from the alliance with her father. They had four children, including Bretislaus II of Bohemia and Judith of Bohemia.[4] Vratislav became duke in 1061 after death of his brother, thus Adelaide was duchess for only a short time before her death early in 1062.
     "Her husband remarried shortly after her death to Swietoslawa of Poland and was later crowned as the first King of Bohemia in 1085.
Notes
1. Dlugosz 1997, p. 1997.
2. Ketrzynski 1950, p. 39.
3. "Adelaide of Hungary (d. 1062)". Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia. Gale Research Inc. Archived from the original on 7 March 2016. Retrieved 8 January 2013.(subscription required)
4. Knoll & Schaer 2003, p. 10.
References
** Ketrzynski, Stanislaw (1950). "The Introduction of Christianity and the Early Kings of Poland". In Reddaway, W.F; Penson, J.H; Halecki, O; Dyboski, R. (eds.) The Cambridge History of Poland. Cambridge University Press.
** Gesta principum Polonorum:The Deeds of the Princes of the Poles. Translated by Knoll, Paul W; Schaer, Frank. Central European University Press. 2003.
** Dlugosz, Jan (1997). The Annals of Jan Dlugosz: An English Abridgement. IM Publications."11



; Per Med Lands: "ADELHEID ([1040]-27 Jan 1062). The Annalista Saxo refers to the wife of Duke Vratislav as "filia Andree regis Ungarie", but does not name her[409]. The Chronica Boemorum names "Adleyta" as the wife of Vratislav of Bohemia but does not give her origin[410]. Her birth date is estimated from her having given birth to four known children before her death. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1062 VI Kal Feb" of "ductrix Adleyth mater Iudithæ et Ludmilæ, similiter Bracislai iunioris et Wratislai, qui in primo flore iuventutis occidit XIII Kal Dec"[411]. m (1057) as his second wife, VRATISLAV of Bohemia Herzog von Olmütz, son of B?ETISLAV Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Judith von Schweinfurt[412] ([1032]-14 Jan 1092). He succeeded his brother in 1061 as VRATISLAV II Duke of the Bohemians. He was declared King of Bohemia at Prague 15 Jun 1085 or 1086."
Med Lands cites:
[409] Annalista Saxo 1061.
[410] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.16, MGH SS IX, p. 77.
[411] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, pp. 79-80.
[412] Who allegedly married secondly, as his second wife, Péter Orseolo King of Hungary, see above.4
As of between 1061 and 1062, Adelaide (?) of Hungary lived at an unknown place ; Duchess consort of Bohemia.11

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, András I: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020694&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020273&tree=LEO
  4. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#AdelaidaMVratislavIIBohemia. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Anastasia of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020695&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#AnastasiaIaroslavnadied10741096.
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 244-7, p. 207. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wratislaw II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020270&tree=LEO
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vratislaus_II_of_Bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#VratislavIIdied1092B
  11. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_of_Hungary
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  13. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00226466. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/

Vratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia1

M, #10359, b. circa 1035, d. 14 January 1093
FatherBretislav I "the Warrior" (?) Duke of Bohemia, Duke of Moravia2,1,3,4,5 b. bt 1002 - 1005, d. 10 Jan 1055
MotherJutha/Judith (?) von Schweinfurt2,1,3,6,5 b. c 990, d. 2 Aug 1058
ReferenceGAV27 EDV26
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Vratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia was born circa 1035; Genealogy.EU (Bohemia 1) says b. ca 1032; Weis [AR7] line 244-7 says b. ca 1035; Leo van de Pas says b. ca 1035; Med Lands says b/ 1032.7,1,8,3 He married Maria (?);
His 1st wife. Per Wikipedia, she died during premature childbirth.1,9,3 Vratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia married Adelaide (?) of Hungary, daughter of András/Andrew I "the Catholic" (?) King of Hungary and Anastasia/Agmund Yaroslavna (?) of Kiev, Queen of Hungary, between 1057 and 1058;
His 2nd wife
Genealogy.EU (Arpad 1) says m. 1057.7,10,8,9,3,11 Vratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia married Swietoslawa/Swatawa (?) of Poland, daughter of Kazimierz I Karol Odnowiciel (?) Count of Poland and Maria Dobroniega Vladimirovna (?) Kijowska, Queen Consort of Poland, between 1062 and 1063;
His 3rd wife.12,8,13,14,15,16,9,3
Vratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia died on 14 January 1093 at Vysehrad (Prague), Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now).7,1,3
Vratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia was buried after 14 January 1093 at Kostel sv. Petra a Pavla, Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1032
     DEATH     14 Jan 1092 (aged 59–60)
     Duke of Bohemia from 1061, succeeding his brother Spytihnev II and from 1085 first King of Bohemia.
     Family Members
     Parents
          B?etislav I. of Bohemia 1002–1055
          Judith von Schweinfurt unknown–1058
     Spouses
          Adelaide Of Hungary unknown–1062
          Swatawa of Poland 1048–1126
     Children
          Judith of Bohemia 1056–1086
     BURIAL     Kostel sv. Petra a Pavla, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     Created by: Lutetia
     Added: 16 Sep 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 97176948.1,8,17
     Reference: Genealogics citesL
1. Europäische Stammtafeln, Band I, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 24.
2. Biogr. details drawn from Wikipedia.16


; Per Genealogy.EU: "Vratislav II, Duke in Olmütz (1055-56)+(1058-61), Duke of Bohemia (1061-85), King of Bohemia (1085-92), *ca 1032, +(Vysehrad) 14.1.1092, bur St.Peter and Paul, Vysehrad, Prague; 1m: Maria N; 2m: 1057 Adelaide of Hungary (+27.1.1062); 3m: 1062 Swatawa of Poland (+1.9.1126.)1"

; Per Enc. of World History: "VRATISLAV II, who, throughout his reign, loyally supported the German emperor, Henry IV, in his struggle with the papacy and took part in the Italian campaigns. He was rewarded by Henry with a crown (1086), but only for his own person."18

; Per Genealogics:
     "Wratislaw became the first king of Bohemia on 15 June 1085. The royal title was a grant from the Holy Roman Emperor and was not hereditary. Before being raised to the kingship, he had ruled Bohemia as duke since 1061. He was one of the greatest of medieval Czech rulers.
     "He was born about 1035, the son of Bretislaw I 'the Warrior', duke of Bohemia and Moravia, and Judith von Schweinfurt. On his father's death in 1055, Wratislaw became duke of Olomouc. He argued with his brother Spytihnev II and was exiled to Hungary. Wratislaw regained his Moravian ducal throne with Hungarian assistance. He eventually reconciled with his brother and succeeded him in the dukeship of all the lands of the Bohemian Crown.
     "Wratislaw was, from the beginning, a vassal and ally of Emperor Heinrich IV. He supported Heinrich in both the Investiture Controversy and the rebellions in Saxony which dominated his long reign. Pope Gregory VII, having already gained the support of Boleslaw II of Poland, was eager to gain the support of the duke of Bohemia to surround the emperor with adversaries fighting for the Church. The Pope confirmed Wratislaw in the privileges of wearing the mitre and tunic which his predecessors had worn. The pope also expressed gratitude for the regular payment of tribute to the Holy See. Wratislaw was often at odds with his brother Jaromir, the bishop of Prague, and he wore his religious vestments around the bishop to irritate him. Jaromir, for his part, ignored the creation of a new Moravian diocese by Wratislaw in 1063. Jaromir even went so far as to take by force the relics removed from Prague to Moravia. Despite the pope's support for Wratislaw's new see, the Bohemian duke was resolute in his allegiance to the empire.
     "In 1070 the Saxons revolted under their duke Magnus and Otto von Nordheim, duke of Bavaria and Boleslaw of Poland attacked Bohemia in 1071. In August 1073 Heinrich responded with an invasion of Poland, but a new Saxon revolt drew him back in 1075. Wratislaw joined him and they defeated the rebels on 9 June at the First Battle of Langensalza. The Bohemian troops showed conspicuous bravery. Heinrich then took Jaromir to Germany to be his chancellor under the name of Gebhard, to Wratislaw's great relief.
     "Wratislaw also took part in the wars against the anti-kings who opposed Heinrich's rule and were elected by a section of the nobility to replace him. At the Battle of Flarchheim the imperial army needed the aid of Wratislaw's contingent to overcome the rebels of the papally-approved claimant Rudolf of Rheinfelden, duke of Swabia. Wratislaw even succeeded in seizing Rudolf's gold sword. This was carried in front of Wratislaw on state occasions. Wratislaw raised an army to serve in Heinrich's Italian campaign of 1081. Despite serving the excommunicated emperor, Wratislaw maintained good relations with the papacy. Nonetheless, Gregory refused to grant Wratislaw permission to use the Slavonic liturgy. However Wratislaw at no stage supported Heinrich's antipope, Clement III.
     "Wratislaw coveted the largely Slavic marches of Meissen and Lusatia, but in spite of Heinrich's promises and Bohemian successes against the rebellious margraves, he never received them. Wratislaw always obediently returned to the emperor any territory conquered from Poland or the margravates. Between 1075 and 1086, he held some land in Lower Lusatia in hopes that eventually Heinrich would confirm it in his possession permanently, but in 1088, with the insurrection of Egbert II of Meissen, Emperor Heinrich granted the region to Heinrich of Ostmark. Wratislaw was thereafter cool to the emperor's military adventures. He never adjusted his loyalty, but he abstained from giving the emperor military aid.
     "Wratislaw married three times. There are no details of the first marriage, which produced no issue. In 1057 he married Adelheid of Hungary, daughter of András I, king of Hungary and Anastasia of Kiev. They had two children, both of whom would have progeny: Bretislaw II, and Judith who married Wladyslaw I Herman, son of Kazimierz I Karol, king of Poland. His children Wratislaw and Ludmilla may have been children of Adelheid but also of his third wife. Adelheid died in 1062, and the following year Wratislaw married Swatawa/Swatislawa of Poland, a daughter of Kazimierz I Karol. They had six children, of whom four (Wladislaw I, Borziwoy II, Sobjeslaw I and another Judith) would have progeny.
     "It was a Premyslid tradition that Moravia would be entrusted to the younger brothers of the ruling prince. In Wratislaw's case, his two younger brothers Konrad I and Otto I inherited Brno and Olomouc, and the youngest, Jaromir, entered the church. However, enmity grew between the brothers. It was then that Wratislaw founded a diocese at Olomouc, under the Archbishopric of Mainz to counter Otto's authority within his province. Both pope and emperor took a hand in refereeing the conflict, which was partly resolved with Jaromir's appointment as Heinrich's chancellor in 1077. In April 1085 a Diet convened in Mainz suppressed the Moravian see, but Wratislaw later founded the see again. Jaromir, who protested in Rome to Pope Urban II, died in 1090.
     "Sadly for Wratislaw, his last years were occupied by more dynastic quarrelling. When his brother Otto I died in 1086, he gave Olomouc to his son Boleslaw (his eldest son from his third marriage), which was seen to be against the interests of Wratislaw's brother Konrad. Wratislaw raised an army against Konrad and sent it out under his eldest son Bretislaw. Instead, this son turned on him. Wratislaw, in keeping with Czech custom, designated his surviving brother Konrad as his heir. He and Konrad were reconciled, and the two routed Bretislaw who fled to Hungary.
     "Wratislaw died of a hunting wound on 14 January 1092, after a reign of thirty years. His brother Konrad succeeded him but died in September of the same year, and the succession passed to Wratislaw's eldest son Bretislaw, returned from exile in Hungary. He died without issue in 1100 and was succeeded by Swatopluk II, the son of Wratislaw's late brother Otto I. When Swatopluk died in 1109, his successor was Wratislaw's son Wladislaw, who would rule as Wladislaw I, duke of Bohemia."16

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Vratislaus (or Wratislaus) II (Czech: Vratislav II.) (d. 14 January 1092), the son of Bretislaus I[1] and Judith of Schweinfurt, was the first King of Bohemia as of 15 June 1085,[1] his royal title granted as a lifetime honorific from Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV that did not establish a hereditary monarchy.[1] Before his elevation to the royal dignity, Vratislaus had ruled Bohemia as duke since 1061.
     "On his father's death in 1055, Vratislaus became duke of Olomouc, whereas his older brother became Duke of Bohemia as Spytihn?v II. He fell out with his brother and was exiled to Hungary. Vratislaus regained the ducal throne of Olomouc with Hungarian assistance and eventually reconciled with his brother, then succeeded him as duke of Bohemia when he died in 1061.
Campaigns of Henry IV
     "Both Pope Alexander II and Pope Gregory VII confirmed Vratislaus in the privilege of wearing the mitre and tunic which his predecessors had.[2] Despite this, Vratislaus supported Henry in both the Investiture Controversy against the popes and the rebellions in Saxony that dominated his long reign. These actions would negate the significance of the mitre.[2]
     "Vratislaus was often at odds with his brother Jaromír, the bishop of Prague. Jaromír, for his part, ignored the creation of a new Moravian diocese in Olomouc by Vratislaus in 1063.[3] Jaromir even went so far as to retake, by arms, the relics removed from Prague and taken to Moravia. Despite the pope's support for Vratislaus' new see, the Bohemian duke was unswayed in his loyalty to the emperor.
     "The Saxons revolted under Duke Magnus of Saxony and Otto of Nordheim, Duke of Bavaria, in 1070 and Boleslaus of Poland attacked Bohemia in 1071. In August 1073, Henry responded with an invasion of Poland, but a new Saxon revolt drew him back in 1075. Vratislaus joined him, and they defeated the rebels on 9 June at the First Battle of Langensalza. The Bohemian troops showed conspicuous bravery. Henry then took Jaromír to Germany to be his chancellor under the name of Gebhard and Vratislaus was greatly relieved.
     "Vratislaus also took part in the wars against the anti-kings who opposed Henry's rule and were elected by a faction of the nobility to replace him. At the Battle of Flarchheim, only through the aid of Vratislaus' contingent was the imperial army capable of overcoming the rebels of the papally-approved claimant Rudolf of Rheinfelden, Duke of Swabia.[4] Vratislaus even succeeded in seizing Rudolf's golden lance.[4] The golden lance was then carried in front of Vratislaus on state occasions.
Relations with the papacy
     "Vratislaus raised an army to serve in Henry's Italian campaign of 1081. In 1083, Vratislaus and his Bohemians were with Henry when they entered Rome itself.
     "Despite his serving an excommunicated emperor, Vratislaus maintained good relations with the papacy. Nonetheless, Gregory refused to grant Vratislaus permission to use the Slavonic liturgy. Never, however, did Vratislaus link his fate with that of Henry's antipope, Clement III.
Expansionism
     "Vratislaus coveted the largely Slavic marches of Meissen and Lusatia, but, in spite of Henry's promises and Bohemian successes against the rebellious margraves, he never received them. He held Lower Lusatia between 1075 and 1086, but in 1088, with the insurrection of Egbert II of Meissen, Henry granted the region to Henry of Ostmark. Vratislaus was thereafter cool to Henry's military adventures. He never wavered in his loyalty, but he abstained from giving the emperor martial aid.
Internal affairs
     "It was a P?emyslid tradition that Moravia would be entrusted to the younger brothers of the ruling prince. In Vratislaus' case, his two younger brothers Conrad and Otto inherited Brno and Olomouc and the youngest, Jaromír, entered the church. However, enmity grew between the brothers. It was then that Vratislaus founded the diocese of Olmütz (diocese of Olomouc), under the Archbishopric of Mainz, to counter Otto's authority within his province. Both pope and emperor took a hand in mediating the conflict, which was partially fixed with Henry's appointment of Jaromír as chancellor in 1077. In April 1085, a reichstag convened in Mainz suppressed the Moravian see, but Vratislaus later re-founded see. Jaromír protested in Rome to Pope Urban II, but died in 1090 before a pope ruled on the matter.
     "Sadly for Vratislaus, his last years were occupied by dynastic quarrelling. When his brother Otto died in 1086, he gave Olomouc to his son Boleslaus, which was seen to be an act against the interests of Conrad. Vratislaus raised an army against Conrad and sent it out under his other son Bretislaus. This son turned on him. Vratislaus, in keeping with Bohemian custom, designated an heir: Conrad. Thus reconciled, the two attacked Bretislaus, who fled to Hungary.
     "Vratislaus died of a hunting wound on 14 January 1092 after a reign of thirty years. He was buried in St. Peter and Paul?s Church, Vyšehrad.[5]
Legacy
     "Vratislaus frequently found himself in conflict with Bishop Jaromír of Prague and sought means to diminish the importance of the Bishop of Prague in domestic Bohemian politics. Among the actions he took were the re-establishment of the Bishopric of Olomouc in 1063 and the creation of the Vyšehrad Chapter in 1070. The latter was richly endowed independently of the Prague bishop, subject instead to the Holy See directly. His success in curbing the power of the Prague bishop helped to strengthen the Bohemian crown and enable later rulers to govern a more unified state. His policy towards the Holy Roman Empire set an example that would be followed in the twelfth century and would ultimately lead to the permanent elevation of Bohemia to the status of a kingdom at the beginning of the thirteenth century. The marriage alliances he was able to conclude with notable foreign princesses reflected the rising position of the P?emyslids among European dynasties. In contrast, Vratislaus's father Bretislaus in 1019 had to abduct his wife, the minor noblewoman Judith of Schweinfurt, to secure any suitable consort at all. His successor continued to cultivate dynastic bonds with notable courts in central and eastern Europe.
Family
     "Vratislaus was married three times. His first wife Maria died during premature childbirth. He married the second time in 1057 to Adelaide, daughter of Andrew I of Hungary, who died in 1061.[6] They had four children:
** Vratislaus (-1061)
** Judith (1056/58-1086), married to Ladislaus I Herman, son of Casimir I of Poland
** Ludmila (-after 1100)
** Bretislaus II of Bohemia (c. 1060–December 22, 1100), Duke of Bohemia

     "In 1062, Vratislaus married a third time to Swatawa of Poland, a daughter of Casimir I of Poland.[7] They had five children:
** Boleslaus (-1091)[7]
** Bo?ivoj II of Bohemia (c. 1064-February 2, 1124), Duke of Bohemia[7]
** Vladislaus I of Bohemia (-April 12, 1125), Duke of Bohemia[7]
** Sob?slav I of Bohemia (-February 14, 1140), Duke of Bohemia[7]
** Judith (c. 1066-9 December 1108), married to Wiprecht II of Groitzsch

Notes
1. Krofta 1957, p. 426-427.
2. Berend, Urbanczyk & Wiszewski 2013, p. 384.
3. Berend, Urbanczyk & Wiszewski 2013, p. 375.
4. Thompson 1926, p. 621.
5. František Palacký: D?jiny národa ?eského v ?echách i v Morav?, book III
6. Ketrzynski 1950, p. 39.
7. Knoll & Schaer 2003, p. 82.
References
** Berend, Nora; Urbanczyk, Przemyslaw; Wiszewski, Przemyslaw (2013). Central Europe in the High Middle Ages:Bohemia, Hungary and Poland, c.900-c.1300. Cambridge University Press.
** Ketrzynski, S. (1950). "The Introduction of Christianity and the Early Kings of Poland". In Reddaway, W.F; Penson, J.H; Halecki, O; Dyboski, R. (eds.) The Cambridge History of Poland:From Sobieski to 1696. Cambridge University Press.
** Krofta, Kamil (1957). "Bohemia to the Extinction of the Premyslids". In Tanner, J.R; Previte-Orton, C.W; Brooke, Z.N. (eds.) Cambridge Medieval History:Victory of the Papacy. Vol. VI. Cambridge University Press.
** Gesta principum Polonorum:The Deeds of the Princes of the Poles. Translated by Knoll, Paul W; Schaer, Frank. Central European University Press. 2003.
** Thompson, James Westfall (1926). "Medieval German Expansion in Bohemia". The Slavonic Review. 4 (No. 12 March).
Literature
** Vratislav Vaní?ek: Vratislav II. (I.) První ?eský král. Vyšehrad 2004, ISBN 80-7021-655-7
** Hans Patze: Die Pegauer Annalen, die Königserhebung Wratislaws v. Böhmen und die Anfänge der Stadt Pegau. JGMODtl 12, 1963, 1-62
** Percy Ernst Schramm: Böhmen und das Regnum: Die Verleihung der Königswürde an die Herzöge von Böhmen (1085/86,1158,1198/1203) (Adel und Kirche. G. Tellenbach z. 65. Geb. Hrsg. J. Fleckenstein-K. Schmid, 1968), 346-364."9

