Ivar (?)1

M, #49531, d. 950
FatherRagnall (Ragnald) (?) King of York and Man2 d. c 921
ReferenceEDV31
Last Edited30 Oct 2020
     Ivar (?) died in 950.1
     EDV-31.

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 420 (Chart 25). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 423-424.

Ragnall (Ragnald) (?) King of York and Man1

M, #49532, d. circa 921
FatherSitric I (?) King of Dublin1 d. 896
ReferenceEDV32
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Ragnall (Ragnald) (?) King of York and Man died circa 921.1
     EDV-32. He was King of York, [Ashley, pp. 462-463] RAGNALL or RAGNALD (I) York, 910-21; Man, 914-21. Ragnall was a grandson of IVARR THE BONELESS and was amongst the many Norse Vikings expelled from Dublin in 902. He spent the next few years harrying the western coast of Scotland and Strathclyde, and it may be that he established a base on Man or one of the Hebridean islands, but certainly did not wield the authority to call himself king. In 910 Ragnall seized the opportunity given by EDWARD THE ELDER'S defeat of the Danish kings of York at Tettenhall to claim York as his own and allow the settlement of the homeless heirs of Ivarr. Ragnall began colonizing land along the Wear and broadened the old kingdom of Jorvik north in Bernicia. In 914 he drove out Ealdred of Bernicia who sought the aid of CONSTANTINE II of Scotland, but the combined Bernician-Scottish army was defeated at Corbridge later that same year. Ragnall rampaged his way across northern Britain, devastating Strathclyde. He rejoined his fleet, probably at Dumbarton, and towards the end of 914 soundly defeated a rival Viking fleet led by Bard Ottarson of Waterford off the coast of Man. It may be in this year that Ragnall declared himself as king of Man as well as the southern Hebrides. During his absence, while he was helping his brother SITRIC regain Dublin, which they achieved by 917, ATHELFLAED of Mercia raised a confederate army against him, but her death in 918 weakened their resolve. A smaller army assembled by Constantine II was defeated again at Corbridge as Ragnall returned across Britain. Ragnall discovered that opposition against him had appeared amongst factions in York, probably amongst the former Danish settlers encouraged by the native English, but Ragnall swooped on York in 919 and regained it without difficulty. He was now firmly ensconced as king, holding control over all land from York to Cumbria, including Man. His tactics were to pitch the Danes against the English and he was assisted by Sitric in trying to goad the Danes into revolt. This failed. Instead of splitting the opposition, as Ragnall had hoped, he had combined them against him and in 920 Ragnall was forced to submit to Edward the Elder as overlord of England. Regaining York was thus a hollow victory, for though he was recognized as king within his kingdom, he could not act without the direct consent of Edward. He died early in 921, and was succeeded by Sitric. between 910 and 921.2 He was King of Man, [Ashley, pp. 423-424] RAGNALL or RAGNALD (I) York, 910-21; and Man, c914-c21. Ragnall was a grandson of IVARR THE BONELESS who was amongst the many Vikings expelled from Dublin in 902. He spent the next few years harrying the western coast of Scotland and Strathclyde, and it may be that he established a base on Man or one of the Hebridean islands, but certainly did not wield the authority to call himself king. In 910 Ragnall seized the kingdom of York and began to carve out a kingdom across northern England. (Full details about Ragnall are under York on page 462). He probably declared himself king of Man in 914 when he defeated a rival Viking fleet off the coast of Man. Man became an ideal staging post between Dublin and York and became the key to Ragnall's power. Ragnall was eventually defeated by Edward the Elder in 920 and forced to recognize him as overlord. Nevertheless Ragnall's hold on Man did not diminish, and it was ruled by the kings of Dublin for the next generation or two. It is believed that they appointed vassal kings to govern the island, of which Gebeachen is the earliest known. between 914 and 921.1

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 423-424. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 462-463.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 424.

Sitric I (?) King of Dublin1

M, #49533, d. 896
FatherIvarr "the Boneless" (?) King of Dublin and York2,3 d. 873
ReferenceGAV30
Last Edited28 May 2020
     Sitric I (?) King of Dublin died in 896.1
      ; Per Baldwin:
     "NN mac Ímair (first name unknown, father of Sitric ua Ímair) [Note: Sitric is called a grandson of Ímar (ua Ímair) in the Irish annals, but no satisfactory evidence has been advanced regarding the name of the intervening generation. The Irish annals (AU and others) show two sons of Ímar, Sichfrith (d. 888), and Sitric (d. 896), both of whom appear to have been kings of Dublin (although the annals do not explicitly give them that title). Another Dublin king in the annals, Barid or Barith (d. 881), is of unstated parentage in most of the annals, but is referred to as another son of Ímar in CS. Of these sons (and possible son), Sitric can almost certainly be ruled out as the possible father of Sitric ua Ímair, because Vikings were very rarely named after their fathers. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that Sitric ua Ímair was the son of another, unknown, son of Ímar.]
** AU = The Annals of Ulster to A.D. 1131, edited by S. Mac Airt and G. Mac Niocaill (Dublin, 1984), also available (without English translation) at the CELT (Corpus of Electronic Texts) website (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/).
** CS = Chronicon Scotorum, edited by W. Hennessy (London, Rolls Series 46, 1866.)4" GAV-30. Sitric I (?) King of Dublin was also known as NN Ímair (?) King of Dublin.4

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 458 (Chart 29). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 458 (Chart 29), 459-460.
  3. [S1527] GEN-MEDIEVAL/soc.genealogy.medieval: "Llywelyn ap Iorwerth ancestor table", online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/llywelyn.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwin: Llywelyn ap Iorweth Ancestor Table.
  4. [S1527] Baldwin: Llywelyn ap Iorweth Ancestor Table, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/llywelyn.htm, http://sites.rootsweb.com/~medieval/llywelyn.htm
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 423-424.
  6. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 458 (Chart 29).
  7. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 420 (Chart 25).