; Per Med Lands:
     "VRATISLAV of Bohemia, son of B?ETISLAV Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Judith von Schweinfurt ([1032]-14 Jan 1093). The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Spitignev, Wratislaw, Conradus, Iaromir, Otto" as the five sons of "Bracizlaus [et] Iuditha"[110]. The Annalista Saxo names "Wratizlao duce" as another son of Judith von Schweinfurt, specifying that he brought his mother's body back to Prague for burial[111]. Herzog von Olmütz 1054-1059. He succeeded his brother in 1061 as VRATISLAV II Duke of the Bohemians. The extent of Bohemian integration in imperial affairs is demonstrated by the grants by "Heinricus…rex" of "comitatum Histrie" and "marchiam Carniole" to the church of Aquileia at the request of "ducibus autem Writizlao Boemie ac Liudolfo Carintie, Cuonone quoque palatino comite et Tieboldo marchione" by two charters dated 11 Jun 1077[112]. The Chronica Boemorum records that "dux Wratislaus et sui fratres Chounradus atque Otto" fought against "orientalem marchionem Lupoldum filium Lucz", the passage being undated with the date 1082 inserted in the margin of the edition[113]. Vratislav was declared King of Bohemia at Prague 15 Jun 1085 or 1086. The Annales Gradicenses record that "rex Wratislaus factus est" in 1086 and that in 1087 "dux Boemie…Wratislaus" was anointed as king and "uxor eius Zuslava" as queen[114]. The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1093 "Wratizlaus rex" and his succession by "Chonradus"[115]. The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records the death in 1093 of "Fratizlaus dux Boemiæ" when he fell from his horse while hunting[116]. The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ records the death in 1093 of "Wratislaus…filius Bretislai, fundator Ecclesiæ Wissegradensis…primus Rex Boemiæ"[117].
     "m firstly MARIA, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not been identified.
     "m secondly (1057) ADELHEID of Hungary, daughter of ANDRÁS I King of Hungary & his second wife Anastasia Iaroslavna of Kiev ([1040]-27 Jan 1062). The Annalista Saxo refers to the wife of Duke Vratislav as "filia Andree regis Ungarie", but does not name her[118]. The Chronica Boemorum names "Adleyta" as the wife of Vratislav of Bohemia but does not give her origin[119]. Her birth date is estimated from her having given birth to four known children before her death. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1062 VI Kal Feb" of "ductrix Adleyth mater Iudithæ et Ludmilæ, similiter Bracislai iunioris et Wratislai, qui in primo flore iuventutis occidit XIII Kal Dec"[120].
     "m thirdly ([1062/63]) SWI?TOSLAWA [Svatana] of Poland, daughter of KAZIMIERZ I KAROL "Odnowiciel/the Renewer" Prince of Poland & his wife Dobronega Maria Vladimirovna of Kiev ([1048]-1 Sep 1126). The Annalista Saxo records the marriage of Duke Vratislav with "Zuatavam, Kazimer ducis Polanorum filiam", after the death of his Hungarian wife[121]. The Chronica Boemorum records the marriage of "Wratislaus dux" and "Zustavam, Kazimir Poloniorum ducis natam, Bloezlai vero et Uladizlai germanam" after the death of "ductrix Adleyth"[122]. The Chronicæ Polanorum refers to an unnamed daughter of King Kazimierz who married "regi Bohemiæ"[123]. The Annales Gradicenses record that in 1087 "dux Boemie…Wratislaus" was anointed as king and "uxor eius Zuslava" as queen[124]. The Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmæ; records the death "Kal Sep 1126" of "Zvatava regina mater Sobezlai ducis"[125]. The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1126 of "Zuatava regina"[126]."
Med Lands cites:
[110] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 67.
[111] Annalista Saxo 1058.
[112] MGH Diplomata VI.2, D H IV 295 and 296, pp. 386 and 389.
[113] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.35, MGH SS IX, p. 89.
[114] Annales Gradicenses 1086 and 1087, MGH SS XVII, p. 648.
[115] Annales Gradicenses 1093, MGH SS XVII, p. 648.
[116] Mariani Scotti Chronicon, Continuatio I, 1085, MGH SS V, p. 562.
[117] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428.
[118] Annalista Saxo 1061.
[119] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.16, MGH SS IX, p. 77.
[120] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, pp. 79-80.
[121] Annalista Saxo 1061.
[122] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80.
[123] Chronicæ Polanorum I.19, MGH SS IX, p. 438.
[124] Annales Gradicenses 1087, MGH SS XVII, p. 648.
[125] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmæ 1126 MGH SS IX, p. 157.3
Vratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia was also known as Vratislaus II (?) Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia.9 Vratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia was also known as Wratislaw II (?) King of Bohemia.8 GAV-26 EDV-27.

; Per Med Lands: "SWI?TOS?AWA [Swatawa] ([1048]-1 Sep 1126). The Chronicæ Polanorum names (in order) "Bolezlavus, Wladislaus, Mescho et Otto" sons of King Kazimierz, and an (unnamed) daughter who married "regi Bohemiæ"[161]. The Annalista Saxo records the marriage of Duke Vratislav with "Zuatavam, Kazimer ducis Polanorum filiam", after the death of his Hungarian wife[162]. The Chronica Boemorum records the marriage of "Wratislaus dux" and "Zustavam, Kazimir Poloniorum ducis natam, Bloezlai vero et Uladizlai germanam" after the death of "ductrix Adleyth"[163]. The Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmæ; records the death "Kal Sep 1126" of "Zvatava regina mater Sobezlai ducis"[164]. m ([1062/63]) VRATISLAV II Duke of the Bohemians, son of B?ETISLAV Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Judith von Schweinfurt ([1032]-14 Jan 1092)."
Med Lands cites:
[161] Chronicæ Polanorum I.19, MGH SS IX, p. 438.
[162] Annalista Saxo 1061.
[163] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80.
[164] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmæ 1126 MGH SS IX, p. 157.15
He was Duke in Olmütz between 1055 and 1056 at Olmutz, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now).1 He was Duke in Olmütz between 1058 and 1061 at Olmutz, Bohemia, Czech Republic (now).1 He was Duke of Bohemia between 1061 and 1085 at Bohemia, Czech Republic (now).1 He was King of Bohemia between 1086 and 1092 at Bohemia, Czech Republic (now).1,16

Family 1

Maria (?)

Family 2

Adelaide (?) of Hungary b. c 1040, d. 27 Jan 1061/62
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  2. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I11411
  3. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#VratislavIIdied1092B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Bretislaw I 'the Warrior': https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020268&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BretislavIdied1055B
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith von Schweinfurt: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020269&tree=LEO
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 244-7, p. 207. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wratislaw II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020270&tree=LEO
  9. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vratislaus_II_of_Bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Arpad 1 page (Arpad family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/arpad/arpad1.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020273&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (the Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Swatawa|Swatislawa of Poland: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020271&tree=LEO
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C5%9Awi%C4%99tos%C5%82awa_of_Poland
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#MieszkoIIdied1034
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wratislaw II: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020270&tree=LEO
  17. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 02 December 2019), memorial page for Vratislav II Of Bohemia (1032–14 Jan 1092), Find A Grave Memorial no. 97176948, citing Kostel sv. Petra a Pavla, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic ; Maintained by Lutetia (contributor 46580078), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/97176948/vratislav_ii-of_bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  18. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 223. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  19. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00226466. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith of Bohemia: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330313&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Ulrich of Bohemia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330325&tree=LEO

Judith (?) of Bohemia, Queen Consort of Poland1,2

F, #10360, b. between 1056 and 1058, d. 25 December 1086
FatherVratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia1,3,4,5 b. c 1035, d. 14 Jan 1093
MotherAdelaide (?) of Hungary1,3,6 b. c 1040, d. 27 Jan 1061/62
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited15 May 2020
     Judith (?) of Bohemia, Queen Consort of Poland was born between 1056 and 1058 at Prague, Okres Praha, Bohemia, Czech Republic.2,7 She married Wladislaw I Herman (?) King of Poland, son of Kazimierz I Karol Odnowiciel (?) Count of Poland and Maria Dobroniega Vladimirovna (?) Kijowska, Queen Consort of Poland, circa 1080;
His 1st wife.8,1,9,3,10,11,5,12,13
Judith (?) of Bohemia, Queen Consort of Poland died on 25 December 1086 at Plock, Mazowieckie, Poland (now); Genealogy.EU (Bohemia 1 page) says d. 25 Dec. 1086; Weis says d.25 Dec 1085; Rafal Pinke says d. 24 Dec. 1086; Med Lands says d. 25 Dec 1086.8,1,3,5,7
Judith (?) of Bohemia, Queen Consort of Poland was buried after 25 December 1086 at Plock Cathedral, Plock, Miasto Plock, Mazowieckie, Poland,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1056, Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic
     DEATH     25 Dec 1086 (aged 29–30), P?ock, Mazowieckie, Poland
     Family Members
     Parents
          Vratislav II Of Bohemia 1032–1092
          Adelaide Of Hungary unknown–1062
     Spouse
          Wladyslaw I Herman 1044–1102
     Children
          Boleslaw III Wrymouth 1086–1138
     BURIAL     Plock Cathedral, P?ock, Miasto P?ock, Mazowieckie, Poland
     Created by: Angie Swann
     Added: 2 Dec 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 155614944.7
     ; Per Med Lands: "JUDITH (-25 Dec 1086). The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam et Ludmilam filias et Brazilaum iuniorem et Wratislaum" as children of Duke Vratislav & his Hungarian wife[137]. The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Iudithæ et Ludmilæ, similiter Bracislai iunioris et Wratislai, qui in primo flore iuventutis occidit XIII Kal Dec" as children of "ductrix Adleyth"[138]. In the same passage, the chronicler records that one of Duke Vratislav's daughters, unnamed and without specifying by which marriage, married "duci Polonico"[139]. The Chronicæ Polanorum refers to the wife of King W?adys?aw as "filiam Wratislavi Bohemici regis"[140]. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1085 VIII Kal Ian" of "Iuditha coniux Wladizlai ducis Poloniorum, quæ fuit filia Wratizlai ducis Boemorum"[141]. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the death in 1086 of "Iudith mater sua [Bolezslaus tertius]"[142]. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum records that she died from the effects of childbirth[143]. m ([1080]) as his first wife, W?ADYS?AW I HERMAN Prince of Poland, son of KAZIMIERZ I KAROL "Odnowiciel/the Renewer" Prince of Poland & his wife Dobronega Maria Vladimirovna of Kiev ([1043]-4 Jun 1102)."
Med Lands cites:
[137] Annalista Saxo 1061.
[138] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80.
[139] Annalista Saxo 1061.
[140] Chronicæ Polanorum I.30, MGH SS IX, p. 442.
[141] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.36, MGH SS IX, p. 91.
[142] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1086, MGH SS XIX, p. 588.
[143] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.5
GAV-26 EDV-26. Judith (?) of Bohemia, Queen Consort of Poland was also known as Judyta (?) czeska.3

; Per Wikipedia:
     "Judith of Bohemia (c. 1056/58 – 25 December 1086), also known as Judith P?emyslid, was a Bohemian princess of the P?emyslid dynasty, and Duchess of Poland by marriage.
     "She was a daughter of Duke Vratislaus II of Bohemia by his second wife Adelaide, daughter of King Andrew I of Hungary.[1][2] She was named after her paternal grandmother Judith of Schweinfurt, who died shortly after her birth.
Life
Family
     "Judith was the second of four children born from Vratislaus II's marriage with the Hungarian princess Adelaide. The others were Bretislaus II, Ludmila (later a nun) and Vratislaus, who died young in battle. Judith's uncle Duke Spytihn?v II died in 1061 and was succeeded by his brother Vratislaus II. One year later, in 1062, Duchess Adelaide died.
     "Duke Vratislaus II remarried in 1063 to ?wi?tos?awa, daughter of Duke Casimir I of Poland. From this marriage, Judith gained five half-siblings: Boleslav (Duke of Olomouc, who died shortly before his father), Borivoj II, Vladislav I, Sob?slav I Old?ich and Judith, later wife of Wiprecht II of Groitzsch, Burgrave of Magdeburg.
Marriage
     "Around 1080, Judith married W?adys?aw I Herman, Duke of Poland (nephew of her stepmother), to solidify the recently established Bohemian-Polish alliance.
     "According to contemporary chroniclers, Duchess Judith performed remarkable charity work, helping the needy and ensuring the comfort of subjects and prisoners. After almost five years of childless marriage, the necessity for an heir increased:
Because she was barren pray to God every day with tears and orations, made sacrifices and paying debts, helping widows and orphans, and given very generous amounts of gold and silver for the monasteries, commanded the priests to pray to the saints and the grace of God for a child.

     "On 10 June 1085, Judith and her husband were present at the coronation of her father Duke Vratislaus II as the first King of Bohemia. One year later, on 20 August 1086, she gave birth to the long-awaited son and heir, the future Duke Boles?aw III Wrymouth. Sadly, the duchess never recovered from the effects of childbirth and died four months later, on 25 December. She was buried in Cathedral of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Masovia in P?ock.
     "Three years later, in 1089, her husband was remarried to the widow of Judith's uncle King Solomon of Hungary, Judith of Swabia, who was renamed Sophia in Poland in order to distinguish herself from W?adys?aw I's first wife.
Notes
1. Cawley, Charles, BOHEMIA - Judith (died 1086), Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, retrieved 15 July 2014,[self-published source][better source needed]
2. Marek, Miroslav. "Complete Genealogy of the Premyslid dynasty". genealogy.euweb.cz. Retrieved 15 July 2014.[self-published source][better source needed]
References
** K. Jasi?ski: Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, Warsaw – Wroc?aw, 1992.2 She was Duchess consort of Poland between 1080 and 1086.2

Family

Wladislaw I Herman (?) King of Poland b. c 1043, d. 4 Jun 1102
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  2. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  3. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00226466. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wratislaw II: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020270&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#VratislavIIdied1092B. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adelheid of Hungary: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020273&tree=LEO
  7. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 02 December 2019), memorial page for Judith of Bohemia (1056–25 Dec 1086), Find A Grave Memorial no. 155614944, citing Plock Cathedral, P?ock, Miasto P?ock, Mazowieckie, Poland ; Maintained by Angie Swann (contributor 48313732), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/155614944/judith_of-bohemia. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 244-8, p. 207. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (The Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  10. [S1657] http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00226085
  11. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page - The Piast family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#WladislawIHermandied1102
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wladyslaw I Herman: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027256&tree=LEO
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw III Krzywousty: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020809&tree=LEO
  15. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#BoleslawIIIdied1138B

Wladislaw I Herman (?) King of Poland1,2,3

M, #10361, b. circa 1043, d. 4 June 1102
FatherKazimierz I Karol Odnowiciel (?) Count of Poland2,3,4,5,6 b. 25 Jul 1016, d. 19 Mar 1058
MotherMaria Dobroniega Vladimirovna (?) Kijowska, Queen Consort of Poland2,3,7,8 b. a 1011, d. 1087
ReferenceGAV26 EDV26
Last Edited15 May 2020
     Wladislaw I Herman (?) King of Poland was born circa 1043.9,10,11 He married Judith (?) of Bohemia, Queen Consort of Poland, daughter of Vratislav II (?) Duke in Olmutz, Duke of Bohemia, King of Bohemia and Adelaide (?) of Hungary, circa 1080;
His 1st wife.9,1,2,12,3,10,13,14,11 Wladislaw I Herman (?) King of Poland married Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia, daughter of Heinrich III "The Black" (?) King of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor and Agnès (?) de Poitou, d Holy Roman Empress, between 1088 and 1089;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband
Leo van de Pas says m. 1088; Rafal Pinke says m. 1088; Genealogy.EU Piast 1 pages says m. ca 1089; Med Lands says m. 1089; Med Lands says m. 1089.15,16,3,10,17,14,11,18
Wladislaw I Herman (?) King of Poland died on 4 June 1102.9,3,10,11
Wladislaw I Herman (?) King of Poland was buried after 4 June 1102 at Plock Cathedral, Plock, Miasto Plock, Mazowieckie, Poland,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1044, Poland
     DEATH     4 Jun 1102 (aged 57–58), P?ock, Mazowieckie, Poland
     Family Members
     Parents
          Casimir I King Of Poland 1016–1058
     Spouse
          Judith of Bohemia 1056–1086
     Siblings
          Boleslaw of Poland 1042–1081
          Swatawa of Poland 1048–1126
     Children
          Boleslaw III Wrymouth 1086–1138
     Children
          Boleslaw III Wrymouth 1086–1138
     BURIAL     Plock Cathedral, P?ock, Miasto P?ock, Mazowieckie, Poland
     Created by: Angie Swann
     Added: 1 Dec 2015
     Find A Grave Memorial 155593254.19
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96]). The Annales of Berthold record the betrothal in 1059 of "Andreas Pannoniæ rex…filio suo Salomoni adhuc puero" and "sororem eius [Heinrici regis] minorem Iuditham"[403]. The Annales Yburgenses refer to the wife of "Ungariam…[rex] Salemannum" as "regis Heinrici sororem" but do not name her[404]. The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[405]. Having left Hungary for Germany after her husband was deposed in 1074, she was living in Regensburg when her husband attempted to reclaim the Hungarian throne. She refused to receive him when he returned in 1083. Her second marriage is confirmed by the Chronicæ Polanorum which records that King W?adys?aw married "sororem imperatoris tertii Henrici, uxorem prius Salemonis Ungariæ regis"[406]. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum specifies her name "Iudite"[407]. The necrology of Weltenburg records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita de Polonia soror Heinrici imperatoris IV"[408]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita regina"[409]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudda regina imperatricis filia"[410].
     "[Betrothed ([1055/59]) to PHILIPPE de France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire). The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[411]. This could only refer to the future Philippe I King of France as it is unlikely that the emperor's daughter would have been betrothed to his younger brother. This betrothal is not corroborated in the western European primary sources so far consulted. He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France.]
     "m firstly (betrothed 1059, early 1063) SALOMON King of Hungary, son of ANDRÁS I "the Catholic" King of Hungary & his second wife Anastasia Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-killed in battle 1087).
     "m secondly ([1089]) as his second wife, W?ADYS?AW I HERMAN Prince of Poland, son of KAZIMIERZ I KAROL "Odnowiciel/the Renewer" Prince of Poland & his wife Dobronega Maria Vladimirovna of Kiev ([1043]-4 Jun 1102)."
Med Land cites:
[403] Bertholdi Annales 1059, MGH SS V, p. 271.
[404] Annales Yburgenses 1074, MGH SS XVI, p. 436.
[405] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 57, p. 127.
[406] Chronicæ Polanorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 445.
[407] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[408] Necrologium Weltenbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 369.
[409] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[410] Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 319.
[411] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 57, p. 127.18


; Per Genealogics: "Wladyslaw Herman was born in 1043, the second son of Kazimierz I Karol, king of Poland, and Dobronega (Maria) of Kiev. He was the younger brother of Boleslaw II, king of Poland. About 1080 Wladyslaw married Judith of Bohemia, daughter of Wratislaw II, king of Bohemia, and Adelheid of Hungary. They had a son Boleslaw who would have progeny. Judith died in 1086, and about 1088 Wladyslaw married Judith (Sofie) of Swabia, daughter of the Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich III and Agnès de Poitou. Wladyslaw and Judith of Swabia had three daughters, of whom two would have progeny. The third, Agnes became abbess of Gandersheim. Wladyslaw took power in 1079, after his brother Boleslaw II 'the Bold' was forced into exile. He supported his brother-in-law the Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich IV, brother of his second wife, in a bid to restore peace. Wladyslaw had an illegitimate son, Zbigniew of Poland. Wladyslaw died on 4 June 1102. His son Boleslaw succeeded him, ruling jointly with Zbigniew until 1107, when Boleslaw had Zbigniew banished, and became sole ruler as Boleslaw III Krzywousty."11

; Per Genealogy.EU: "Wladislaw I Herman, Ct of Poland (1079-1102), *1043, +4.6.1102; 1m: ca 1080 Judith of Bohemia (*ca 1056 +25.12.1086); 2m: ca 1089 Jutta of Germany (*1047 +1100.)10"

; Per Med Lands:
     "W?ADYS?AW HERMAN of Poland, son of KAZIMIERZ I KAROL "Odnowiciel/the Renewer" Prince of Poland & his wife Dobronega Maria Vladimirovna of Kiev ([1043]-4 Jun 1102). The Chronica principum Polonie records that one source names "duos filios, Bolcelsum secundum et Wladislaum primum" as the children of "Kazimirus" and his wife "Dobrognewam", adding that another source names "quatuor…filios Boleslaum, Wladislaum, Meziconem et Ottonem unamque filiam" as his children by his unnamed wife "de Russia"[172]. The Chronicæ Polanorum names (in order) the four sons "Bolezlavus, Wladislaus, Mescho et Otto" of King Kazimierz, and an (unnamed) daughter who married "regi Bohemiæ"[173]. "Vladizlaum et Bolizlaum" are named as sons of Kazimierz & his wife in the Annalista Saxo[174]. He succeeded in 1080 as W?ADYS?AW I Prince of Poland. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the death in 1102 of "Hermannus dux Polonie cognominatus Vladislaus"[175].
     "m firstly ([1080]) JUDITH of Bohemia, daughter of VRATISLAV II Duke of the Bohemians & his second wife Adelheid of Hungary ([1056/58]-25 Dec 1086). The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam et Ludmilam filias et Brazilaum iuniorem et Wratislaum" as children of Duke Vratislav and his Hungarian wife[176]. The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Iudithæ et Ludmilæ, similiter Bracislai iunioris et Wratislai, qui in primo flore iuventutis occidit XIII Kal Dec" as children of "ductrix Adleyth"[177]. In the same passage, the chronicler records that one of Duke Vratislav's daughters, unnamed and without specifying by which marriage, married "duci Polonico"[178]. The Chronicæ Polanorum refers to the wife of King W?adys?aw as "filiam Wratislavi Bohemici regis"[179]. The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1085 VIII Kal Ian" of "Iuditha coniux Wladizlai ducis Poloniorum, quæ fuit filia Wratizlai ducis Boemorum"[180]. The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the death in 1086 of "Iudith mater sua [Bolezslaus tertius]"[181]. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum records that she died from the effects of childbirth[182].
     "m secondly ([1089]) as her second husband, JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] of Germany, widow of SALOMON King of Hungary, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH III King of Germany & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96], bur Admont Abbey). The Annales Yburgenses refer to the wife of "Ungariam…[rex] Salemannum" as "regis Heinrici sororem"[183]. The Chronicæ Polanorum records that King W?adys?aw married "sororem imperatoris tertii Henrici, uxorem prius Salemonis Ungariæ regis"[184]. The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum specifies her name "Iudite"[185]. The necrology of Weltenburg records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita de Polonia soror Heinrici imperatoris IV"[186]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudita regina"[187]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "II Id Mar" of "Iudda regina imperatricis filia"[188].
     "Mistress (1): ---. The name of Prince W?adys?aw's mistress is not known.
Med Lands cites:
[172] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 58.
[173] Chronicæ Polanorum I.19, MGH SS IX, p. 438.
[174] Annalista Saxo 1039.
[175] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1102, MGH SS XIX, p. 588.
[176] Annalista Saxo 1061.
[177] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80.
[178] Annalista Saxo 1061.
[179] Chronicæ Polanorum I.30, MGH SS IX, p. 442.
[180] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.36, MGH SS IX, p. 91.
[181] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1086, MGH SS XIX, p. 588.
[182] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[183] Annales Yburgenses 1074, MGH SS XVI, p. 436.
[184] Chronicæ Polanorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 445.
[185] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559.
[186] Necrologium Weltenbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 369.
[187] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.
[188] Boehmer, J. F. (1868) Fontes Rerum Germanicarum, Band IV (Stuttgart), Kalendarium Necrologicum Canonicorum Spirensium, p. 319.14


; Per Wikipedia:
     "W?adys?aw I Herman (c. 1044[1] – 4 June 1102) was a Duke of Poland from 1079 until his death.
     "He was the second son of Casimir I the Restorer by his wife Maria Dobroniega, daughter of Vladimir the Great, Grand Duke of Kiev.
Biography
     "As the second son, W?adys?aw was not destined for the throne. However, due to the flight from Poland of his older brother Boles?aw II the Bold in 1079, he was elevated to the rank of Duke of Poland. Opinions vary on whether W?adys?aw played an active role in the plot to depose his brother or whether he was handed the authority simply because he was the most proper person, being the next in line in the absence of the king and his son Mieszko Boles?awowic.
     "In 1080, in order to improve the relations between Poland and Bohemia, W?adys?aw married Judith, the daughter of the Duke (and first King from 1085) Vratislaus II. After this, the foreign policy of the Duke gravitated strongly towards appeasement of the Holy Roman Empire.
He accepted overlordship of the Empire, and when in 1085 while in Mainz the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV announced that his brother-in-law Vratislaus II to be King of Bohemia and Poland, W?adys?aw did not object. He also never pursued the Royal crown due to his subservient status. Soon after, he was forced by the barons of Poland to recall from exile in Hungary his nephew and rightful heir to the Polish throne, Mieszko Boles?awowic. The young prince accepted the overlordship of his uncle and gave up his hereditary claims in exchange for becoming first in line of succession. W?adys?aw was forced to accept the terms of his nephew, because his eldest and only son at that time, Zbigniew, was illegitimate because he had been born from a union not recognized by the church. W?adys?aw's relations with the Emperor were considerably improved after his second marriage with his sister Judith (also Dowager Queen of Hungary) in 1089.
     "W?adys?aw abandoned the alliance with Hungary favored by his deposed brother, and joined the anti-Papal camp. Also, he resumed paying tribute for Silesia to Bohemia. In addition Kraków and Cieszyn were ceded to Bohemia, Lubusz Land was lost to Germany while Przemy?l Land in the east was lost to Halych-Ruthenia. W?adys?aw did make attempts to regain the control of Pomerania, and through numerous expeditions was temporarily (1090–1091) able to do so.
     "Although W?adys?aw was formally Dux and an Overlord of Poland, in reality the barons who banished his brother used this victory to strengthen their position. It's not surprising therefore, that within a short time the Duke was forced to give up the government to his Count Palatine, (Polish: wojewoda) a high born noble named Sieciech. Sieciech's administration of the realm was negatively perceived by those of the barons who were not the beneficiaries of the power shift.
     "The birth of the future Boles?aw III completely changed the political situation in Poland. Mieszko Boleslawowic was already seventeen at that time and was, by the previous agreement made after his return, the first in line to succeed. In 1089 Mieszko died under mysterious circumstances, probably poisoned on the orders of Sieciech and Duchess Judith-Sophia. Almost immediately, Zbigniew was sent to Germany and placed in the Quedlinburg Abbey. With the idea of forcing his first-born son to take the holy vows, W?adys?aw intended to deprive him of any chance of succession.
     "In 1090 Sieciech, with help of Polish forces under his command, managed to gain control of Gda?sk Pomerania, albeit for a short time. Major towns were garrisoned by Polish troops, the rest were burned, in order to thwart any future resistance. Several months later, however, a rebellion of native elites led to the restoration of the region’s independence from Poland.
     "Sieciech's tyrannical rule reflected negatively on W?adys?aw, causing a massive political migration out of Poland. In 1093 Silesia rebelled, and the comes Magnus with the assistance of the Bohemian and Polish knights welcomed Zbigniew after he escaped from Germany; however, soon Sieciech captured the prince and imprisoned him. The increasing dissatisfaction in the country forced the release of Zbigniew in 1097. Immediately after this W?adys?aw (after an unsuccessfully retaliatory expedition against Silesia and forced to recognize Zbigniew as the legitimate heir) appointed his sons as commanders of the army which was formed in order to recapture Gda?sk Pomerania.
     "Simultaneously a great migration of Jews from Western Europe to Poland began circa 1096, around the time of the First Crusade. W?adys?aw, a tolerant ruler, attracted the Jews into his domains, and permitted to settle throughout the entire country without restriction.
     "Soon Zbigniew and Boles?aw decided to join forces and demanded that the reigns of the government should be handed over to them. W?adys?aw agreed to divide the realm between the brothers, each to be granted his own province while he himself kept control of Mazovia and its capital at P?ock. W?adys?aw also retained control of the most important cities i.e. Wroc?aw, Kraków and Sandomierz. Zbigniew’s province encompassed Greater Poland including Gniezno, Kuyavia, ??czyca and Sieradz. Boles?aw’s territory included Lesser Poland, Silesia and Lubusz Land.
     "However, Sieciech, alarmed by the evident diminution of his power, began to intrigue against the brothers. W?adys?aw decided to support him against his own sons. Defeated, in 1101 and after the mediation of the Archbishop of Gniezno Martin, the Duke was forced to confiscate Sieciech's properties and exiled him.
     "W?adys?aw died on 4 June 1102, without resolving the issue of succession, leaving his sons to struggle for supremacy. His body was interned in the P?ock Cathedral.[2][3][4][5]
Churches founded
     "W?adys?aw founded several churches in Poland. Most notably he was the founder of the Romanesque Wawel Cathedral of which the Silver Bells Tower still remains standing. He was also very fond of Saint Giles (Polish: Idzi) to whom he founded no less than three churches: in Kraków, Inowlodz and Giebultow. This is attributed to the fact that while his first wife was finally pregnant after six years of childless marriage, the Duke sent rich gifts to the Benedictine monastery of Saint Gilles in southern France, begging for a healthy child. When a boy was born, Wladyslaw began building churches in his honor. According to legend, he also founded a church "on the sand" dedicated to the Virgin Mary, which was later granted to the Carmelites.
Health issues
     "According to Gallus Anonymus, W?adys?aw long suffered from a debilitating ailment that affected his legs. There is also a legend which states that in 1086 W?adys?aw was affected by a terrible pox, with abscesses that affected his nose and face. According to the legend Holy Virgin appeared in the duke's dream and led him to find the cure in the sandy area outside the city. Once healed W?adys?aw founded a Church of Holiest Virgin Mary "on the sand" in the spot where he found the cure.
Marriages and issue
     "Before W?adys?aw took the title of Duke of Poland, probably during the 1070s, he had a relationship with a certain Przec?awa, whose exact origins are unknown, although some sources stated that she belonged to the Prawdzic clan.[6] Her status is also a matter of dispute among the historians: some believed that she only was W?adys?aw's mistress and others asserted that she was his wife, but this union was performed under pagan rituals and in consequence not recognized by the Church as a valid marriage. By 1080, one year after W?adys?aw ascended to the Polish throne, Przec?awa either died or was sent away; it's believed by some sources that after she was dismissed by the Duke, Przec?awa took the veil under the name of Christina (Polish: Krystyna) and died around 1092.[7] This union produced a son, Zbigniew (b. c. 1070/73 – d. c. 1112/14), who was considered illegitimate.
     "In 1080 W?adys?aw married firstly with Judith (b. c. 1056 – d. 25 December 1086), daughter of Duke (and since 1085 King) Vratislaus II of Bohemia. They had one son:
1. Boles?aw III Wrymouth (b. 20 August 1086 – d. 28 October 1138).

     "In 1089 W?adys?aw married secondly with Judith (b. 9 April 1054 – d. 14 March c. 1105), daughter of Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor and widow of King Solomon of Hungary. They had four daughters:
1. Sophia (b. c. 1089 – d. bef. 12 May 1112), married bef. 1108 to Yaroslav Sviatopolkovich, Prince of Volhynia, son of Sviatopolk II of Kiev.
2. Agnes (b. c. 1090 – d. 29 December 1127), Abbess of Quedlinburg (1110) and Gandersheim (1111).
3. Adelaide (b. c. 1091 – d. 25/26 March 1127), married bef. 1118 to Dietrich III, Count of Vohburg and Margrave of the Northern March.[8]
4. A daughter (b. c. 1092 – d. bef. 1111), married c. 1111 with a Polish lord.
References
1. POLAND
2. Antoni Czubinski, Jerzy Topolski – "History of Poland" Ossolineum, Warsaw (1988)
3. Lech Bielski, Mariusz Traba – "Poczet Krolow i Ksi??at Polskich" Park, Bielsko-Bia?a (2005)
4. Przemys?aw Wiszewski, "W?adys?aw Herman and his Epoch" Wydawnictwo Dolno?l?skie, Wroc?aw (2002)
5. Gallus Anonymus – "Cronicae et gesta ducum sive principum Polonorum" (c.1115)
6. K. Jasi?ski, Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, Wroc?aw – Warszaw (1992).
7. Krystyna Przec?awa Prawdzic
8. Adelaide's parentage is disputed among the historians and web sources."20

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von. Page 82.11 He was King of Poland, Vladislav I (Ladislas), an indolent and unwarlike ruler, brother of Boleslav. He resigned the royal title and attempted to secure peace by supporting the Emperor Henry IV, as well as by courting the nobility and clergy. between 1079 and 1102.21 He was Duke of Poland between 1079 and 1102.10,20

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Judith (?) of Bohemia, Queen Consort of Poland b. bt 1056 - 1058, d. 25 Dec 1086
Child

Family 3

Judith/Sofie (?) of Swabia b. 1047, d. bt 1093 - 1095
Children

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Bohemia 1 page (The Premyslids): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/bohemia/bohemia1.html
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page (The Piast family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  3. [S1657] Pagina Domestica Curiosa Reformata et Amplificata, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00226085. Hereinafter cited as http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/
  4. [S1657] http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00231034
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Kazimierz I Karol: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027277&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#MieszkoIIdied1034. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1657] http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00231353
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Dobronega (Maria) of Kiev: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027278&tree=LEO
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 244-8, p. 207. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Piast 1 page - The Piast family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/piast/piast1.html
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wladyslaw I Herman: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027256&tree=LEO
  12. [S1657] http://main.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/, online Wacek-OL Database, http://main.amu.edu.pl/bin-rafalp/osoby2.pl?00226466
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#VratislavIIdied1092B
  14. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#WladislawIHermandied1102
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Judith: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027255&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Wladyslaw I Herman: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027256&tree=LEO
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Salian page - The Salian family: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/german/salian.html
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#JudithMariaM1SalomonHungaryM2WladyslawI.
  19. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 02 December 2019), memorial page for Wladyslaw I Herman (1044–4 Jun 1102), Find A Grave Memorial no. 155593254, citing Plock Cathedral, P?ock, Miasto P?ock, Mazowieckie, Poland ; Maintained by Angie Swann (contributor 48313732), at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/155593254/wladyslaw_i-herman. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  20. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W%C5%82adys%C5%82aw_I_Herman. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  21. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 224. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Boleslaw III Krzywousty: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00020809&tree=LEO
  23. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/POLAND.htm#BoleslawIIIdied1138B
  24. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027258&tree=LEO
  25. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Rurik 4 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/russia/rurik4.html
  26. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnes of Poland: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027257&tree=LEO

Margaret le Despenser1,2,3,4,5,6,7

F, #10362, d. 3 November 1415
FatherSir Edward le Despenser Knight, K.G., 1st Lord le Despenser, Lord of Glamorgan1,2,3,8,9,10,11,6,7 b. bt 24 Mar 1335 - 1336, d. 11 Nov 1375
MotherElizabeth de Burghersh Baroness Burghersh1,2,8,9,10,6,7 b. b 5 Apr 1342, d. 26 Jul 1409
ReferenceGKJ19
Last Edited25 Dec 2013
     Margaret le Despenser was born at Ryhall, Rutland, England.8,7 She was born circa 1360. She married Sir Robert de Ferrers Knt., de jure 5th Lord Ferrers of Chartley, son of Sir John de Ferrers Knt., de jure 4th Lord Ferrers of Chartley and Lady Elizabeth Stafford, after 1379; his 2nd wife.12,2,3,8,5,6,13,7
Margaret le Despenser died on 3 November 1415.12,8,6,7
Margaret le Despenser was buried after 3 November 1415 at Merevale Abbey, Warwickshire, England.14,8,6,7


     GKJ-19.

; van de Pas cites: The Royal Lineage of Our Noble and Gentle Families, London, 1884, Foster, Joseph, Reference: 36 ; places Dave Utz.7

; Weis [AR7] 70-36.15

Family

Sir Robert de Ferrers Knt., de jure 5th Lord Ferrers of Chartley b. bt 31 Oct 1357 - 1359, d. bt 13 Mar 1412 - 1413
Children

Citations

  1. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 13-10, p. 15. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Despencer - Barons Despencer, Earl of Gloucester, p. 167. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Ferrers - Barons Ferrers of Chartley, p. 199.
  4. [S1720] David Utz, "Utz email #2 29 May 2005 "Aline de Gai's descents to Robert Abell"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 May 2005, 8 [22] Margaret le Despencer b: in of Ryhall, Rutland d: 03 November 1415 Burial: Merevale Abbey
    .... +[23] Robert de Ferrers b: 31 October 1359 in of Chartley, co. Stafford m: Aft. 1379 d: 12 March 1412/13 Burial: Merevale Abbey. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email #2 29 May 2005."
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Despenser 9.iv: p. 270. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Ferrers 11: p. 309.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret le Despenser: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140924&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S1720] David Utz, "Utz email #2 29 May 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 29 May 2005.
  9. [S1854] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005 "Elizabeth (Bosvile) (Harlakenden) Pelham: A 'New' Plantagenet Descent"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 6 Jan 2005."
  10. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Despenser 9: p. 269.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sir Edward le Despenser: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00037964&tree=LEO
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 61-34, p. 66. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Ferrers: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140923&tree=LEO
  14. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 137-138. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 70-36, p. 73.
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Ferrers.pdf: p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edmund Ferrers: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177559&tree=LEO

Sir Robert de Ferrers Knt., de jure 5th Lord Ferrers of Chartley1,2,3,4

M, #10363, b. between 31 October 1357 and 1359, d. between 13 March 1412 and 1413
FatherSir John de Ferrers Knt., de jure 4th Lord Ferrers of Chartley1,5,6,4 b. 10 Aug 1331, d. 3 Apr 1367
MotherLady Elizabeth Stafford1,7,6,4 b. c 1337, d. 7 Aug 1375
ReferenceGKJ19
Last Edited25 Dec 2013
     Sir Robert de Ferrers Knt., de jure 5th Lord Ferrers of Chartley was born between 31 October 1357 and 1359 at Chartley, Staffordshire, England; Utz #2 29 May 2005 says b. 31 Oct. 1359.8,9,10,3,4 He married Elizabeth (?) after 16 September 1376; his 1st wife.9,3,4 Sir Robert de Ferrers Knt., de jure 5th Lord Ferrers of Chartley married Margaret le Despenser, daughter of Sir Edward le Despenser Knight, K.G., 1st Lord le Despenser, Lord of Glamorgan and Elizabeth de Burghersh Baroness Burghersh, after 1379; his 2nd wife.8,11,1,10,12,3,4,13
Sir Robert de Ferrers Knt., de jure 5th Lord Ferrers of Chartley died between 13 March 1412 and 1413; Utz #2 29 May 2005 says d. 12 March 1412/13.8,10,3,4
Sir Robert de Ferrers Knt., de jure 5th Lord Ferrers of Chartley was buried circa 12 March 1413 at Merevale Abbey, Warwickshire, England,

; Utz #2 29 May 2005 says d. 12 March 1412/13.9,10,3,4
     ; van de Pas cites: 1. The Royal Lineage of Our Noble and Gentle Families, London, 1884, Foster, Joseph, Reference: 36 : place Dave Utz
2. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: V 315
3. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef.1700, 7th Edition, 1992, Weis, Frederick Lewis, Reference: 62.4

Sir Robert de Ferrers Knt., de jure 5th Lord Ferrers of Chartley lived at Chartley, Staffordshire, England.14

; "Robert de Ferrers, 4th Baron Ferrers, of Chartley, but never summoned to parliament. His lordwhip m. Margaret, dau. of Edward, Lord Le Despencer, and dying 13 March, 1412-13, had (with a dau. Philippa, m. to Sir Thomas Green, of Boughton), three sons, Edmund, his heir; Thomas and Edward..."1 GKJ-19.