Sir John de Faucomberge1,2,3

M, #49534, d. 20 July 1405
FatherSir Thomas de Fauconberge Knt., 5th Lord Fauconberge2,4,3 b. 20 Jul 1345, d. 9 Sep 1407
MotherConstance de Felton2,4 d. b 8 Jun 1402
Last Edited14 Jun 2009
     Sir John de Faucomberge married Joan Conyers, daughter of Sir Robert Conyers of Ormsby and Aline de la Ley Lady of Homildon.2

Sir John de Faucomberge died on 20 July 1405; dsp & vp, being beheaded for treason.2,3
      ; John (Sir); participated in the uprising of 1405 (see NORTHUMBERLAND, D); m as her 2nd husb Joan (m 3rd by 28 July 1408 her 2nd husb's stepmother's bro Sir Thomas (II) Brounflete, s of Sir Thomas (I) Brounflete (see below); d 6/7 Nov 1438), dau of Sir Robert Conyers, of Ormesby, Yorks, and widow of Robert del Bowes (d by 22 Dec 1399), and dsp & vp 20 July 1405, being beheaded for treason.2

Family

Joan Conyers b. c 1395, d. c 7 Nov 1438

Citations

  1. Per Watson: "Sir John Faucomberge who died in 1405, was the son of Thomas Faucomberge (d. 9 September 1407) and his first wife Constance Felton (d. about June 1402). "domino Johanni Fauconberg filio meo " is mentioned in the will of his mother, Constance dated in 1402, together with his wife Joan.

    See: Complete Peerage, Vol 5, pp 276-80 and Surtees Society, Vol 4, Testamenta Eboracensia, Part 1 (London: 1836) p 293."
  2. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Yarborough Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  3. [S2300] John Watson, "Watson email 11 Oct 2008: "Re: Faucomberge of Withernwick and Faucomberge of Bilton"," e-mail message from e-mail address (unknown address) to e-mail address, 11 Oct 2008. Hereinafter cited as "Watson email 11 Oct 2008."
  4. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Fauconberge 10: p. 304. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

(?) mac Ragnall1

M, #49535, d. 942
FatherRagnall (Ragnald) (?) King of York and Man1 d. c 921
Last Edited2 Sep 2002
     (?) mac Ragnall died in 942.1
     He was King of Man, [Ashley, p. 424] MAC RAGNALL Man, ?937-42. The Celtic chronicles mention a son of Ragnall who plundered the Irish coasts during 942 and sought refuge on an island. No more details are known, but since this pirate was identified as the son of a king, then he was probably a son of RAGNALL (I) of York, as he would be too old to be a son of RAGNALL (II). He may have been an illegitimate son, or one dispossessed by the rising power of SITRIC and his brother Gothfrith, and he resorted to piracy. He might have assumed control of Man after the death of GEBEACHAN at Brunanburh in 937. However, by 942 his raids had become a sufficient problem for the other Norse settlers to deal with him. He escaped them but was captured by Matudán, king of Ulster, who executed him. between 937 and 942.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 424. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Harald (?) King of Limerick1

M, #49536, d. 940
FatherSihtric Cáech (?) King of Dublin and York1,2 b. c 885
Last Edited29 Oct 2020
     Harald (?) King of Limerick died in 940.1
      ; Per Baldwin (Isle of Man):
     "Harald ("Aralt") is referred to as the grandson of Ivar in AI. CS calls him a son of the grandson of Ivar, i.e., of Sitric ("Aralt mac .h. Imair .i. mac Sitric, Rí gall Luimnigh, do marbad la Connachtoíbh"). If the account of CS is literally true, and the "grandson" of AI just means descendant in general, then Harald would probably be a brother of Olaf Cuaran, as shown in the table. However, Ivar also had a son named Sitric (d. 896), so if the "mac .h." is a mistake for just ".h." (a common abbreviation for the word "ua" ["grandson'] and its various declensions), then Harald may have been son of this earlier Sitric."
Baldwin cites:
** AI = The Annals of Inisfallen (MS. Rawlinson B.503), edited by Seán Mac Airt (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies,
1951, reprinted 1977).
** CS = Chronicon Scotorum, edited by W. Hennessy (London, Rolls Series 46, 1866.)2"

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 420 (Chart 25). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm, http://sites.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 424.
  4. [S2073] Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm

Magnus Haraldsson (?) King of Man and the Isles1

M, #49537, d. 977
FatherHarald (?) King of Limerick1 d. 940
Last Edited8 Mar 2004
     Magnus Haraldsson (?) King of Man and the Isles died in 977.1
     He was King of Man and the Isles: [Ashley p. 424] MAGNUS or MACCUS HARALDSSON Man and the Isles, c972-7. Magnus and Godred were probably the sons of Harald Sitricson, making them grandsons of SITRIC CAECH, the king of Dublin and York. If so, then their father had been king of the Norse in Limerick until his death in 940, when Magnus may have been only an infant. Magnus was one of the kings present at Chester in 973 demonstrating his allegiance to king EDGAR. His brother, Godred, is also shown as ruling Man during and after Magnus's death, until he was killed by the Scots of Dál Riata in 989. Both brothers would have used Man for raiding mainland Britain and Ireland. Godred is recorded as raiding Anglesey in 979, during the reign of MAREDUDD AP OWAIN who used Godred's forces to support his own army. After Godred's death the island remained in dispute between the earls of Orkney and the kings of Dublin for the next century. Godred's son, RAGNALD GODREDSON, continued to call himself king of Man and was so recorded when he died in 1005. between 972 and 977.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 424. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Godred Haraldsson (?) King of Man and the Isles1

M, #49538, d. 989
FatherHarald (?) King of Limerick1,2 d. 940
Last Edited29 Oct 2020
     Godred Haraldsson (?) King of Man and the Isles died in 989.1
     He was King of Man and the Isles: [Ashley, p. 424] GODRED HARALDSSON Man and the Isles, 977-89. Magnus and Godred were probably the sons of Harald Sitricson, making them grandsons of SITRIC CAECH, the king of Dublin and York. If so, then their father had been king of the Norse in Limerick until his death in 940, when Magnus may have been only an infant. Magnus was one of the kings present at Chester in 973 demonstrating his allegiance to king EDGAR. His brother, Godred, is also shown as ruling Man during and after Magnus's death, until he was killed by the Scots of Dál Riata in 989. Both brothers would have used Man for raiding mainland Britain and Ireland. Godred is recorded as raiding Anglesey in 979, during the reign of MAREDUDD AP OWAIN who used Godred's forces to support his own army. After Godred's death the island remained in dispute between the earls of Orkney and the kings of Dublin for the next century. Godred's son, RAGNALD GODREDSON, continued to call himself king of Man and was so recorded when he died in 1005. between 977 and 989.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 424. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.