; Weis AR 61-34.15

; Faris (1999, pp. 137-138): "ROBERT DE FERRERS, Knt., of Chartley, co. Stafford, son and heir, was born in Staffordshire on 31 Oct. 1357 or 1359. He was married for the first time after 16 Sep. 1376 to ELIZABETH _______. She was living on 13 Jan. 1378/9. He was married for the second time to MARGARET LE DESPENSER, fourth and youngest daughter of Edward Ie Despenser, of Glamorgan and Morgannwg, 4th Lord Despenser (descendant of King Edward I), by Elizabeth, daughter of Bartholomew de Burghersh, of Ewyas Lacy, co. Hereford, etc., 4th Lord Burghersh [see CLARE 9 for her ancestry]. They had three sons and one daughter. SIR ROBERT DE FERRERS [5th Lord Ferrers of Chartley de jure] died on 12 or 13 Mar. 1412/13. His widow died on 3 Nov. 1415. They were buried at Merevale Abbey.
Dugdale, Warwickshire, p. 1068. C.P. 5:315-317, 320 chart (1926). Paget (1957) 206:3-4. Paget (1977), p. 412.
Children of Robert de Ferrers, by Margaret Ie Despenser:
i.     EDMUND DE FERRERS [see next].
ii.     PHILIPPE DE FERRERS, married THOMAS GREENE [see GREENE 8]."9 Sir Robert de Ferrers Knt., de jure 5th Lord Ferrers of Chartley was also known as Sir Robert Ferrers Knt., de jure 5th Lord Ferrers of Chartley.3 He was de jure 5th Lord (Baron) Ferrers of Chartley in 1357.1,3

Family 1

Elizabeth (?) d. a 13 Jan 1378/79

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Ferrers - Barons Ferrers of Chartley, p. 199. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S1720] David Utz, "Utz email #2 29 May 2005 "Aline de Gai's descents to Robert Abell"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 29 May 2005, 8 [22] Margaret le Despencer b: in of Ryhall, Rutland d: 03 November 1415 Burial: Merevale Abbey
    .... +[23] Robert de Ferrers b: 31 October 1359 in of Chartley, co. Stafford m: Aft. 1379 d: 12 March 1412/13 Burial: Merevale Abbey. Hereinafter cited as "Utz email #2 29 May 2005."
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Ferrers 11: p. 309. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Ferrers: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140923&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John de Ferrers: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177555&tree=LEO
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Ferrers 10: pp. 308-309.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth Stafford: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00028784&tree=LEO
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 61-34, p. 66. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), pp. 137-138. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  10. [S1720] David Utz, "Utz email #2 29 May 2005," e-mail to e-mail address, 29 May 2005.
  11. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Despencer - Barons Despencer, Earl of Gloucester, p. 167.
  12. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Despenser 9.iv: p. 270.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margaret le Despenser: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140924&tree=LEO
  14. [S673] David Faris, Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 158.
  15. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7.
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Ferrers.pdf: p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  17. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Edmund Ferrers: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177559&tree=LEO

Guncelin de Badlesmere Baron Badlesmere1,2

M, #10364, b. 1244, d. 1301
FatherGiles de Badlesmere3,2 b. 1205, d. 1256
MotherMargaret Leveland4 b. 1223
ReferenceEDV20
Last Edited7 Oct 2020
     Guncelin de Badlesmere Baron Badlesmere married Joan fitz Bernard, daughter of Ralph fitz Bernard Lord of Kingsdowne and Joan de Aquillon.5,2,6 Guncelin de Badlesmere Baron Badlesmere was born in 1244 at Castle Badlesmere, co. Kent, England.1
Guncelin de Badlesmere Baron Badlesmere died in 1301.1,2
     ; "Gunceline de Badlesmere, known first as a great rebel to Henry III, for which he was excommunicated by the archbishop of Canterbury; but subsequently, returning to his allegiance, as justice of Chester, in that office he continued until the 9th of Edward I (1280-1). In the next year he was in the expedition made into Wales, and in the 25th of the same monarch, in that into Gascony, having previously, by the writ of 26 January in that year, been summoned to the parliament at Salisbury for the following Sunday, the feast of St. Matthew, 21 September, as Gunselm de Badlesmere. He d. four years afterwards, seised of the manor of Badlesmere, which he held in capite of the crown, as of the barony of Crevequer, by the service of one knight's fee. He m. the heiress of Ralph Fitz Bernard, Lord of Kingsdowne, and was s. by his on, then twenty-six years of age..." EDV-20 GKJ-19.

Family

Joan fitz Bernard b. 1254, d. 1310
Children

Citations

  1. [S1217] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:1590432, Sue Cary (unknown location), downloaded updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1590432&id=I05373
  2. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, p. 18. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  3. [S1217] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1590432&id=I10001
  4. [S1217] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1590432&id=I10008
  5. [S1217] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1590432&id=I06312
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177631&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  7. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 70-33, p. 72. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  8. [S1217] e-mail address, updated 25 Aug 2001, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1590432&id=I11713
  9. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, p. 19.
  10. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Burghhersh 9: p. 169. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

Theobald I de Verdun 1st Lord Verdun

M, #10365, b. circa 1248, d. 24 August 1309
FatherJohn de Verdun of Weobley, co. Hereford b. 1233, d. b 17 Oct 1274
MotherMargaret de Lacy Lady of Dulek d. 1256
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited18 Dec 2020
     Theobald I de Verdun 1st Lord Verdun was born circa 1248.1 He married Margery/Eleanor de Bohun, daughter of Sir Humphrey VI de Bohun Lord Bohun, châtelain de Winchester and Eleanor de Braiose of Huntington, Brecon, Wales, before 6 November 1276.1,2,3
Theobald I de Verdun 1st Lord Verdun died on 24 August 1309 at Alton, Staffordshire, England.1
     He was 1st Lord Verdun. EDV-22 GKJ-21.

Citations

  1. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 70-31, p. 72. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  2. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 13-4, p. 14. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margery de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177623&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theobald de Verdun: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027639&tree=LEO
  5. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 70-32, p. 78.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3T-Z.htm#TheobaldVerdundied1316. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Margery/Eleanor de Bohun1

F, #10366
FatherSir Humphrey VI de Bohun Lord Bohun, châtelain de Winchester1,2 d. 27 Oct 1265
MotherEleanor de Braiose of Huntington, Brecon, Wales1,3 b. c 1225, d. 1275
Last Edited18 Dec 2020
     Margery/Eleanor de Bohun married Theobald I de Verdun 1st Lord Verdun, son of John de Verdun of Weobley, co. Hereford and Margaret de Lacy Lady of Dulek, before 6 November 1276.4,5,1
     ; van de pas cites: 1. The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XII 249
2. A Genealogical History of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited and extinct peerages of the British Empire, London, 1866, Burke, Sir Bernard, Reference: 548.1

; Weis [AR7] 70-31.4

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Margery de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00177623&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Humphrey de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015452&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Eleanor de Braose: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139096&tree=LEO
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 70-31, p. 72. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 13-4, p. 14. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Theobald de Verdun: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00027639&tree=LEO
  7. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 70-32, p. 78.. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  8. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3T-Z.htm#TheobaldVerdundied1316. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

John de Verdun of Weobley, co. Hereford1,2

M, #10367, b. 1233, d. before 17 October 1274
FatherTheobald II le Boteler Lord Botiller d. b 1230
MotherRohese de Verdun d. 10 Feb 1247
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited1 Jan 2006
     John de Verdun of Weobley, co. Hereford married Alianore (?)3,2 John de Verdun of Weobley, co. Hereford was born circa 1226.4 He was born in 1233.2 He married Margaret de Lacy Lady of Dulek, daughter of Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Harold, Co. Hereford and Isabel (Isabella) le Bigod, before 14 May 1244.5,3,2
John de Verdun of Weobley, co. Hereford died before 17 October 1274.5,4,2
     EDV-23 GKJ-22. He was he accompanied Prince Edward on Crusade in 1270.2

Family 1

Alianore (?)

Family 2

Margaret de Lacy Lady of Dulek d. 1256
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 249, de VERDUN 3:i. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 250, de VERDUN 4.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 120, de LACY 10:ii.
  4. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 13-4, p. 14. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 70-30, p. 72. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.

Margaret de Lacy Lady of Dulek1

F, #10368, d. 1256
FatherGilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Harold, Co. Hereford b. bt 1191 - 1200, d. bt 12 Aug 1230 - 25 Dec 1230
MotherIsabel (Isabella) le Bigod b. 1210
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited1 Jan 2006
     Margaret de Lacy Lady of Dulek married John de Verdun of Weobley, co. Hereford, son of Theobald II le Boteler Lord Botiller and Rohese de Verdun, before 14 May 1244.2,1,3
Margaret de Lacy Lady of Dulek died in 1256.2
     EDV-23 GKJ-22.

Family

John de Verdun of Weobley, co. Hereford b. 1233, d. b 17 Oct 1274
Child

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 120, de LACY 10:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 70-30, p. 72. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 250, de VERDUN 4.

Theobald II le Boteler Lord Botiller1

M, #10369, d. before 1230
FatherTheobald le Boteler2,1 d. 1206
MotherMaud le Vavasour2,1 b. c 1187, d. b 1250
ReferenceGAV22 EDV24
Last Edited31 Aug 2008
     Theobald II le Boteler Lord Botiller married (?) de Pondibus; his 1st wife.1 Theobald II le Boteler Lord Botiller married Joan du Marrisco/Marais/Marsh.1 Theobald II le Boteler Lord Botiller married Rohese de Verdun, daughter of Sir Nicholas de Verdun of Alton, co. Stafford and Basilia de Cogan, after 4 September 1225; his 3rd wife.3,4,1
Theobald II le Boteler Lord Botiller died before 1230.1
     GAV-22 EDV-24 GKJ-23.

; per Butler: [quote]Theobald Walter Born c. 1140 - d. before 10/8 1205(Cal. Close Rolls p. 54). As Stated in Part I Hervey Walter gave him his lands in Amounderness abt 1160(Lib. Nig.) that make Theobald Walter approx 60 years of age in 1200 and 65 when he dies.

Theobald Walter mar. 1st ? there is a pipe roll alluding to this, I have it but must find it.(buried in boxes)
Children:
Beatrice

Theobald Walter mar. 2nd Matilda/Maud Vavasour dau. of Robert Vavasour
Children:
1. Matilda maried to Gerald Pendergast
2. Theobald II

Notes; Theobald and his sister Matilda were initially a ward of the king by Gilbert fitzReinfried, then by Robert Vavasour (1206), father of their mother, Matilda/Maud, Then of Fulk fitzWarin, who married Matilda/Maud, widow of Theobald Walter.

2/8/1214 The King grants wardship of Theobald II to Reginald de Pontibus.Pons/Ponte, custody of his lands of Weeton, Treules and Routhcliffe and to marry his daughter.
Further Reginald is also custodian of Theobalds lands in Thurles (CDI nos. 514,516),
"..of Theobalds son and heir to Reginald Pontibus to marry his daughter and direct seisin of all Theobalds estates except Amounderness which the King had given to Theobald should be made to the said Reginald" (Close Rolls p. 163b). August 24, 16 John, The king commands Henry Archbishop of Dublin cause to be given to Reginald de Pontibus or his emissary full seisin of the castles Dorles,Rashue,Loshe, Armolen and Kakaulis which belonged to Theobald Walter in Ireland and anything taken for the latter after they had been given to Reginald de Pontibus shall be restored", (Pat Close Rolls 16 John, p.1 m13).
Godifre de Marisco held the same (Pat. Close Rolls 16 John p.1 m12) Robert de Marisco had warship of Thurles in 1219(CDI no. 906 Who is Reginald de Pontibus?
Steward of Poitou and Gascony in 1254(Cal. Pat Rolls Henry III Vol IV
pp.302-303) In charge of the Kings money in Poitou 1214 Letter from
the King to Reginald de Pontibus concerning Emery the
moneymaker(Claus. 17 John, mem.14)Dec. 8, 1215

Theobald II mar. 1st dau of Reginald de Pontibus
" mar 2nd Joand du Marrisco/Marais /Marsh
" mar. 3rd Rohese de Verdun
it is known whose children he had by Rhoese de Verdun, it is NOT
known by which of his first two wives, he had Theobald III, as until
now this first marriage has not been mentioned. Comments-thoughts MORE
than welcome!

Theobald II comes of age by July 2, 1221(Close Rolls p.463) and is
dead by 1230

Interesting side bar: Botelers Barons of Wem and Oversley and of
Sudley, Badminton and Woodhall are also descended from Theobald Walter
thru the female line. To Wit: Theobald II mother, Matilda/Maud,
married Fulk fitzWarin, whose daughter Hawise(Hawise and Theobald are
1/2 brother/sister) married William Pantulf, Baron of Wem whose
daughter married Ralph Boteler of Oversley and he became Baron of Wem
in the right of his wife. Thus Theobald II Pincerna of Ireland is the
Great 1/2 Uncle of Ralphs children. [end [quote].1 He was Lord Botiller.5 Theobald II le Boteler Lord Botiller was also known as Theobald le Botiller Lord Botiller.6

Family 1

(?) de Pondibus

Family 2

Joan du Marrisco/Marais/Marsh

Family 3

Child

Family 4

Rohese de Verdun d. 10 Feb 1247
Children

Citations

  1. [S2212] Emmett L. Butler, "Butler email 6 Jan 2008: "Botelers of Ireland: the First Generations, Part II"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Butler email 6 Jan 2008."
  2. [S812] e-mail address, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=bferris, Jr. William R. Ferris (unknown location), downloaded updated 4 Apr 2002, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bferris&id=I3941
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 70-30, p. 72. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 249, de VERDUN 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  5. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 134-3, p. 172. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  6. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Norfolk Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  7. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Cornwall 5: p. 232. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

Rohese de Verdun1

F, #10370, d. 10 February 1247
FatherSir Nicholas de Verdun of Alton, co. Stafford2 b. b 1248, d. 28 Jun 1271
MotherBasilia de Cogan3
ReferenceGAV23 EDV24
Last Edited27 Jan 2008
     Rohese de Verdun married Theobald II le Boteler Lord Botiller, son of Theobald le Boteler and Maud le Vavasour, after 4 September 1225; his 3rd wife.4,1,5
Rohese de Verdun died on 10 February 1247.1
     GAV-23 EDV-24 GKJ-23.

Family

Theobald II le Boteler Lord Botiller d. b 1230
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 249, de VERDUN 3. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 249, de VERDUN 2:i.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 249, de VERDUN 2.
  4. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 70-30, p. 72. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  5. [S2212] Emmett L. Butler, "Butler email 6 Jan 2008: "Botelers of Ireland: the First Generations, Part II"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 6 Jan 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Butler email 6 Jan 2008."

Maud le Boteler1,2

F, #10371, d. 27 November 1283
FatherTheobald II le Boteler Lord Botiller2 d. b 1230
MotherRohese de Verdun d. 10 Feb 1247
ReferenceGAV21 EDV21
Last Edited12 Oct 2008
     Maud le Boteler married John Fitz Alan 6th (?) Earl of Arundel, son of John Fitz Alan Lord of Clun & Oswestry, co. Salop and Isabel d'Aubigny.3,4 Maud le Boteler married Richard d'Amundville.1
Maud le Boteler died on 27 November 1283.3,5,4,1
     GAV-21 EDV-21. Maud le Boteler was also known as Maud le Botiller.6

Family 1

Richard d'Amundville

Family 2

John Fitz Alan 6th (?) Earl of Arundel b. 18 Apr 1266, d. b 10 Nov 1267
Children

Citations

  1. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), p. 249, de VERDUN 3:ii. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Cornwall 5: p. 232. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  3. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 149-29, p. 132. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  4. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors, p. 86, FITZ ALAN 7.
  5. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 70-30, p. 72.
  6. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Norfolk Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  7. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arundel 1 page (The House of Arundel): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel1.html
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, John Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00030560&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  9. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 7: pp. 313-314.

Sir William de Beauchamp KG, 1st Lord Abergavenny1,2,3

M, #10372, b. after 1344, d. 8 May 1411
FatherThomas de Beauchamp KG, 11th Earl of Warwick4,2,3 b. 14 Feb 1313, d. 13 Nov 1369
MotherLady Catherine de Mortimer4,2,3 b. c 1315, d. 1371
Last Edited6 Oct 2020
     Sir William de Beauchamp KG, 1st Lord Abergavenny was born after 1344.5,2,3 He married Lady Joan Fitz Alan, daughter of Richard Fitz Alan KG, 11th/4th Earl of Arundel, 10th Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Bohun, before 4 March 1392.6,2,3,7
Sir William de Beauchamp KG, 1st Lord Abergavenny died on 8 May 1411.8,5,2,3
     Sir William de Beauchamp KG, 1st Lord Abergavenny lived at Abergavenny Castle, Monmouthshire, England.5 He was 11th Earl of Warwick. GKJ-18. He was 1st Lord Bergavenny.9

; Faris (1999, p. 20): "JOAN FITZ ALAN, sister and eventual (in 1415) co-heiress to Thomas Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel, was born in 1375. She was married to WILLIAM DE BEAUCHAMP, K.G., of Abergavenny Castle, co. Monmouth, Lord Bergavenny, fourth son of Thomas Beauchamp, of Elmley, co. Worcester, 11th Earl of Warwick, Baron of Salwarpe, co. Worcester, of Hanslope, co. Buckingham, of Flamstead, co. Hertford, and of Warwick, co. Warwick (of Magna Carta Surety descent and descendant of Charlemagne), by Katherine, daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, Baron of Wigmore, co. Hereford (descendant of Charlemagne). He was born after 1344. WILLIAM DE BEAUCHAMP, Lord Bergavenny, died testate on 8 May 1411. His widow died testate on 14 Nov. 1435.
C.P. 1:24-26 (1910). C.P. 10:125 (1945). Paget (1977), p. 423.
Children of William de Beauchamp, by Joan Fitz Alan:
i.     RICHARD BEAUCHAMP [see next].
ii.     JOAN BEAUCHAMP, married JAMES BUTLER [see BUTLER 7]." Sir William de Beauchamp KG, 1st Lord Abergavenny was also known as Sir William Beauchamp KB, 2nd Lord Bergavenny, Earl of Worcester.3

Family

Lady Joan Fitz Alan b. 1375, d. 14 Nov 1435
Children

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Norfolk Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arundel 1 page (The House of Arundel): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel1.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Bergavenny 10: p. 92. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited & Extinct Peerages, p. 31. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  5. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 20. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  6. [S1429] Notable British Families, Notable British Families CD # 367, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Fitz-Alan - Earls of Arundel, Baron Maltravers, p. 201.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Joan Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026714&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 120-35, p. 107. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S633] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. and William R. Beall Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 : The Barons Named in the Magna
    Charta, 1215 and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America
    During the Early Colonial Years, 5th Edition
    (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishine Co., Inc., unknown publish date), line 47-8, p. 68. Hereinafter cited as Weis MCS-5.
  10. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Butler 12: p. 178.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan de Beauchamp: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00101374&tree=LEO

Lady Joan Fitz Alan1,2,3,4

F, #10373, b. 1375, d. 14 November 1435
FatherRichard Fitz Alan KG, 11th/4th Earl of Arundel, 10th Earl of Surrey1,2,5,3,6,7,4 b. 1346, d. 21 Sep 1397
MotherElizabeth de Bohun1,2,5,6,8,4 d. 3 Apr 1385
Last Edited6 Oct 2020
     Lady Joan Fitz Alan was born in 1375.9,2,4 She married Sir William de Beauchamp KG, 1st Lord Abergavenny, son of Thomas de Beauchamp KG, 11th Earl of Warwick and Lady Catherine de Mortimer, before 4 March 1392.1,2,5,4
Lady Joan Fitz Alan died on 14 November 1435.10,2,5,4
     ; van de Pas cites: The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: Q 113638 / Q 99364.4