Ragnald Godredson (?) King of Man1

M, #49539, d. 1005
FatherGodred Haraldsson (?) King of Man and the Isles1,2 d. 989
Last Edited1 Nov 2020
     Ragnald Godredson (?) King of Man died in 1005.1
     He was [Ashley, p. 424] RAGNALD GODREDSON Man, d 1005. Ragnald was the son of GODRED HARALDSSON. He was recorded as King of Man at the time of his death in 1005 though it is not clear whether he ruled under his own authority or as vassal to SIGURD of Orkney, who had imposed his authority over the Western Isles. It is likely that Man was sufficiently far south to escape much of Sigurd's control and that Ragnald and his brother Kenneth were able to rule Man with relative autonomy. Kenneth passed the kingship on to his son Swein, who died in 1034 without an heir leaving the island vulnerable to the rule of Sitric of Dublin and subsequently THORFINN of Orkney. in 1005.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 424. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 420 (Chart 25).

Kenneth Godredson (?) King of Man1

M, #49540, d. after 1005
FatherGodred Haraldsson (?) King of Man and the Isles1 d. 989
Last Edited7 Mar 2004
     Kenneth Godredson (?) King of Man died after 1005.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 424. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Swein (?) King of Man1

M, #49541, d. 1034
FatherKenneth Godredson (?) King of Man1 d. a 1005
Last Edited13 Mar 2004
     Swein (?) King of Man died in 1034.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 424. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Olaf (?)1

M, #49542
FatherRagnald Godredson (?) King of Man1 d. 1005
Last Edited1 Nov 2020

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 420 (Chart 25). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Harald (?)1

M, #49543
FatherOlaf (?)1
Last Edited29 Oct 2020

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 420 (Chart 25). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 425-426.

Godred III Crovan "White Hands" (?) King of Man and Dublin1,2

M, #49544, d. 1095
FatherHarald (?)1
Last Edited29 Oct 2020
     Godred III Crovan "White Hands" (?) King of Man and Dublin died in 1095.1,2
     He was King of Man: [Ashley, pp. 425-426] GODRED CROVAN (WHITE HANDS) Man, 1079-95; Dublin, 1091-4. We know little about the background of Godred. He was Norse, and apparently raised on the Isle of Man (though not necessarily born there). His nickname, which he earned because of his habit of wearing white gauntlets into battle, is of Gaelic origin (Crobhan), suggesting links to the Irish-Norse colonies around Dublin. His family may have emanated from there and settled on Man during the conquests of THORFINN THE MIGHTY of Orkney, who established control over most of the western seaboard of Scotland and into the Irish Sea. This suggests he may have been born around 1040. He may even have spent his youth on the Orkneys as part of Thorfinn's summer army. It is probable that he was descended from GODRED HARALDSSON, who ruled Man a hundred years earlier. It is just possible that he was the grandson of Ivar Haraldson, king of Dublin from 1038-46, who died in 1054. Godred fought alongside the Norse king Harald Hardraada at the Battle of Stamford Bridge in September 1066. He survived and made his way to Man where he sought refuge. Man was nominally under the control of the king of Dublin, GODRED SITRICSON. His son FINGAL administered the islands and it was he that Crovan sought to defeat in three expeditions that he led against Man until his success in 1079. The islanders eventually welcomed him as their own. Just as EINAR (I) had in Orkney, Godred denied the islanders any udal rights, meaning that they owned the land as tenants to the king and not as an inheritance to their families. Godred thus claimed absolute authority over all of his domain. This extended throughout the Western Isles, including the northern Hebrides which he evidently conquered from the earls of Orkney (PAUL and ERLEND), who may not in practice have administered the islands. In order to govern this widespread diversity of islands, Godred established a parliament, the Tynwald, which consisted of thirty-two representatives. Sixteen of these came from Man itself, with the other sixteen from the four quadrants of the Hebrides with their bases at Lewis, Skye, Mull and Islay. The Hebrides were known to the Norse as the Sudreys or Southern Isles (with the Orkneys as the Nordreys). The name survives today in the bishopric of the islands, known as Sodor and Man. Man was nominally Christian when Godred conquered it, but Godred firmly established a local church under Bishop Roolwer or Rolf. Because of the extent of his kingdom Godred spent little time on Man, though he saw it as the centre of his government. His home was apparently on Islay, but he also spent much time in Dublin, which he succeeded in regaining from the Irish and which he governed from 1091-94. Godred died in 1095, probably in his mid fifties. His efforts had established a strong government across Man and the Isles and a dynasty that would rule for two centuries. He passed into the folklore of Man, where he became known as King Gorry or King Orry (the first G remaining as part of King). He was succeeded by his son LAGMAN. between 1079 and 1095.1 He was King of Dublin between 1091 and 1094.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 425-426. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 426.
  4. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 420 (Chart 25).
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 427.

Gothfrith/Guthfrith Sitricsson (?) King of Dublin1,2

M, #49545, d. between 951 and 951
FatherSihtric Cáech (?) King of Dublin and York1,2 b. c 885
MotherUnknown (?)2
Last Edited28 May 2020
     Gothfrith/Guthfrith Sitricsson (?) King of Dublin died between 951 and 951.2
     Gothfrith/Guthfrith Sitricsson (?) King of Dublin lived at an unknown place ; Per Med Lands: "GUTHFRITH (-[951/52]). The Annals of the Four Masters record that “Godfrey son of Sitric with the foreigners of Ath-cliath” plundered “churches of Meath” in 949[1267]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Gothfrith son of Sitriuc with the foreigners of Ath Cliath” plundered churches in 951[1268]. King of Dublin: the Chronicon Scottorum records in 951 that "Gothfrith son of Sitruic took Ath Cliath and plundered Cenannas and…he died in a short time"[1269]."
Med Lands cites:
[1267] Annals of the Four Masters 949.9, p. 665.
[1268] Annals of Ulster, 951.3, p. 397.
[1269] Chronicon Scottorum, 951, p. 181.2

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 420 (Chart 25). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/IRELAND.htm#OlafSihtricsondied981. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.

Olaf Sitricson Cuarán (?) King of Dublin and York1

M, #49546, b. circa 910, d. 981
FatherSihtric Cáech (?) King of Dublin and York1,2,3,4,5,6,7 b. c 885
MotherUnknown (?)5,7
ReferenceGAV28
Last Edited21 Jul 2020
     Olaf Sitricson Cuarán (?) King of Dublin and York was born circa 910.6 He married Unknown (?)
;
His 1st wife.7 Olaf Sitricson Cuarán (?) King of Dublin and York married Dúnlaith (?), daughter of Muirchertach na Cochall Craicinn mac Néill, after 952
;
His 2nd wife.7 Olaf Sitricson Cuarán (?) King of Dublin and York married Gormlaith ingen Murchada of Uí Dúnlainge, daughter of Murchad mac Finn King of Laigin/Leinster,
;
Her 1st husband, his 3rd wife.3,6,8,9
Olaf Sitricson Cuarán (?) King of Dublin and York died in 981 at Isle of Iona, Argyll and Bute, Scotland.1,3,6
     Reference: Genealogics cites:
1. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America bef. 1700, Baltimore, 1995, Weis, Frederick Lewis; Sheppard, Walter. 202.
2. Historia hen Gruffud vab Kenan vab Iago Peniarth Manuscript.
3. The Kings of the Isle of Man, Gen-Medieval/soc.genealogy.medieval , Baldwin, Stewart.6
GAV-28.

; This is the same person as Amlaíb Cuarán at Wikipedia.10

; Per Genealogics:
     "Amlaib Cuaran, also known by his Norse name Oláfr Cuarán, was a 10th century Norse-Gael who was king of Dublin and York. His byname, Cuarán, is usually translated as 'sandal'. His name appears in a variety of anglicised forms, including Olaf Cuaran and Olaf Sihtricson, particularly in relation to his short-lived rule in York. He was the last of the Ui Imair dynasty to play a major part in the politics of Britain and Ireland.
     "Amlaib was twice, perhaps three times, ruler of York and Northumbria and twice ruler of Dublin and its dependencies. A king for forty years, he was an indomitable warrior, but far from invincible, and a ruthless pillager of churches, who ended his days in respectable retirement at Iona Abbey. Born when the Ui Imair ruled over large areas of Britain and Ireland, by the time of his death the kingdom of Dublin was a minor power in Irish politics. At the same time, Dublin became a major centre of trade in Atlantic Europe, and mastery over the city and its wealth became the supreme prize for ambitious Irish kings.
     "Amlaib was a patron of Irish poets and Scandinavian skalds who wrote verses praising their paymaster. He married at least twice, and had many children who married into Irish and Scandinavian royal families. His descendants were kings in the Isle of Man and the Hebrides until the 13th century. By his wife Gormlaith ingen Murchada he had a son Sitric 'Silkbeard' who would also rule Dublin. Other sons included Ragnall, Glum Iarainn and Harald.
     "Amlaib abdicated in 980 and died on Iona in 981."6

; Per Baldwin (Llywelyn): "Amlaíb Cuaran (Old Norse Óláfr Kváran), king of Dublin & York, d. 981 [AU] [GaC] AU = The Annals of Ulster to A.D. 1131, edited by S. Mac Airt and G. Mac Niocaill (Dublin, 1984), also available (without English translation) at the CELT (Corpus of Electronic Texts) website (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/).
GaC = Genealogies from the work generally known as "Hanes Gruffudd ap Cynan" (actually titled "Historia hen Gruffud vab Kenan vab Iago"), of which the earliest manuscript is Peniarth MS. 17 (mid-13th century), in EWGT, pp. 35-37.
EWGT = Early Welsh Genealogical Tracts, edited by P. C. Bartrum (University of Wales Press, Cardiff, 1966)."3 Olaf Sitricson Cuarán (?) King of Dublin and York was also known as Olaf Amlaíb Sihtricsson King of Dublin and York.7 Olaf Sitricson Cuarán (?) King of Dublin and York was also known as Amlaíb Cuarán King of Dublin and York.11