; Weis [AR7] 120-35.11 Lady Joan Fitz Alan was also known as Joan Arundel.5,12

Family

Sir William de Beauchamp KG, 1st Lord Abergavenny b. a 1344, d. 8 May 1411
Children

Citations

  1. [S1429] Unknown compiler, Notable British Families 1600s-1900s from Burke's Peerage., CD-ROM (n.p.: Broderbund Software Company, 1999), Notable British Families, Burke's "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages" (Gen. Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1985 reprint of 1883 edition), Fitz-Alan - Earls of Arundel, Baron Maltravers, p. 201. Hereinafter cited as Notable British Families CD # 367.
  2. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Arundel 1 page (The House of Arundel): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brit/arundel1.html
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Butler 12: p. 178. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Lady Joan Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026714&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  5. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Bergavenny 10: p. 92.
  6. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 11: p. 320.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Richard Fitzalan: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026620&tree=LEO
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Elizabeth de Bohun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00015457&tree=LEO
  9. [S673] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists: The Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies before 1701, English Ancestry Series, Volume 1, Second Edition (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), p. 20. Hereinafter cited as Faris [1999] - Plantagenet Ancestry.
  10. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Norfolk Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  11. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 120-35, p. 107. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  12. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Fitz Alan 11.iv: p. 322.
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Joan de Beauchamp: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00101374&tree=LEO

Jean "d'Acre" de Brienne Seigneur of Chateau-du-Loir1,2,3,4

M, #10374, b. 1230, d. 1296
FatherJean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople1,5,4,6 b. 1168, d. 21 Mar 1237
MotherDoña Berengaria (?) Infanta de Castilla y León, Empress consort of Constantinople1,4,7,6 b. bt 1198 - 1199, d. 12 Apr 1237
ReferenceEDV22 GKJ22
Last Edited6 Nov 2020
     Jean "d'Acre" de Brienne Seigneur of Chateau-du-Loir was born in 1230.8 He married Jeanne de Châteaudun Dame de Chateau-du-Loire, daughter of Geoffroy VI (?) vicomte de Châteaudun, Seigneur de Mondoubleau, de Saint Calais et du Bouchet and Clémence des Roches Vicomtesse de Châteaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau, after 1251;
His 1st wife; her 2nd husband.9,1,10,11,12,3,4,13,14 Jean "d'Acre" de Brienne Seigneur of Chateau-du-Loir married Marie de Coucy Dowager Queen of Scotland, daughter of Enguerrand III de Coucy Seigneur de Coucy et de Marle, Cte de Roucy et de Perche and Marie de Montmirail, in June 1257;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.1,15,16,3,13
Jean "d'Acre" de Brienne Seigneur of Chateau-du-Loir was buried in 1296 at Abbey de Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen-l'Aumone, Departement du Val-d'Oise, Île-de-France, France,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1230, France
     DEATH     1296 (aged 65–66)
     Also known as Jean d' Acre. Younger son of Jean de Brienne, King of Jerusalem and his third wife, Berengia of Castille. Brother of Alphonse I de Brienne. In the right of his second wife he was the Seigneur of Chateau-du-Loir, le Boux, Loupelande, Mayet and Oustille. Butler of France, Ambassador to Castile, Bailiff of Monfort-l'Amaury.
     He married first, Marie de Coucy, the widow of Alexander II, King of Scotland, who died 08 July 1249) and the daughter of Enguerrand de Coucy. They had no children.
     He married again to Jeanne de Chateaudun, daughter of Geoffroi VI, Vicomte of Chateaudun by Clemence de Roches, and widow of Jean (John) de Montfort who died 1249 in Cyprus. They had one daughter, Blanche, who would marry Guillaume (William) de Fiennes.
     Family Members
     Parents
      Jean de Brienne 1170–1237
     Siblings
      Yolanda de Brienne 1212–1228
      Alphonse de Brienne 1225–1270
      Louis of Acre
     BURIAL     Abbey of Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen-l'Aumone, Departement du Val-d'Oise, Île-de-France, France
     Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
     Added: 5 Dec 2012
     Find A Grave Memorial 101770135.8
Jean "d'Acre" de Brienne Seigneur of Chateau-du-Loir died in 1296.9,1,16,4
     EDV-22 GKJ-22.

; Jean "d'Acre", bouteiller of France, +1296; 1m: Marie, Dowager Queen of Scotland, dau.of Enguerrand de Coucy; 2m: 1251 Jeanne, Dame de Chateau-du-Loir, dau.of Vcte Geoffroy de Chateaudun.1

Reference: Leo van de Pas cites: 1. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 167.2 He was Grand Butler of France in 1258 at France.13 He was Grand Butler of France in 1258.9 He was Ambassador to Castile in 1276.13

Family 2

Marie de Coucy Dowager Queen of Scotland b. bt 1220 - 1225

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brienne 1 page (de Brienne Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brienne/brienne1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026635&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Brienne 6: p. 155. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf, p. 7. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026633&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#JeanBriennedied1237. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of León and Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026634&tree=LEO
  8. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 14 October 2019), memorial page for Jean de “John” Brienne (1230–1296), Find A Grave Memorial no. 101770135, citing Abbey of Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen-l'Aumone, Departement du Val-d'Oise, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Anne Shurtleff Stevens (contributor 46947920), at: .https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/101770135/jean-de-brienne. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  9. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 120-30, p. 107. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Châteaudun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026636&tree=LEO
  11. [S4748] France Balade, online <http://www.francebalade.com/>. Hereinafter cited as France Balade Website (FR).
  12. [S1557] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004: "Companions of the Third Crusade (was Re: Crusader ancestors (long)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Jan 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004."
  13. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_II_of_Brienne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche de Brienne, Dame de Loupelande: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026632&tree=LEO
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Coucy: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00002876&tree=LEO
  16. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Coucy 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/coucy1.html
  17. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Brienne 7: p. 155.
  18. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Mortimer 7: p. 522.

Jeanne de Châteaudun Dame de Chateau-du-Loire1,2

F, #10375, b. circa 1227, d. 1265
FatherGeoffroy VI (?) vicomte de Châteaudun, Seigneur de Mondoubleau, de Saint Calais et du Bouchet1,2,3,4,5,6,7 b. 1218, d. 6 Feb 1250
MotherClémence des Roches Vicomtesse de Châteaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau2,3,6,8,5,7 b. 1193, d. a Sep 1259
ReferenceEDV22 GKJ22
Last Edited6 Nov 2020
     Jeanne de Châteaudun Dame de Chateau-du-Loire was born circa 1227; Ravilious cites:
4. "Europaische Stammtafeln," per Janko Pavsic, email 1/19/2001 (Vol III.4,
tafel 689-690), janko_pavsic@my-deja.com; also jankopavsic@hotmail.com.
6. Ed Mann, "Jean de Brienne," Society of Medieval Genealogy
(www.rootsweb.com), 28 Mar 1999 (on GEN-MEDIEVAL-L@rootsweb.com).3 She married Jean I de Montfort Comte de Montfort, son of Amaury VI/VII de Montfort Duc de Narbonne, Comte de Toulouse and Béatrix (?) de Viennois, in March 1248; her 1st husband.2,9,10,3,11 Jeanne de Châteaudun Dame de Chateau-du-Loire married Jean "d'Acre" de Brienne Seigneur of Chateau-du-Loir, son of Jean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople and Doña Berengaria (?) Infanta de Castilla y León, Empress consort of Constantinople, after 1251;
His 1st wife; her 2nd husband.12,1,2,10,3,13,11,14,15
Jeanne de Châteaudun Dame de Chateau-du-Loire died in 1265; "or a little after."11
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: 1. The Plantagenet Ancestry Baltimore, 1975. , Lt.Col. W. H. Turton, Reference: 167
2. Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 690.2

; Jeanne qui épouse en 1248 Jean Comte de Montfort l'Amaury qui meurt en 1249, en secondes noces elle se marrie en 1251 avec Jean de Brienne fils du Roi de Jérusalem. Elle a eu une fille avec chacun de ses époux.10 EDV-22 GKJ-22.

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brienne 1 page (de Brienne Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brienne/brienne1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Châteaudun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026636&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1557] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004: "Companions of the Third Crusade (was Re: Crusader ancestors (long)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Jan 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004."
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffroy VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046806&tree=LEO
  5. [S4748] France Balade, online <http://www.francebalade.com/>, http://www.francebalade.com/chartres/ctdunois.htm. Hereinafter cited as France Balade Website (FR).
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/cfrachacha.htm#GeoffroyVIChateaudundied1250. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vicomtes de Châteaudun, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence des Roches: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046807&tree=LEO
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean I: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122081&tree=LEO
  10. [S4748] France Balade Website (FR), online http://www.francebalade.com/
  11. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf, p. 7.
  12. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 120-30, p. 107. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  13. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Brienne 6: p. 155. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  14. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_II_of_Brienne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Blanche de Brienne, Dame de Loupelande: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026632&tree=LEO
  16. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Beatrix de Montfort: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026902&tree=LEO
  17. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Richardson PA, Brienne 7: p. 155.

Geoffroy VI (?) vicomte de Châteaudun, Seigneur de Mondoubleau, de Saint Calais et du Bouchet1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #10376, b. 1218, d. 6 February 1250
FatherGeoffroy III/V (?) Vicomte de Châteaudun, Seigneur de Mondoubleau, de Saint Calais, de La Guerche et du Bouchet7,8,4,5,6,9 b. 1170, d. a Nov 1218
MotherAdèle de Donzy Dame de Coulanges10,5,4,6,9 b. 1170, d. a 1207
ReferenceEDV22
Last Edited29 Oct 2020
     Geoffroy VI (?) vicomte de Châteaudun, Seigneur de Mondoubleau, de Saint Calais et du Bouchet was born in 1218; Racines et Histoire (Châteaudun) says b. ca 1195.5,9 He married Mabilie (?) before December 1218;
His 1st wife.5,6,9,11 Geoffroy VI (?) vicomte de Châteaudun, Seigneur de Mondoubleau, de Saint Calais et du Bouchet married Clémence des Roches Vicomtesse de Châteaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau, daughter of Guillaume des Roches Sénéchal d’Anjou, Maine & Tourain, seigneur de Château-du-Loir and Marguerite (?) de Nevers, dame de Sablé, in 1220;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.
Genealogics says m. 1220; Racines et Histoire (Châteaudun) says m. bef Jul 1229.12,13,14,9,5,6,15,16
Geoffroy VI (?) vicomte de Châteaudun, Seigneur de Mondoubleau, de Saint Calais et du Bouchet died on 6 February 1250 at Palestine; Weis (AR7, line 120-31) says d. 1249; Comtes et Vicomtes de Chateaudun says "En 1248 le Roi l'affranchit de la vassalité des Comtes de Vendome pour Mondoubleau et Geoffroy l'accompagne en Terre Sainte, il n'en est jamais revenu et y est mort en 1249."17,18,5,4,6,9
     EDV-22 GKJ-23.

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 690.5

; Per France Balade:
     "Geoffroy VI (+1249) - Fils de Geoffroy V, il devient Vicomte de Chateaudun, Seigneur de Mondoubleau, de Saint Calais et du Bouchet en 1218.
     "Il épouse Clémence des Roches fille de Guillaume des Roches et de Marguerite de Sablé, elle était veuve de Thibault VI Comte de Blois. Elle apporta le titre de Seigneur de Chateau du Loir, de Mayet, de la Suze et de Loupelande (toutes siyuées dans le Maine) à son mari.
     "En 1225 et à nouveau en 1229 il participe à la Croisade contre les Albigeois. En septembre 1238 le Comte de Champagne cède sa suzeraineté sur les Comtés de Blois, de Chartres et de Dunois et sur la Vicomté de Chateaudun au Roi de France, à partir de là la Vicomté relève directement de la Couronne. A son retour de croisade en 1238, il rase la chapelle Notre Dame dans l'enceinte du chateau de Mondoubleau pour en développer les fortifications. En 1240 le Roi Louis IX le charge (avec Jean de Beaumont) de conduire une armée contre le Vicomte de Béziers, et en 1242 le Roi le charge d'aller combattre le Comte de la Marche.
     "Geoffroy cède la Seigneurie du Bouchet à sa soeur Agnès avant 1240. En 1248 le Roi l'affranchit de la vassalité des Comtes de Vendome pour Mondoubleau et Geoffroy l'accompagne en Terre Sainte, il n'en est jamais revenu et y est mort en 1249.
     "Il a deux filles de son mariage avec Clémence des Roches:
- Clémence qui suit,
- Jeanne qui épouse en 1248 Jean Comte de Montfort l'Amaury qui meurt en 1249, en secondes noces elle se marrie en 1251 avec Jean de Brienne fils du Roi de Jérusalem. Elle a eu une fille avec chacun de ses époux.“.4


; Per Med Lands:
     "GEOFFROY [VI] (-6 Feb 1250, bur Ronceray). "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" freed a serf, with the consent of "Adelicia uxore mea et heredibus meis Gaufrido et Isabella", by charter dated 1202[987]. "…Gaufrido filio meo…" consented to the donation by "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteaudun by charter dated Oct 1209[988]. "Gaufrido filio nostro, et Ysabella, Adelicia, Johanna, Agneta filiabus nostris" consented to the donation by "G comes Castriduni et A uxor mea" to the abbey of Bécheron by charter dated 1212[989]. "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni et…Adelicia vicecomitissa" donated a fair to the priory of Mondoubleau, with the consent of "Gaufrido filio nostro, filiabus nostris Ysabella, Adelicia, Johanna et Agnete", by charter dated May 1213[990]. A charter dated 1217 records that “defunctus Jobertus dominus Guirchie bone memorie” had donated “pedagii sui in toto dominio Guirchie” to Bécheron, later confirmed by “Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni et Aalicia uxor mea” with the consent of “Gaufridus filius noster et filie nostre Ysabella, Aalicia et Johanna et Agnes”[991]. Vicomte de Châteaudun. "Amaury de Craon et Jeanne de Roches, Geoffroy de Châteaudun et Clémence des Roches" confirmed the donation of revenue made to Bonlieu abbey by “Guillaume des Roches et Marguerite de Sablé” by charter dated [16/31] Jul 1222[992]. "M[argarita] domina Sabolii [...quondam uxor domini Guillelmi], Amauricus de Credone senescallus Andegavensis [...Johenna uxore mea], G[aufridus] vicecomes Castriduni [...de assensu...Clementiæ uxoris meæ]" confirmed exemptions granted to the inhabitants of Cohémon by “dominus noster bonæ memoriæ G[uillelmus] de Rupibus seneschallus Andegavensis” by charter dated 1222 [after 15 Jul][993]. "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" donated a fair to Châteaudun, with the consent of "Clemencia uxore mea, condam comitissa Blesensi", by charter dated Jul 1229[994].
     "m firstly MABILIE, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.
     "m secondly CLEMENCE des Roches, widow of THIBAUT VI Comte de Blois, daughter of GUILLAUME des Roches Seneschal of Anjou & his wife Marguerite Dame de Sablé [Nevers] (-after Sep 1259). "Amaury de Craon et Jeanne de Roches, Geoffroy de Châteaudun et Clémence des Roches" confirmed the donation of revenue made to Bonlieu abbey by “Guillaume des Roches et Marguerite de Sablé” by charter dated [16/31] Jul 1222[995]. "M[argarita] domina Sabolii [...quondam uxor domini Guillelmi], Amauricus de Credone senescallus Andegavensis [...Johenna uxore mea], G[aufridus] vicecomes Castriduni [...de assensu...Clementiæ uxoris meæ]" confirmed exemptions granted to the inhabitants of Cohémon by “dominus noster bonæ memoriæ G[uillelmus] de Rupibus seneschallus Andegavensis” by charter dated 1222 [after 15 Jul][996]. "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" donated property to the donation to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun with the consent of "Clemencia quondam comitissa Blesensi uxore mea" by charter dated Oct 1226[997]. "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" donated a fair to Châteaudun, with the consent of "Clemencia uxore mea, condam comitissa Blesensi", by charter dated Jul 1229[998]. “Clémence dame de Châteaudun et de Château-du-Loir” donated property to Bonlieu, with the consent of “sa fille Jehanne comtesse de Montfort”, for the souls of “feu Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d’Anjou, de Marguerite dame de Sablé, et de Geoffroy vicomte de Châteaudun”, by charter dated Apr 1250[999]. "Clementia Castriduni et Castrilidi domina...cum...filia mea Johanna quondam comitissa Montisfortis" donated harvest to the nuns of Bonlieu, for the souls of “...Gaufridi quondam vicecomitis Castriduni sponsi mei”, by charter dated Nov 1255[1000]."
Med Lands cites:
[987] Châteaudun La Madeleine, XLVII, p. 54.
[988] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu LXXXV, p. 59.
[989] Bécheron CXLVIII, p. 129.
[990] Châteaudun La Madeleine, LXXII, p. 77.
[991] Bécheron (Merci-Dieu), LXV, p. 61.
[992] Château-du-Loir, 140, p. 104.
[993] Château-du-Loir, 142, p. 104.
[994] Châteaudun La Madeleine, LXXXVIII, p. 95.
[995] Château-du-Loir, 140, p. 104.
[996] Château-du-Loir, 142, p. 104.
[997] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu CXXXVI, p. 93.
[998] Châteaudun La Madeleine, LXXXVIII, p. 95.
[999] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2996, p. 366, citing ‘Archiv. de l’abbaye de Boulieu’.
[1000] Château-du-Loir, 180, p. 150.6


; Per Racines et Histoire (Châteaudun): “1) Geoffroi VI ° ~1195 + 06/02/1250 (croisé, Egypte) vicomte de Châteaudun, seigneur de Mondoubleau, Château-du-Loir (72), La Suze-sur-Sarthe (72), Loupelande (72), SaintCalais et du Bouchet (1218), croisé en Albigeois et en Terre Sainte (1226, 1229, 1248), X dans l’Ost royal à Béziers (1240) et en Marche (1242)
     ép. 1) dès 12/1228 Mabilie
     ép. 2) dès 07/1229 Clémence des Roches ° ~1200 + après 09/1259 dame de Château-du-Loir, Mayet, La Suze et Loupelande (Maine) (fille de Guillaume des Roches et de Marguerite de Sablé ; veuve de Thibaud VI, comte de Blois + 22/04/1218)”.9
; Per Racines et Histoire (Craon): “Clémence des Roches ° 1193
     ép. 1) Thibaud VI, comte de Blois ° 1185 + 1218
     ép. 2) 1220 Geoffroi IV, vicomte de Châteaudun + 1250”.14 He was vicomte de Châteaudun
Per Wikipedia: "This line of viscounts of Châteaudun became extinct in 1249, with the death Geoffrey VI of Châteaudun."
Per Wikipédia (Fr.): "1218-1249 : Geoffroy VI, fils du précédent et sans doute d'Adèle, x Clémence des Roches dame de Château-du-Loir, Mayet, La Suze, Louplande, fille du sénéchal Guillaume“ between 1218 and 1250.19,20

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffroy V: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00165053&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adele de Nevers: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00165054&tree=LEO
  3. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vicomtes de Châteaudun, p. 6: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  4. [S4748] France Balade, online <http://www.francebalade.com/>, http://www.francebalade.com/chartres/ctdunois.htm. Hereinafter cited as France Balade Website (FR).
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffroy VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046806&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/cfrachacha.htm#GeoffroyVIChateaudundied1250. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffroy V: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00165053&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/cfrachacha.htm#HuguesIVChateaudundied1180B
  9. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vicomtes de Châteaudun, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Adele de Nevers: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00165054&tree=LEO
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Mabilie: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00473534&tree=LEO
  12. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 120-30, p. 112. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  13. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 8: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  14. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Craon, p. 13: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Craon.pdf
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence des Roches: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046807&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#ClemenceRocheM1ThibautVIBlois.
  17. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 120-31, p. 107. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  18. [S1557] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004: "Companions of the Third Crusade (was Re: Crusader ancestors (long)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Jan 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004."
  19. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counts_and_Viscounts_of_Ch%C3%A2teaudun. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  20. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Liste des comtes et vicomtes de Châteaudun: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_comtes_et_vicomtes_de_Ch%C3%A2teaudun. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  21. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vicomtes de Châteaudun, p. 7: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf
  22. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clemence: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050009&tree=LEO
  23. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Dreux-Beu.pdf, p. 2.
  24. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brienne 1 page (de Brienne Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brienne/brienne1.html
  25. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Châteaudun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026636&tree=LEO