; Per Ashley [1998:464-5]:
     "OLAF SITRICSON CUARAN York 941-3 (with the Five Boroughs 941-2), 948-52; and Dublin, 945-8, 952-80. He was the son of SITRIC CAECH but had been too young to inherit York after his father's death in 927, and indeed had been smuggled out of Britain to relative safety in Ireland by his uncle Gothfrith. He was known colloquially as Olaf Cuarán from the Gaelic for sandals, presumably from his habit of wearing these rather than more solid footwear. This may in its own small way give us an image of an Olaf who was rather more relaxed than his battle-mad brethren, and one that was testified by his ability to weather all storms and survive to a ripe old age, unlike any of his kin. He was still a fearless fighter, but did not have the military or political acumen of his father or his cousin, OLAF GOTHFRITHSON, though this did not seem to worry him. He no doubt fought alongside his cousin in his early campaigns, but he was left in charge of Dublin when Olaf Gothfrithson set out upon his second invasion of England in 939. Following Olaf s victory, Olaf Cuarán was summoned to York to help in the conquest of Bernicia, so he was already present in the kingdom when Olaf Gothfrithson died in 941. Olaf Cuarán was accepted as successor without argument. However his reign opened inauspiciously, for early in 942 EDMUND of Wessex regained the Five Boroughs and expelled the Norse from Danish Mercia. Recognizing Edmund's authority, Olaf submitted to him early in 943 and agreed to adopt the Christian faith. However, just like his father, he soon rejected it. It may have been this, or the sign of weakness in having lost the Five Boroughs, that caused the Northumbrian witan to eject Olaf later in 943. In all likelihood Wulfstan, the archbishop of York, who was a supporter of the Norse kings, had endeavoured to convert Olaf to Christianity, and Olaf s failure to keep the faith caused Wulfstan to seek his dismissal. Olaf sought refuge in Strathclyde, under king DONALD, where a significant Norse contingent lived. He was probably biding his time seeking an opportunity to recover York where his cousin, RAGNALL GOTHFRITHSON had been installed as king. However, in 945, Edmund led a further campaign against the Norse, which resulted in the death of Ragnall and the expulsion of Olaf from Britain. Olaf returned to Dublin where he deposed his cousin Blacar, who had been a rather ineffective caretaker king since 941. His next few years were full of rebuilding the Dublin kingdom which had been damaged by onslaughts from the Irish kings. Since the Irish were not united in their opposition, Olaf allied with one contingent to help fight another and in this he was successful until a disastrous defeat at Slane in 947. By then news had reached Olaf of the death of the English king EDMUND and the succession of his brother EADRED. Eadred had sought to subdue the Northumbrians who still defied Saxon rule, but though he was successful for a short period, York accepted ERIK BLOODAXE as their king. Olaf refused to consider a rival Norse king on the throne of his father, and late in 947 he re-mustered his fleet and sailed again to his Scottish allies to plan his attack on York. This time he was more successful. Eadred was more prepared to accept Olaf as king than the vicious Erik and, once Eadred had driven Erik out of York early in 948, Olaf resumed his kingship unopposed. Eadred allowed Olaf s rule on the basis that he would defend Northumbria against Erik. However, York was now divided. Archbishop Wulfstan and his party had given their support to Erik, and continued to do so. Despite his continuing opposition to Christianity, Olaf felt powerless against Wulfstan, who was the real ruler of Northumbria in his role as king-maker, and submitted to his bidding. Olaf was thus at a disadvantage in 952 when Erik returned in force to regain York. Despite the support of his Strathclyde and Scottish allies, Olaf found himself expelled from York again, this time by Erik. Olaf wintered in Scotland and returned to Dublin in 953 where he succeeded in re-establishing his control over the Norse settlements and remained there as king for the next twenty-seven years. Remarkably, for a man who had plundered and destroyed so many monasteries, he eventually accepted Christianity in 980 and retired to spend his final days on Iona. He died in 981, aged about sixty. His son Sitric Silkenbeard ruled in Dublin after him, but no more of the descendents of IVARR THE BONELESS ruled in York."1

; Per Med Lands:
     "OLAF [Amlaib] Sihtricsson, son of SIHTRIC King of York & his first wife --- ([900]-Iona [978/80]). Given the date of his death, and the record of activities of the sons of King Sihtric in 922, it is likely that Olaf was born in [900]. [The Annals of Clonmacnoise record in 922 that "Maceilgi with the sons of Sittrick tooke Dublyn on Godfrey"[1270]. The source does not name Sihtric´s sons who were involved in this campaign.] He was accepted as King of York by the Northumbrians in 927 after the death of his father, and was supported by his uncle Guthfrith who came from Dublin. However, Æthelstan invaded Northumbria and expelled Olaf, who joined his father's former associates in Ireland[1271]. The Annals of the Four Masters record in 938 that “Amhlaeibh Cuaran went to Cair-Abroc”[1272]. Florence of Worcester records that Olaf joined his cousin at York in 940 and was elected King of York[1273]. Simeon of Durham records that "the son of Sihtric named Onlaf reigned over the Northumbrians" in 941 but was driven out in 943[1274]. He lost the territories gained by Olaf Guthfrithson to Edmund King of Wessex in 942, and he was driven out of York and deposed in favour of his cousin Rægnald. He returned to Northumbria in 944, reasserting himself as king in opposition to Rægnald, but he was expelled by Edmund King of Wessex later that year[1275]. Simeon of Durham records that King Edmund expelled "king…Anlaf the son of Sihtric and [king] Reignold the son of Guthferth" from Northumbria in 944[1276]. Florence of Worcester records that Eadmund King of Wessex expelled "duos reges, Anlafum regis…Sihtrici filium, et Reignoldum Guthferthi filium" from Northumbria, undated but dateable to [944] from the context[1277]. King of Dublin: the Annals of the Four Masters record that “Blacaire one of the chiefs of the foreigners was expelled from Dublin” in 943 and “Amhlaeibh remained after him there”[1278]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Blacair gave up Áth Cliath” in 945 and that “Amlaíb succeeded him”[1279]. He returned to York once more in 949, expelling King Erik "Blodøks/Blood-axe", but was finally driven out in his turn by Erik in 952, when he returned to Dublin to take over from his brother Guthfrith. The Annals of the Four Masters record in 962 “a victory…over Amlaeibh, son of Sitric, by the Osraighi i.e. at Inis-Teoc”[1280]. The Annals of the Four Masters record in 965 that “Muireadhach, son of Faelan, Abbot of Cill-dara, and royal heir of Leinster, was slain by Amhlaeibh, lord of the foreigners, and by Cearbhall, son of Lorcan”[1281]. The Annals of the Four Masters record in 975 that “Muircheartach, son of Domhnall Ua Neill, and Conghalach, son of Domhnall, son of Conghalach, two heirs to the monarchy of Ireland, were slain by Amhlaeibh, son of Sitric”[1282]. The Annals of the Four Masters record in 978 "the battle of Teamhair…gained by Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, over the foreigners of Ath-cliath and of the Islands, and over the sons of Amhlaeibh in particular", where "Ragnhall son of Amhlaeibh heir to the sovereignty of the foreigners” was killed, adding that "after this Amhlaeibh went across the sea and died at l-Coluim-Cille"[1283]. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Olaf son of Sitric high-king over the Foreigners of Dublin” died in Iona in [978/79] after being defeated by “Mael-Sechnaill the Great”[1284], the battle being dated between 978 and 980 in different sources (see below).
     "m firstly ---. No record has been found in any primary sources which confirms this supposed first marriage. However, given Olaf´s estimated birth date, it is likely that he was married before his marriage to the widow of Domnall.
     "m [secondly] (after 952) as her second husband, ---, widow of DOMNALL, daughter of ---. Her marriages are confirmed by the Annals of Tigernach which record that “MaelSechnaill son of Domnall and Glún iarainn (Ironknee) son of Olaf, son of MaelSechnail´s mother” defeated “Domnall Clóen, son of Lorcán, and Imar of Waterford” in [981/82][1285].
     "m [thirdly] as her first husband, GORMLAITH, daughter of MURCHAD MacFinn King of Leinster & his wife --- (-1030). She married secondly Brian Boru, and thirdly, as his [third] wife, Maelsechnaill King of Ireland. The Annals of Tigernach record the death in 1030 of “Gormlaith, daughter of Murchad son of Fland” mother of “Sitric son of Olaf king of the Foreigners and of Donnchad son of Brian king of Munster”[1286]. The Annals of the Four Masters record the death in 1030 of “Gormlaith daughter of Murchadh son of Finn, mother of the king of the foreigners Sitric, Donnchadh son of Brian king of Munster, and Conchobhar son of Maeleachlainn king of Teamhair”[1287]."
Med Lands cites:
[1270] Annals of Clonmacnoise, 922, p. 148.
[1271] Stenton (2001), p. 340.
[1272] Annals of the Four Masters 938.13, p. 641.
[1273] Florence of Worcester, 941, p. 98.
[1274] Simeon of Durham, p. 483.
[1275] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A and D, 944.
[1276] Simeon of Durham, p. 503.
[1277] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Vol. I, p. 134.
[1278] Annals of the Four Masters 943.8, p. 655.
[1279] Annals of Ulster, 945.6, p. 393.
[1280] Annals of the Four Masters 962.14, p. 687.
[1281] Annals of the Four Masters 965.9, p. 689.
[1282] Annals of the Four Masters 975.5, p. 705.
[1283] Annals of the Four Masters 978.3, p. 709.
[1284] Annals of Tigernach II, p. 234.
[1285] Annals of Tigernach II, p. 235.
[1286] Annals of Tigernach II, p. 263.
[1287] Annals of the Four Masters 1030.21, p. 821.7
He was King of Jórvík
Per Wikipedia: "The kings of Northumbria in the Norse era variously controlled Jórvík, the former Deira, from its capital York or the northern part of the kingdom, the former Bernicia, from Bamburgh."
See attached map of the Kingdom of Jórvík (from Wikipedia: By William Robert Shepherd - Source:This image is a copy or a derivative work of british_isles_802.jpg, from the map collection of the Perry–Castañeda Library (PCL) of the University of Texas at Austin.This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing for more information.Original: Shepherd, William R. (1926) Historical Atlas, Category:New York: Henry Holt and Company, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=444734) between 941 and 944.10 He was King of Dublin between 945 and 947.10

Family 1

Child

Family 3

Unknown (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 464-465. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S1490] Genealogics Website (oiginated by Leo van de Pas, continued by Ian Fettes), online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Sitric ua Imair: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00424557&tree=LEO. Hereinafter cited as Genealogics Website.
  3. [S1527] GEN-MEDIEVAL/soc.genealogy.medieval: "Llywelyn ap Iorwerth ancestor table", online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/llywelyn.htm, http://sites.rootsweb.com/~medieval/llywelyn.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwin: Llywelyn ap Iorweth Ancestor Table.
  4. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm, http://sites.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.
  5. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/IRELAND.htm#OlafSihtricsondied981. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  6. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Amlaib Cuarán: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00250084&tree=LEO
  7. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/IRELAND.htm#OlafSihtricsondied981B
  8. [S1490] Genealogics Website, online http://www.genealogics.org/index.php, Gormlaith ingen Murchada: https://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00250085&tree=LEO
  9. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/IRELAND.htm#Gormlaithdied1030
  10. [S1953] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amla%C3%ADb_Cuar%C3%A1n. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  11. [S1527] Baldwin: Llywelyn ap Iorweth Ancestor Table, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/llywelyn.htm
  12. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/IRELAND.htm#GydaMOlavTrygvason

Lagman Godredsson (?) King of Man and the Isles1

M, #49547, d. between 1097 and 1111
FatherGodred III Crovan "White Hands" (?) King of Man and Dublin1,2 d. 1095
Last Edited29 Jul 2007
     Lagman Godredsson (?) King of Man and the Isles died between 1097 and 1111; on pilgrimage to Jerusalem.1
     He was King of Man and the Isles: [Ashley, p. 426] LAGMAN Man and the Isles, 1095-9. Lagman was the eldest son of GODRED CR0VAN, and inherited the kingship of Man and the Isles. His father had already granted him the lordship of the Northern Isles from 1091 when Godred established himself as king of Dublin. After Godred's death there was considerable rivalry for the rulership of Man and the Isles, and Lagman found himself in contention with DOMNALL MAC TEIGE and his own brother Harald. The sequence of events is unclear and it is not certain whether Harald's imprisonment, mutilation and subsequent death happened before 1099 or after. In 1099 Man was conquered by Magnus III of Norway, who established his young son SIGURD as king of Orkney and the Isles and he so remained until he returned to Norway in 1103. It may have been then that the rivalry between Lagman and Harald erupted. Either way, after Harald's death, Lagman was overcome with guilt and resigned the kingship, going on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, where he died. The record of his death varies from 1097 to 1111, the latter seeming the more likely. This left the way open for Domnall mac Teige to claim the kingship. between 1095 and 1099.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 426. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.

Harald Godredsson (?)1

M, #49548, d. circa 1099
FatherGodred III Crovan "White Hands" (?) King of Man and Dublin1,2 d. 1095
Last Edited29 Jul 2007
     Harald Godredsson (?) died circa 1099.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 420 (Chart 25). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.

Ragnald Haraldsson (?) King of Man1,2

M, #49549, d. 1153
FatherHarald Godredsson (?)1,2 d. c 1099
Last Edited29 Jul 2007
     Ragnald Haraldsson (?) King of Man died in 1153.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 420 (Chart 25). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.