Clémence des Roches Vicomtesse de Châteaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau1,2,3,4,5,6,7

F, #10377, b. 1193, d. after September 1259
FatherGuillaume des Roches Sénéchal d’Anjou, Maine & Tourain, seigneur de Château-du-Loir3,8,9,2,5,6,10,7 b. bt 1165 - 1170, d. 15 Jul 1222
MotherMarguerite (?) de Nevers, dame de Sablé3,11,2,10,6,5,7 b. c 1175, d. bt 20 Jul 1238 - 1 Dec 1246
ReferenceEDV23 GKJ23
Last Edited9 Nov 2020
     Clémence des Roches Vicomtesse de Châteaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau was born in 1193; Racines et Histoire (Châteaudun) says b. ca 1200; Racines et Histoire (Craon) says b. ca 1193.6,5 She married Thibaut VI de Blois Comte de Blois et de Clermont, son of Louis I de Blois comte de Blois, comte de Clermont, comte de Nicée and Catherine de Clermont comtesse de Clermont;
His 2nd wife; her 1st husband.12,2,10,5,6,7,13 Clémence des Roches Vicomtesse de Châteaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau married Geoffroy VI (?) vicomte de Châteaudun, Seigneur de Mondoubleau, de Saint Calais et du Bouchet, son of Geoffroy III/V (?) Vicomte de Châteaudun, Seigneur de Mondoubleau, de Saint Calais, de La Guerche et du Bouchet and Adèle de Donzy Dame de Coulanges, in 1220;
His 2nd wife; her 2nd husband.
Genealogics says m. 1220; Racines et Histoire (Châteaudun) says m. bef Jul 1229.14,10,6,5,15,16,2,7
Clémence des Roches Vicomtesse de Châteaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau died after September 1259.3,10,5,2,7
     ; Per France Balade:
     "Geoffroy VI (+1249) - Fils de Geoffroy V, il devient Vicomte de Chateaudun, Seigneur de Mondoubleau, de Saint Calais et du Bouchet en 1218.
     "Il épouse Clémence des Roches fille de Guillaume des Roches et de Marguerite de Sablé, elle était veuve de Thibault VI Comte de Blois. Elle apporta le titre de Seigneur de Chateau du Loir, de Mayet, de la Suze et de Loupelande (toutes siyuées dans le Maine) à son mari.
     "En 1225 et à nouveau en 1229 il participe à la Croisade contre les Albigeois. En septembre 1238 le Comte de Champagne cède sa suzeraineté sur les Comtés de Blois, de Chartres et de Dunois et sur la Vicomté de Chateaudun au Roi de France, à partir de là la Vicomté relève directement de la Couronne. A son retour de croisade en 1238, il rase la chapelle Notre Dame dans l'enceinte du chateau de Mondoubleau pour en développer les fortifications. En 1240 le Roi Louis IX le charge (avec Jean de Beaumont) de conduire une armée contre le Vicomte de Béziers, et en 1242 le Roi le charge d'aller combattre le Comte de la Marche.
     "Geoffroy cède la Seigneurie du Bouchet à sa soeur Agnès avant 1240. En 1248 le Roi l'affranchit de la vassalité des Comtes de Vendome pour Mondoubleau et Geoffroy l'accompagne en Terre Sainte, il n'en est jamais revenu et y est mort en 1249.
     "Il a deux filles de son mariage avec Clémence des Roches:
- Clémence qui suit,
- Jeanne qui épouse en 1248 Jean Comte de Montfort l'Amaury qui meurt en 1249, en secondes noces elle se marrie en 1251 avec Jean de Brienne fils du Roi de Jérusalem. Elle a eu une fille avec chacun de ses époux.“.17

; Per Med Lands:
     "GEOFFROY [VI] (-6 Feb 1250, bur Ronceray). "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" freed a serf, with the consent of "Adelicia uxore mea et heredibus meis Gaufrido et Isabella", by charter dated 1202[987]. "…Gaufrido filio meo…" consented to the donation by "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteaudun by charter dated Oct 1209[988]. "Gaufrido filio nostro, et Ysabella, Adelicia, Johanna, Agneta filiabus nostris" consented to the donation by "G comes Castriduni et A uxor mea" to the abbey of Bécheron by charter dated 1212[989]. "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni et…Adelicia vicecomitissa" donated a fair to the priory of Mondoubleau, with the consent of "Gaufrido filio nostro, filiabus nostris Ysabella, Adelicia, Johanna et Agnete", by charter dated May 1213[990]. A charter dated 1217 records that “defunctus Jobertus dominus Guirchie bone memorie” had donated “pedagii sui in toto dominio Guirchie” to Bécheron, later confirmed by “Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni et Aalicia uxor mea” with the consent of “Gaufridus filius noster et filie nostre Ysabella, Aalicia et Johanna et Agnes”[991]. Vicomte de Châteaudun. "Amaury de Craon et Jeanne de Roches, Geoffroy de Châteaudun et Clémence des Roches" confirmed the donation of revenue made to Bonlieu abbey by “Guillaume des Roches et Marguerite de Sablé” by charter dated [16/31] Jul 1222[992]. "M[argarita] domina Sabolii [...quondam uxor domini Guillelmi], Amauricus de Credone senescallus Andegavensis [...Johenna uxore mea], G[aufridus] vicecomes Castriduni [...de assensu...Clementiæ uxoris meæ]" confirmed exemptions granted to the inhabitants of Cohémon by “dominus noster bonæ memoriæ G[uillelmus] de Rupibus seneschallus Andegavensis” by charter dated 1222 [after 15 Jul][993]. "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" donated a fair to Châteaudun, with the consent of "Clemencia uxore mea, condam comitissa Blesensi", by charter dated Jul 1229[994].
     "m firstly MABILIE, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.
     "m secondly CLEMENCE des Roches, widow of THIBAUT VI Comte de Blois, daughter of GUILLAUME des Roches Seneschal of Anjou & his wife Marguerite Dame de Sablé [Nevers] (-after Sep 1259). "Amaury de Craon et Jeanne de Roches, Geoffroy de Châteaudun et Clémence des Roches" confirmed the donation of revenue made to Bonlieu abbey by “Guillaume des Roches et Marguerite de Sablé” by charter dated [16/31] Jul 1222[995]. "M[argarita] domina Sabolii [...quondam uxor domini Guillelmi], Amauricus de Credone senescallus Andegavensis [...Johenna uxore mea], G[aufridus] vicecomes Castriduni [...de assensu...Clementiæ uxoris meæ]" confirmed exemptions granted to the inhabitants of Cohémon by “dominus noster bonæ memoriæ G[uillelmus] de Rupibus seneschallus Andegavensis” by charter dated 1222 [after 15 Jul][996]. "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" donated property to the donation to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun with the consent of "Clemencia quondam comitissa Blesensi uxore mea" by charter dated Oct 1226[997]. "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" donated a fair to Châteaudun, with the consent of "Clemencia uxore mea, condam comitissa Blesensi", by charter dated Jul 1229[998]. “Clémence dame de Châteaudun et de Château-du-Loir” donated property to Bonlieu, with the consent of “sa fille Jehanne comtesse de Montfort”, for the souls of “feu Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d’Anjou, de Marguerite dame de Sablé, et de Geoffroy vicomte de Châteaudun”, by charter dated Apr 1250[999]. "Clementia Castriduni et Castrilidi domina...cum...filia mea Johanna quondam comitissa Montisfortis" donated harvest to the nuns of Bonlieu, for the souls of “...Gaufridi quondam vicecomitis Castriduni sponsi mei”, by charter dated Nov 1255[1000]."
Med Lands cites:
[987] Châteaudun La Madeleine, XLVII, p. 54.
[988] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu LXXXV, p. 59.
[989] Bécheron CXLVIII, p. 129.
[990] Châteaudun La Madeleine, LXXII, p. 77.
[991] Bécheron (Merci-Dieu), LXV, p. 61.
[992] Château-du-Loir, 140, p. 104.
[993] Château-du-Loir, 142, p. 104.
[994] Châteaudun La Madeleine, LXXXVIII, p. 95.
[995] Château-du-Loir, 140, p. 104.
[996] Château-du-Loir, 142, p. 104.
[997] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu CXXXVI, p. 93.
[998] Châteaudun La Madeleine, LXXXVIII, p. 95.
[999] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2996, p. 366, citing ‘Archiv. de l’abbaye de Boulieu’.
[1000] Château-du-Loir, 180, p. 150.16

; Per Racines et Histoire (Châteaudun): “1) Geoffroi VI ° ~1195 + 06/02/1250 (croisé, Egypte) vicomte de Châteaudun, seigneur de Mondoubleau, Château-du-Loir (72), La Suze-sur-Sarthe (72), Loupelande (72), SaintCalais et du Bouchet (1218), croisé en Albigeois et en Terre Sainte (1226, 1229, 1248), X dans l’Ost royal à Béziers (1240) et en Marche (1242)
     ép. 1) dès 12/1228 Mabilie
     ép. 2) dès 07/1229 Clémence des Roches ° ~1200 + après 09/1259 dame de Château-du-Loir, Mayet, La Suze et Loupelande (Maine) (fille de Guillaume des Roches et de Marguerite de Sablé ; veuve de Thibaud VI, comte de Blois + 22/04/1218)”.5 EDV-23 GKJ-23.

; Per Ravilious:
     "1.1.1 Clemence des Roches[4]
     "Death: 1259[2]
     "vicomtesse de Chateaudun, Dame de Montdoubleau
     "2nd wife of Geoffrey de Chateaudun
     "cf. ES III, Tafel 690[2]
     "Spouse: Geoffroi VI de Chateaudun[4], vicomte de Chateaudun 1218-1250
     "Death: 6 Feb 1250, on Crusade[5],[2]
     "Father: Geoffroi V de Chateaudun (-ca1218)
     "Mother: Adele de Nevers
     "Children: Jeanne (~1227-)
     " Clemence (-1259)
Sources:
2. Detlev Schewennicke, "Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge," [ " European Family Trees: Family Trees for the History of European States, New Series " ], Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1978-1995 [3rd series], First series by Wilhelm Karl, Prinz zu Isenburg, continued second series by Frank, Baron Freytag von Loringhoven.
4. "Europaische Stammtafeln," per Janko Pavsic, email 1/19/2001 (Vol III.4, tafel 689-690), janko_pavsic@my-deja.com; also jankopavsic@hotmail.com.“.3 Clémence des Roches Vicomtesse de Châteaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau was also known as Clemence des Roches.18

; Per Med Lands:
     "CLEMENCE des Roches (-after Sep 1259). "Clemencia uxore mea" consented to the donation by "Theobaldus Blesensis et Clarimontis comitis" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun by charter dated Apr 1218[412]. King Philippe II confirmed a charter dated 1218 under which “Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d’Anjou partant pour l’Albigeois” established the rights in his succession of “Jeanne et Clémence ses deux autres [“autres” a mistake?] filles”, with the consent of “Marguerite de Sablé sa femme et d’Amauri de Craon mari de sa fille aînée”, by charter dated Mar 1219, which specifies that the former would receive Sablé, Briollai, Châteauneuf-sur-Sarthe, Précigné et Brion and the latter Château-du-Loir, Maiet, la Suze and Louplande[413]. "Amaury de Craon et Jeanne de Roches, Geoffroy de Châteaudun et Clémence des Roches" confirmed the donation of revenue made to Bonlieu abbey by “Guillaume des Roches et Marguerite de Sablé” by charter dated [16/31] Jul 1222[414]. "M[argarita] domina Sabolii [...quondam uxor domini Guillelmi], Amauricus de Credone senescallus Andegavensis [...Johenna uxore mea], G[aufridus] vicecomes Castriduni [...de assensu...Clementiæ uxoris meæ]" confirmed exemptions granted to the inhabitants of Cohémon by “dominus noster bonæ memoriæ G[uillelmus] de Rupibus seneschallus Andegavensis” by charter dated 1222 [after 15 Jul][415]. "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" donated property to the donation to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun with the consent of "Clemencia quondam comitissa Blesensi uxore mea" by charter dated Oct 1226[416]. "Clementia Castriduni et Castrilidi domina...cum...filia mea Johanna quondam comitissa Montisfortis" donated harvest to the nuns of Bonlieu, for the souls of “...Gaufridi quondam vicecomitis Castriduni sponsi mei”, by charter dated Nov 1255[417].
     "m firstly as his second wife, THIBAUT VI Comte de Blois, son of LOUIS Comte de Blois & his wife Catherine Ctss de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (-16 or 22 Apr 1218).
     "m secondly as his second wife, GEOFFROY [VI] Vicomte de Châteaudun, son of GEOFFROY [V] Vicomte de Châteaudun & his first wife Adela de Nevers (-6 Feb 1250, bur Ronceray)."
Med Lands cites:
[412] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu CXVII, p. 80.
[413] Delisle (1856), 1885, p. 415.
[414] Château-du-Loir, 140, p. 104.
[415] Château-du-Loir, 142, p. 104.
[416] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu CXXXVI, p. 93.
[417] Château-du-Loir, 180, p. 150.7


; Per Racines et Histoire (Craon): “Clémence des Roches ° 1193
     ép. 1) Thibaud VI, comte de Blois ° 1185 + 1218
     ép. 2) 1220 Geoffroi IV, vicomte de Châteaudun + 1250”.6
; Per Med Lands:
     "THIBAUT de Blois (-16 or 22 Apr 1218). "…Theobaldo filio meo, Johanna filia mea…" consented to the confirmation by "Ludovicus Blesensis et Clarimontis comes" of the donation by "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteaudun by charter dated Mar 1200[353]. "Ludovicus comes Blesensis et Clarimontis" confirmed a donation to Chartres Notre-Dame by his father, with the consent of "Katherina uxor mea, filiis meis Theobaldo et Radulfo et filia mea Johanna et Philippo fratre meo", by charter dated 1201[354]. "…Theobaldo filio meo, Iohanna filia mea…" consented to the donation by "Ludovicus Blesensis et Clarimontis comes…Iherosolimam proficiscens" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun by charter dated May 1202[355]. He succeeded his father in 1205 as THIBAUT VI Comte de Blois et de Clermont. "Theobaldus Blesensis et Clarimontis comitis" donated property to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun with the consent of "Clemencia uxore mea" by charter dated Apr 1218[356]. On his death the county of Clermont [en-Beauvaisis] was sold to the French crown[357]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "X Kal Mai" of "Theobaldus Blesensis et Clarimontis comes", stating that "matris sui Katherine comitisse" donated property for his soul[358].
     "m firstly (before 19 Sep 1213) MATHILDE d'Alençon, daughter of ROBERT Comte d'Alençon & his second wife Jeanne de Preuilly Dame de la Guerche et de Bouchet. A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont names “Joannem et Matildam” as the children of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” and his wife “Joanna…filia domini Josberti de Guirchia”, adding that Matilda married “comiti Blesensi Theobaldo”[359].
     "m secondly as her first husband, CLEMENCE des Roches, daughter of GUILLAUME des Roches Seneschal of Anjou & his wife Marguerite Dame de Sablé [Nevers] (-after Sep 1259). The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. "Clemencia uxore mea" consented to the donation by "Theobaldus Blesensis et Clarimontis comitis" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun by charter dated Apr 1218[360]. She married secondly Geoffroy [VI] Vicomte de Châteaudun. Her second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated Oct 1226 under whichj "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" donated property to the donation to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun with the consent of "Clemencia quondam comitissa Blesensi uxore mea"[361]. "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" donated a fair to Châteaudun, with the consent of "Clemencia uxore mea, condam comitissa Blesensi", by charter dated Jul 1229[362]."
Med Lands cites:
[353] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu LI, p. 35.
[354] Chartres Notre-Dame, Tome II, 151, p. 14.
[355] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu LXVII, p. 45.
[356] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu CXVII, p. 80.
[357] ES III 653.
[358] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire du xii siècle, p. 61.
[359] Dugdale Monasticon III, Shrewsbury Abbey, XI, Genealogia Dominorum Bellismontium, p. 522.
[360] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu CXVII, p. 80.
[361] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu CXXXVI, p. 93.
[362] Châteaudun La Madeleine, LXXXVIII, p. 95.19

; Per Racines et Histoire (Blois-Champagne): “Thibaud VI de Blois + 16 ou 22/04/1218 comte de Blois et de Clermont (1205) (cité dans des chartes à l’Hôtel-Dieu de Châteaudun en 03/1200, 05/1202 & 04/1218 ; à sa mort, le comté de Clermont est vendu à la Couronne de France)
     ép. 1) avant 19/09/1213 Mathilde d’Alençon (fille de Robert, comte d’Alençon, et de Jeanne de Preuilly, dame de La Guerche et de Bouchet)
     ép. 2) Clémence des Roches + après 09/1259 (fille de Guillaume des Roches, Sénéchal d’Anjou, et de Marguerite, dame de Sablé (Nevers) ; ép. 2) Geoffroi VI, vicomte de Châteaudun (citée dans une charte à l’Hôtel-Dieu de Châteaudun en 04/1218 ; dans une charte de donation au même par son 2nd mari en 10/1226) ”.10
; Per Genealogy.EU (Blois 1): “H1. Thibaut VI, Cte de Blois et de Clermont, +1218; m.Clemence des Roches; according to some sources he 2m: Matilda d'Alencon”.12

Citations

  1. [S4748] France Balade, online <http://www.francebalade.com/>. Hereinafter cited as France Balade Website (FR).
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence des Roches: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046807&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1557] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004: "Companions of the Third Crusade (was Re: Crusader ancestors (long)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Jan 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004."
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Dreux-Bû (ancien Beu) & seigneurs de Beaussart & Châteaudun, p. 2: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Dreux-Bu.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vicomtes de Châteaudun, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf
  6. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Craon, p. 13: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Craon.pdf
  7. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#ClemenceRocheM1ThibautVIBlois. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume des Roches: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122082&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#GuillaumeRochesdied1222.
  10. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 8: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122083&tree=LEO
  12. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#H2
  13. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Thibaut VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00330780&tree=LEO
  14. [S2372] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 8th ed. w/ additions by Wm R. and Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 1992: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004), Line 120-30, p. 112. Hereinafter cited as Weis [2004] "Ancestral Roots" 8th ed.
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Geoffroy VI: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046806&tree=LEO
  16. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/cfrachacha.htm#GeoffroyVIChateaudundied1250
  17. [S4748] France Balade Website (FR), online http://www.francebalade.com/, http://www.francebalade.com/chartres/ctdunois.htm
  18. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Blois 1 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/blois/blois1.html#H2
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#ThibautVIdied1218
  20. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clemence: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00050009&tree=LEO
  21. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jeanne de Châteaudun: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026636&tree=LEO

Guy I de La Roche-sur-l'Ognon Lord/Duke of Athens1,2

M, #10378, d. 1263
FatherOthon I de la Roche Seigneur de Ray, Lord of Athens1,3,2 b. c 1170, d. 1225
Last Edited27 Nov 2020
     Guy I de La Roche-sur-l'Ognon Lord/Duke of Athens married NN de Cicon.4,2
Guy I de La Roche-sur-l'Ognon Lord/Duke of Athens died in 1263.1,2
     ; Leo van de Pas cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag Marburg., Detlev Schwennicke, Editor, Reference: III 441.2 He was Lord of Athens between 1225 and 1260.1 He was Duke of Athens between 1260 and 1263.1