Sir Thomas II Brounflete1

M, #49550
FatherSir Thomas Bromflete Knt., of Londesborough and Weighton, Yorks1 b. c 1385, d. 31 Dec 1430
Last Edited20 Dec 2002
     Sir Thomas II Brounflete married Joan Conyers, daughter of Sir Robert Conyers of Ormsby and Aline de la Ley Lady of Homildon, before 28 July 1408
; her 3rd husband, her 2nd husband's stepmother's brother.1

Family

Joan Conyers b. c 1395, d. c 7 Nov 1438

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Yarborough Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Joan Neville1

F, #49551, b. circa 1433
FatherWilliam de Neville Knt., KG, 1st Earl of Kent; Lord Fauconberge1,2 b. c 1408, d. 9 Jan 1462/63
MotherJoan/Alice Faucomberge Baroness Faucomberge1,2 b. 18 Oct 1406, d. 11 Dec 1490
Last Edited5 Oct 2008
     Joan Neville died; dsp & vm.1 She married Sir Edward Bethom/Bethum.1
Joan Neville was born circa 1433.1
      ; Joan; b c 1433; m by 1463 Sir Edward Bethom/Bethum (dsp before his w 22 Feb 1472), of Beetham and Hazleslack, Westmorland, and dsp & vm.1

Family

Sir Edward Bethom/Bethum d. 22 Feb 1472

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Yarborough Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.
  2. [S2261] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 1st edition (n.p.: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 2004), Fauconberge 11: pp. 304-305. Hereinafter cited as Richardson PA.

Sir Edward Bethom/Bethum1

M, #49552, d. 22 February 1472
Last Edited20 Dec 2002
     Sir Edward Bethom/Bethum married Joan Neville, daughter of William de Neville Knt., KG, 1st Earl of Kent; Lord Fauconberge and Joan/Alice Faucomberge Baroness Faucomberge.1

Sir Edward Bethom/Bethum died on 22 February 1472; dsp before his wife.1

Family

Joan Neville b. c 1433

Citations

  1. [S1396] Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site, online http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/peerageandgentry/sitepages/home.asp, Yarborough Family Page. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage & Gentry Web Site.

Ragnald Olafsson (?) King of Man1

F, #49553, d. 1164
FatherOlave I Godfredson (?) King of the Isle of Man1 b. c 1080, d. 29 Jun 1153
MotherIngebiorg Hakonsdatter (?) of Orkney1 d. 1126
Last Edited13 Mar 2004
     Ragnald Olafsson (?) King of Man died in 1164.1
     She was King of Man, [Ashley, p. 428] RAGNALD OLAFSSON Man 1164, for only four days. He was the illegitimate son of OLAF (I). After the murder of SOMERLED and with GODRED II, his half-brother, in Norway, Ragnald seized Man. Godred was already returning home and promptly killed Ragnald upon his arrival. Ragnald's reign, although unofficial, is the shortest on record of any ruler in Britain. in 1164.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 428. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Ivar (?)1

M, #49554
FatherGodred IV "the Black" (?) King of Man and the Isles1,2 d. 10 Nov 1187
Last Edited29 Jul 2007

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 420 (Chart 25). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.

Ragnald I Godredsson (?) King of Man1

M, #49555, d. 1229
FatherGodred IV "the Black" (?) King of Man and the Isles1 d. 10 Nov 1187
Last Edited16 Jul 2020
     Ragnald I Godredsson (?) King of Man was buried in 1228 at St. Mary of Furness .2
Ragnald I Godredsson (?) King of Man died in 1229 at Tynwald; Killed in battle.1
     Ragnald I Godredsson (?) King of Man was also known as Reginald (?) King of Man.3 He was King of Man: [Ashley, pp. 428-429] RAGNALD (I) Man, 1187-1230. Ragnald was GODRED II's eldest son and, although illegitimate, seized the throne since his half-brother OLAF (II), the legitimate heir, was only ten. Ragnald himself may not have been much older, perhaps eighteen or slightly more. Ragnald had all the appeal of the Hollywood Viking - one tale about him states he spent three years on board ship. Though this is doubtless apocryphal, it does suggest that Ragnald preferred sea-roving and piracy to the due administration of his territory. Most of his reign seems to have consisted of annoying people and playing one king off against another. When his brother Olaf objected to his ill-treatment, he despatched him to WILLIAM THE LYON of Scotland, who kept him imprisoned for seven years. When Ragnald began to meddle in Irish affairs he offended the English king, JOHN, who summoned Ragnald in 1206 to pay homage. And when Ragnald ignored his sovereign overlord, Inge II of Norway, he was summoned to pay homage to him in 1210. This further annoyed John, who invaded Man and demanded further fealty from Ragnald. Nevertheless Ragnald managed to ply the Irish seas for nearly forty years until, at length, Olaf caught up with him. In 1226 Olaf succeeding in forcing Ragnald to share part of the kingdom with him, but hostilities were still strong and split the island north and south. Ragnald sought support from his powerful allies in Galloway, whilst Olaf hurried to Norway seeking support from the king. In 1230 Olaf and Ragnald met in battle on the Tynwald Hill in Man, and Ragnald was slain. between 1184 and 1230.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 428-429. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2203] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG): MEDIEVAL LANDS - A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#dauRagnaldManM2Llywelyn. Hereinafter cited as FMG Medieval Lands Website.
  3. [S757] Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001), pp. 128-129 LLYWELYN ab IORWERTH 10:v. Hereinafter cited as Boyer [2001] Med English Ancestors.
  4. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 429-430.
  5. [S2203] FMG Medieval Lands Website, online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/index.htm, https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#dauRagnallManMThomasGalloway

Godred Donn "the Brown-Haired" (?)1

M, #49556, d. 1230
FatherRagnald I Godredsson (?) King of Man1 d. 1229
Last Edited5 Mar 2004
     Godred Donn "the Brown-Haired" (?) died in 1230.1
     He was King of the Outer Isles: [Ashley, pp. 429-430] GODRED DONN (THE BROWN-HAIRED) Outer Isles, 1230. He was the son of RAGNALD (I) and inherited many of his vicious qualities, though his life was not long enough to perfect them. His father had usurped the rule of Man and the Isles, and Godred had every anticipation of succeeding him, except that his uncle OLAF II insisted on claiming his rightful heritage. In about 1220, Godred's mother despatched him to Lewis to murder Olaf, but the uncle escaped and Godred exercised his wrath by despoiling the island. Years later uncle and nephew became reconciled, and in 1230 Godred was given Olaf s former share of the kingdom, the Outer Isles based on Lewis. In that same year king Haakon IV of Norway chose his opportunity to visit his kingdom in the Western Seas and install his own choice of king, USPAK. Godred rallied to support his uncle, but was killed in the conflict. He was probably in his early forties. in 1230.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 429-430. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 430.

Harald II Godredsson (?) King of Man1

M, #49557
FatherGodred Donn "the Brown-Haired" (?)1 d. 1230
Last Edited7 Mar 2004
     Harald II Godredsson (?) King of Man was King of Man: [Ashley, p. 430] HARALD II Man, 1249-50. He was the son of GODRED DONN and sought to claim what he believed was his birthright. Even though RAGNALD II was the approved successor to HARALD I, Harald Godredsson succeeded in having him murdered after just three weeks. Harald usurped the throne, but he was promptly summoned to Norway, where he was deposed. between 1249 and 1250.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 430. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.

Olaf II "the Black" Godredsson (?)1

M, #49558, d. 1237
FatherGodred IV "the Black" (?) King of Man and the Isles1,2 d. 10 Nov 1187
Last Edited29 Jul 2007
     Olaf II "the Black" Godredsson (?) married Christina (?)3,2

Olaf II "the Black" Godredsson (?) died in 1237.1
      ; OLAF (II) THE BLACK Lewis, 1207, 1214-30; Man, 1226-37. Olaf was the eldest legitimate son of GODRED II but was only ten years old when his father died in 1187. RAGNALD (I), Olaf's elder (illegitimate) half-brother seized the kingdom. Olaf spent most of life trying to regain it. In 1207 he was granted Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, but was dissatisfied with this bleak and inhospitable territory. When he objected Ragnald had Olaf seized and handed to WILLIAM THE LYON of Scotland, who held him imprisoned until 1214. Upon his release Olaf was forced into a marriage with Lavon, the sister of Ragnald's wife, but within a short space of time the marriage was annulled on the basis that Lavon was too closely related to Olaf's mistress. Her sister was so affronted at this that she sent her son, GODRED DONN, to Lewis to murder Olaf, but Olaf escaped. Olaf subsequently married Christina, daughter of the earl of Ross, by whom he became the ancestor of the Macleod clan of Lewis and Skye. Olaf suffered Ragnald's abuses for a further ten years and then, in 1226, gathered together a fleet from amongst those chieftains who supported him, primarily from Skye, Lewis and Ross, and descended on Ragnald, who was forced to come to terms with Olaf. Olaf was now granted authority over all of the northern Hebrides, whilst Ragnald retained Man, but Olaf remained dissatisfied. He returned with his fleet, and in 1230 slew Ragnald in a battle at Tynwald Hill on Man. After forty years, at the age of fifty, Olaf had at last gained his inheritance. However, he now found himself caught between the opposing factions of the kings of England and Norway. In 1230 Olaf was summoned to Norway to pay homage to Haakon IV. Later that same year, when Olaf was forced to share half of his kingdom with Ragnald's son Godred Dunn, Haakon IV sent a fleet to enforce Norwegian sovereignty over the whole of the Hebrides. He intended to place his own nominee, USPAK, as king of the Isles. The enterprise misfired somewhat, though it resulted in Lewis being laid to waste, and both Godred and Uspak being killed in battle. Olaf had been forced to support Haakon's venture, but HENRY III summoned Olaf to him, saying that it was Olaf's responsibility to police the waters of the Irish Sea against such marauders. Thereafter, regardless of Olaf's allegiance to Norway, he was forced to place fifty ships at the disposal of the English crown. This further annoyed Haakon, who summoned Olaf to Norway, but Olaf died when on the point of leaving. He was then aged sixty. His life must have been one of total frustration.1

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 429. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, p. 420 (Chart 25).
  4. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 430.
  5. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 431.

Christina (?)1

F, #49559
Last Edited29 Jul 2007

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), p. 420 (Chart 25). Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.
  3. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 430.
  4. [S1361] Mike Ashley, Ashley (1998) - British Kings, pp. 420 (Chart 25), 431.

Harald I Olafsson (?) King of Man1

M, #49560, d. circa November 1248
FatherOlaf II "the Black" Godredsson (?)1,2 d. 1237
MotherChristina (?)1
Last Edited29 Jul 2007
     Harald I Olafsson (?) King of Man married Cecilia (?) of Norway, daughter of Hakon IV Hakonsson "the Old" (?) King of Norway and Kanaga (?), in 1248
; her 2nd husband.1,3,4,2
Harald I Olafsson (?) King of Man died circa November 1248.1
     He was King of Man: [Ashley, p. 430] HARALD (I) Man, 1237-48. Harald found himself caught between his loyalties to Norway and England. On his accession, when he was only fourteen, he refused to acknowledge King Haakon IV as his overlord, so the Norwegian king promptly sent his agents to depose Harald and confiscate his revenues. Harald reconsidered his position and presented himself to Haakon in 1239 where he was so warmly received that Harald stayed at the court for two years, so it was a more mature eighteen-year-old who returned to Man in 1241. HENRY III of England, however, always in need of support, was keen to have access to Harald's fleet and commanding position. In 1246 he summoned him to his court and knighted him. Haakon would have none of that so summoned Harald back to his court, where he arrived in 1247. Again Harald was warmly received and given the hand of Haakon's daughter, Christina. All of this shows the importance that Man held to the Norwegian and English crowns. Unfortunately Harald and his new bride were drowned off Orkney on their return in October or November 1248. between 1237 and 1248.1

Family

Cecilia (?) of Norway d. c Nov 1248

Citations

  1. [S1361] Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings & Queens (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1998), pp. 420 (Chart 25), 430. Hereinafter cited as Ashley (1998) - British Kings.
  2. [S2073] The Kings of the Isle of Man, Compiled by Steward Baldwin, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/man.htm. Hereinafter cited as Baldwiin: The Kings of the Isle of Man.
  3. [S1426] Jiri Louda (Tables) and Michael Maclagan (text), Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 2002), Table 24. Hereinafter cited as Louda & Maclagan [2002] Lines of Succession.
  4. [S1438] Miroslav Marek, online http://genealogy.euweb.cz/index.html, unknown author (e-mail address), downloaded updated 15 May 2003, Norway 3 page: http://genealogy.euweb.cz/scand/norway3.html