Family 1

Child

Citations

  1. [S1559] The Periphery of Francia: Outremer - Kings of Jerusalem and Cyprus,
    Counts of Edessa, Princes of Antioch, Counts of Tripoli, Kings of Thessalonica, Dukes of Athens, Princes of Achaea, and the Grand Masters of the Military Monastic Orders, online The Periphery of Francia: Outremer. Hereinafter cited as http://www.friesian.com/outremer.htm#edessa
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guy de La Roche-sur-l'Ognon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00093475&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Othon I de La Roche-sur-l'Ognon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00309931&tree=LEO
  4. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, NN de Cicon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00309930&tree=LEO
  5. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Isabelle de La Roche-sur-l'Ognon: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00093476&tree=LEO
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LATIN%20LORDSHIPS%20IN%20GREECE.htm#IsabelleM1GeoffroyBrielM2HuguesBrienne. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guilhem de La Roche: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00596664&tree=LEO
  8. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LATIN%20LORDSHIPS%20IN%20GREECE.htm#GuillaumeAthenddied1287
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alice de La Roche-sur-l'Ognon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00093473&tree=LEO
  10. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de La Roche-sur-l'Ognon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00163410&tree=LEO

Marguerite (?) de Nevers, dame de Sablé1,2,3,4,5

F, #10379, b. circa 1175, d. between 20 July 1238 and 1 December 1246
FatherRobert IV de Nevers seigneur de Sablé, seigneur de La Suze2,3,5,6 b. c 1150, d. 13 Jan 1196
MotherClemence de Mayenne Dame d'Angon3,7,8,5,6 d. c 1190
ReferenceEDV23
Last Edited31 Oct 2020
     Marguerite (?) de Nevers, dame de Sablé was born circa 1175; Racines et Histoire says b. ca 1175; Genealogics says b. ca 1179.5,9 She married Guillaume des Roches Sénéchal d’Anjou, Maine & Tourain, seigneur de Château-du-Loir, son of Baudouin des Roches, between 1190 and 1193.10,8,5,11,9,6,12
Marguerite (?) de Nevers, dame de Sablé died between 20 July 1238 and 1 December 1246.8,5,9,6
Marguerite (?) de Nevers, dame de Sablé was buried between 20 July 1238 and 1 December 1246 at Abbey of Peray-aux-Nonnains.9,6


     ; Per Med Lands:
     "CLEMENCE des Roches (-after Sep 1259). "Clemencia uxore mea" consented to the donation by "Theobaldus Blesensis et Clarimontis comitis" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun by charter dated Apr 1218[412]. King Philippe II confirmed a charter dated 1218 under which “Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d’Anjou partant pour l’Albigeois” established the rights in his succession of “Jeanne et Clémence ses deux autres [“autres” a mistake?] filles”, with the consent of “Marguerite de Sablé sa femme et d’Amauri de Craon mari de sa fille aînée”, by charter dated Mar 1219, which specifies that the former would receive Sablé, Briollai, Châteauneuf-sur-Sarthe, Précigné et Brion and the latter Château-du-Loir, Maiet, la Suze and Louplande[413]. "Amaury de Craon et Jeanne de Roches, Geoffroy de Châteaudun et Clémence des Roches" confirmed the donation of revenue made to Bonlieu abbey by “Guillaume des Roches et Marguerite de Sablé” by charter dated [16/31] Jul 1222[414]. "M[argarita] domina Sabolii [...quondam uxor domini Guillelmi], Amauricus de Credone senescallus Andegavensis [...Johenna uxore mea], G[aufridus] vicecomes Castriduni [...de assensu...Clementiæ uxoris meæ]" confirmed exemptions granted to the inhabitants of Cohémon by “dominus noster bonæ memoriæ G[uillelmus] de Rupibus seneschallus Andegavensis” by charter dated 1222 [after 15 Jul][415]. "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" donated property to the donation to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun with the consent of "Clemencia quondam comitissa Blesensi uxore mea" by charter dated Oct 1226[416]. "Clementia Castriduni et Castrilidi domina...cum...filia mea Johanna quondam comitissa Montisfortis" donated harvest to the nuns of Bonlieu, for the souls of “...Gaufridi quondam vicecomitis Castriduni sponsi mei”, by charter dated Nov 1255[417].
     "m firstly as his second wife, THIBAUT VI Comte de Blois, son of LOUIS Comte de Blois & his wife Catherine Ctss de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (-16 or 22 Apr 1218).
     "m secondly as his second wife, GEOFFROY [VI] Vicomte de Châteaudun, son of GEOFFROY [V] Vicomte de Châteaudun & his first wife Adela de Nevers (-6 Feb 1250, bur Ronceray)."
Med Lands cites:
[412] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu CXVII, p. 80.
[413] Delisle (1856), 1885, p. 415.
[414] Château-du-Loir, 140, p. 104.
[415] Château-du-Loir, 142, p. 104.
[416] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu CXXXVI, p. 93.
[417] Château-du-Loir, 180, p. 150.13


; Per Genealogics:
     "Marguerite was born about 1179, the eldest daughter of Robert de Sablé, Grand Master of the Knights Templar, and Clémence de Mayenne, dame d'Angon. She became the second wife of Guillaume des Roches, seneschal of Anjou, the son of Baudouin de Roches and Alix de Châtellerault. They had a son Robert, who died young, and two daughters, Jeanne and Clémence, who would both have progeny.
     "Upon her father's death in the Holy Land on 23 September 1193, the lordships and lands, mostly in the River Sarthe valley passed to Marguerite, making her one of the wealthiest heiresses in Anjou and Maine. However, her honours and vast landholdings went to her husband, whom she had married two years earlier.
     "Guillaume died on 15 July 1222. The Sablé barony and hereditary seneschalship passed on to Amaury I, sire de Craon, husband of Jeanne, the elder daughter of Guillaume and Marguerite, and then passed on to Amaury's and Jeanne's son Maurice IV de Craon, who married Isabelle de Lusignan, a half-sister of King Henry III of England.
     "Marguerite died sometime after 20 July 1238, and was buried in the abbey of Perray-aux-Nonnains."9

Reference: Genealogics cites: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.) 3:690, 718a.9

; Per Ravilious email [2004: "Marguerite de Sable
Death: aft 20 Jul 1238[2],[1]
cf. ES III, Tafel 690[2]
Spouse: Guillaume des Roches, seigneur de Roche-au-Moine, Anjou
Death: 15 Jul 1222[1]
Marr: ca 1190[2]
Children: Clemence (-1259)
Jeanne (-<1241)
Sources:
1. Mike Talbot, "Lusignan and Fougeres," Feb 10, 1999, GEN-MEDIEVAL-L@rootsweb.com, additional information and correction from Olivier Cocheril.
2. Detlev Schewennicke, "Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge," [ " European Family Trees: Family Trees for the History of European States, New Series " ], Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1978-1995 [3rd series], First series by Wilhelm Karl, Prinz zu Isenburg, continued second series by Frank, Baron Freytag von Loringhoven."8 EDV-23 GKJ-24.

; Per Med Lands:
     "MARGUERITE (-before 1 Dec 1246, bur Perray-aux-Nonnains). The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Guillaume des Roces" married "la dame de Sabluel"[721]. "Margarita domina Sabolii" confirmed donations to Fontaine-Daniel by "avunculi mei domini Juhelli de Meduana" by charter dated 1205[722]. An enquiry dated to [1340] records that "Missires Robert de Sableuil" had two daughters married to "Messire Guillaume des Roches…l’ainznée…Misire Jeufroy Marciau…l’autre"[723]. "M[argarita] domina Sabolii [...quondam uxor domini Guillelmi], Amauricus de Credone senescallus Andegavensis [...Johenna uxore mea], G[aufridus] vicecomes Castriduni [...de assensu...Clementiæ uxoris meæ]" confirmed exemptions granted to the inhabitants of Cohémon by “dominus noster bonæ memoriæ G[uillelmus] de Rupibus seneschallus Andegavensis” by charter dated 1222 [after 15 Jul][724]. Marguerite de Sablé donated property to Bonlieu abbey, with the consent of her sister "Philippa de Marstac", by charter dated 1227[725]. A charter dated 1 Dec 1246 records the return by the monks of Marmoutier of documents given to them by "la feue dame" Marguerite[726].
     "m ([1190]) as his second wife, GUILLAUME des Roches, son of BAUDOUIN des Roches & his wife --- ([1155/60]-15 Jul 1222, bur Bonlieu)."
Med Lands cites:
[721] Michel (1840), p. 93.
[722] Fontaine-Daniel, XIX, p. 36.
[723] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 176, citing Enqueste sur l’Usage des Contez d’Anjou, de Touraine et du Maine.
[724] Château-du-Loir, 142, p. 104.
[725] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, p. 134.
[726] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, p. 141.6

; Per Med Lands:
     "GUILLAUME des Roches ([1155/60]-15 Jul 1222, bur Bonlieu). The Chronicle of Parcé records Guillaume as son of Baudouin des Roches en Poitou and his wife Alix de Châtellerault[390]. His parentage is confirmed by a donation dated 1215 made by "Guillelmus de Rupibus Senescallus Andegavensis" to the abbey of Perseigne of property which had belonged to "Herberti de Rupibus patris Balduini de Rupibus patris sui"[391]. Seigneur de Longué-Jumelles, de Château-du-Loir. “Guillaume de Roches” donated property to the abbey of la Boissière, with the consent of “Philippe sa femme et par Hilaire mère de la dite Philippe”, by undated charter[392]. Seneschal of Anjou. “Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d’Anjou” confirmed an agreement between the monks of Villeloin and “Tancrède” concerning “des bois de Chedon” by charter dated 1201[393]. “Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d’Anjou” confirmed the donation of “de la métaire de Perreria située à Château-du-Loir, ainsi que du moulin” to Louroux abbey made by “Beaudoin des Roches son fils” by charter dated Mar 1207 (O.S.?)[394]. King Philippe II confirmed a charter dated 1218 under which “Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d’Anjou partant pour l’Albigeois” established the rights in his succession of “Jeanne et Clémence ses deux autres [“autres” a mistake?] filles”, with the consent of “Marguerite de Sablé sa femme et d’Amauri de Craon mari de sa fille aînée”, by charter dated Mar 1219, which specifies that the former would receive Sablé, Briollai, Châteauneuf-sur-Sarthe, Précigné et Brion and the latter Château-du-Loir, Maiet, la Suze and Louplande[395]. The Chronicon Turonense Magnum records the death in 1222 of "Guillelmus de Rupibus senescallus Andigavensis" and his burial "in ecclesia monialium Cistercensis ordinis…Bonus Locus" which he had founded "juxta Castrum Lidi"[396].
     "m firstly PHILIPPA, daughter of --- & his wife Hilaire ---. “Guillaume de Roches” donated property to the abbey of la Boissière, with the consent of “Philippe sa femme et par Hilaire mère de la dite Philippe”, by undated charter[397].
     "m secondly ([1190]) MARGUERITE de Sablé, daughter of ROBERT [IV] Seigneur de Sablé [Nevers] & his wife Clémence de Mayenne (-before 1 Dec 1246, bur Perray-aux-Nonnains). The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Guillaume des Roces" married "la dame de Sabluel"[398]. "Margarita domina Sabolii" confirmed donations to Fontaine-Daniel by "avunculi mei domini Juhelli de Meduana" by charter dated 1205[399]. An enquiry dated to [1340] records that "Missires Robert de Sableuil" had two daughters married to "Messire Guillaume des Roches…l’ainznée…Misire Jeufroy Marciau…l’autre"[400]. "M[argarita] domina Sabolii [...quondam uxor domini Guillelmi], Amauricus de Credone senescallus Andegavensis [...Johenna uxore mea], G[aufridus] vicecomes Castriduni [...de assensu...Clementiæ uxoris meæ]" confirmed exemptions granted to the inhabitants of Cohémon by “dominus noster bonæ memoriæ G[uillelmus] de Rupibus seneschallus Andegavensis” by charter dated 1222 [after 15 Jul][401]. Marguerite de Sablé donated property to Bonlieu abbey, with the consent of her sister "Philippa de Marstac", by charter dated 1227[402]. A charter dated 1 Dec 1246 records the return by the monks of Marmoutier of documents given to them by "la feue dame" Marguerite[403].
     "Guillaume & his first wife had one child.
     "Guillaume & his second wife had three children."
Med Lands cites:
[390] Port (1876), Tome II, p. 37, citing Mss. Baluze, 280.
[391] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 201, quoting Registre de la Chambre des Contes.
[392] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2129, p. 229, citing ‘Archiv. de l’abbaye de la Boissière’.
[393] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2153, p. 232, citing ‘Cartul. de Villeloin fo. 72 v’.
[394] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2181, p. 238, citing ‘Archiv. de la Boissière’.
[395] Delisle (1856), 1885, p. 415.
[396] Chroniques de Touraine, Chronicon Turonense Magnum, p. 153.
[397] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2129, p. 229, citing ‘Archiv. de l’abbaye de la Boissière’.
[398] Michel (1840), p. 93.
[399] Fontaine-Daniel, XIX, p. 36.
[400] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 176, citing Enqueste sur l’Usage des Contez d’Anjou, de Touraine et du Maine.
[401] Château-du-Loir, 142, p. 104.
[402] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, p. 134.
[403] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, p. 141.12

Citations

  1. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence des Roches: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046807&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Robert de Nevers: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122084&tree=LEO
  3. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite de Nevers: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122083&tree=LEO
  4. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf, p. 6. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  5. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Craon.pdf, p. 10.
  6. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/anjounob.htm#MargueriteSableMGuillaumeRoches. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence de Mayenne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122085&tree=LEO
  8. [S1557] John P. Ravilious, "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004: "Companions of the Third Crusade (was Re: Crusader ancestors (long)"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 21 Jan 2004. Hereinafter cited as "Ravilious email 21 Jan 2004."
  9. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marguerite: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122083&tree=LEO
  10. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 120-31, p. 107. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  11. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Guillaume des Roches: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00122082&tree=LEO
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#GuillaumeRochesdied1222.
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#ClemenceRocheM1ThibautVIBlois.
  14. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Clémence des Roches: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00046807&tree=LEO
  15. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Comtes de Blois & Chartres (Blois-Champagne), p. 8: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Blois-Champagne.pdf
  16. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Craon, p. 13: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Craon.pdf
  17. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Vicomtes de Châteaudun, p. 9: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf
  18. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#JeanneRochesdied1238.

Jean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople1,2,3,4

M, #10380, b. 1168, d. 21 March 1237
FatherÉrard II de Brienne Comte de Brienne1,2,3,5 b. c 1130, d. 8 Feb 1191
MotherAgnes de Montfaucon1,6,5,7
ReferenceEDV22 GKJ23
Last Edited6 Nov 2020
     Jean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople was born in 1168; Genealogy.EU (Brienne 1 page) says b. ca 1148; Genealogics says b. 1168; Rudt Collenberg says b. 1147; Med Lands says b. 1170/75.8,1,2,9,5 He married Maria del Monferrato Queen of Jerusalem, daughter of Conrad I del Monferrato Marchese del Monferrat, King of Jerusalem, Prince of Tyrus and Isabella/Isabeau (?) d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem, on 14 September 1210 at Tyrus;
His 1st wife.2,1,10,9,3,11,5,12,13 Jean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople married Stephanie/Isabelle (?) Princess of Armenia, daughter of Leo I/II (?) King of Armenia, Lord of the Mountains and Isabelle (?), before May 1214;
His 2nd wife.1,14,3,11,4,5,15 Jean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople married Doña Berengaria (?) Infanta de Castilla y León, Empress consort of Constantinople, daughter of Alfonso IX 'The Slobberer" Fernandez (?) King of Leon & Galicia and Berenguela I La Grande Alfonsez (?) Queen of Castile, in 1224 at Toledo, Provincia de Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain (now);
His 3rd wife.16,1,17,2,3,18,19,5
Jean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople died on 21 March 1237 at Constantinople (Istanbul now), Byzantium; Genealogics says d. 21 March 1237; Med Lands says d. 27 March 1237.16,8,1,17,2,3,20,5
Jean I de Brienne King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople was buried after 23 March 1237 at Basilica di San Francesco d'Assisi, Assisi, Provincia di Perugia, umbria, Italy,

; From Find A Grave:
     BIRTH     1170, Brienne-le-Chateau, Departement de l'Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France
     DEATH     23 Mar 1237 (aged 66–67), Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
     Crusader. He was a French knight who became King of Jerusalem by marriage and ruled the Latin Empire of Constantinople Turkey, as regent. He was a prominent figure after the 5th and 6th for France when he was invited in 1229, by the barons of the Latin Empire of Constantinople to become emperor-regent, on condition that Baldwin of Courtenay should marry his second daughter and succeed him. He then ruled in Constantinople and in 1235, with a few troops, he repelled a siege of the city by John III Vatatzes, Emperor of Nicaea, leading a successful cavalry charge which killed some 10,000 enemy soldiers. Bio by: John "J-Cat" Griffith
     Family Members
     Spouse
          Berengaria of León 1204–1237
     Children
          Yolanda de Brienne 1212–1228
          Alphonse de Brienne 1225–1270
          Jean de Brienne 1230–1296
          Louis of Acre 1230–1297
     BURIAL     Basilica di San Francesco d'Assisi, Assisi, Provincia di Perugia, Umbria, Italy
     Maintained by: Find A Grave
     Added: 5 Dec 1998
     Find A Grave Memorial 4104.21
     ; Per Med Lands:
     "Infanta doña BERENGUELA de Castilla y León (1204-Constantinople 12 Apr 1237, bur Constantinople). The Chronicon Mundi of Lucas Tudensis names "Alionoram primogenitam, Constanciam, et Berengariam" as the daughters of Alfonso IX King of León and his second wife[891]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "rex Ierusalem Iohannes" as daughter of "Berengaria" and "regi Legionensi id est regi Galicie" and in a later passage records the marriage of "rex Iohannes Ierosolimitanus" and "filia regis Gallicie, sororem Fernandi de Castella", but in neither place is she named[892]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1223 of "le roi de Castille…sa sœur Bérengère, nièce de Blanche reine de France" and "Jean roi de Jérusalem"[893]. The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "II Id Apr" of "Berengaria imperatrix Constantinopolitane"[894]. "Jehan fiuz le roy Jehan de Jherusalem, bouteillier de France" instituted masses for "nostre pere le roy Jehan de Jherusalem et empereur de Costantinoble…et madame Berangiere sa fame jadis nostre mere" in the church of St Paul, Paris by charter dated Oct 1294[895].
     "m (Toledo 1224) as his third wife, JEAN de Brienne King of Jerusalem, son of ERARD II Comte de Brienne & Agnès de Nevers ([1170]-Constantinople 23 Mar 1237, bur Constantinople). Elected Emperor of Constantinople 1231."
Med Lands cites:
[891] Lucas Tudensis, Liber IV, p. 109.
[892] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1212 and 1224, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 895 and 913.
[893] Guizot, M. (ed.) (1825) Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis (Paris), p. 132.
[894] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 655.
[895] Nouvelles Preuves I, p. 41.19


; Per Genealogy.EU (Ivrea 6): “D6. [2m.] Infta Berenguela, *1198/99; m.Toledo 1224 Jean de Brienne, Emperor of Constantinople (+1237)”.22 EDV-22 GKJ-23.

; This is the same person as:
”John of Brienne” at Wikipedia, as
”Jean de Brienne” at Wikipédia (Fr.),
and as ”Juan de Brienne” at Wikipedia (Es.)23,24,25

; Per Genealogics:
     "A younger son of Erard II, comte de Brienne and Agnès de Montfaucon, Jean was probably born in 1168. Penniless, he passed many years as a minor noble until befriended by King Philippe II August of France, who arranged for him to marry Maria de Monferrato, queen of Jerusalem. In 1210 Jean reached the Palestinian city of Acre and on 14 September 1210 he married Maria and became titular king of Jerusalem. Maria died in 1212 and Jean was named regent for their infant daughter Yolande, who inherited the crown as Isabella II.
     "Before May 1214 he married Stephanie/Isabella of Armenia, daughter of the Armenian king Leo II, and had a son by her. As regent Jean arranged a five-year truce with al-Malik al-Adil, sultan of Egypt and Syria. During the truce he persuaded Pope Innocent III to launch the Fifth Crusade in support of his daughter's kingdom.
     "In 1218 he joined the crusading force in an expedition against the Egyptian port of Damietta. After quarrelling with the crusade leader, the cardinal legate Pelagius, Jean left Egypt in February 1220, returning in July 1221 to witness the humiliating defeat of the crusaders and the abandonment of the siege of Damietta.
     "Stephanie died in 1219; Jean then married Berenguela of León and Castile, daughter of Alfonso IX, king of León, and his second wife Berenguela of Castile; they had three sons and a daughter who would have progeny. In 1225 he gave his daughter Isabella in marriage to the Holy Roman Emperor Friedrich II, trying to retain his rights as regent of the kingdom of Jerusalem. Immediately following the marriage Friedrich began to contest these rights.
     "In 1228 Jean was invited to Constantinople to be regent and co-emperor with the young Baudouin II de Courtenay, and arranged a match between Baudouin and Marie, his four-year old daughter by Berenguela. Crowned in 1231, Jean helped fend off attacks by the Bulgarian tsar Ivan Asen II and the Nicaean emperor Johannes III Vatatzes, but shortly before his death he was forced to appeal to the West for help. Jean died on 21 March 1237 in Constantinople."2

Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, 4 volumes, Marburg, 1953, 1975., W. K. Prinz von Isenburg, Reference: II 47, 136
2. The Complete Peerage 1936 , H.A.Doubleday & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: V 168.7


; Per Racines et Histoire (Brienne): “Jean 1er de Brienne ° ~1175 (Brienne) + 21 ou 23/03/1237 (Paris) bailli de Chypre, roi et régent de Jérusalem (1210-1225 - abdication), vice-empereur latin de Constantinople (1229-1237),
seigneur de Brienne pour son frère Gautier III
     ép. 1) 14/09/1200 ou 1209 ? (Tyr) Maria de Montferrat, reine de Jérusalem ° 1191/92 + 1212 (fille de Conrad de Montferrat, co-roi de Jérusalem, et d’Isabelle d’Anjou, reine de Jérusalem)
     ép. 2) dès 05/1214 Stéphanie (Isabelle, Rita) d’Arménie ° après 1195 + 06/1219/20 (fille de Léon 1er (ou II) «Le Grand», roi de Petite Arménie, et d’Isabelle d’Antioche)
     ép. 3) 1222 ou 1224 ? (Tolède ou Burgos) Berenguela (Bérengère) de Castille, infante de Castille ° ~1199 (Burgos, Castille) + 12/04/1237 (fille d’Alfonso IX, roi de Léon et de Castille, et de Berenguela, infante de Castille)”.26

; Per Genealogy.EU (de Brienne 1): "F4. Jean de Brienne, King and Regent of Jerusalem (1210-25), Latin Emperor of Constantinople (1229-37), *ca 1148, +23.3.1237; 1m: Tyrus 1210 Maria of Montferrat, Queen of Jerusalem (*1191 +1212); 2m: before V.1214 Stephanie (+1219) dau.of King Leon I of Armenia; 3m: Burgos 1224 Infta Berenguela of Castile."1

; Per Med Lands:
     "JEAN de Brienne, son of ERARD [II] de Brienne & his wife Agnès de Montbéliard [Montfaucon] ([1170/75]-27 Mar 1237). "Johan de Briene" is named as brother of Gauthier de Brienne by William of Tyre (Continuator), after his brother Guillaume[311]. "Gualterius comes Brene" donated property to Beaulieu (Aube) by charter dated 1194 with the consent of "Willelmi et Johannis fratrum eius"[312]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Iohannis frater eiusdem comitis [Galteri comitis Briennensis" when recording that he succeeded as Comte de Brienne after the death of his brother[313]. "Johannes comes Brene" donated property to Basse-Fontaine by charter dated Apr 1210[314]. His first marriage was arranged by Philippe II King of France, who gave him a dower of 40,000 silver pounds, a sum which was equalled by Pope Innocent III[315]. He landed at Acre 13 Sep 1210, was married to his first wife the next day, and was crowned 3 Oct 1210 at Tyre as JEAN King of Jerusalem by Albert Patriarch of Jerusalem[316]. "Iohannes…Latinorum Ierusalem rex decimus et comes Brena et domina Maria uxor mea regina" donated property to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated 1 Jul 1211[317]. He retained the bailiship of the kingdom of Jerusalem after the death of his first wife[318], nominally in the name of his daughter. After a long siege, and with the help of western armies which were part of the Fifth Crusade, Damietta in Egypt was captured 5 Nov 1219 and added to the territory of the kingdom of Jerusalem[319]. Jean left the crusade in Feb 1220, intending to visit Armenia to claim the throne in the name of his second wife following the death of her father, but as both she and their infant son died before he sailed for Cilicia he had no further claim and abandoned the journey[320]. He arrived back with the Fifth Crusade 6 Jul 1221, which proceeded to march further into Egypt but was forced to retreat and return Damietta 8 Sep 1221[321]. After appointing Eudes de Montbéliard as regent, King Jean sailed from Acre in autumn 1222, to find a suitable husband for his daughter. He agreed to her marriage with Friedrich II King of Germany on condition that he continued as regent of Jerusalem for life. Matthew Paris records that “Johannes de Brennes rex Jerusalem et magister superioris Hospitalis fratrum Jerusalem” visited England “circa octavas Apostolorum Petri et Pauli” to seek help for the relief of “Terræ Sanctæ”[322]. His son-in-law reneged on his promise relating to the throne of Jerusalem immediately after his wedding and declared himself king of Jerusalem in 1225[323]. He was appointed regent of the Latin empire of Constantinople, by agreement at Perugia in Apr 1229, and was crowned JEAN Emperor of Constantinople on his arrival in the city in 1231. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1237 in Constantinople of "rex Iohannes"[324].
     "m firstly (Tyre 1210) MARIE Queen of Jerusalem, daughter of CORRADO Marchese di Monferrato & his third wife Isabelle Queen of Jerusalem (Tyre Summer 1192-1212). William of Tyre (Continuator) names her and specifies her parentage[325]. A continuator of Caffaro records the death in 1192 of "Conrado marchionis Montidferrati" leaving "uxore sua pregnante, ex quo nata est unica filia Maria"[326], which indicates that Maria must have been born in summer 1192, therefore after her mother's second marriage. She was known as "la Marquise", from her father's rank[327]. Her marriage was arranged by Philippe II King of France, who gave her husband a dower of 40,000 silver pounds, a sum which was equalled by Pope Innocent III[328]. She was crowned with her husband 3 Oct 1210 at Tyre[329]. William of Tyre (Continuator) records her death in childbirth within two years of her marriage[330].
     "m secondly ([23/30] Apr 1214) RITA [Stephanie] of Armenia, daughter of LEWON I King of Armenia & his first wife Isabelle --- (after 1195-[Acre] [Jun] 1220). William of Tyre (Continuator) names her and her father when recording her marriage, specifying that she was the daughter of his first marriage[331]. The Chronique du Royaume de la Petite Arménie of Constable Sempad names "une fille encore en bas âge…Ritha" as Leo's daughter by his first marriage, stating that she was brought up by her paternal grandmother[332]. Smbat Sparapet's Chronicle records that "King Lewon gave his daughter Rita to the king of Jerusalem" in [27 Jan 1214/26 Jan 1215][333]. "Leo…rex Armenie" granted property to the Knights Hospitallers with the consent of "domini Rupini principis Antiochie…nepotis et heredis mei" by charter dated 23 Apr 1214, and declared having received a loan from the Knights Hospitallers by charter dated the same date, both documents specifying that they formed part of the arrangements for the marriage of "mee filie" and "regi Iherosolimitano"[334]. William of Tyre (Continuator) records that "li rois Johans", on hearing news of the death of “Livon le roi d’Ermenie, pere de sa feme”, left for Acre from where he intended to go to Armenia to claim the throne, but that he abandoned the journey because his wife died, and after 15 days later also “un fil que il en avoit de age de IV ans”[335].
     "m thirdly (Toledo 1224) Infanta doña BERENGUELA de Castilla y León, daughter of don ALFONSO IX King of León & his second wife Infanta doña Berenguela de Castilla (1204-Constantinople 12 Apr 1237, bur Constantinople). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "rex Ierusalem Iohannes" as daughter of "Berengaria" and "regi Legionensi id est regi Galicie" and in a later passage records the marriage of "rex Iohannes Ierosolimitanus" and "filia regis Gallicie, sororem Fernandi de Castella", but in neither place is she named[336]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1223 of "le roi de Castille…sa sœur Bérengère, nièce de Blanche reine de France" and "Jean roi de Jérusalem"[337]. "Jehan fiuz le roy Jehan de Jherusalem, bouteillier de France" instituted masses for "nostre pere le roy Jehan de Jherusalem et empereur de Costantinoble…et madame Berangiere sa fame jadis nostre mere" in the church of St Paul, Paris by charter dated Oct 1294[338]. The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "II Id Apr" of "Berengaria imperatrix Constantinopolitane"[339]."
Med Lands cites:
[311] WTC XXVII.XIV, p. 235.
[312] Abbé Laloire (ed.) (1878) Chartes de Beaulieu (Aube), Collection des principaux cartularies du diocèse de Troyes Tome IV (Paris, Troyes), (“Beaulieu (Aube)”) 191, p. 284.
[313] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1201, MGH SS XXIII, p. 879.
[314] Abbé Laloire (ed.) (1878) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Basse-Fontaine, Collection des principaux cartularies du diocèse de Troyes Tome III (Paris, Troyes) (“Basse-Fontaine”) 7, p. 13.
[315] WTC XXX.XIII, p. 307, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 132-3.
[316] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 133.
[317] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 145, p. 268.
[318] WTC XXXI.IX, p. 320.
[319] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 162.
[320] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 164-5.
[321] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 167.
[322] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1874) Matthæi Parisiensis, Monachi Sancti Albani, Chronica Majora (“MP”), Vol. III, 1223, p. 82.
[323] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 173-4.
[324] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1237, MGH SS XXIII, p. 941.
[325] WTC XXX.XI, p. 305.
[326] Caffaro regni Iherosolymitani brevis historia, Iacobus Avrie (continuator), p. 147.
[327] WTC XXX.XIV, p. 308.
[328] WTC XXX.XIII, p. 307, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 132-3.
[329] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 133.
[330] WTC XXXI.VIII, p. 320.
[331] WTC XXXI.VIII, p. 320.
[332] Sempad Chronique du Royaume de la Petite Arménie, RHC, Documents arméniens, Tome I (Paris, 1869), 654, p. 642.
[333] Bedrosian, R. (trans.) (2005) Smbat Sparapet's Chronicle (Venice Manuscript) (New Jersey) 102, 663 A.E [27 Jan 1214/26 Jan 1215], a vailable at (20 Aug 2007).
[334] Langlois, V. (ed.) (1863) Le Trésor des Chartes d'Arménie (Venice) ("Chartes d´Arménie"), VIII and IX, pp. 122 and 124.
[335] WTC XXXII.XVI, p. 349.
[336] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1212 and 1224, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 895 and 913.
[337] Guizot, M. (ed.) (1825) Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis (Paris), p. 132.
[338] Mas Latrie, L. de (ed.) (1873) Nouvelles Preuves de l'Histoire de Chypre sous le règne des princes de la maison de Lusignan, Bibliothèque de l'Ecole des chartes, Tome XXXIII (Paris) ("Nouvelles Preuves I"), p. 41.
[339] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 655.5


; Per Med Lands:
     "MARIA di Monferrato (Tyre summer 1192-1212). William of Tyre (Continuator) names her and specifies her parentage[257]. A continuator of Caffaro records the death in 1192 of "Conrado marchionis Montidferrati" leaving "uxore sua pregnante, ex quo nata est unica filia Maria"[258], which indicates that Maria must have been born in summer 1192, therefore after her mother's second marriage. She was known as "la Marquise", from her father's rank[259]. She succeeded her mother in 1206 as MARIE Queen of Jerusalem, under the regency of Jean of Ibelin Lord of Beirut[260]. Her marriage was arranged by Philippe II King of France, who gave her husband a dower of 40,000 silver pounds, a sum which was equalled by Pope Innocent III[261]. She was crowned with her husband 3 Oct 1210 at Tyre[262]. William of Tyre (Continuator) records her death in childbirth within two years of her marriage[263].
     "m (14 Sep 1210) as his first wife, JEAN de Brienne, son of ERARD [II] de Brienne & his wife Agnes de Montfaucon (-27 Mar 1237). He landed at Acre 13 Sep 1210, was married next day and crowned 3 Oct 1210 at Tyre as JEAN King of Jerusalem by Albert Patriarch of Jerusalem[264]."
Med Lands cites:
[257] WTC XXX.XI, p. 305.
[258] Caffaro regni Iherosolymitani brevis historia, Iacobus Avrie (continuator), p. 147.
[259] WTC XXX.XIV, p. 308.
[260] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 104.
[261] WTC XXX.XIII, p. 307, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 132-3.
[262] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 133.
[263] WTC XXXI.VIII, p. 320.
[264] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 133.13


; Per Genealogy.EU (Aleramici (di Montferrato) family): “Maria, Queen of Jerusalem (1206-12), *1191, +1212; m.Tyrus 14.9.1210 Jean de Brienne (*ca 1148 +23.3.1237).”.27

; Per Racines et Histoire (Montferrat): “2) Marie di Monferrato ° 1191/92 + 1212 Reine de Jérusalem (1205/06-1212)
     ép. 14/09/1210 (Tyr) Jean 1er de Brienne ° ~1170/75 + 12 ou 27?/03/1237 Roi de Jérusalem (1210-1225, Empereur de Constantinople (1231-1237) ”.28

; Per Med Lands:
     "RITA [Stephanie] of Armenia (after 1195-[Acre] [Jun] 1220). William of Tyre (Continuator) names her and her father when recording her marriage, specifying that she was the daughter of his first marriage[561]. The Chronique du Royaume de la Petite Arménie of Constable Sempad names "une fille encore en bas âge…Ritha" as Lewon's daughter by his first marriage, stating that she was brought up by her paternal grandmother[562]. Smbat Sparapet's Chronicle records that "King Lewon gave his daughter Rita to the king of Jerusalem" in [27 Jan 1214/26 Jan 1215][563]. "Leo…rex Armenie" granted property to the Knights Hospitaller with the consent of "domini Rupini principis Antiochie…nepotis et heredis mei" by charter dated 23 Apr 1214, and declared having received a loan from the Knights Hospitaller by charter dated the same date, both documents specifying that these financial transactions formed part of the arrangements for the marriage of "mee filie" and "regi Iherosolimitano"[564]. William of Tyre (Continuator) records that "li rois Johans", on hearing news of the death of “Livon le roi d’Ermenie, pere de sa feme”, left for Acre from where he intended to go to Armenia to claim the throne, but that he abandoned the journey because his wife died, and after 15 days later also “un fil que il en avoit de age de IV ans”[565].
     "m ([23/30] Apr 1214) as his second wife, JEAN de Brienne King of Jerusalem, son of ERARD [II] de Brienne & his wife Agnès de Montfaucon (-27 Mar 1237)."
Med Lands cites:
[561] WTC XXXI.VIII, p. 320.
[562] Sempad, 654, p. 642.
[563] Smbat Sparapet's Chronicle 102, 663 A.E [27 Jan 1214/26 Jan 1215].
[564] Chartes d'Arménie, VIII and IX, pp. 122 and 124.
[565] WTC XXXII.XVI, p. 349.29
He was Count of Brienne between 1205 and 1221.23 He was King of Jerusalem, See attached map . between 1210 and 1225.8,1,11,23 He was Crusader - The Fifth Crusade. Innocent III, unwilling to let the crusading idea lapse, preached the Fifth Crusade at the Fourth Lateran Council. Egypt was to be the objective; the date, 1217; John of Brienne, king of Jerusalem, was replaced by the papal legate Pelagius as leader (1218). Capture of Damietta (1219); rejection (in the expectation of Frederick II's arrival) of the offers of the sultan (1219) to exchange Jerusalem for Damietta; failure of the march on Cairo; treaty of 1221: eight-year truce; Damietta lost; retreat. between 1218 and 1221.8,30 He was Regent of Constantinople for John between 1229 and 1231.31 He was Latin Emperor of Constantinople between 1229 and 1237.2,23 He was Co-Emperor of Constantinople between 1231 and 1237.8,31,1

Family 1

Maria del Monferrato Queen of Jerusalem b. 1192, d. a 14 Apr 1212
Child

Family 2

Stephanie/Isabelle (?) Princess of Armenia b. a 1195, d. Jun 1220
Child

Citations

  1. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Brienne 1 page (de Brienne Family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/brienne/brienne1.html
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026633&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans: The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (11, Rude de Lille, Paris 7e, France: Librairie C. Klincksieck for the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Armenian Libraryn (Lisbon), 1963), Chart IX (B): The House of Brienne-Jerusalem. Hereinafter cited as Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Armenia 1 page - The Rupenids: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/crus/armenia1.html
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#JeanBriennedied1237. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Agnès de Montfaucon: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026641&tree=LEO
  7. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Jean de Brienne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026633&tree=LEO
  8. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, 7th edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.
    Baltimore, 1992, unknown publish date), line 114-28, pp. 104-105. Hereinafter cited as Weis AR-7.
  9. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart A (R1): Relationship Table XII - XIII Century.
  10. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page (Aleramici (di Montferrato) family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  11. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart V (J): The House of the Kings of Jerusalem.
  12. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Maria de Monferrato: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026637&tree=LEO
  13. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#MarieQueen
  14. [S1671] Count W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg, Rudt-Collenberg: The Rupenides, etc., Chart I (Rup.).
  15. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Stephanie|Isabella of Armenia: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00444886&tree=LEO
  16. [S632] Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis AR-7, line 120-29, p. 107.
  17. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  18. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Berenguela of León and Castile: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00026634&tree=LEO
  19. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CASTILE.htm#BerenguelaLeondied1237
  20. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Brienne 5: p. 154. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.
  21. [S2374] Find a Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 October 2019), memorial page for Jean de Brienne (1170–23 Mar 1237), Find A Grave Memorial no. 4104, citing Basilica di San Francesco d'Assisi, Assisi, Provincia di Perugia, Umbria, Italy ; Maintained by Find A Grave, at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/4104/jean-de_brienne. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave.
  22. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Ivrea 6: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea6.html
  23. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Brienne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  24. [S4742] Wikipédia - L'encyclopédie libre, online https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip%C3%A9dia:Accueil_principal, Jean de Brienne: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_de_Brienne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipédia (FR).
  25. [S4760] Wikipédia - Llaenciclopedia libre, online https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Portada, Juan de Brienne: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_de_Brienne. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia (ES).
  26. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Maison de Brienne, p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Brienne.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Racines et Histoire.
  27. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, updated 15 May 2003, Montfer page (Aleramici (di Montferrato) family): http://genealogy.euweb.cz/italy/montfer.html
  28. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, Seigneurs de Montferrat (Aleramici, Mon(te)ferrato), p. 4: http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Montferrat.pdf
  29. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ARMENIA.htm#IsabelleMJeanBrienneJerusalem
  30. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth Edition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001), p. 236. Hereinafter cited as The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed.
  31. [S1224] General Editor Peter N. Stearns, The Encyclopedia of World History, 6th Ed., p. 238.
  32. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 90: Holy Roman Empire - General survey (until Frederick III). Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  33. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Yolande de Brienne: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013541&tree=LEO
  34. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/JERUSALEM.htm#YolandeQueen
  35. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Louis de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00139445&tree=LEO
  36. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Marie de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00013812&tree=LEO
  37. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Alfons/Aufons de Brienne: http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00064501&tree=LEO
  38. [S2280] Racines et Histoire, online http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/LGN-frameset.html, http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Chateaudun-Vicomtes.pdf, p. 7.